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Full text of "Exhibitors Herald World"

Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



AUDIOVISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The UBRARY CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 
for Audio Visual Conservation 
www.loc.gov/avconservation 



111' far 



^Th^ Test of Earnings, " by Martin /. Quigley 

EXH I B ITO RS 





RALD 



W 







HE SMITH BROTHERS ARE 
lOT TO BE SNEEZED AT! 

"he public coughs up the dough 
or those hoys — 

BUT NOW without question 

the Greatest Money Team of All is * 

THE DUNCAN 

SISTERS in their 

grand show of laughs, loves, tears, songs 

IT'S A GREAT Lil^E 

DNE OF THE BIG ONES AND MORE COMING FROM The Life of 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER The Pam 




ol. 98, No. I 



Entered 

we 



itered as second-class matter, August 20, 1917, at the Post Offi'-e at Chicago, 111., under the act of March 3, 1879. Published Ifiniiarv 4 IQTO ■ 
ekly by Quigley Publishing Co., at 407 South Dearborn St., Chicago. Subscription, $3.00 a year. Single copies, 25 cents. -»a""a« J -K ^ 




It's tough going against that stream 

The big money, today, comes to the man who keeps in touch with his 
patrons and puts on his screen the pictures he knows they want, such as 

UNITED ARTISTS PICTURES 

Always the Best by Public Demand 

"Coquette" — "Alibi" — "Bulldog Drummond" — "The Trespasser" — 
"Three Live Ghosts" — "Condemned" — "The Locked Door" — "Lummox" 
—"New York Nights"— "Puttin' on the Ritz"— "Be Yourself !"— "Hell 
Harbor" — "The Swan" — "The Bad One." 



J 




ITS FAME 
SWEEPING the WORLD ! 

I 

- i 




ALIER 





PARAMOUNT'S 
SONG ROM Ar¥€E 
SENSATION! 



'^Chevalier is utterly delightful, entrancing 
and enrapturing" {N. Y. Daily News) in "the 
smartest musical comedy yet to reach the 
singing screen." {N. Y. American). "What he 
does to the women!" (A'^. Y. Mirror). "Only a 
master director could have turned it out." 
{N. Y. Graphic). *'The best musical show of 
the season." (JS,Y. Tele gram). In fact, public 
arid critics agree "The Love Parade" is the 
greatest motion picture entertainment to 
date! 





'THE LOVE 



ERNST 



LIJBITSCH 





tUPINO LANE and LILLIAN ROTH 



"Jeanette MacDonald has the best singing 
voice yet heard upon the screen." (iV. Y. Tel- 
egram.) "Her abihty equals her charm. "(^i'"* 
Daily). "Lupino Lane and LiUian Roth splen- 
did in comedy parts." (Film Daily). By Ernest 
Vajda and Guy Bolton. Based upon the play, 
"The Prince Consort," by Leon Xanrof and 
Jules Chancel. Music by Victor Schertzinger. 
Lyrics by Clifford Grey. B. P. Schulberg, 
General Manager, West Coast Productions. 




PARADE 



59 





The GREATEST $2 SELL-OUT 
Broadway Has Ever Seen 2 



To say "The Love Parade" is smashing all records 
at the Criterion Theatre, New York, at $2 is inade- 
quate. Not only is this great picture standing them 
up every performance; the advance ticket sale is 
the biggest by far that America's ace $2 picture 
theatre has ever known, not excepting "Wings" or 
"The Covered Wagon!" "THE LOVE PARADE" 
IS THE OUTSTANDING BOX OFFICE CLE AN- 
UP OF THE AGE! 




1 




-0 



c 




1 




4^ 



THE LOVE PARADE 



55 



< PRIDE OF PARAMOVNT'S XEW SHOW WORLD 



A H! 






AH! 

Willie Collier, Sr., known in every opry house, 
stage, auditorium and hippodrome here and abroad, 
will be the laugh sensation of the nation in 
HARMONY AT HOME. 

If the mammoth audiences who have chortled at 
Collier for years could be packed into one hundred 
Yale Bowls to see and hear this great comic in his 
first talkie, the laugh explosions would rock the 
land from the Rockies to the Roxy. 

And with Collier— making plenty of Whoopee 
—is YOUTH— Marguerite Churchill, Dixie Lee, Rex 
Bell, Charlie Eaton and Charlotte Henry— flaming, 
frivoling and frolicking. 

And around the youth is Elizabeth Patterson 
and Dot Farley for more laughs. 

H.A.H! is the screen version of Harry Delf*s 
"The Family Upstairs," which every stock com- ^| 
pany plays and plays and packs them in. 

H.A.H! is every home with the front wall torn 
off. It's your home— my home— their home. It hits 
the home right smack on the funny bone. 

And now when they're crying for laughs— Give 
'em this fountain of fun— Guaranteed to make 'em 
forget pains, pills, plasters and ticker-tape. 

H. A.H! - HARMONY AT HOME - Means 
Money in the mint! Collier means KALE! So strike 
up the accordion! Directed hy Hamilton McFadden. 



ONE of THE BEST TALKING 



They called him 




this dashing young birdman who 
whirled through the heavens and 
astounded a gaping, awe-struck 
world with his daring and heroism. 




A spectacular all talking, all 
thrilling romance of the air 

with 

JOHN GARRICK 

the talkirig screen's latest "find" 

HELEN CHANDLER 
GILBERT EMERY 

Story by Llewellyn Hughes 
Directed by JOHN BLYSTONE 

Presented by WILLIAM FOX 



MAKE A NEW ALTITUDE REC^^J^ 
THE SKY'S THE LIMIT ON f^l 



I 

I 



MOVIES of THE YEAR! 



For thrills, action, sound, ocf/ng ^T"^™^^^ 

thrillers by 5,000 feet What a mov/e/ 4 , "' 

'"'u. A;.. , , 



--New York Daily Mirror 



Convin«'"9 




One of tne best talk and sound m« • ' 





a heart-stopping sequences seen 
3tt\e sc®"®^ between the Zep and the 



jsov^ ° 9"°'°L,„a ana enthralling entertainment." ^ 

""^ '/> 



°";,e scenes _ 

with e«,>ement. ,f 




^ ^ ::f'^ done." 

TeL 



V„ V "'^"^ '"Merest ^H^; ""^-Pan^ 




Enioyable— exciting — 



the production as a whole is adm- l. 
-New York Sun ^ Qdm/rob/e. 





o migV^ty one. A real motion picture' 



—New York World 



FOR YOUR BOX-OFFICE 
SURE-FIRE SMASH froi^ 




vVARNER BROS. Rin 



9 




MONTE BLUE w LUPE VELEZ 
in TICEB- R.OSE' 




THE SONG HIT 
OF HITS 

'THE DAY 
YOU FALL 
IN LOVE" 



Sung by 

LUPE VELEZ 



Published by 
M. WITMARK & SONS 



''Viia^h.one!' is the regisl&y&di trade,-may\ of The Vita^hom Corporation designating its products 



in the Newl/ear with 




Selected as the Opening Attraction for 

Warner Bros. 

BEACON THEATRE 



NEW YORK 



A Gorgeous Vitaphone Picturization of 
WILLARD MACK'S famous stage play. 

oAdapted by 
HARVEY THEW and GORDON RIGBY 

With a distinguished cast including 

H. B. WARNER 
GRANT WITHERS * GASTON GLASS 
RIN TIN TIN ♦ TULLY MARSHALL 

Directed by 

GEORGE FITZMAURICE 




tBROS.6 




(allu wim the 
Heart oF 
Hew York / 

9 




11 1 1 ai 




COLOR ^ National and IJ^^s^ Picture 



"Vitaphone" is the registered trade mark of the Vitaphone Corp. desfgnating its products 



The 
Independent 
Film Trade 
Paper 



EXHIBITORS 

H E RALD 
WORLD 



Home 
Office: 
407 So. Dearborn St. 
Chicago 



IN THIS ISSUE 



EXHIBITION CONTRACT 

Exhibitors Agree and Disagree on Funda- 
mentals OF New Contract — Opinion Is Gen- 
eral, However, That Revised Agreement Is 
Necessary — Conferences Between Theatre 
Organizations and Distributors Will Be Con- 
tinued Some Time in January — Distributors 
See Agreement on Instrument. 



HEARST— FOX— PLAQUE 

Hearst's Desire for Film Throne Is Whet- 
ted BY Turndown by Fox and He Awaits New 
Opening Despite Rejection of $200,000,000 
Bid — Publisher Is Close to Inside Circle Even 
Now — Spotlight of Plaque Awards Thrown 
ON Small House with Better Sound Repro- 
duction. 



COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS 

NEWS DEPARTMENTS 



Conditions are basically sound for 1930, say Lightman and Myers 
— Laenunle adopts civil service examination system for promo- 
tions within ranks. 

Bah for a Leopard! Sure, But — -W. S. Van Dyke tells about gen- 
teel lions and sprinting buffalo — Spectators are thrilled as old 
Selig studio in Chicago burns. 

Ninety million feet of color photography is set as annual output 
of Colorcraft, new organization — New theatre in Chicago marks 
growth of "Little Cinema" movement. 

Theatres drop threat to close as second-run relief is given to 
seven independents at Racine, Wis. 

FEATURES 



The Voice of the Industry (Letters from Readers) 60 

Motion Picture Finance 22 

Service Talks 43 

Los Angeles, by Douglas Hodges 37 

Broadway 12 

Sound Pictures 30 

Pictorial Section 23 

Short Features with Sound 41 

J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 63 



The Studio 37 

Short Features 40 

Music and Talent 49 

The Theatre 46 

Classified Advertising 59 

Quick Reference Chart 54 

What the Picture Did for Me 61 

New Pictures 65 

Chicago Personalities, by J. F 66 



ADVERTISEMENTS 

film, SOUND AND EQUIPMENT — Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 
United Artists, Eastman Kodak, Educational, Fox, Paramount 
Famous Lasky, Warner Brothers, First National, Hollywood Plaza 
Hotel, National Screen Service, Talking Picture Epics, Vitadisc 
Company, Renier Manufacturing Company, Weber Machine Cor- 
poration, Walt's Theatre Company, Goetz Movie-Phone, Beaded 
Screen Corporation, Bower Show Print. 

MUSIC AND TALENT— Paul and Ferral, Leo Feist, Inc., Brooks 
Costumes, Doris Roche. 



CHICAGO 

407 South Dearborn St. Telephone Harrison 0036-37-38 

Cable Address : Quigpuboo 
EDWIN S. CLIFFORD, Ceneral Manager 
JAY M. SHRECK, Managing Editor 
GEORGE CLIFFORD, Busineai Manager 
ERNEST A. ROVELSTAD, ;Ve«» Editor 

HOLLYWOOD 

1605 North Cahnenga St. Telephone Gladstone 2118-2119 
DOUGLAS HODGES 
West Coast Manager 



EDITORIAL 
AND 
ADVERTISING 
OFFICES 



565 Fifth Avenue 



NEW YORK 

Telephone Wiekersham 2366-2367 



PETER VISCHER, Neu> York Editor 
JAMES BEECROFT, New York Advertising Manager 

LONDON 
THE BIOSCOPE 
Faraday House 
8-10 Charing Cross Rd., W. C. 2 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: United States and its possessions, Canada and all countries of the Americas— $3.00 per year; Great Britain and its colonies — £l per year. 
Other foreign eountries— t.S.OO per year. Single copies 25 cents. Advertising rate cards and Audit Bureau of Circulations statements furnished upon appllcaliom. 
TYie HERALD- WORLD asenmes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts. No manuscripts are returned unless authors so request. 



10 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS 

HERALD 
WORLD 

Martin J. Qui'gley, Publisher & Editor 

Incorporating Exhibitors Herald, founded in 1915; Moving Pic- 
ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and 
The Film Index, founded in 1909 

Published Every Wednesday by 

QuiGLEY Publishing Company 
Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 
Martin J. Quigley, President 
Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Copyrigbt, 1930, by Quigley Publishing Company 
All editorial and business correspondence 
should be addressed to the Chicago ofBce 

Other publications: Better Theatres, devoted to construction, equipment and 
operation of theatres; published erery fourth week in conjunction with Exhibitors 
UERJU.D- World; The Motion Picture Almanac, Pictures and Personalities, pub- 
lished annually; The Chicagoan and Polo, Class publications. 



Vol. 98, No. 1 January 4, 1930 



The Test of Earnings 

EARNINGS, after all, tell the story about an industry 
and about the individual concerns in an industry. 
Therefore, a great deal of interesting information and 
guidance about the picture business is revealed when the 
test of earnings is applied. 

The picture business, during the year just ended, has 
earned vastly more profits than in any similar period in 
its history. This fact, startling and most pleasing in itself, 
becomes considerably more impressive when it is realized 
that 1929 has been a year of tremendous readjustment in 
the film industry. If such profits could be earned during 
a year of widespread readjustment, then the future is 
bright indeed. 

Granting only a fair showing during the final quarter 
of last year, the definite figures being not yet available, the 
earnings of the principal producing and distributing com- 
panies in the first three quarters of 1929 were vastly 
greater than in any previous like period. In certain in- 
stances the volume of profits is most impressive. 

The major theatre circuits, aided by the most attractive 
brand of entertainment ever offered, have had a most 
flourishing year. Net earnings have showed a most satis- 
factory increase because attendance was increased and at 
the same time a number of substantial economies in opera- 
tion were possible because of the use of sound and talking 
pictures, curtailing expenditures for personal talent. 

The record, however, in the case of the smaller theatres 
is not so favorable and would have been decidedly less 
favorable if it were not for the practical aid which dis- 
tributors rendered to these houses. Adjustment on film 
rentals, totalling a huge sum, have been allowed to the 
sinaller houses with the result that an exceedingly had 
situation has been avoided and at the same time a new 
order has been created under which the smaller houses, 
both in the neighborhoods and in the smaller towns, now 
have a real chance both to survive and to make a profit. 

The test of earnings, therefore, as apphed to the motion 
picture business generally on its operations during the 
past year supplies grounds not only for confidence but 
also for real enthusiasm. 



Publicity Hounds 

ANEW country, such as the West Coast of the United 
States, is seldom able to boast of anything impressive 
in the way of the calibre of its public officials. Officialdom 
generally in Los Angeles is a conspicuous instance of this. 

There is in office in Los Angeles a certain group of cheap 
imitations of public officials whose conduct cannot escape 
giving a severe, localized pain to any observer. 

An illustration is the murder mystery involving the 
death of a distinguished motion picture director, William 
D. Taylor. Elsewhere public officials might feel some 
chagrin over their lamentable incapacity in solving such a 
murder as this. In Los Angeles, however, the officials have 
not the good sense or the good taste to let this case rest — 
as far as publicity is concerned — in view of the fact that 
they have made no progress whatsoever on the road toward 
its solution. 

But the carpet-baggers in California, still somewhat 
dizzy over their escape from obscurity in Iowa, Nebraska 
or Indiana, keep this Taylor case close at hand and when- 
ever they experience a desire for some cheap publicity 
they drag it back into the newspapers with silly statements 
to the effect that they are on the verge — for about the 
hundredth time, if the record is examined — of a solution. 

If they are so close to a solution of the case, the question 
might be asked, why don't they go ahead and solve it? 
. * * « 

Back to Work 

SOME sage observations from Mr. Carl Laemmle: 
"I would not be surprised," Mr. Laenunle says, "if 
there is considerable unscrambling of mergers. Entirely 
too much attention has been given to stock tickers and 
merger manipulations, instead of to the making of first 
class pictures and the proper conduct of picture business 
as picture business." 

Mr. Laemmle's indictment might with equal force be 
applied to many other businesses. The stock ticker and 
financial manipulation generally have played a much too 
important part in American business during the past few 
years. 

Many a merger looks bright on paper and in conversa- 
tion; often the actual showing of a profit after the scram- 
bling process has been completed becomes a different story 
entirely. Countless mergers have been effected with little 
or no serious thought as to whether the combination would 
show a profit after the increased capitalization, cost of 
financing, upset in personnel and the other factors affect- 
ing mergers. Naturally many of these never have and 
never will. 

The merger program has pretty much run its course in 
the film business for the time being. And there is ground 
for much satisfaction in this, to the picture business if 
not to the brokers. 

As far as attention to the ticker is concerned, so many 
people have been compelled to re-direct their full atten- 
tion to their regular sources of income that there is now 
but very little to worry about in that direction. 

« * * 

THERE are indications that production will soon be 
started on several widths of the wider film, creating 
an inevitable trend toward a condition of much confusion 
and waste. 

Standardization on some particular width of the wider 
film is not easy of accomplishment when several individual 
processes have been developed, but failure to reach a 
standard basis will tremendously handicap this develop- 
ment which is badly needed in the large houses at once 
and in practically all the theatres eventually. 

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



II 



Hearst Desire for Film Throne 
Is Whetted by Turndown by Fox 

Awaits New Opening Despite 
Rejection of 200 Million Bid 

Close to Inside Now, with Cosmopolitan, Fox Hearst 
News Corporation and Part in Newsreel Theatre 



Thrill for Hearst 
In Pictures, But — 

That motion pictures hold a thrill 
and a glamour for William Randolph 
Hearst is a well-known fact. He has 
for many years been keenly inter- 
ested in pictures and their develop- 
ment, and has always looked upon 
them as a great factor in American 
life. 

"/ have made a great deal of money 
in newspapers," he once said at a 
banquet, "and dropped it in pictures." 

Hearst does not believe in sending 
good money after bad. 



January Sales Plan 
Of Universal Wins 
Albany Exhibitors 

(Special to the, Herald-World) 
ALBANY, Dec. 31.— The majority of ex- 
hibitors in this city are rather favorably in- 
clined towards Universal's plan of launching 
its sales campaign in January rather than in 
the spring. In the first place, the exhibitors 
admit that they are more inclined to buy, or 
at least to be in the mood for buying, when 
the shekels are falling into the till by the 
thousands, rather than during the late spring, 
or just before the usual dull summer season. 
In fact. Alec Sayles, general manager of the 
Buckley houses in Albany, says that he doesn't 
feel much like talking along buying lines when 
business is off, as it naturally is during the 
late spring. 

_ "I think Universal has come pretty near hit- 
ting the nail on its head," said Sayles, "and 
whoever conceived the idea of starting the 
sales campaign in January should be given 
recognition as bringing an excellent idea into 
the industry generally. 

"I know that I feel more like buying when 
business is good than when it is in the dol- 
drums," he said, "and I certainly know that I 
don't feel like talking about pictures when 
there is a mere dribble of people entering the 
house." 

Sayles just about sums up what other ex- 
hibitors in Albany think of the Universal plan. 
And the number includes Charles Smakwitz, 
general manager of the Warner houses ; Abe 
Stone, owner of the Eagle ; Herman Vineberg, 
owner pi the Arbor and other theatres, not 
forgetting for a moment Harry Hellman and 
his Royal and Paramount theatres. It looks 
as if Universal will not have a hard time in 
placing its product next month in Albany. 



Bring Suit for $4,650 
Against Pacent Company 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW ORLEANS, Dec. 31.— Frank and 
J. L. Alsina, operators of the Famous theatre 
in the lower section of the city has brought 
suit to recover $4,650 from the Pacent Repro- 
ducing Company, charging that the corporation 
installed reproducing apparatus in their the- 
atre in April and that up to the present time 
it has failed to operate flawlessly. 

The petition alleges that the initial cost of 
the reproducer was $3,500, and for this sum 
the defendant company guaranteed results. 
To this amount the brothers claim they added 
one thousand dollars to improve the sound 
waves. They are suing for the purchase 
price, plus the one thousand dollars. 



By PETER VISCHER 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31. — William Randolph Hearst's burning ambition to 
take a commanding position in the motion picture industry today is still unsat- 
isfied. He is now sitting on the outer edge of events, brains on edge and 
cash in hand, waiting for the psychological moment to arrive to make a win- 
ning move. 

Since the recent crash of the stock market, when the vast organizations 
built by William Fox were thrown into confusion, Hearst has several times 
been close to his goal. He even got the opportunity to make a definite offer, 
something like $200,000,000 for the Fox enterprises. 

The Hearst offer, big as it was, under the sirable location in the city," he said, "and 
circumstances, was flatly refused. The offer then I buy next door to it." 
was brought to William Fox by one of the Hearst might now be said to be next 
keenest mmds of the film mdustry, a man door to the most desirable position in the 
close to both Fox and Hearst. It was brought film industry. 

with the clear understanding that some of the 

most powerful moneyed interests were ready 
to back Hearst, practically with unlimited 
capital. It was refused, largely because Wil- 
liam Fox was not in the mood to accept it. 

In Touch with Insides 

Hearst can be patient, and he is by no means 
out of touch with events on the inside of the 
motion picture circle. In fact, he is already 
a partner of Fox's, for his Cosmopolitan Pro- 
ductions are under the banner of Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer and the newly organized Fox- 
Hearst News Corporation is partly Fox and 
partly Hearst. The two share the Fox News- 
reel theatre, although Fox Movietone News 
is billed in larger type than the Hearst Metro- 
tone News. 

That Hearst is not unsatisfied with his pres- 
ent position may be gathered from an incident 
typical of his way of doing business. He was', 
on this occasion, inspecting real estate in one 
of the largest Eastern cities, in which he has 
extensive newspaper properties. 

Next Door to Best Position 

"W. R., how do you decide upon a piece of 
real estate?" he was asked. 

"I pick out what I consider the most de- 



Bomb Thrower Arrested; 
One Explodes While He 
Is Arraigned in Court 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

OAKLAND, CAL., Dec. 31.— Christmas 
spirit evidently meant only a redoubling of 
effort on the part of those who have sought 
persistently to interfere with programs at the 
Piedmont theatre since the installation of 
audien equipment. Late last week, when the 
house was filled with a holiday crowd, Lloyd 
Townsend, the manager, saw a man deposit a 
bottle in the aisle and start to leave. The 
man, who gave the name of Robert J. Rob- 
erts, was placed under arrest, and ushers lo- 
cated four bottles, three of which had ex- 
ploded, driving patrons to the street. 

Although detected in the act, Roberts 
pleaded not guilty, when brought before Po- 
lice Judge Edward J. Tyrrell, and demanded 
a jury trial. While he was being arraigned 
in court the fourth bomb, said to have been 
planted by him, exploded in the property of- 
fice and made it necessary to adjourn court 
until the city hall could be aired. 



MPPDA Is Sued for $1,300,000 Damages 
By Ivan Abramson. Brookhart Counsel (?) 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31. — Charging that the formation of the Hays Organization 
in 1921 was for the unlawful purpose of destroying competition of the independent 
producers and of monopolizing for their own benefit the exhibition of motion pic- 
tures, Ivan Abramson and the Graphic Film Corporation are bringing suit against 
the Hays office and the leading producing and distributing companies for the sum 
of $1,300,000. 

In the action, which is Bled in the United States District Court, Southern Dis- 
trict of New York, the plaintiffs claim that due to the activities of the MPPDA 
the number of independent producers has been cut from 50 to 12 and that also, 
because of their activity, they, the plaintiffs, have been unable to £nd an outlet for 
their product. Among the pictures which plaintiffs claim they were not able to 
market on account of the defendants' alleged violations of the Sherman antitrust 
law are "Mother Eternal," made in 1925, "Lying Wives," in 1926, and "Children of 
Fate," 1927. 

Attorneys of record for the plaintiffs are Blau, Perlman & Polakoff. Ivan 
Abramson claims that Senator Smith W. Brookhart will be trial counsel. 
The Hays office, through C. C. Pettijohn, denied the allegations. 



J2 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1950 



mm 



War 

UERBERT BRENON is in town smoking 
up the Radio offices on "The Case of 
Sergeant Grischa," which promises to be a 
great story of the war, thrilling and dramatic, 
but not cool and intellectual, instead packed 
with the throb of the heart. 

Universal is excited about the work that's 
bemg done on "All Quiet on the Western 
Front," most dramatic of the war stories, now 
being pictured at Universal City. 

It looks as if the West Coast is going to be 
more of a battlefield than ever. 

^ ijc :{c 

"Farewell to Arms" 

WHO is going to make "Farwell to Arms ?" 
Ernest Hemingways great novel in 
some ways overshadows every other story of 
the war. Certainly it is in the forefront of 
war stories written by an American. It is a 
magnificent story, and I only wish it could be 
filmed as written. 

What will "Farewell to Arms" look like 
when the censors, the women's organizations, 
and the representatives of Signor Mussolini 
get through with it, to say nothing of writers, 
■directors, and actors? 

^ ^ ^ 

"The Royal Box" 

I SHOULD like to know what prompted the 
brothers Warner to make "The Royal Box" 
as their first full-length picture in the German 
language. Charles Coghlan's old drama of the 
early eighteen hundreds is pretty rickety and 
-wobbly, and shows it. I doubt if it is just the 
thing to catch the eye of postwar Germany. 

On the other hand, I must say that Alex- 
ander Moissi was an inspired choice for the 
role of the great tragedian, Edmund Kean, 
who fell in love with a beautiful countess and 
went mad on the stage, denouncing the Prince 
•of Wales in the midst of the soliloquy from 
Hamlet, thereby making a bum out of himself. 
(Actually.) 

For all the hoopla that appeared in th? 
New York papers about Alexander Moissi 
when he deigned to touch these shores a year 
or two ago, he is an actor of the old days, 
part and parcel of the sonorous speechifying 
and gruesome eye-rolling that went on in "The 
Royal Box." Moissi plays Kean as the Eng- 
lish tragedian himself might have done it, and 
to the modern eye that's ham any way you 
slice it. 

The picture is an interesting experiment and 
"has very distinct exploitation and publicity 
possibilities for cities with large German popu- 
lation, as, for instance, Milwaukee and Cin- 
cinnati. 

* * * 
The New Year 

BROADWAY looks forward to the new 
year with the greatest eagerness. Good 
pictures are playing on Broadway and better 
pictures are coming. There is a feeling of 
optimism, despite the unhappy days of the 
market crash and their resultant confusion. 

In the critical eye of time, 1929 will be 
looked upon with no great enthusiasm. It 
was an important year, but more a necessary 
evil than anything else. It was a year of 
great movements, in growth, in development, 
in retrenchment, in sound, color and screen, 
and great movements are always accompanied 
with great pain. 
Here's to 1930! 

PETER VISCHER. 



"Warner Club Gaities' " Tryouts Popular 

NEW YORK. — More than 100 aspirants appeared 
for tryouts for the "Warner Club Gaities" to be pro- 
duced in February. The tryouts were held in the 
new projection room at 321 West 44th street. 



The Laughter of the Gobs 



T N the first place, there's something about a couple of sailor boys that makes you cx- 
pect something to laugh at. Then you are all set for what is in the second place — 
namely, William Haines and Karl Dane. Seems like a sure-fire formula for raucous 
entertainment, and it's the one used in making "Navy Blue," M G M's new William 
Haines production. It's an ail-talker with dialog by the famous Nugents, J. C. and 
Elliott. Clarence Brown directed this picture, which is successor to "Dynamite" at 
the Capitol in New York. 




Dining — Karl Dane and William Haines. 




Looking — Haines and Anita Page. 




Scrubbing — Haines and Dane again. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



13 



Fox Fights 
Control 



to Retain Personal 
of Picture Enterprises 

Endless Conferences Are Now 
Being Held by Three Trustees 

Producer Thus Far Remains in Actual Control of His 
Companies Through Directorships 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31. — Reorganization of the gigantic structure of Wil- 
liam Fox enterprises, under the control of a benevolent trusteeship, is pro- 
ceeding, but with difficulty. Seemingly endless conferences are being held 
with the representatives of William Fox, J. E. Otterson and H. L. Stuart, the 
three trustees maneuvering for position. 

That Fox is still fighting to retain personal control of the organization he 
built up through 25 years of personal leadership was made clear by Donald 
Henderson, one of the representatives of Halsey, Stuart and Company, bank- 
ShoWn by F ox Feb, 2 ^""^ enterprises. 



Columbia Launches 
Ad I>rive in Liberty 

(Special to the Heratd-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Columbia, 
looking forward to a year of ambi- 
tious plans and considerable expan- 
sion, is providing a national hookup 
between exhibitors and the public in 
the form of an advertising campaign 
in the magazine Liberty. The Srst 
picture to be given special advertis- 
ing is "Murder on the Roof," which 
£rst appeared in fiction form in 
Liberty. 



First Specially Made 
Grandeur Film to Be 



(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEVJ YORK, Dec. 31.— Fox is expected to 
show its first picture especially made for 
Grandeur film at the Roxy on or before Feb- 
ruary 2. The general release date of the 
picture, "Happy Days," is also set for the 
same day. 

The public's first glimpse of the Fox wide 
screen medium was given in the Grandeur 
version of "Fox Movietone Follies" which ran 
for two weeks at the Gaiety last summer. 

Other Grandeur pictures are not on the 
Fox schedule until near the end of the year's 
selling season. 



Clash of Authority Bars 
Canadian Film Premiere 
As 1,000 Seek Admission 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
OTTAWA, Dec. 31.— A sensational clash 
of authority between the Dominion and On- 
tario governments over Sunday shows re- 
sulted in the cancellation at the zero hour of 
premiere presentation of the Dominion gov- 
ernment's special five reel production, "The 
Arctic Patrol," in the Avalon theatre Sunday 
night while 1,000 sought admission. 

Announcement was posted that the Ontario 
government had not issued a permit for Sun- 
day performance despite federal auspices. The 
finger of moral uplifters is seen in the situa- 
tion and a real issue has been raised. 



Henderson said that Fox had not, up to 
Tuesday, relinquished necessary control to the 
board of trustees. So far. Fox retains actual 
control of his companies because the boards of 
directors of those companies are still Fox- 
controlled. Henderson said that it was gen- 
erally understood that certain Fox directors 
would resign from the various Fox boards of 
directors, but that the resignations had not 
been received and there was no way in which 
the Fox representatives could be replaced 
legally until April IS, the time of the regular 
annual election. Meanwhile, the trustees, dom- 
inated by Otterson and Stuart, hold a major- 
ity of the Fox voting stock in escrow but can- 
not do anything with it. 

"It is obvious," said Henderson, "that some- 
thing must be done when a company has a 
lot of short-term notes to meet." 

Apparently the Fox short-term notes amount 
to about $90,000,000, and the possibility still 
exists that Fox, an astute leader, will be able 
to find capital in new quarters which would 
leave him independent of his present creditors, 
Und therefore independent of his fellow-trus- 
tees. Some of these short-term notes fall due 
April 1. Fox or his representatives are not 
commenting on the situation, but it is signifi- 
cant that Fox pictures and Fox theatres are 
doing big business. 



died at the foot of two main staircases lead- 
ing from the balcony, and bodies lay six 
feet deep. 

Such a tragedy would be impossible in the 
theatres of the United States because of 
the care exercised in theatre construction and 
the large number of safety devices in use. 



Small Exhibitors Seek 

To Organize Own Body 

A group of Chicago small theatre opera- 
tors have moved to organize an association 
through which to contract with unions and 
otherwisfe act jointly in their interests. 

It is said about 40 exhibitors are interested, 
only about ten of whom are now members 
of the Chicago Exhibitors Association. 

Jacob Lasker, head of Jacob Lasker & Sons, 
operators of several small houses, is one of 
the leaders in the organization activities. 



Non-Inflammable Sound 
Screen Developed by Erpi 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— After a long period 
of experiment and tests on many sound 
screens submitted. Electrical Research Prod- 
ucts has found a non-inflammable sound 
screen which satisfactorily meets all require- 
ments. This new screen is now available to 
all Western Electric wired theatres and for 
future installations. 



Police Are Investigating 
Picture Theatre Tragedy 
In Scotland; 69 Dead 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

PAISLEY, SCOTLAND, Dec. 31.— A 
police investigation is underway here today 
as a result of the deaths of 69, mostly chil- 
dren, in a stampede which followed a fire in 
a crowded theatre during the showing of 
M G M's "The Crowd." Most of the victims 
were suffocated or tramped to death. Many 



Censor Grants Showing 
And Then Changes Mind 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
CINCINNATI, Dec. 31.— After having given 
Pantheon theatre, Toledo, Ohio, permission to 
show "Wedding Rings" four days, the Ohio 
censor board ordered it stopped. The picture 
will have to be entirely remade if shown in 
Ohio. 



''Blaze O* Glory" Opens 
At $11 Admission Charge 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Asking $11 a seat 
for the premiere, Sono-Art presented Eddie 
Dowling's second sound venture, "Blaze O' 
Glory," at the George M. Cohan theatre Mon- 
day night before an attractive audience. 



Tiffany ''Party Girl" Debut 
New Year Eve at Midnight 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Tiffany tried a new 
wrinkle in opening "Party Girl" on New 
Year Eve at the moment of loudest celebra- 
tion. The picture, a Halperin production, 
with Douglas Fairbanks. Jr., heading the cast, 
was brought into the Gaiety theatre in the 
center of Broadway's festivities at midnight. 



Laemmle Adopts Civil Service System 

To Promote Managers and Head Bookers 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31. — Universal is adopting a civil service examination sys- 
tem, both written and oral, for its exchange managers and head bookers, in line 
with Carl Laemmle's policy of promotion from the ranks. Each manager and head 
booker will take the written examination in his own office, and the completed 
paper will be sent to Lou B. Metzger, general manager. Metzger and other officers 
of the company will compose the examining board for the oral examinations. 



14 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1950 



Bah for a Leopard! Sure, But 



Even if W. S. Van Dyke does like artichokes and maynonnaise, and even if a Lion 
has soft sliin and doesn't attack you because he isn't interested, there's such a thing 
as carrying a joke too far when a stampeding herd of buffalo is charging at you. 



By NORMAN KRASNA 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— I had hoped that W. S. Van Dyke would be a 
smallish sort of man. Then I could write a story of how darkest 
Africa's lions and leopards and elephants trembled when this mite 
of a man lifted a puny finger. If he wasn't small enough for the purposes of 
such a story, I hoped that he would be very big. Then I could write a story 
of how darkest Africa's lions and leopards and elephants trembled when this 
hulk of a man lifted a powerful finger. 

"Yes, sir," I said. 

"Why, they're nothing more than cow- 
ards and liars," he continued. "Big game 
in Africa d oesn't bother anyone, hardly. 
For myself, I wouldn't walk across a back 
garden in Africa without a gun, but, as a 
rule, if you won't bother the cats they 
won't bother you. Depend on that now." 

What's a Dot Between Friends? 

I assured him I was depending on it. 
This is exactly how he speaks to you. He 
flares up for five minutes on something 
fond in his memory, then whirls around 
and pokes you with a finger that would 
make a swell mashie, and demands that 
you either agree or disagree with him. I 
agreed every single time. I'm no fool. 

"When you see dots on the map of Af- 
rica," he said, "don't think there are peo- 
ple living in the vicinity. Lord, no. Why, 
we'd go a few hundred miles into the inte- 
rior, locate a pretty big dot that's labeled 
Beelzebub or something, and find that the 
place is famous because two natives traded 
goats there six years before. They nevsr 
came back. 

A Land of Manana 

"And there you are, stuck swell and with 
the prospect of arguing with the natives 
about the necessity of keeping the schedule 
that Mr. So and So has mapped out in 
the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer office. 

"Africa is a land of manana. Everything 
is met with, 'I'll do it tomorrow, sure.' 
And that was no way to run our particular 



BUT complications set in. For a man 
who has been camera-shooting the 
most exclusive and dangerous big game in 
the world as part of 
his job in directing 
"Trader Horn" for 
Metro - Goldwyn - 
Mayer these last 
seven months, he 
presents a discour- 
aging normal ap- 
pearance. 

Five feet eleven, 
lean and looking 
wind-whipped, red- 
dish face, white and 
even teeth behind a 
slit of thin lips, 
close-cropped black 
hair — -I once knew a 
trolley conductor 
who looked like that. 

But when he began to speak of his ad- 
ventures, of forbidden territories, of treach- 
erous natives, of wild animal scents, he 
seemed dififerent. What a whale of a dif- 
ference just a few scents make! 

When I came into the office he had al- 
ready passed the first month of his trip. 
I found him on the shores of Lake Victoria. 

"You know, young fellow," he turned on 
me, "all these big boys that come back 
from Africa loaded with pelts of animals 
and supposedly thrilling stories of hand- 
to-hand captures are pure, unadulterated 
hooey. What do you say?" 




W. S. Van Dyke 




W. S. Van Dyke brought two natives back with him from Africa who are necessary for the 
remaining sequences of M G M's "Trader Horn," which will be filmed in Hollywood. Their 
names are Mutia and Riano and they landed in New York just in time to see the first snow- 
fall of their lives. The unaccustomed climate made them practically numb with cold. Be- 
cause the B'wani tribe does not happen to use English as its language the two Africans were 
detained at Ellis Island until sufficient legal procedure could be marshaled to release them. 



business. We were carting 92 tons of 
equipment and we needed roads for it, not 
hatchet-hacked trails. We used 35 automo- 
biles for a party composed of 35 white peo- 
ple and 128 blacks. Seven-eighths of the 
trip, you may be surprised to learn, was 
made in light trucks, real, genuine Ameri- 
can automobiles. 

"We didn't have any especial trouble with 
animals, but the funniest, ha, ha, this is 
hot, listen to this" — he almost slapped my 
shoulder out of joint — "here's one time 
we thought we were dead ones. 

A Funny, Funny Story! 

"Bob Roberts, that's my cameramian, and 
myself had taken a little scouting trip to 
map out some locations. We hadn't a rifle 
with us, only Roberts' camera. We had 
gone about two miles when suddenly we 
heard a sort of roaring swishing, very much 
like a waterfalls sound. I knew there 
wasn't any water around and for a few 
seconds the thing looked a bit eerie. Know 
what it was?" 

"No," I said. 

"It was one of the largest herds of buf- 
falo I've ever seen. For some reason they 
were stampeding and the rush of their 
bodies through the shoulder high grass ac- 
counts for the swishing noise. At the mo- 
ment Roberts and I thought they were 
surrounding us preparatory to attack. I 
was pretty scared, let me tell you, be- 
cause there's nothing worse than being 
attacked by a buffalo. And there I was, 
hoping that the stampede was caused by 
something other than our presence, when 
I felt a tug at my shoulder. I turned 
around. There was Roberts, white as sand. 
'Say, Mr. Van Dyke,' he said. 'Do you 
'want to buy a camera cheap?' Ha, ha, ha." 
"Ha, ha," I said. I'm no fool. 

Bah for a Leopard. 

"Now about those buflfalo. They're 
tough. A lion isn't. A lion has a soft 
skin and won't attack. And not because 
they're afraid. They're just not interested. 
Same for a leopard. Bah for a leopard!" 

"Pooh, pooh!" I agreed. I snapped my 
fingers. 

"But you take a buffalo — " (He says 
this as you would say, "But you take an 
apple.") "A buffalo can spot you at 3,000 
yards. An elephant can't. Why, if you're 
to windward you can walk under an ele- 
phant and he won't see you. A rhino has 
such awful eyesight you have to scratch a 
match on his horn before you'll get a 
tumble out of him. Follow me?" 

I assured him I used a mechanical 
lighter. 

"But those darn bufiFalo will smell you 
out and stamp you so far into the ground 
that a whisk broom won't get you together 
again." 

Wives and Shillings 

A few more details presented themselves. 
It seems that a wife can be bought for 
four goats or forty shillings, shillings pre- 
ferred. At the moment Africa is lorig on 
wives and short on shillings. He offered 
us the helpful advice on what to do when 
a lion jumps you. A lion jumped on Jack 
Lucey and all Lucey had to do was to 
relax. Lucey moved his arm through 
nervousness and the lion snapped it right 
ofif. But Lucey kept still and the lion left 
him. "Always remember that," Van Dyke 
told me. 

"Yes, sir," I said. 

The biggest surprise was his declaration 
that the whole thing bored him stiff. "I 
don't like this business of traipsing all over 
Africa," he admitted. "I'm a home-loving 
man who likes his pipe and slippers. I like 
artichokes and mayonnaise. I don't want 
to see a bean again — I don't care how nu- 
tritious it is — as long as I live. If any- 
one ever tries to give me bacon for break- 
fast I'll bite him. I want cream out of a 
can, not weeks-old water out of an ele- 
phant foot's depression. I want . . ." 

"Have a cigarette," I said. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



15 





Simple modernistic art in theatre con- 
struction is exemplified in the entrance 
to the new Cinema in Chicago of the 
Theatre Guild. 



C. R. Metzger Named 
General Manager of 
Indiana Exhibitors 

(Special to the Hcrald-World) 

INDIANAPOLIS, Dec. 31.— Directors of 
the Associated Theatre Owners of Indiana at 
a recent meeting elected Charles R. Metzger of 
this city to the office of general manager and 
attorney. The first of the year he will begin 
his third term in the office. Directors who 
attended the meeting were Harry Markum, A. 
C. Zaring, Jean Marks and Metzger, all of 
Indianapolis; A. C. Miller of Brazil, Samuel 
Carlton of Frankfort, H. B. Vonderschmitt, 
Bloomington, A. E. Bennett of Muncie, H. E. 
Hart of Auburn, A. M. Howard of Monon 
and Samuel Neall of Kokomo. Miller is 
president. 



Licenses Taken Out After 
Settling of Suits Brought 
By Bray Hurd Company 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Suits for infringe- 
ment brought by Bray Hurd Process Com- 
pany,_ Inc., inventors and owners of patents 
covering processes by which animated car- 
toons are made, have been settled and the 
parties involved have taken out Hcenses. 

Those who now have licenses to operate un- 
der the company's patents are Bray Pictures 
Corporation, Aesop Fables, Inc., Max Flei- 
scher, Winkler Pictures, Inc., Winsor McKay 
and Paul Terry. 



Raise Carnival License 
From $10 per Day to $250 

(Special to tha Herald-World) 

GRIDLEY, CAL., Dec. 31.— Traveling car- 
nival attractions will not find the picking so 
easy in Gridley in the future. Formerly, a 
license fee of $10 a day prevailed, but the 
City Council has increased this to $250 a day, 
payable in advance, for the protection of local 
amusement enterprises. 



A New Theatre Marks Growth 
Of "Little Cinema" Movement 

Motion Picture Theatre Guild Opens House in Chicago for Presen- 
tation of Silent Films "Appealing to the 
Intellectual" — Is Fourth in Group 
By GEORGE SCHUTZ 

The "little cinema" movement was advanced by one theatre more last week, 
when on Thursday evening, the fourth house of the Motion Picture Theatre 
Guild, a quasi-endowed organization with headquarters in Philadelphia, was 
opened in Chicago. Its inaugural audience approached in size the capacity of 
300, including among its members people prominent in art and social circles, 
many of whom were invited guests, and the program, which consisted in 
"Shiraz" (said to be the first all-Hindu film ever produced), three short sub- 
jects and selections by a string quartet brought an enthusiastic response. 

The Cinema, as this latest of the Guild the trade mark of an American producer 
group is called, is housed in a new structure will not necessarily constitute a ban. The 

■ ■ ■ test will be: "Does it have a decided appeal 

to the intellectual?" 

The short subjects also must meet this 
test, of course, but in this class the Ameri- 
can producer seems to enjoy better stand- 
ing. On the initial program were two of 
domestic manufacture, "In a Drop of 
Water," one of the Louis H. Tolhurst 
Secrets of Life series; and Educational's 
Hugo Riesenfeldt prize short, "The Voice 
of the Nightingale." 



of simple modernistic design located in the 
Towertown-Gold Coast district wherein 
those who work in Art live in curious con- 
trast with those who patronize it. Inside 
the little one-story theatre was the sparkle 
and flash of formal evening attire; outside 
chauffeurs waited within the cabs of illus- 
trious motors. A few blocks from this loca- 
tion lies Smoky Hollow, a Sicilian slum 
wherein many an underworld plot has been 
conceived — and consummated. 

Coffee Served Gratis 

The entertainment offered proved essen- 
tially similar to that of the Guild's other 
houses in Philadelphia, Rochester and Buf- 
falo, and of the Little Carnegie and Film 
Guild Cinema in New York. The theatre 
has no pit, no organ. On a balcony to the 
right of the projection room is located the 
cabinet of a non-synchronous machine, 
through which "a musician, not an opera- 
tor" (as the management explained) sup- 
plies a cued musical accompaniment to the 
feature picture. Also on this balcony is 
located the string quartette, which is a 
regular feature. It plays selections of 
chamber music during the short subjects 
and also during an intermission between 
the shorts and feature. 

The intermission at the Cinema is called 
an "interlude," and during it patrons may 
repair to the foyers and lounges for coffee 
and cigarettes, at the expense of the man- 
agement. The cigarettes are of domestic 
manufacture. 

"Our whole idea," explained Louis M. 
Machat, managing director of the entire 
Guild group, "is to provide a quiet place 
where the intellectual may enjoy examples 
of art — music and other forms of art as well 
as motion picture art — in an atmosphere of 
refinement and freedom. We want our 
patrons to feel free to move about, read 
or rest in the lounge, go into the audi- 
torium to see the picture, just as they 
please." 

Art Works Displayed 

There is a good-sized foyer on the main 
floor and a smaller one on the second. The 
lounge, off of which are the men's and 
women's retiring rooms, is located on a 
lower level. These three chambers, which 
are appointed in a definitely modernistic 
style, have an incidental use as art galleries. 
Their walls are accessible to any com- 
petent artists who may wish to display 
their works for the delight and education 
of the Cinema patrons and also for the 
attraction of purchasers. 

Of the examples of cinematic art which 
the Cinema is to offer, most if not all will 
come from foreign producers, according to 
the management. This applies especially 
to the features, though it is explained that 



No Sound Pictures 

The third short on the inaugural program 
also was of American sources, being sev- 
eral hundred feet of motion pictures made 
around the year 1900. 

No sound pictures will be shown at the 
Cinema. The interest of the clientele is in 
cinematic art, which is pantomimic, accord- 
ing to the view expressed by the manage- 
ment. 

Performances are daily and continuous, 
running from 1 p. m. to 11 p. m. Prices 
for week-day matinees are 50 cents, for 
evening, Saturday and holiday perform- 
ances, 75 cents. 

The Cinema in Chicago was erected by 
Newton C. Farr, from whom it is leased 
by the Chicago Art Cinema Guild, Inc., an 
Illinois corporation affiliated with the Phil- 
adelphia organization. 

Hindu Film Well Done 

The inaugural feature, "Shiraz," portrays 
a story of the creation of the famous Taj 
Mahal, tomb of the beloved queen to Em- 
peror Shah Jehan. The program called it 
"a poetic drama." Failing to utilize all of 
the pictorial advantages which various 
American, German and Russian directors 
might have noted, the production, which 
was directed by Franz Osten, a German, 
and Victor Peers, an Englishman, yet suc- 
ceeds in telling an essentially local but 
appealing story of a wife's fidelity with a 
genuine sympathy for the cinematic me- 
dium. But it probably contains little of 
sheer entertainment value to Western peo- 
ples, except for very special groups. 

A feature of the architectural aspect of 
the Cinema is the absence of seats outside 
the direct line of vision. Wide aisles are 
at the sides and down the middle, making 
only two blocks of seats, which are directly 
before the screen, the auditorium being 
rectangular in shape. 



Steinfeld Leaves W B 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Arnold Steinfeld, 
formerly associated with Warner Brothers' 
real estate department, is no longer connected 
with the organization. 



16 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



The Sound 




SI Seadler 



Quiet, pull-ease! 

* iif * 

The Newsreel theatre had a shot last week 
of a birdie making a glider flight. He tells 
about it, kisses the gal goodby, waves a cheery 
farewell and you see him taken up in his kite, 
pulled by an airplane. In a smsh, the thing 
goes wrong and you see the lad bounced up 
and down upon the ground and destroyed. 

Very pretty, indeed. 

* * * 

Profile 

Si Seadler : Advertis- 
^ing manager for Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer. Quar- 
ter indi under six feet. 
Blondish hair. Double- 
breasted coat, or coats, 
gray. Wears rubbers and 
a tie with stripes. 
Weighs 165 with four 
diet days to go. Writes 
ads involving Cleopa- 
tra, Caesar, and Greta 
Garbo: "Speech is Sil- 
ver, but Greta Garbo is 
Golden !" Very married. 
Has a picture in his 
office of three-year-old 
Junior, who's growing 
up to be an advertis- 
ing manager. He wrote 
"The Anagram Book," 
best seller, and is allowed to eat at the Algon- 
quin. Born on Momingside Heights. His 
favorite srtory tells how Dewey marched up 
Fifth Avenue to celebrate the Battle of 
Manila Bay. This happened in 1898 and Si 
was born in 1897. Told the story to Howard 
Dietz and Dietz made him write advertising 
copy right off. Discovered the raspberry is 
a synchronized fruit and reads market reports 
while sucking an aspirin lollypop. 

* * * 

They're shooting an all-Chinese short at the 
Paramount Studio here. Seven women and a 
man all no spikee English. Going to be called 
"The Golden Kimono" and directed by Ray 
Cozine. Cozine began a correspondence course 
in Chinese and found out in the first lesson that 
there are 30,000 letters in the Chinese alphabet. 
Trying to get a rebate or change his course to 
Home Cooking. 

* * * 

Glendon Allvine sent out Christmas cir- 
culars that explained all the advantages of 
the modernistique Allvine home. Mahty 
nice, suh, but whufs the idea? Selling it? 

* * * 

Scene at the Paramount Studio. This man 
Wilke, right center, speaking to a carpenter. 
"Lissen, feller. I just left for lunch an hour 
ago and I come back and find you've changed 
my office again. Come on, be reasonable. I'll 
t^e any office, absolutely any one, but don't 
change it between meals." And so on and on. 

* * * 

A finished piece of art in five attempts is par 
for the course at Radio. 

* * * 

"Cinema" is a new magazine devoted to the 
screen in words of six syllables. It broke 
forth in January under the guiding hand of 
Jack Harrower. It claims recording is noth- 
ing, unless you have something worth record- 
ing. Cheap talk makes cheap pictures. 

* * * 

It's getting so now a picture reviewer has 
to be a linguist. 



Conditions Basically Sound for 
1930, Say Myers and Lightman 

Leaders of M P T 0 A and Allied States Also Agree That Exhibitors 
Must Work and Organize in Their Common Interest — "Can't 
Depend on George," Leaders Declare 

Conditions are fundamentally sound for the motion picture business indus- 
try in 1930. On this point there is agreement in statements just issued by 
M. A. Lightman, president of the M P T O A, and Abram F. Myers, president 
of the Allied States Association. Their predictions regarding the coming year 
and what the exhibitors must do to make it a big year in the theatre field, are 
in part as follows : 



More later. 



NORMAN KRASNA. 



Says Lightman: — 

I believe that 1930 will see many changes 
in our industry. 

Those best able to meet up with these 
situations, however vexatious they may be 
to some, will experience satisfaction and 
prosperity. 

Our organization thinks that a procedure 
of co-operation with producers and distrib- 
utors is a necessary economic measure to 
more fully conserve the welfare of the 
exhibitor. 

Big Business 

Western Electric is now in control of a 
large part of the producing and exhibiting 
field. The Radio Corporation of America, 
through subsidiary concerns, has a produc- 
ing unit and a very fine line of theatres 
and is adding to the chain. It is well 
known that the American Telegraph & 
Telephone Company '(The Bell) is also in 
a somewhat commanding position. Bank- 
ing interests allied with these big concerns 
have vast sums of money invested. 

Lower Costs 

The latest information from inside 
sources is that the bankers interested in 
the motion picture business are now making 
a "searching survey" and an analysis of all 
of its parts with a view to making such 
business readjustments as may be deemed 
advisable. 

We can assume that some radical revi- 
sions will be made in overhead costs in 
some production centers. But we may be 
sure that this move for more efficiency will 
be in the interest of economic business 
relations. 

Lesser combinations of all kinds will 
likely follow these surveys in the elimina- 
tion of duplicating overhead. 

All of this should reduce overhead and 
production and distribution costs generally. 
It should make pictures cheaper to the the- 
atre owners. 

Independent Exhibitors 

But new lines of procedure will feature 
the buying of pictures. No theatre owner 
will be permitted to indulge in the bad busi- 
ness practice of buying large quantities of 
pictures beyond his needs just to shut out 
his competitor. New methods of selling 
pictures will be inaugurated, but this will 
probably not come until after the next sell- 
ing season. One thing that will cause this 
will be the passing of the star series. 

We will not have a Utopia, by any 
means. We will all have to work. But 1 
believe that the fellow who wants to be 
decent and fair will be treated right. 

Silent pictures, at least the type being 
offered today, should be discontinued^ at 
once. Inslead of helping the small exhibi- 
tor, the producer is harming both the ex- 
hibitor and himself. Every exhibitor 
should be encouraged to install sound — and 
good sound at that— if he expects to remain 
in business. 

The big corporations and their banker 
allies will see in the independent theatre 
owners one of their best assets and I pre- 
dict that they will keep him in business. 



Says Myers> 



Much as we would like to join the halle- 
lujah chorus of the White House butter 
boys, we must admit that the Hoover brand 
of prosperity is not up to the Coolidge 
standard. The wiping out of from seven 
to ten billions of value, even paper value, 
cannot be accomplished without a profound 
effect on business conditions. The money 
is gone and the plans made in reliance on 
it are being cancelled. 

However, the economists tell us that 
while many ambitious projects for expan- 
sion have gone by the boards, fundamental 
conditions are sound, and people will go 
about their business in the same old way. 
Theatre owners will have to combat any 
' falling off in patronage by redoubling their 
efiforts to get patrons into their houses. 
Each should study his situation thoroughly, 
enhance his goodwill in every way possible, 
become a good neighbor with all that im- 
plies, and organize! 

Remember, you are selling the most valu- 
able commodity in the world — recreation. 
It is not a luxury, but a necessity, and 
you should adopt every means for bringing 
this home to your patrons. 

Insurance. 

The man engaged in a hazardous occupa- 
tion wants accident insurance if he can get 
it; the man whose property is exposed to 
the fire hazard is most likely to buy fire 
insurance; insurance agents would have no 
trouble _ selling to men over 80, if their 
companies would permit it. 

The man who must buy from thoroughly 
organized sellers, and must employ thor- 
oughly organized workers, is most in need 
of organization. 

The theatre owners of the country sim- 
ply cannot survive unless they perfect 
strong local and national organizations for 
the protection of their property and defense 
of their rights. This is an old theme, but 
it must be impressed on your members 
more and more. 

A strong national association, adequately 
financed, could demand as a matter of right 
and obtain the measures which the exhibi- 
tors otherwise can only hope for. 

"Can't Depend on George" 

_ In supporting Allied there is a disposi- 
tion in some quarters to "let George do 
it." This is unfair, because we can't al- 
ways depend on George. We are now in 
a desperate struggk for the things which 
the exhibitors must have, and there must 
be no letdown in our efforts now. So do 
your part, and leave George to us! 

Remember, also, that there will continue 
to be a national organization no matter 
what comes out of the pending conference, 
and what you remit now will be duly cred- 
ited. A few organizations are holding back, 
or cutting down their remittances because 
thev think something may happen which 
will relieve them of the necessity of mak- 
ing their full contribution. This policy will 
wreck us, and our whole program, in short 
order. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



17 



Spotlight Thrown on Small House 
With Better Sound Reproduction 

Recommendations Are Received 
Daily from Newspaper Editors 



Alicoate Lauds 
Campaign 

An editorial by ]ac\ Axlcoate in "The 
Film Daily," entitled "Sound Sense": 

"Exhibitors HeralD'World is to be 
congratulated for the aggressive campaign 
in the interest of better sound reproduc 
tion in the theatres of the country. No 
greater problem confronts the theatre man- 
ager of today. Adequate standardization 
for the presenting of sound and dialogue 
productions is becoming increasingly im- 
portant. We know of no quicker way to 
drive your patrons to other theatres or 
form of amusement than to fail to keep 
your sound equipment functioning prop- 
erly or to watch each day for continual 
and progressive sound innovations in re- 
production. We repeat a thought of sev- 
eral weeks back. No picture is better than 
the sound equipment over which it is 
shown." 



Recommendations 
for Awards 

There follows a partial list of theatres which 
have received the Herald'World Plaque, or 
which have been recommended by newspaper 
editors and critics and will receive the Plaque 
shortly : 



WARNER 


CAMEO 


T^ew Yor\ 


Cleveland 


CRITERION 


MAINSTREET 


J<iew Tor\ 


Kansas City 


CHICAGO 


NEWMAN 


Chicago 


Kansas City 


PARAMOUNT 


LYRIC 


Los Angeles 


Redfield, S. D. 


COLONIAL 


RIALTO 


A\ron 


Birmingham, Ala. 


PALACE 


PALACE 


Akjon 


Gallatin, Tenn. 


ORPHEUJM 


MARYLAND 


A?^ron 


Hagerstown, Md. 


BLEECKDR HALL 


ARCADIA 


Alban^i 


Wellsboro. Pa. 


CENTURY 


RIALTO 


Bufalo 


Kingsville, Texas 


LAFAYETTE 


ORPHEUM 


Bufalo 


Denver 


CAROLINA 


SANTA FE 


Charlotte 


Denver 


ROXY 


UNITED ARTISTS 




Portland, Ore. 


PROCTOR'S 58TH 


ORIENTAL 


STREET 


Portland, Ore. 


N.ew Yor\ 


STILLMAN 


CHINESE 


Cleveland 


Hollywood 


MIDLAND 


WARNER'S DOWN- 


Kansas City 


TOWN 


PLAZA 


Los Angeles 


Kansas City 


LOEW'S 


STATE 


AJ^ron 


Lima, Ohio 


STRAND 


EL PORTAL 


AJ^ron 


Las Vegas, Tsf. M. 


LELAND 


COLONY 


Albany 


Portsmouth, Va. 


GEORGIA 


MISSOURI 


Atlanta 


St. Joseph, Mo. 


GREAT LAKES 


ORPHEUM 


Bufalo 


Harrisburg, III. 


BROADWAY 


ALLADIN 


Charlotte 


Denver 


HIPPODROME 


FEDERAL 


Cleveland 


Denver 



Herald-World Award of Merit Also Open to Theatres in 
the Dominion of Canada — Winners Listed 

By JAY M. SHRECK 

The theatre in the small community and in the neighborhood house has won 
its place in the spotlight through better sound reproduction. 

Recommendations from newspaper editors and critics for presentation of the 
Herald-World's Award of Merit to theatres included in the foregoing classifica- 
tion are received daily from all sections of the United States and from Canada. 

At this time it is opportune to again call attention to the fact that presentation 
of the Plaque, symbolic of the Award of Merit is not confined to any class of 
theatre or to any locality. Large or small, a theatre, through the local editor or 
critic, must submit the required proof of better sound reproducion. 

Recent recommendations include: 

COLONY THEATRE, Portsmouth, Va. 

A 

MARYLAND THEATRE, Hagerstown, Md. 

A 

MISSOURI THEATRE, St. Joseph, Mo. 
ARCADIA THEATRE, Wellsboro, Pa. 
ORPHEUM THEATRE, Harrisburg, 111. 
FEDERAL THEATRE (Suburban), Denver, Colo. 

A 

SANTA FE THEATRE (Suburban), Denver, Colo. 

* . . i 

RIALTO THEATRE, Kingsville, Texas. 

STUART THEATRE, Lincoln, Neb. 

A 

CAPITOL THEATRE, Grand Island, Neb. 
RIVOLI THEATRE, Hastings, Neb. 

A 

GRANADA THEATRE, Norfolk, Neb. 

The foregoing is evidence of the interest of the small community editor and 
critic in his local theatre, and in the type of entertainment aflforded the citizens 
of that community. 

Letters from exhibitors who have received the Plaques are glowing illufltra- 
tions of the painstaking effort which has made possible the standard of sound 
reproduction which won for them the Award of Merit. 

Constant servicing, eflScient projectionists, acoustical treatment requiring 
weeks and even months before the proper effect was obtainable, rehearsals and 
the regular service of a monitor are but a few of the factors which are responsible 
for better sound reproduction in these theatres. 

It is interesting to note that recommendations for presentation of the Plaque 
to theatres in the small towns have come from motion picture critics on the staffs 
of metropolitan dailies. That fact is a tribute to sound reproduction in the 
smaller communities. 



18 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



e8« 



C/4N0THER DISTINGUISHEOHONOR 



,e8< 



EXECVTWE WILL 
PRESENT AWARD 

, At Wednesday evening's galo per- 
formance of "Condemned" Mayor ) 
John H. Porter will present to J. 
J. Franklin, division manag-er of Fox 
West Coast Tlieaters, from the 
stage of Grauman's Chinese The- 
ater, the Exhibitors' Hefrald-World 
H ward, of merit in the form of a 
bronze plaque. 

i' George L. Eastman will introduce 
the mayor Ipeforo the audlenc 
wlucli will include • officials of t 
Chamber of Commerce, the Ac.' 

leniy of llotion Picture A_r 
Sciences, members of 
Board of Review 



/ 



. AiViiiJia.ijficjiiii;! 



I La^ nig]ic GiauiransCliincse 
was sknaltyhonoTcdtyttis 
Award of Merit" offered by 

I g:&fcExhibitotSHen]d-W3tId 

j and prexnted by 
Honorable JbhnH. Portct 
for the beA-jwndn/mdiution. 
of any/Aomtii)CarLfotni!t. 

THis is further material 
evidence that Qmnmi 
\ QilnescTficitfc isthe 
premiere snawimie^ \ 
of We^ernAtnetica 
offerln»-the greateSb 
plctures-fin«t service 
" the ticmostri'n 
enter winmentr 
value./ 



■ I A 



or 



C5, 



'at 



'li. 



eat, 



"'•en 



'in-,, a 



"in 



'erti 
9/1 



'n 



?'-a^ 



CRITICS GIVE 
FILM MEDAL 

; Sherwood and Schallert 
To Confer Honor on 
Chinese Theater 



Sciences, members "f ty^jgpl^^^ /"A J7^^ a 1r5->-''" s.c^'^" 1 

Board of Review 'Y'KJ <?C ^ , '9'' . 10 1 

1 ^ c^^^^^^^^ 



A committee of . ciistinguislied 
newspapermen, headed by Robert E. 
Sherwood, and acting upon the basis 
of recommendations by Edwin 
Schallert, drama /editor of the Los 
iiigeles Times, has conferred a si'g- 
)nor upon Grauman's Chinese 



edltJ 
occas^ 
Thi' 

was 
Herald- 
reproduc 
South ernl 



M?^Au ^^^^^^ 

W <7^4/i I . A • iJ'H^J Jof America fc 
r ^ .^/? y , ^-QyJferald- world 

^"ist, ^^Jf ^#sound veprod 

''?/>„ :^''Z*Co^7*e/.< -^G^^*^ # Chinese thea 



4,>*6 ..So/" 



\**^ cico'tK.Met ..we*-. r,,!i ov^ - 



«o 



CIUNESE SOUND 
EARNS MED A 



leoided to present the 
was offered 
by the Ex- 
for excel - 

.eproduction! to 

„ Chinese theater, where 
led," starring Ronald Col- 
ni Ann Harding, is the cur- 
traction. 
, Sheehan Receives 
has been deemed proper to 
■^. the presentation in the fore- 
_jrt of Grauman's Chinese. High 
fecutives representing the industry, 
iUff of the theater 
[e Pox West Coast 
the general pub- 
when the bronze 
fesents the award, 
nted to Howard 
ident of Fox West 



Grauman's Chinese 
Gains "Award of 

Merit" Plaque 



'/jrt^'^-V''' Oflp'''^^'!?!^^ Of '''ajjrf °§ conferred a signal honor 

I rjr-a iimnn'« OhinpRp. Theater. 



Oe 



Orauman's Chinese Theatre has 
„een signally honored with the "■e*^;;;^V.^7x,-Cv« ^'sV ' 

Mentation liy Hon. John H. P"i'tei'. t otS^^gftX)^ '0''^e^ 
mrvo of Los Angeles, of the "Award |cp*s^ oi^^^4 ^°%^^^A\es^ 
of MerU" bronze plaque offered by ^^^:^^o^^^ 
The Exhibitors HeraU^Wol■ld. The le^gc^VO^^oV^^^^ ^\ 
theatre was awarded the PlBQue be■p^^&^^c^^^o^,^^l^^^^^^^^e^•^ 
cause of its high quahty o£ lepio- 

auction of sound film. This ~ - -,eC-"ot SV^e-;,^e' 
mark the Chinese as the finest «^ ^ev ^gc^-^a^ 
sound theatre in California. Many* ^^^^„^e.^^^^^.S 
notables o£ the screen and Los ^n- ft xj^ .e* ^,-,\,\c - 
'geles city officials attended the Pi^^-K St^'^^^a'^'i.^ 



sentation ceremonies. 



Headed by R.obert E. Slierwood, 
and Including: Edwin Schallert, 
drama editor of Los Angeles, a! 
committee of newspaper men hris 
conferred a signal honor upon 
Grauman's Chinese Theatei 

They have decided to present the 
award of merit offered to theaters 
of America by the Exhibitor's 
Herald-World for excellenco In 
sound reproduction to the Chinese 
Theater, where "Condemned," star- 
ring Ronald Colman, with Ann 
Harding, Is current. 

Befitting the dignity ot the 
award and in a serious effort to 
bring to. thcj attention of the in- 
dustry and the pulSic the impor 
tanee of sound projection, the pres 
ontation will be mad&-a public one 
in /the forecourt of the theater with 
executives representinif th9 indus- 
try, the press, thp staff of the 
house and officials of West Coast 
Theaters, as well . as the public 



^^Sk lL'i\iL'rtlTS?" i' trntTi 



Prominent in this layout is a reproduction of the advertisement carried by the Chinese theatre, Hollywood, in eight Los Angeles and 
Hollywood newspapers announcing presentation of the Herald-World Plaque to the theatre. Surrounding the ad are clippings from local 

newspapers indiacting the prominence given to this civic and industry event. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



19 



Exhibitors Agree and Disagree 
On New Contract Fundamentals 



Distributors See 
Agreement on 
Contract 



(Special to the Herald-World) 

HEW YORK. Dec. 31.— The distrihti- 
tors are ta\ing an optimistic view of the fw 
ture of a new standard exhibition contract. 
"When the joint sessions of exhibitors, at- 
tended by distributor representatives, ad- 
journed in Hew Tor\ until after the holi- 
days, Felix F. Feist of Metro -Goldwyn- 
Mayer, sent the following notations to Sid- 
ney R. Kent, chairman: 

Although no other distributor represen- 
tative than yourself and myself have 
been present at all of the joint meetings, 
I take it that there will be no objection to 
a statement from me of my understanding 
of the matters upon which there has been 
a general unanimity of opinion. 

For such purpose and to aid this con- 
ference in making progress I submit the 
following: 

(a) That it is desirable, a fair, legal 
and effective standard exhibition contract 
.... shall be used in the industry. It 
seems to be the consensus of opinion that 
such a contract can be agreed upon. 

(b) That a fair, legal and effective 
formula for the arbitration of commercial 
disputes is highly desirable and that such 
a formula can be agreed to. 

(c) That the problems created by 
"protection" can be solved by a fair, legal 
and ejfective zoning or clearance plan. . . . 

Having acted as a member of the con- 
tract committee appointed at the trade 
practice conference, and which agreed 
upon the current standard exhibition con- 
tract and the rules of arbitration it occurs 
to me that the questions concerning which 
there has been expressed some difference 
of opinion are as follows: 

(1) The number of arbitrators who 
shall comprise each arbitration board, 

(2) The manner in which they shall 
be chosen. 

These questions are not serious ob' 
stacles to an agreement upon the formula 
for arbitration if it is borne in mind that 
the men who act upon these Boards and 
the interested parties, in the various dis' 
tributing centers should themselves have 
something to say with reference to the 
number who shall comprise their board, as 
well as the manner in which they shall be 
chosen. 

It is my impression that much good has 
already resulted from the discussions in 
the joint meetings and I am strongly of 
the opinion that many constructive sug- 
gestions will follow. 



Opinion General, However, That 
Revised Agreement Is Necessary 

Conferences Between Theatre Organizations and Dis- 
tributors Will Be Continued Sometime in January 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.- — Exhibitors, classified as to the two national organ- 
izations, agree and disagree (not an unnatural situation) on what should and 
should not be put in and left out of a standard exhibition contract, an agree- 
ment on arbitration, a definite understanding on zoning and protection and an 
arrangement for a single national exhibitor organization. 

Following the recent conferences in New York, called at the behest of Sidney R. Kent to 
consider exhibitor organization merger and revised contractual relations, all parties to the 
conferences issued statements setting forth their reactions and their opinions. Further discus- 
sions will be held probably in January, and likely in French Lick, or maybe Chicago. 

Summarized, the opinions of the different factions follow: 



MPTO A 



ALLIED 



National Organization 

M P T O A favors the creation of a single 
national organization, or the merging of the 
present organizations, upon such terms as shall 
be mutually agreeable to all concerned in the 
film industry. 

M P T O A believes that a plan can be 
worked out so that such an organization could 
be independently controlled, and satisfactory 
to independent and affiliated houses. 

Contract 

M P T O A finds the present contract obso- 
lete and 'believes that a new agreement, "in 
form brief and concise, and in subject matter 
clear in definition of the rights, obligations 
and duties of the parties" to the contract 
should be drafted. 

M P T O A believes that there should be a 
more definite availability clause; elimination 
of all score charges ; privilege of cancellation 
of 10 per cent of the product without the 
payment of 50 per cent of the film rentals; a 
more definite commitment on the part of the 
distributor for the delivery of good prints, 
realizing that the advent of sound makes this 
imperative; charges for shipment of records 
to an exhibitor should be computed as based 
upon distance from film center serving the 
film, and excess charge over this amount 
should be borne by distributor ; and as a work 
sheet is used by the distributor to promote 
a sale, it should be a part of the contract. 

Theatre Expansion 

M P T O A is of the opinion that there is 
no feasible way in which theatre expansion 
can be controlled, holding that it would work 
against those bound to such an agreement. 

Arbitration 

M P T O A, although holding that the 
present form of arbitration has been effective, 
agrees that arbitration must be by mutual con- 
sent. Therefore, it suggests that at the time of 
the taking of the contract a separate agree- 
ment be entered into calling for arbitration of 
the disputed terms of the contract, and that 
the rules be an integral part of the arbitration 
agreement. 



National Organization 

Allied sees no objection to a single inde- 
pendent national exhibitor organization, but 
its executives believe that such an organiza- 
tion, to be successful, "must be patterned after 
our (Allied) plan." 

Allied believes that two affiliated exhibitors 
should sit with the executive committee of 
any single national organization created, but 
without any voting power. 

Contract 

Allied finds the present contract too verbose 
and so involved "that very few laymen under- 
stand its provisions or are conversant with 
their rights and obligations thereunder," and 
favors a new contract for the benefit of all. 

Allied believes a more adequate description 
of product should be given; that the exhibitor 
should have the right to exclude 10 per cent 
of the pictures without payment; that pic- 
tures not made by the distributor should be 
so designated ; that the acceptance of the pic- 
ture contract should be contingent upon the 
acceptance of the record or score contract; 
that the score charge should be eliminated on 
percentage booking; that there should be a 
warranty as to the fitness of film, records or 
score ; that exhibitors should be permitted to 
play pictures in the order of their release to 
first runs or affiliated theatres; that play dates 
should not be refused on percentage pictures 
during weeks of poor business. 

Theatre Expansion 

Allied believes overseating is a menace to 
the stability of the industry, and good would 
result if a careful and impartial survey were 
to precede every project. 

Arbitration 

Allied, in its suggestions for "voluntary" 
arbitration, proposes that the boards be auth- 
orized, "in the exercise of a sound discretion, 
to receive and consider all evidence, docu- 
mentary and oral, bearing on the essential 
merits of each controversy, to the end that 
the awards may work even and exact justice, 
or the nearest approach thereto that is pos- 
sible with these human agencies." 



On the follcnving pages are presented the statements of the exhibitor organ- 
izations from which the foregoing summary has been taken. 



20 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



Preliminaries to New Standard Contract 

Standard exhibition to contract, arbitration, zoning or protection and possibly exhibitor organization merger are consid- 
ered the outstanding subject for discussion when the joint conferences get underway again in January. 

The opinions on some of these subjects, summarized on the preceding page, are presented herewith in more detail: 



Allied Wants — 

ARBITRATION 

In order that the system may be entirely voluntary 

(a) specific agreement to arbitrate should be in- 
cluded in each contract, to be signed individu- 
ally in each case ; or. 

(b) blanket agreement to arbitrate should be signed 
and filed with Exhibitor Organization and Film 
Board. 

PERSONNEL OF BOARD: For the distributors, 
any member of the F. B. T. to be eligible. For the 
exhibitors, a group of 10 exhibitors or theatre man- 
agers (not dii-ectly or indirectly connected with dis- 
tributors) to be named by the local exhibitor organ- 
ization as eligible. 

ORGANIZATION OP BOARD : The board shall be 
constituted as follows : 

(a) In case the exhibitor shall so elect, the board 
shall consist of three members — one selected by 
the exhibitor from the 10 eligible, one by the 
distributors from F. B. T. members, the third to 
be selected by the two from a group of at least 
five arbitrators from outside the industry nomi- 
nated by the American Arbitration Society and 
approved by the exhibitor organization and 
F. B. T. 

(b) In case the exhibitor shall not so elect, the 
board shall consist of "three and three" as in 
the past, with a seventh to be chosen from 
among the five outside arbitrators nominated as 
above, in case of a tie. 

POWERS AND DUTIES: A principal defect in 
arbitration, in addition to the methods by which it 
was imposed and enforced, was the rule limiting the 
boards to the enforcement of the strict letter of 
the standard exhibition contract. Serious injustice 
has been done in countless cases due to the inability 
of the board to take into consideration the repre- 
sentations, warranties and promises made as induce- 
ment for signing the contract, as well as conditions 
arising subsequent to the contract. We propose that 
the boards to be authorized, in the exercise of a sound 
discretion, to receive and consider all evidence, docu- 
mentary and oral, bearing on the essential merits of 
each controversy, to the end that the awards may 
work even and exact justice, or the nearest approach 
thereto that is possible with these human agencies. 
In arbitration we think the governing principle 
should be the intention of the parties to be ascer- 
tained from the contract, given a common sense in- 
terpretation in the light of the situation of the 
parties when the contract was made, and from the 
construction which they gave to it by their subse- 
quent words and deeds. In other words, in meritori- 
ous cases, the arbitrators should look beyond the 
written words of the contract and try and place 
themselves in the shoes of the parties to the contract 
in order to determine how they regarded their agree- 
ment. However, their power shall not extend to the 
fixing or changing of prices on existing contracts. 

ENFORCEMENT OF AWARD : It is believed that, 
once the reforms herein suggested are accomplished, 
opposition to the adoption of the uniform arbitration 
law by the states will abate. 

EXPENSE: Ebchibitor arbitrators to receive 
traveling expenses plus $.5 per diem. "Outside" 
arbitrators to be paid fee usually required in such 

cases. A filing fee of per cent of the claim 

shall be paid by party filing the claim. 

CONTRACT 

This instrument must be written in a language 
that will leave no doubt as to the meaning of its 
provisions. Moreover, the contract is too lengthy to 
be of practical service and very few exhibitors take 
the trouble to read all of its provisions, relying 
I)erhaps on the assurance that it is a uniform stand- 
ard contract that cannot be changed. Since this is 
so, it appears to be an economic waste to print 
every single clause on every one of the many eon- 
tracts that the exhibitor is called upon to sign. The 
suggestion is, therefore, made that the uniform con- 
tract when mutually agreed upon shall be the Master 
Contract on file at every exchange and organization 
centers, and that a simple contract be drawn for the 
exhibitor to sign at the completion of negotiations, 
this contract to contain only those provisions that are 
peculiar to the transaction and to incorporate by 
reference the general provisions of the standard ex- 
hibition contract. This would simplify each transac- 
tion and the exhibitor would be called upon to read 
only those terms that peitain peculiarly to the single 
transaction. We submit that once a uniform con- 
tract is agreed upon, couched in terms of understand- 
able English, the exhibitor would actually have placed 
in front of him an order blank containing a schedule 
of the pictures he was buying, the price thereof, run 
and protection. This order blank should also contain 
space for any special arrangement. 

It is not enough, however, that the contract be 
simplified by reducing its size and clarifying its 
meaning. It must be made equitable for both parties 
to the contract, in order that there be a feeling of 
confidence between the buyer and the seller, and the 
following suggestions are made with that in view : 

DESCRIPTION OF PRODUCT: The exhibitor is 
called upon to sign a contract for pictures that have 
not been made or have been made but concerning 
the quality of which he knows nothing, while the 
distributor in many instances knows of its inferior 



Hold Restriction of 
Expansion Illegal 



(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— The prospect for the 
solution of the protection problem is bright, but 
regulation or restriction of theatre expansion not 
only is impractical but illegal in the opinion of the 
afEliated theatres, commenting upon the recent joint 
conferences in New York. Briefly, the affiliated 
theatres hold these opinions: 

A — Protection: We believe that the discussion of 
the past few days have cleared the way for a 
general solution of problems growing out of this 
subject. That a fair and intelligent zoning of 
the various distributing centers and key cities 
throughout the country will solve most of the 
questions. That upon the failure of the various 
elements in these zones to solve this problem for 
themselves a properly constituted committee of 
all interested parties can be set up in New York 
to which the matter can be referred for solution, 
appeal or review. 

B — Regulation or restriction of theatre building or 
expansion is impractical for the following reasons: 

1 . We are advised that any attempt on the part 
of the various committees here assembled or anybody 
else to lay down rules and regulations for the re- 
striction of the building or acquisition of theatres 
would be in restraint of trade and is a subject mat- 
ter concerning which the various groups cannot 
legally take action. 

2. Many of the present exhibitors and certainly, 
many more of the potential exhibitors do not 
belong to any organization and would not be affected 
by the proposals. 

3. Expansion programs are rarely advertised in 
advance of execution and are frequently impossible 
to cancel when once a start is made. The whole 
country and each situation in it cannot be canvassed 
and charted. 

4. To restrict building in any locality would 
confine the industry and block development. In- 
vention and innovation are essential to growth. 
Vision and progress and the right of the public to 
enjoy the benefits thereof cannot be arbitrated. 

We reiterate our statements heretofore expressed 
that coercive or oppressive methods of theatre ac- 
quisition or expansion by anyone, whomsoever, 
should be and is condemned. 



quality and unfitness for exhibition. It would ap- 
pear that the exercise of ordinary business foresight 
would cause the producer to plan production far 
enough ahead to enable him to give a fairly ade- 
quate description of the pictures in the contract. 
Description by star alone, director alone, or author 
alone, would appear to be inadequate and there 
should be further means of identification. That this 
is recognized is seen by the efforts of the distributors 
to encourage the sale by more vivid description, 
usually in color, in the beautiful books shown to the 
exhibitors at the time of sale and by the use of 
work sheets. If these are used, it would appear to 
be only equitable that these books and work sheets 
be considered part of the contract for the purpose of 
determining whether there has been a substitution. 

EXCLUDING POOR PICTURES: The exhibitor 
has only so many play dates which he is desirous 
of. using for the exhibition of pictures that will find 
favor with the public. For their protection he should 
not be compelled to run pictures of poor quality. 
. . . If the picture is worth while, the exhibitor's 
business judgment will prompt him to run it. If it 
is poor, he should not be expected to run it, and 
if there is an economic loss it is best for the indus- 
try that the industry assume the loss rather than 
that the public be made to view a poor picture. The 
exhibitor should, therefore, have the right to exclude 
at least 10 per cent of the pictures purchased without 
payment therefore. It is only fair that the exhibitor 
have the right to exclude poor pictures when the 
distributor reserves to himself and actually exercises 
the right to decide not to produce certain pictures 
that have already been sold, merely because he feels 
that it may be unprofitable for him to make those 
pictures. 

PICTURES NOT MADE BY THE SELLER: In 

the next place the exhibitor from his dealings with 
the distributors has learned from experience in whose 
product to have confidence. Occasionally, however, a 
distributor undertakes to distribute a picture not 
made by_ him and it is unfair to the exhibitor to 
expect him to take this picture without knowledge 
of the fact that it was not made by the distributor 
in whose ability to make good pictures he has confi- 
dence. It is, therefore, only equitable that pictures 
not made by the distributor shall clearly indicate 
the name of the producer and the place of production. 

PICTURES AND RECORDS: A problem that has 
faced many exhibitors is that of negotiating two dis- 
tinct contracts for the showing of a picture. Fre- 



quently he negotiates a contract for the picture it- 
self and then has to negotiate for the records or 
score that he must use in order to exhibit the picture. 
A picture without the accompanying synchronization 
is as useful to him as a dress suit without a pair of 
pants. It follows, therefore, that regardless of any 
legal technicalities, or whether negotiated at the same 
or different times, or from the same or a different 
corporation, provision should be made that the ac- 
ceptance of one contract shall be contingent upon the 
acceptance of the other. 

SCORE CHARGES: The advent of sound pictures 
has presented numerous problems. One of these is 
the question of the score charge. If negotiated for 
at the same time as the picture, the exhibitor can 
easily figure the combined costs and a meeting of 
minds on both can be arrived at. It would appear, 
however, that when a picture is not sold at any 
stated price but on a percentage basis so that the 
distributor for the time being becomes a partner of 
the exhibitor, that the score charge be eliminated. 
What part of the distributor's share of the receipts 
is to be set aside to cover the score charge is for 
him alone to determine. 

WARRANTY AS TO FITNESS: A problem that 
faces the exhibitor frequently after the contract has 
already been executed is the quality of the film and 
of the records or score delivered to him by the dis- 
tributor. As this is entirely within the control of 
the distributor, there should be a warranty as to the 
fitness for use of the film and records or score. 

PLAYING IN ORDER OF FIRST RUN: Perhaps 
one of the greatest causes of dissatisfaction among 
many exhibitors is the apparent discrimination by 
distributors in favor of theatre controlled by their 
affiliated companies. The ordinary exhibitor is fre- 
quently compelled to play pictures in the order of 
their release, while the affiliated theatre may select 
the box office hit for exhibition when the public is 
eager to see it and postpone the playing of prior 
releases to a more convenient time. It would appear 
only equitable that the new standard contract provide 
that whenever a picture is shown by any theatre in 
a film exchange zone, all other theatres in that zone 
shall have the right to show that picture in the 
same order of release. 

DAYS FOR PLAYING PERCENTAGE: Another 
justifiable ground for complaint is the practice of re- 
fusing to accept play dates on percentage pictures 
during certain weeks of the year. This works a 
great hardship, particularly in view of the great ex- 
tension of percentage selling, leaving very few pic- 
tures that can be run during these weeks, and, 
carried to a logical conclusion, would compel the 
exhibitor to close his theatre at certain times. Why 
isn't it fair to ask the distributor to share in a few 
weeks of poor business when he participates in a 
share of so many good weeks' business ? 

MAKING PICTURES AVAILABLE: One of the 
greatest ills is the over-buying on the part of the 
exhibitor for reasons beyond his control, due to the 
fact that pictures contracted for by him have not 
been made available to him for a showing, either be- 
cause the prior run has not already been sold, or 
because of the reluctance on the part of the dis- 
tributor to assign play dates to the first run account. 
When the exhibitor is so delayed in his play dates, 
the only recourse is to go into the market to purchase 
pictures, but he is confronted with the situation of 
being compelled to take perhaps an entire program 
in order to secure the few pictures that he needs 
while he is being delayed. The result is over-buying 
and later in the season he is confronted with assign- 
ment of play dates for a number of pictures far in 
excess of the play dates available to him. Surely 
the contract should be drawn so as to provide this 
exhibitor with a remedy. Either the distributor 
should be compelled to assign play dates to the first 
run and should not be permitted to sell a subsequent 
run until the prior run has already been sold, or else 
the exhibitor who is so delayed and is compelled to 
purchase other pictures should have the right to can- 
cel the pictures that he has been delayed in showing. 

CANCELLATION AFTER 90 DAY _ CLOSING: 
Occasionally it occurs that an exhibitor is compelled 
to close his theatre because of poor business and when 
he reopens his theatre he is confronted with the fact 
that he must play the pictures already under con- 
tract. . . . Invariably the reason for the closing is 
because of his inability to do profitable business with 
the poor quality of pictures delivered, and the chances 
of making the investment profitable when he reopens 
are reduced to a minimum when he is compelled to 
play these old pictures. It would appear only equit- 
able that a statute of limitations be provided for in 
the contract, providing that when a theatre is closed 
for a period of three months during the show sea- 
son all contracts for pictures in existence at the 
termination of this period shall be void. 

ZONING 

The plan, to be efficient, must in the first instance 
be the product of conferences between the interested 
parties in the particular locality in which the plan is 
to operate, and, therefore, its application is limited 
only to the vicinity affected. 

Such a zoning committee should consist of an 
agreed number of distributor representatives to work 
with a like number of exhibitor representatives ap- 
pointed by the respective organizations. The duties 
of a zoning committee shall be: 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



21 



1. To canvass the situation and to write such a 
tentative plan. 

2. Before adoption give notice either by hearing or 
by placing in the hand of each theatre affected 
a copy of such recommendations. 

3. To listen to and give consideration to objections 
or recommendations at hearing to be held before 
final adoption. 

4. To revise such a plan at stated or necessary 
intervals. 

The success of such a zoning plan is dependent, 
naturally, upon the positive adherence to it by all 
exchanges, and, therefore, inasmuch as they have the 
balance of power or decision the finding of such a 
committee must be made final for all exchanges who 
are members of and secure the benefits of the Film 
Board of Trade. 

A few broad gauged principles must be observed 
in the formation of such a plan, namely : 

1. The plan should specify the maximum protection 
for each theatre to start from the last day of 
exhibition of the previous run. 

2. If day and date protection is included, a pro- 
vision as to a limited time after availability 
within which the picture must be played. 

3. A rule that the foregoing of protection of one 
theatre in favor of another shall make such pic- 
tures available to all theatres in that zone at the 
start of the showing so favored. 

4. That each exhibitor be given a copy of the plan. 

5. That such protection as granted be over specific 



Hays Office Is Silent on 
Allied Statement 



(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— The Hays office 
here has no comment to make on the fol- 
lowing statement issued late last week by the 
Allied States Association: 

"We believe the Allied States Associa- 
tion is constituted in a way that will give 
fair representation to every unit that is 
desirous of affiliating with her, and that 
any national organization, to be successful, 
must be patterned after our plan. Allied 
States Association has a binding contract 
with its president and general council for 
a term of years, the obligation of which' 
must be discharged to the satisfaction of all 
parties thereto, whatever arrangement is 
made." 

theatre, rather than area, but that the plan be 
deemed to cover any new theatres erected in that 
zone or territory. 

6. That in case of the failure of such a committee 



to meet, continue, or agree, the same shall be 

referred to a national committee. 
7. That exchanges agree to use the terms of the 

plan in writing protection rather than or in 

addition to any zoning they may use for their 

individual product. 
For local committees, consideration should be given 
to the practical problem that while certain hou.ses in 
a zone may be so close to another zone as to make 
protection between the two necessary ; such protection 
known as overlapping need not apply to other thea- 
tres in the respective zones. 

NATIONAL APPEAL BOARD 

A national appeal board of six shall be selected as 
follows : Two representatives from the distributors, 
two from the affiliated theatres, and two from the 
National exhibitors organization. 

This body shall review and make final decision 
and/or recommendation in all controversies which 
may be brought to them on appeal from local zoning 
boards of theatre expansion boards. 

A vote of five out of the six shall be required for 
a final decision. 

In case of no decision by this board, the question 
at issue will be referred for final decision or recom- 
mendation, as the case may be, to an arbitration 
committee consisting of one representative appointed 
by the national exhibitors organization, one ap- 
pointed either by the distributors or the affiliated 
theatre group, and a third to be selected by the 
two from a group of five nominated by the Ameri- 
can Arbitration Society. 



M P T O A Wants— 

CONTRACT 

Due to the new development in our business, the 
form of contract in general use is now obsolete, and 
a joint contract committee should be requested to, at 
as early a date as convenient, draft a new agreement, 
in form brief and concise, and in subject matter 
clear in definition of the rights, obligations and 
duties of the parties with respect to all matters. 

We believe that there are numerous matters re- 
quiring consideration, and believe that these matters 
should be submitted to the committee for their action. 
We will contribute our efforts to that end at the 
proper time, but at this moment, we want to par- 
ticularly point out the following: 

a. A more definite availability clause. 

b. The elimination of all score charges. 

c. The privilege of cancellation of 10 per cent of the 
product without the payment of 50 per cent of 
the film rentals. 

d. A more definite commitment on the part of the 
distributor for the relivery of good prints, realiz- 
ing that the advent of sound makes this impera- 
tive. 

e. Charges for shipment of records to an exhibitor 
should be computed as based upon distance from 
film center serving the film, and excess charge 
over this amount should be borne by distributor. 

f. If a work sheet is used to promote the sale of 
a contract, it shall be signed and will, there- 
after be considered as a part of the contract. 

PROTECTION 

We believe that fair and leasonable protection in 
our business is necessary. However, it is our judg- 



Oysters — 

And More Oysters 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

TACOMA, Dec. 31.— It took 
America to discover oysters, but it 
takes Alfonso Balante, popular door- 
man at the Riveria theatre to prove 
their savory succulence. As just a 
small portion of his Christmas feed" 
and on a $10 bet at a down-town 
restaurant, Balante consumed a half 
gallon of oysters, some fried, some 
raw, in addition to a loaf of bread, 
a whole apple pie, six raw eggs, and 
two pitchers of water. 

As he swaggered away from the 
table, admiring friends declared he 
could eat a cow if the horns were 
knocked off. In the far northwest, 
men are men, and it takes a lot to 
fill 'em. 



ment. that the fair-minded in our industry — producer, 
distributor and theatre-owner alike — are cognizant 
of its abuse by some exhibitors. 

In numerous instances throughout the country, pro- 
tection privileges are demanded by exhibitors and 
granted by distributors that can find no justification 
and that are entirely without the bounds of fairness 
and right. 

We must vigorously condemn this practice, and 



Feist to Act . 
As Chairman 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— During the 
absence of Sidney R. Kent abroad, 
Felix F. Feist will act as chairman 
of the joint conferences which will 
be held to draft a new standard exhi- 
bition contract and new rules of 
arbitration. 



urge that committees, representing the various inter- 
ests involved, be created in the different film zones, 
to the attention of whom these matters may be 
directed, with a view of establishing by mutual 
agreement fair and equitable protection as to time, 
locality, distance and character of theatre. 

That a national committee of two distributors, two 
affiliated theatre owners and two independent theatre 
owners be appointed by the respective organizations 
before whom the findings of the zone committees may 
be reviewed at the instance of the aggrieved party. 
That this national committee be appointed as each 
case arises. 

ARBITRATION 

We are inclined to view, and we here declare that 
the method of arbitration now in force has been 
effective, and proven of inestimable value to the 
vast majority of those engaged in the various 
branches of our business. That it has not met with 
unanimous approval, we grant, and we believe that 
it would be for the best interests of all to incorpo- 
rate such changes as may clarify the operation of 
the board and be mutually acceptable to all branches 
of the industry. 

In view of recent developments, we are of the 
opinion that arbitration in any specific instance must 
be by mutual consent. We, therefore, suggest that 
at the time of the taking of the contract, a separate 
agreement be entered into calling for arbitration of 
the disputed terms of the contract. We suggest that 
the rules for the conduct of the arbitration court be 
an integral part of the arbitration agreement. 

For a set-up of the board that we feel should be 
acceptable to all, we recommend the following: 

For the hearing of any particular case, the Film 
Board of Trade president, or other designated officer, 
shall appoint four members of the organization, and 
the properly designated officer of the local exhibitor 
organization shall also appoint four members. These 



eight names shall be submitted to the interested 
parties at least seven days prior to the date sched- 
uled for the hearing. The parties at interest shall 
each have the right to reject any three of the names 
submitted, such rejection to be mailed to both the 
Film Board of Trade secretary and the secretary of 
the local theatre owners organization within 48 hours 
of the receipt of such list of names. 

In the event that six names have been rejected, 
the board shall consist of the two remaining names ; 
and in the event four have been rejected, four shall 
sit ; if two are rejected, then six shall sit. In no 
event, however, shall the board consist of more than 
three from each organization ; and in no event shall 
the board consist of more members from one side 
than the other, the additional names of one organ- 
ization over the other to be stricken off by the proper 
officer of the organization to which they belong. 

As an alternate plan for the set-up of the board, 
we suggest the appointment by the properly desig- 
nated officers of each organization (distributors and 
exhibitors) of two men each, with each side having 
the right to reject three names. In the event chal- 
lenges are made, additional names shall be submitted 
to take the place of those rejected, and the same 
rejectional right shall exist. If, however, additional 
challenges are made, the respective officers of the 
distributing and exhibitor organizations shall make 
additional appointments, and these shall hear the case. 

As to the other rules necessary for the conduct of 
the board, we are agreeable, but not in any way 
wedded to the existing rules, and will consider with 
an open mind any additions or deletions that may 
be advanced. 



Spinach — 
Versus Mistletoe 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

PORTLAND, Dec. 31.— Next 
Christmas if no mistletoe is handy, 
young men should beware of trying 
to use a substitute, says pretty Elise 
Fields, popular cashier at the Jeffer- 
son theatre. Supposedly large bunch 
of the well-known greenery was held 
over her head by one of the city's 
dashing Beau Brummels. The charm- 
ing young cashier glanced uv as the 
hasty kiss was being imprinted on 
her lips and much to her surprise saw 
only a bunch of spinach. 

"I'm not the type that can be mis- 
tletoed with spinach," she explained. 
The officer on the beat offered to 
make an arrest, but the girl only 
winked. Doubtless only an old 
"spinach custom." 



22 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



MOTION PICTURE FINANCE 



Fox a Source of Perplexity 

By LAURENCE STERN 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31. — The holiday influence may send patrons flocking 
to the theatres, but it carries Wall Street's interest in finance to low 
ebb. Trading in motion picture shares during the last week, as well 
as in the general market, is without significance, reflecting chiefly the narrow 
operations of professional speculators and the absence of public interest either 
in buying or selling. 



FOX FILM continues a source of special 
perplexity and will so continue until the 
financing plans being worked out by the Fox 
trustees are made known. Meanwhile the 
financial district almost daily is flooded with 
adverse rumors regarding the company and 
the issue remains a center of recurrent bearish 
attacks. 

* * * 

It is impossible to determine how much of 
the selling is for short account, how much is 
real liquidation and to what extent either is 
justified by the company's actual status. Fox 
held fractionally above its former low, rallied 
at the week-end, but closed with a net loss 
of points for the week. Other leaders 
merely marked time, Loew's, Paramount and 
Radio-Keith-Orpheum advancing a trifle and 
Warner Brothers sagging point. Activity 
in all was below normal. 



for the 12 weeks ended October 5, but this in- 
cludes $129,397 transferred from surplus to 
cover "excess cost of sales over normal costs." 



WB Is Not Backing 
Nathanson Chain, 
Says H. M. Warner 

( special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— H. M. Warner, 
president of Warner Brothers, issued an em- 
phatic denial to the report that his company is 
backing the project of N. Nathanson in the 
purchase of property in Montreal and other 
Canadian cities for the purpose of building a 
theatre chain. 



^ ^ 

It becomes increasingly apparent to Wall 
Street that the Fox difficulties do not im- 
portantly change the competitive set-up of the 
industry. Indeed, the financial interest of 
Western Electric in Fox is taken as indica- 
tion that the company will in future benefit 
from more or less permanent affiliation with 
American Telephone & Telegraph manage- 
ment. 

* * * 

The progress of Radio-Keith-Orpheum, 
affiliated with both General Electric and West- 
inghouse, is watched with keen interest. To 
Wall Street this division 0(f primary backing 
looms larger than current production and earn- 
ings of the various film companies. 

^ ^ ^ 

The chief external news item is Paramount's 
$2,000,000 purchase of 15 theatres of the Shen- 
andoah Valley Theatres Corporation, a sub- 
sidiary of Universal Pictures Corporation. 
Pathe Exchange reports net profit of $29,894 



Mrs. Seidwitz, Actress of 
Screen and Stage, Dead 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
BALTIMORE, Dec. 31.— Mrs. Seidwitz, 
former stage and screen actress and the 
daughter of the late Robert H. Bussey, at one 
time state's attorney for Baltimore county, 
died in Baltimore after an illness of several 
days. 

See Nathanson Chain Delay 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
MONTREAL, Dec. 31.— Rumors in fi- 
nancial circles today were that the N. L. 
Nathanson chain may be delayed because 
of the Fox situation, particularly if the 
superior court here awards possession of 
the disputed downtown theatre site to 
Famous, when injunction proceedings are 
heard January 17. 



Capacity Audience 
At Opening of Fox's 
New Atlanta Theatre 

(Special to the^ Herald-World) 

ATLANTA, GA., Dec. 31.— With a capacity 
audience marvelling at the size and splendor 
of the interior and enthusiastically applauding 
everv feature of the initial program, Fox's 
new $3,000,000 theatre here got away to a fly- 
ing start this week with the formal opening 
Christmas Day. The house seats approxi- 
mately 5,000 and the place was packed when 
the show started promptly on the scheduled 
time — 1 :15 o'clock in the afternoon. 

The show went off with a snap and bang, 
carrying the audience along on the crest of 
enthusiasm. The thousands who attended the 
opening performance were there expecting 
something well worth while in the entertain- 
ment line, and they were not disappointed. 
Comedy, music, splendor and beauty were 
combined in the stage and screen presenta- 
tions and the whole show was offered in such 
an enthusiastic, neighborly sort of way that it 
made everybody feel they were glad they at- 
tended. 

Sono Art-World Wide 
Films to Be Sold in 
NY by First Division 

(Special to thel Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— A deal whereby the 
distribution of Sono Art- World Wide pictures 
will be handled by First Division in greater 
New York and Northern New Jersey has 
been closed by E. W. Hammons, George W. 
Weeks and Harry H. Thomas. The new move 
took effect December 30. 

Harry H. Thomas, president of First Divi- 
sion, becomes an important figure with the 
national organization through the transaction. 
First Division will retain its name and identity 
but will be the New York exchange of Sono 
Art- World Wide. 

The First Division at 630 Ninth Avenue 
will take over the entire product previously 
handled by Sono Art-World Wide. The present 
First Division sales organization will be en- 
larged. The first picture to be released under 
the new arrangement will be Eddie Dowling's 
"Blaze o' Glory." 



W B Signs Vina Delmar 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Vina Delmar, short 
story writer, has been signed by Warner 
Brothers to write original material for Vita- 
phcne pictures. She will leave New York im- 
mediately for the coast. 



SECURITIES PRICE RANGE 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Sales High 

American Seating 2,500 19 

Brunswick-Ballce-Ck)Hender 10,700 22 

Consolidated Film, pfd 3,100 16% 

Eastman Kodak 9,100 182 J4 

Do. pfd 10 126 

Fox Film "A" '. 305 300 27% 

Loew's, Inc 23,100 46% 

Do. pfd, n.w 200 86 

Do. pfd, w.w 500 85% 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer pfd 400 23% 

Paramount 39,100 50% 

Pathe Exchange 13.400 3% 

Do. "A" 6,700 6 

Radio C!orporation 586,000 43% 

Do. pfd. "A" 400 54 

Do. pfd. "B" 2,200 73% 

Radio-Keith-Orpheum 49,600 19 



Week Ending December 28 

Sales 

Low Close Shubert Theatres 3,700 

,„ iq Stanley Company 170 

,n Universal Pic 1st pfd 240 

, Warner Brothers "A" 102,500 

14% 1654 Do. pfd 900 

19^'^ VoR CHICAGO STOCK MARKET 

Marks Brothers cvt p 550 

2?7* .,1/ Morgan Litho 3,400 

41% 43%, 

86 86 NEW YORK CURB 

85% 85% Con. Theat 200 

23% 23% Film Insp. Meh 700 

45% 49 Fox Theatres "A" 26,900 

2% 2% General Theatre Equipment 2,200 

4% 5% Loew's rts 400 

35% 40% Do. war 200 

54 54 National Screen 300 

72% 73 Sentry Safety 4 400 

16% 18 Trans-Lux 1,900 



High 


L.OW 


11 


9% 


32 


26 


34 


28 


42 


37% 


38 


35 


12 


8% 


9% 


8 


3 


3 


1^1 


1% 


6% 


5% 


28% 


27 


12% 


12% 


2 


2 


16% 


15% 




6 


478 


4 



Close 
10% 
32 
28 

39% 
36 

12 
8% 

3 

W4. 

5% 
27% 
12% 

2 

15% 
6 

4% 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



23 ! 



Film News 
in Pictures 



PICTORIAL SECTION 



Stories Told 
by the Camera 






Comedienne plus — plus what being well displayed above, in this 
new portrait of Lucille Hutton, who adds comeUness to comedy as 
a feminine lead in Jack White's talking productions for Educational. 



In style. Gone arc the days when orchards were featured in 
women's millinery. Here is Alice White, First National's modern 
young star, exhibiting a hat expressive of this new age. 





Joining the Westward migration. Another episode in the Gold 
Rush of 1929 which is taking Broadway leaders to Hollywood. On 
this occasion (represented above) George M. Cohan signs a con- 
tract in New York with United Artists following negotiations con- 
ducted by Al Lichtman, \ice president and general manager, shown 
with Cohan. The original Yankee Doodle boy will produce an 
audien starring Ai Jolson. 



Leaders in the radio and sound field. Louis Gerard Pacent, head 
of the Pacent Reproducer Corporation, and Dr. Lee De Forest, in- 
ventor of Phonofilm and a pioneer in radio research, shown fol- 
lowing their recent nomination for important oiBces. Pacent was 
named for the presidency of the Radio Club of America, while De 
Forest was made a candidate for the presidency of the Institute of 
Radio Engineers. They have been friends for 23 years. 



J 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 




The reformed clothes for men, displayed (rather 
bashfully) by Messrs. Hardy and Laurel. Those 
who have not realized what a vast field for reform 
there really is in male attire, are asked to study 
these Roach-M G M stars. 



Puzzle: Find the guy you'd rather be. 
He suspended somewhere over Califor- 
nia is Monty Collins. The nonchalant 
fellow looking our way is Steve Roberts, 
Educational director who got Monty in 
this fix to make people laugh at "Ro- 
mance De Luxe," Mermaid comedy. 





Rowland V. Lee, Paramount director, 
who has started production on a new 
picture starring George Bancroft, en- 
titled, "Ladies Love Brutes," which 
sounds interesting, true or not. 



Indicating why actor-folk like the films. No laughing it off — that California climate has its ef- 
fect. For even troupers aren't interested only in money and applause. If Grant Withers were 
merely a stage player, could he have this sweet little cottage (?) to live in the year ^ound? The 
Warned Brothers featured player recently built it in Hollywood, and therein he resides with his 
mother. And that's Grant himself in the front yard. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



25 






Poised in a step from a modern eccentric dance — 
and how much it is like the old fashioned dance 
we danced long ago on the Bowery. But Marion 
Byron (Warner Brothers player so fetching above) 
wouldn't know about that. 





"Regusting" to make a poor working girl 
wait for a kiss being enjoyed by two other 
people! But there's more than that to 
this scene from First National's "No, No, 
Nanette." In this episode are Zasu Pitts, 
Alexander Gray aiid Bemice Claire. 




A panoramic view of some polite whoopee. Picture a scene like this on wide film and shown on 
the super-screens which are to come and you will get an idea of the new thrills in store for the 
motion picture public. This scene (recorded on the present standard film, however) is from First 
National's latest vehicle for Richard Barthelmess, "Son of the Gods." The star and Constance 

Betmett are in the foreground. 



Really a star, though without a heaven 
of her own. Again, in Universal's 
"The Night Ride," Barbara Kent is 
featured opposite the starred player, 
this time Joseph Schildkraut. 



26 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



90 Million Feet of Color Photography 
Set as Color or aft Yearly Output 

New Process of Dr. William Hoyt Peck Is Mechanical Throughout — 
Building Factory in Brooklyn — Two Others Approved 
By DOUGLAS FOX 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31. — The tremendous success enjoyed by certain cur- 
rent feature pictures, attributed largely to the fact that they are 
entirely in color, has brought about a tremendous demand for hard, 
fast color photography — a demand which the organizations engaged in that 
kind of work are not able to fulfill. Already we have a number of companies 
specializing in color work. There are Technicolor, Multicolor, Harriscolor 
and Photocolor. The latest addition to the list and, paradoxically, one of the 
oldest, is Colorcraft. 



FIFTEEN to twenty years ago Dr. William 
Hoyt Peck anounced that were you placed 
in a yellow-green room the chances were that 
you wouldn't tell white lies about not going 
to Aunt Clara's tea — that you'd up and speak 
the brutal truth about it. Also that eating in a 
blue dining room would give you indigestion, 
that a red one would guarantee you freedom 
from dyspepsia; that if your sitting room were 
red you'd" fight with your better half, but that 
if there were a soft red glow when your 
sweetie came around everything would be 
hotsy-totsy. Which, time has come to prove, 
was a pretty accurate, if partial, analysis of 
the effects of colors on the human system. 

90,000,000 Feet a Year Planned 

At the time he made these statements Dr. 
Peck was experimenting with color photog- 
raphy. His experiments continued for many 
years. They have become the basis of the 
Colorcraft Corporation, which, beginning in 
March, will turn out color photography at the 
rate of 90,000,000 feet a year. 

The process, and it's a new one, is entirely 
mechanical from start to finish. Technically 
speaking, what will happen to the film after it 
has been exposed through a split prism lens 
and a static color filter, is briefly this : It will 
travel through a chemical salt bath that trans- 
forms the silver salt of the film filament into 
a mordant that picks up the dye (two colors 
composed of five) in direct quantitative pro- 
portion to the black and white intensity of the 
ordinary positive, and will be fixed in a lake 
and then will go through a special hardening 
process without which all of the foregoing 
would be useless. 

Erecting Factory in Brooklyn 

The Colorcraft Corporation is erecting a 
factory in Brooklyn which, for fire safety, at 
any rate, has noi peer today. Automatic sprin- 
klers are installed at intervals of six feet 
throughout the building. Every room in the 
plant, which is within two blocks of Para- 
mount's Astoria studio, has a separate vent so 
that, in case of fire, the conflagration will be 
confined to that one room. There are even 
vents in the cellar leading up to the roof. 

For taking pictures in Colorcraft which, it 
is claimed, is equal if not superior to anything 
now on the market, it will be necessary to use 
a double-coated stock made by Eastman and 



put it through a special toughening process 
which gives it four times the life of ordinary 
black and white film. A special negative is 
made by Dupont. Dr. Peck himself designed 
the camera lens, which is double corrected for 
purposes of extra sharp definition without the 
possibility of any color fringe. 

As I understand it, two negatives are used, 
one for each side of the spectrum. In photog- 
raphy they build up densities which, after 
various treatments, represent color later on. 
The film is developed in an automatic machine, 
is even dried on moving automatic containers 
with sprinkler heads and heating coils inside 
them; then it is dyed in a number of solutions 
and goes through a couple of other processes 
and, eventually, emerges complete without 
having been touched by a human hand. 

Twelve Units Side by Side 

Twelve of these units which develop and 
dye will stand side by side in the Long Island 
plant. Each one will have a capacity of 23 feet 
a minute which, at 24 hours a day, 300 days in 
the year, works out roughly at something 
more than 90,000,000 feet. 

As soon as the building is completed another 
one will be built in Hollywood and plans for 
the erection of a third in England already 
have been approved. 

A feature of Colorcraft, according to Dr. 
Peck, is that it is just as quick as, if not 
quicker than black and white photography; 
that, using this method, it would be just as 
easy to have newsreels, for instance, in color 
as in black and white. 

Invented 4-Kilowatt Nitrogen Lamp 

An interesting sidelight on Dr. Peck (he was 
once an electrical engineer) is that, in experi- 
menting for a lamp with which to photograph 
color indoors, he invented the light which is 
now used almost exclusively in the production 
of talking pictures. This was back in 1921. 

In December, 1921, Dr. Peck also had a talk- 
ing picture equipment of his own invention. 

Cameras for the Colorcraft Corporation, by 
the way, are being manufactured by Messrs. 
Bell & Howell after specifications by Dr. Peck. 

The corporation received its charter last 
July and is being financed by H. H. Montis 
and Company. Officers have not yet been 
elected. The London representative is Col. 
A. L. Hamilton, who has offices in the Wool 
Exchange. 



Mechanism Devised to 

Project Films Without 

Intermittent Shutter 

British Use Series of Moving Lenses 
to Keep Film in Continuous 
Motion 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

LONDON, Dec. 20.— A non-intermittent 
projector which incorporates in its design 
a number of features which, if successful, 
might have a revolutionary effect on pres- 
ent methods, has been demonstrated at the 
workshop of W. E. John in Kingston-on- 
Thames, near London. The inventors are 
John and Messrs. Roberts and Campbell. 
Sir Abe Bailey, South African capitalist, 
backed the experimental work, and it is 
announced that Bailey Southwell has been 
named chairman of a company. Photo- Vi- 
sion, Ltd., formed to market the device. 

The basic feature of the new type of 
mechanism, through which the film runs 
continuously, is a set of lenses arranged in 
a circuit shape like the letter D. The film 
moves in front of the flat side, each frame 
moving upward evenly with a lens, which 
rneets it at the lowest point of the flat 
side of the circuit. As another frame rises 
to this point, another lens, coming down 
the curved side of the circuit, meets it and 
travels upward evenly with it. Light is ad- 
mitted through only one of the frames at 
a time,_ though the gate could be enlarged, 
it is said, to accommodate more frames. 

The light shining through the frame is 
received by a front lens, which is the one 
that refracts the light onto the screen. 

It is pointed out that this method could 
be capable of eliminating any flicker which 
may result from the intermittent process. 
It is also said that sound could be re- 
corded directly opposite its corresponding 
frame. Another feature claimed is that 
wider frames could be used on 35-mm. stock 
by laying the frames along the film in- 
stead of transversely and running the film 
through the mechanism horizontally. Sim- 
plification of the three-color process in col- 
ored_ cinematography is also declared to be 
possible with this mechanism. 



Need Seen for Making 
Fabrics in Theatres and 
Studios Non-Inflammable 

(Special to thei Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— The danager of fire 
which may lie in the use of decoration or 
sound proofing of fabrics which have not been 
flame-proofed, was pointed out by Samuel H. 
Gutterman, president of the Associated Fab- 
rics Corporation, in commenting on methods 
in theatres and studios attendant upon sound. 

"Once," he said, "a general reluctancy to- 
wards the use of flame proof materials pre- 
vailed, but by experiment the flame proofing 
process has been perfected to a degree where 
the original appearance, lustre and other desir- 
able qualities of the fabric are retained in their 
entirety, making it easily possible to oibtain 
flame proof fabrics of every description from 
the flimsiest transparent tissue to the heaviest 
and finest silk brocatelle." 



Leo Abrams Appointed 
Manager of Universal 
Exchange in New York 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Leo Abrams has 
been appointed manager of the big U ex- 
change in New York City, it has been an- 
nounced by M. Van Praag, general sales man- 
ager of Universal. 

Abrams, former manager of Universal's 
Kansas City exchange, succeeds Dave Miller, 
whose future plans have not been announced. 



Spectators Thrilled as Selig Studio 

Burns; Two Are Rescued from the Fire 

Fire destroyed the old Selig studio at 3900 North Claremont avenue, Chicago, 
with a loss of about $100,000. Onlookers who could remember back a generation 
or so well might have thought that this was another one of the thrillers which were 
filmed there, one among them being the "Third Alarm." 

The blaze was discovered by Anna Kinsch, a stenographer for the Flavour Candy 
company which occupied the two top Boors. She was trapped by the flames, and 
as the "heroine" of this last "feature" was rescued by being carried down a ladder. 

Likewise Neal Diller, who attempted to put company books in the fireproof 
vault, was caught, and he was saved by the accustomed ladder method. 



January 4, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



27 




They're still talking about that Christmas Party that was held by Columbia for its home office brigade on the day before Yule. The scene of 
festivities was Janssen's llof-brau in New York. Among the executives present were Joe Brandt, president ; Abe Schneider, assistant secretary 
and treasurer; Joe Goldberg, general sales manager; Rube Jackter, assistant sales manager; Hank Linet, director of advertising and publicity; 
Frank Spicker, director of art; Hal Hodes, director of sales promotion; Henri Brunet, manager of exchange operation; Max Seligman, office 
manager and purchasing agent; Mortijner Wormser, controller; Jack Bellman, Greater New York division manager; George S. Jeffrey, East- 
ern division manager; G. W. Minder, Southern division manager; Ben F. Rosenberg, circuit sales manager; Col. Brady, supervising director 

of Columbia-Victor Gems, and S. Goddard, president of Goddard & Co., bankers. 



Western Electric Accord 
With Tobis Rumored in 
Berlin; Inter-use Seen 

[By Berlia Correspondent of The Herald- World] 

BERLIN, Dec. 21 (By Mail).— Will the 
patents dispute be ended within a month ? 
Since the return of Dr. Deutsch, the Tobis- 
Kuchenmeister negotiator from New York, 
rumors of an accord with Western Electric 
have sprung up in Amsterdam and in Berlin. 
The basis for such an accord would be full 
interuse of apparatus, full rights for American 
patent-holders in America, full rights of ex- 
ploitation for Germans in Germany and the 
rest of the world to be divided between 
America and Germany. 



Talkers Established 
Higher Than All Silent 
Pictures, Says Eraser 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— "It takes no great 
soothsayer to forsee what the coming year 
should bring the motion picture industry, 
from a production point of view, and I think 
the most interesting thing about the next 
twelfth month will be what it will not bring 
us," says William R. Eraser, general manager 
of the Harold Lloyd corporation. "The past 
year has been one of somewhat startling 
changes in the industry. Entertainment values 
were greatly improved. The talking picture 
established itself on a plane, higher in my 
opinion, than the silent picture ever did. But 
it was a mere beginning. The forthcoming 
year will see advances which hardly more 
than a year ago we did not even dream of. 



Theatres Drop Threat to Close 
As Second-Run ReKef Is Given 

Seven Racine Independents Win Right to Show Pictures Not Hav- 
ing Had First-Run, and Also Get Earlier Release Dates, 
Through Allied, Milwaukee Association and Exchanges 

[By Special Correspondent to the Herald-World] 
MILWAUKEE, Dec. 31. — Independent theatres at Racine, which have 
been clamoring for relief in the matter of release dates on motion pictures for 
second run, have -won a victory. Late last week, the independent theatre 
owners came to Milwaukee to attend a special meeting held for them. At this 
meeting were officers of the state organization of the Allied States Associa- 
tion, officers of the Milwaukee Theatre Owners Association and a few repre- 
sentatives of the film exchanges. 

The Racine men obtained relief for which they asked. The state associa- 
tion has effected an arrangement for them which will permit them to obtain 
pictures which have not yet had a first run in Racine. This gives them a break 
on some of the pictures which play in Racine. They have also obtained earlier 
release dates for other pictures. 



Harry Kalmine Named 
Chief Booker for W B 
Circuit of Theatres 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Harry M. Kalmine 
has been named chief booker of Warner 
Brothers chain of theatres. The appointment 
was made by Spyros Skouras, general man- 
ager of the circuit. 

For the past several years Kalmine has been 
division manager for the New Jersey group 
of Warner Brothers circuit. The appointment 
was made in line with the Warner policy of 
promoting those men who have stood out by 
efficient work in the field. 



According to Henry Staab, executive sec- 
retary of the Wisconsin state association 
affiliated with Allied, the Racine theatre 
owners no doubt will find this satisfactory. 

The situation came to a head a few 
weeks ago when it was reported that seven 
independent theatres in Racine, represent- 
ing a $1,000,000 investment in buildings and 
equipment, would be closed January 1 un- 
less the owners of the theatres obtained 
more satisfactory release dates on motion 
pictures for second run from the two chain 
theatres holding first-run rights. 



Max Krofta, manager of the Granada 
theatre, Racine, chairman of this special 
committee, stated at the time the commit- 
tee was organized: 

"Two chain theatres in Racine have first- 
run rights on the output of principal motion 
pictures companies with nine-month pro- 
tection on subsequent runs in all theatres, 
with the exception of those charging 10 
cents admission. The protection on 10 
cent houses is one year. 

Five theatres in Racine have been wired. 



Spoor Thompson Machine Co. Enjoined 

In Action by Bennett Laboratories 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31. — In an action brought in the U. S. District Court here 
against Spoor Thompson Machine Co., by the Bennett Film Laboratories, it is 
charged that when the Laboratories became a subsidiary of the Consolidated Film 
Industries the machine company apparently considered contractural obligations 
between itself and the plaintiff null and void. 

Hence, sustaining the contention of the plaintiff. Judge Caffery last week en- 
joined the Spoor Thompson Machine Co., from manufacturing, leasing or deliver- 
ing Spoor Thompson developing machines to Paramount and H. E. R. or to any 
other party pending the termination of the action instituted (in name, at least) by 
the Bennett Film Laboratories. Likewise, he enjoined Paramount and H. E. R. 
from using or disposing of the machines. 



28 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



Launching the New Production Year 



FOX 

An insight into the entertainment which 
will come from the Fox Studios for the 
early part of the new year may be gained 
from the 27 productions on the 1929-1930 
schedule of 48 pictures, yet to be released. 

The latest release is Raoul Walsh's "Hot 
for Paris," with Victor McLaglen, Fifi 
Dorsay and El Brendel. 

Scheduled for general release in January 
are: "The Lone Star Ranger," an all-talk- 
ing Western, directed by A. F. Erickson, 
with George O'Brien and Sue Carol; "Cam- 
eo Kirby," a musical drama directed by Irv- 
ing Cummings, with J. Harold Murray and 
Norma Terris; "Harmony at Home," di- 
rected by Hamilton MacFadden and Wil- 
liam Collier, Sr., and Marguerite Church- 
ill; "The Sky Hawk," now playing twice 
daily at the Gaiety theatre. 

For February release: "Happy Days," 
directed by Benjamin Stoloff, with a cast 
of over 300, including most of the stars 
under contract; "Men Without Women," 
undersea drama directed by John Ford with 
16 men and no woman in the cast; "City 
Girl," directed by F. W. Murnau, with 
Charles Farrell and Mary Duncan. 

A Wide Variety of Pictures 

Promised for early 1930 are a variety of 
pictures ranging from the "Fox Movietone 
Follies of 1930," to the dramatic "Louis 
Baretti," which will be directed by John 
Ford and will feature Paul Muni. Melo- 
drama will be represented by "Temple 
Tower," in which Kenneth MacKenna will 
carry on the further adventures of Bulldog 
Drummond, with Donald Gallaher direct- 
ing, and ""Phe Fatal Wedding," a modern- 
ized version of Theodore Kremer's stage 
play, to be directed by William K. Howard. 

Other productions promised for 1930 in- 
clude: "The Dollar Princess," to be di- 
rected by Alexander Korda, with J. Har- 
old Murray, El Brendel and Marj'orie 
White; "The Girl Who Wasn't Wanted," 
directed by A. F. Erickson, with George 
O'Brien and Helen Chandler; "High So- 
ciety Blues," the second Janet Gaynor- 
Charles Farrell musical comedy to be di- 
rected by David Butler, with Louise Fa- 
zenda and Lucien Littlefield in support; 
"On the Level," directed by Irving Cum- 
mings, with Victor McLaglen and Lee 
Tracy; "Playmates," another Gaynor-Far- 
rell musical comedy romance; "The Big 
Party," directed by John Blystone, with 
Sue Carol and Richard Keene featured. 

The second Will Rogers picture will be 
based on an Edwin Burke story, with Ben- 
jamin Stoloff directing. "The Solid Gold 
Article" will be Chandler Sprague's first di- 
rectorial effort; "Yonder Grow the Daisies" 
will be directed by Alfred E. Worker, with 
Robert Ames, Lila Lee and Mantagu Love; 
"Fast Workers," directed by Frank Strayer, 
features most of the young personalities 
under contract to Fox. "A Very Practical 
Joke" will be directed by Berthold Viertel. 
"If I Was Alone with You" will be Sidney 
Lanfield's first Fox picture, and "Common 
Clay" will be the first Victor Fleming Fox 
production. 

* * * 

PARAMOUNT 

An expansion program involving the erec- 
tion of several new sound stages and buildings 
and the enlargement of others on the 26-acre 
Paiamount studio property in Hollywood was 
announced today by B. P. Schulberg general 
manager of West Coast production, to take 
care of Paramount's contemplated output of 
product for the first half of 1930. 

Leading the schedule for the first half of 
the coming year are such specials as "The 
Love Parade," starring Maurice Chevalier, 
and with Jeanette MacDonald, under the di- 
rection of Ernst Lubitsch: "The Vagabond 



King," an all-technicolor production starring 
Dennis King, and a revue, "Paramount on 
Parade," in which the majority of Paramount 
stars are to appear. 

To be released in the immediate future are 
"The Kibitzer," with Harry Green; "Ap- 
plause," with Helen Morgan; "Behind the 
Makeup," with Fay Wray, William Powell 
and Hal Skelly; Gary Cooper's first starring 
vehicle, "Seven Days Leave ;" "The River Inn," 
with Helen Morgan and Charles Ruggles; 
"Street of Chance," with William Powell; 
"Burning Up," starring Richard Arlen ; 
Charles "Buddy" Rogers in "Young Eagles," 
directed by William Wellman ; "Dangerous 
Paradise," starring Nancy Carroll ; "The Ben- 
son Murder Case," with William Powell; 
"Ladies Love Brutes," starring George Ban- 
croft; "The Two Black Crows in the A. E. 
F,'' starring Moran and Mack; Ruth Chatter- 
ton in "Sarah and Son;" "Slightly Scarlet," 
co-starring Evelyn Brent and Clive Brook; and 
"Men Are Like That," with Hal Skelly. 

Also included on the release schedule are 
"Return of Fu Manchu," with Warner Oland ; 
Jack Oakie in "Marco Himself" and another 
Oakie production to be announced later; 
"Young Man of Manhattan," with Richard Ar- 
len and Claudette Colbert; "The Big Pond," 
Maurice Chevalier's third starring vehicle, 
with Claudette Colbert; Helen Kane in "Dan- 
gerous Nan McGrew;" a new Clara Bow star- 
ring picture; Nancy Carroll in "Honey;" two 
Western specials with Gary Cooper and Eu- 
gene Pallette; "Let's Go Native," with Jean- 
ette MacDonald, and Gary Cooper in "Only 
the Brave," with Mary Brian. 

* * * 

COLUMBIA 

Columbia Pictures will release a diversified 
list in 1930, some of them being: 

Roadshow Productions 

A David Belasco stage production to be di- 
rected by Frank R. Capra. 

"Hell's Island," with Jack Holt to be starred 
under Frank R. Capra's direction. 

Special Productions 

Three special productions starring Evelyn 
Brent. 

"The Melody Man," by Herbert Fields, 
Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers, the cast 
headed by William Collier, Jr., Alice Day and 
John St. Polls and R. William Neill at the 
megaphone. 

"For the Love o'Lil," Liberty's cover serial 
by Leslie Thrasher. Victor Heerman is di- 
recting Johnny Arthur and Sally Starr. 

"Murder on the Roof," from the serial by 
Edward Doherty. George B. Seitz directed 
Dorothy Revier, Margaret Livingston and 
Raymond Hatton. 

"Sweethearts on Parade," based on the pop- 
ular song. 

"The Squealer," from the Broadway suc- 
cess by Mark Linder. 

Deluxe Productions 

"Mexicali Rose," with Barbara Stanwyck, 
Sam Hardy and Arthur Rankin heading the 
cast. Erie C. Kenton handles the megaphone. 

"Vengeance," directed by Archie Mayo. Jack 
Holt, Dorothy Revier and Philip Strange head 
a cast including 300 native extras. 

"Last of the Lone Wolf," by Louis Joseph 
Vance; "Borrowed Love," from the play by 
Bide Dudley; "Ladies Must Play;" "Jazz 
Daughters ;" "Sisters," Molly O'Day and Sally 
O'Neil; "The Black Sheep," "Paris Nights," 
"Prince of Diamonds," by Gene Markey; 
"Temptation," "Private Property," "Around 
the Corner," and "Personality." 

* * * 

UNITED ARTISTS 

Al Jolson, Eddie Cantor, Florenz Ziegfeld, 
George M. Cohan, Arthur Hammerstein, Irv- 
ing Berlin, Louis Bromfield, Stephen Vincent 
Benet, Rudolph Friml, William Anthony Ma- 
guire and Walter Huston are new personali- 



ties aligned with the various producers of 
United Artists for 1930, with more new fac- 
tors in production than any prior year has 
produced, and with more films scheduled than 
ever. The list now contemplated, completed, 
or in preparation, is only partial : 

Mary Pickford in her second individual all- 
talking picture. 

Norma Talmadge in "Du Barry," David Be- 
lasco's play. Her first talking picture was 
"New York Nights," soon to be exhibited. 
Sam Taylor will direct. 

Gloria Swanson will follow "The Tres- 
passer" with "Queen Kelly." Walter Byron 
appears opposite Miss Swanson. 

Dolores Del Rio is now acting under direc- 
tion of George Fitzmaurice, and with Edmund 
Lowe as leading man in "The Bad One," John 
Farrow's story. 

No Speech in Chaplin Film 

Charlie Chaplin's "City Lights," now in pro- 
duction, is a silent film that will be synchron- 
ized with music but will not contain any 
speech. Virginia Cherrill is leading woman; 
Harry Myers has an important role. 

Douglas Fairbanks will make his first indi- 
vidual all-talking picture, following his ap- 
pearance with his wife in "Taming of the 
Shrew." 

Al Jolson will be the star of George M. 
Cohan's first film, to be based on an original 
story and with Cohan songs. 

Ronald Colman will follow "Bulldog Drum- 
mond" and "Condemned" with Samuel Gold- 
wyn's production of "Raffles." Harry d'Ar- 
rast is directing. Sidney Howard wrote the 
screen play. 

Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., going to Hollywood 
in February, will begin his film-making, in 
partnership with Samuel Goldwyn, with Eddie 
Cantor starred in an audible version of 
"Whoopee." Thornton Freeland will direct. 

"The Locked Door," from Channing Pol- 
lock's "The Sign on the Door," is soon to be 
exhibited nationally. Directed by George Fitz- 
maurice, it has Rod LaRocque, Barbara Stan- 
wyck, William Boyd and Betty Bronson. 

Arthur Hammerstein, now in Hollywood, 
will make as his first film "Bride 66," with Ru- 
dolph Friml composing the music and Herbert 
Stothart writing the story. 

David Wark Griffith's dramatization of the 
human side of Abraham Lincoln will have in 
the title role Walter Huston. Stephen Vin- 
cent Benet, author of "John Brown's Body," 
is in Hollywood with Griffith, preparing the 
story. 

Berlin as a Producer 

Irving Berlin will emerge as a producer, 
his first a musical comedy, "Upstairs and 
Down." 

"The Swan," Ferenc Molnar's play, has been 
filmed as an all-talker under direction of Paul 
Stein, with Lillian Gish as star, and Rod La- 
Rocque, Conrad Nagel, Marie Dressier and Al- 
bert Conti. 

Harry Richman has just completed "Puttin' 
on fhc Ritz." 

"Hell Harbor," Henry King's production 
made in Florida, has Lupe Velez. 

Fannie Brice has completed "Be Yourself!" 

Herbert Brenon's first talking picture, "Lum- 
mox," has a cast that includes Winifred West- 
over, Ben Lyon, William Collier, Jr., Dorothy 
Janis and Edna Murphy. It is based on Fan- 
nie Hurst's novel and will soon be released. 
It has been set to German by Fred Zelnik. 

"Hell's Angels," now being edited by How- 
ard Hughes, will be shown on Broadway this 
spring, with color and dialog. Ben Lyon, Jean 
Harlow, James Hall and Thelma Todd head 
the cast. 

Louis Bromfield goes to HollyTvood in Janu- 
ary to write original stories and dialog for 
Samuel Goldwyn Productions. William An- 
thony Maguire goes to Hollywood within the 
next fortnight to write, direct and produce 
pictures for United Artists. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



29 



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It's "Selective Accident"; 

That's Menzies Definition 

Of Film Production Art 

Artist Who Became Producer Says 
Chance Often Brings Perfection 
That Careful Planning Misses 

(Special to the Herald-Wcrld) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— "Art is a selective 
accident." 

So says William Cameron Menzies, who 
won fame with his sets for "The Thief of 
Bagdad" and is the first artist to become a 
film producer. 

Menzies, 32, Yale man, alumnus of the Art 
Students League, former habitue of Mother 
Berlolloti's restaurant in Greenwich Village, 
has been brought to the conclusion just quoted 
bv intimate association with the motion pic- 
ture. He is accustomed to sketch out almost 
every scene of a picture before it goes into 
production. He strives and is noted for his 
compositions. And yet, he says, neither he nor 
his cameramen can purposely achieve the com- 
positions which they arrive at by_ chance. 
Illustrating his point, he claims that in taking 
the individual frames of a track shot he finds 
many of them more balanced, more symmet- 
rical, or, conversely, for emphasis, more per- 
fectly out of proportion than anything which 
he himself can design. 

Works for Effect 

Menzies, naturally, works for effect. Like 
Roland West, he paints in many of his shad- 
ows. He works from a scenario, tries to in- 
ject in his sketches the atmosphere of the 
scene in the script. When he decides on a set 
he has his drawing projected in perspective, 
has the carpenters copy it faithfully down to 
the last detail, works out a lot of the "busi- 
ness" in the actual picture some time before 
it gets into, the hands of the director. 
; Now that he is producing in collaboration 
with John W. Considine, Jr. (United Artists), 
he'll be able to inject even more atmosphere 
into his work than has been the case in the 
past. He'll have the whole picture absolutely 
worked out long before it goes in front of the 
cameras. Heretofore, he has had from 80 to 
100 drawings of the principal sequences of a 
film tacked up on the wall of his studio so 
that the producer can see what he is going to 
get. Now, with a staff of artists polishing up 
his roughs he'll have every scene in front of 
him so that he and Considine will know ex- 
actly what is what. 

"Raffles" Probably His Next 

Some of his recent pictures include "Alibi," 
"Bulldog Drummond" and "Condemned." 
Some of his earlier ones were "'Rosita," the 
Lubitsch picture; "The Bat," with its sinister, 
shadowed, angular backgrounds ; "The Wan- 
derer," "The Dark Angel," "The Eagle," 
"Kiki" and "The Tempest." 

His next one will probably be "Raffles," 
with Ronald Colman in the part of the de- 
lightful crook. It is possible, too, that he'll 
help out on the art direction of Roland West's 
"Chicago" with Chester Morris. 



Paramount-Publix Radio 
Broadcast Will Feature 
Harry Green, Comedian 

(Special to the\ Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dea 31.— The feature of the 
coming Paramount-Publix Radio broadcast 
over the Columbia system will be Harry Green, 
comedian of the Paramount production "Kib- 
itzer." The program will be broadcast at 10 
o'clock Eastern Standard time, next Satur- 
day. 

Green's part of the program will be pre- 
sented during the last half of the hour, and 
will be relayed from Hollywood to station 
WABC, New York, and then placed on the 
air. 

Others assisting in this program are : David 



Mendoza, who will conduct the Paramount 
symphony orchestra; Jesse Crawford, sched- 
uled for an organ solo; Dorothy Adams, who 
will sing, and Harriet Lee, who will also sing. 
Paul Ash and others will be present. 

Bessie Love Wed to 

William Hawks, Broker 

(Special to thA Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 31.— Bessie Love, pop- 
ular screen actress, was married to William 
Hawks, Beverly Hill's stock broker, at the St. 
James Episcopal church. 

The wedding was attended by notables of 
filmdom, who literally thronged the church 
during the ceremony. Particiapting in the 
wedding were Blanche Sweet, matron of 
honor, and Bebe Daniels, Carmel Myers, Exiith 
Mayer, Irene Mayer, Norma Shearer, Athole 
Shearer Hawks, sister-in-law of the groom, 
and Mary Astor, bridesmaids. 



Carl Laemmle Elected 
To Fellowsfiip in Royal 
Society of Arts, London 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Carl Laemmle, 
president of Universal, has been elected to 
Fellowship in the Royal Society of Arts, Man- 
ufactures and Industry of London. Laemmle's 
name was proposed by R. A. Watters, Lon- 
don physicist and engineer. 

Kansas City Council 

Vetoes Padlock Measure 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
KANSAS CITY, Dec. 31.— The city council 
of Kansas City last night refused to pass the 
proposed ordinance which would padlock mo- 
tion picture and legitimate theatres if they pre- 
sented immoral shows. Local women's clubs 
have been attempting to force the issues. 



30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



SOUND PICTURES 

Effecting a Smooth Changeover with Sound 

By F. H. RICHARDSON 
CALDWELL'S METHOD COMMENDED AND ADDED TO 



AN ASTONISHING GREETING 

I PEEL THAT I JUST MUST EXPRESS MY ASTONISHMENT AND SINOEHE 
GRATITUDE AT AND FOR THE RATHER AMAZING NUMBER OF CHRISTMAS GREET- 
ING CARDS PILED AROUND US. STARTED TO COUNT THEM THIS MORNING, 
BUT WHEN I GOT UP TO FIFTEEN HUNDRED AND WAS APPARENTLY ONLY ABOUT 
HALF WAY THROUGH AND FRIEND POSTMAN BROUGHT ANOTHER BATCH? I QUIT 
THE JOB. 

I GUESS AFTER ALL A CONSIDERABLE LOT OF YOU DD RATHER -LIKE THE 
"OLD MAN," BUT I AM PARTICULARLY PLEASED AT THIS INCONTROVERTIBLE 
EVIDENCE THAT THE EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD DOES REACH AND IS READ 
BY A HUGE NUMBER OF THEATRE MANAGERS AND PROJECTIONISTS. FOR IF 
SOMETHING LIKE 3,000 OF THEM SEND CARDS, SURELY WE MAY WELL BELIEVE 
THAT MANY TIMES THAT NUMBER READ OUR "STUFF." 

I THANK YOU, GENTLEMEN! I HOPE THAT EVERY DARNED ONE. OF YOU 
MAKES, AT THE VERY LEAST CALCULATION, $3,465,641.10 DURING 1930, 
AND THAT YOU ENJOY EVERY DAD-BINGED CENT OF IT! ! ! 




FL. May, chief projectionist of the 
• Empress theatre, Owensboro, Ky., has 
the following to say concerning Brother 
Ken Caldwell's answer to Bluebook School 
Question No. 2, which appeared in the May 
25th issue. I am sure Friend Caldwell will 
receive the suggestions in good part. Here 
is brother May's letter: 

"I have read with great interest the Ken 
Caldwell answer to question No. 2 of the 
new Bluebook School. I quite agree with 
you that his answer is very good. Our 
equipment here is W. E. universal base 
with Motiograph DeLuxe heads, but we 
have Simplex in the other two houses and 
can see how Mr. Caldwell's ideas would 
save the Simplex sound projectionist a lot 
of trouble. However, I beg to differ with 
him on the proper method of calculating 
the number of turns to give the record on 
threadup. 

"As far as the picture projection is con- 
cerned, the Caldwell method is okay, but it 
completely disregards the proper projection 
of the music score. He speaks of fading 
(changeover) from title to scene rather 
than title to title, and in the case of title to 
title dissolve, there is nearly always an or- 
chestral accompaniment. We find that the 
orchestral changeover (this is my own 
term) may be classified under three general 
headings: (1) In which the starting reel 
is a continuation of the ending reel; (2) in 
which the starting reel repeats the last one 
or two musical phrases of the ending reel; 
(3) in which the ending reel concludes 
with a retard in tempo, holding the last 
note for a few seconds. The beginning 
reel proceeds usually with the same selec- 
tion. This is really a sub-classification of 
condition number 1, but I mention it in that 
the changeover procedure is different. 

"I suggest the following method for 
determining the number of turns for the 
record: play the end of reel one, keeping 
the last few phrases of the music in mind. 
Then play beginning of reel two, counting 
the number of turns from start mark until 
music begins. If music repeats (condition 
2), play again and count turns from start- 
mark to end of repeated phrases. Mark 
this number of turns on the record. Follow 
this procedure for all records of the pic- 
ture, of course doing this without the film. 
We are now ready for rehearsal of the pic- 
ture. Let us assume that reel one is near- 
ing completion. A projectionist should be 
stationed at the turntable of reel two, and 
should count the number of record turns 
from the time projector is started until 
conclusion of music on reel one. The 
difference between this count and the num- 
ber of turns marked on the record will be 
the number of threadup turns, with ex- 
ceptions as noted below. 

Herewith is our changeover (fader). 



Condition one: Use the exact difference of 
turns and at conclusion of music a very 
quick change of fader. Condition two: 
Add one-quarter turn to the difference and 
make very quick fader change with ex- 
tremely short pause at zero. This to pre- 
clude possible playing a note or so of the 
repeat. Condition three: After about one or 
one and one-half seconds of long note, bring 
fader slowly down three or four points. 
Then cut off quickly, wait one-half second 
at zero and bring up quickly on other side 
of fader. A one-half turn must be taken 
from the turn difference as explained in 
early part of paragraph, in order that the 
pickup notes of reel two will not be missed. 

"It is our experience that following this 
method will give the effect of continuous 
orchestration without any break in the 
phrasing or tempo of the music. We have 
been told several times by people who 
often come to hear the score as well as 
see the picture that they were unable to 
distinguish at what moment the change- 
overs in the score were made. It is quite 
true that 90 per cent of the film change- 
overs will be title to title, but if the projec- 
tionist will take the time and trouble to 
have the aperture edges of screen image 
coincide, also to have the framers locked, 
or practically so, in the correct vertical 
positions, he can make a practically 
perfect dissolve from title to title. 
(By this I mean that the. framer should not 
be immovable, just tight enough so that 



there is no possibility of crawling, and ad- 
justed so that the title lines coincide 
vertically.) There will, of course, be some 
difference if the distortion caused by 
projectors being off center is much, or if 
the lenses (objective, are not matched in 
e. f. Even so, this difference is so slight 
that we do not believe it sufficient to 
butcher (!) up the score in order to effect 
its remedy. And don't think for a minute 
that your music loving patrons do not 
know when the score changeover is messed 
up. They, even as all of us, express wonder 
at first that it (good score change) can be 
done. But eventually they expect this and 
are very ready to criticise if a changeover 
is foozled. 

"We might here state that some in- 
stances will arise while computing the num- 
ber of threadup turns that the result will 
be less than none. In this case compute 
as before, do not give the record any turns 
at all. Multiply the number of turns 
figured by one and eight-tenths seconds, 
and do not start the motor of No. 2 projec- 
tor until that number of seconds has 
elapsed after the starting point given on 
the cue sheet. It is here quite possible 
that in holding the starting cue that "End 
of part so-and-so" may show on the screen. 
Then ye projectionist is between the devil 
and the deep sea and must start the motor 
soon enough to prevent this and make a 
fairly slow change with fader. 

"Mr Caldwell says that he welcomes 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



31 



criticism, and I therefore am sending him 
a copy of this letter. Also I welcome any 
criticism either you or he may have of my 
method, feeling as I do that the Bluebook 
School is conducted for the sole purpose 
of betterment of both visual and sound 
projection. Neither am I conceited enough 
to think that my method is the best, but I 
do think it worth considering. And if any- 
one can give me a better one than that 
I use, you can bet your bottom dollar that 
a change will be made P. D. Q." 

Brother May is absolutely correct in his 
assumption that the Bluebook School, as 
well as the Projection department in 
Better Theatres, are conducted for the sole 
purpose of betterment of both visual and 
sound reproduction and projection. I shall 
not comment upon May's method, pre- 
ferring to leave that to our readers, partly 
because it would take considerable time for 
me to study it all out and make an in- 
telligent comment, and partly because you 
men who are working with the equipment 
should be better able to judge of its value 
than I. 

Please remember, gentlemen, that I am 
editor of the Bluebook; School and the 
Projection department. As such I try, with 
at least fair success, to keep abreast of 
modern procedure and practice, but after 
all it is, I believe, of greater value to 
projection and to the men engaged therein 
to have you discuss these matters, than it 
is for me to pass judgment. If it comes 
right down to a mooted question between 
two of you at any time, I will, however, 
undertake to settle the matter. I can do 
this because I have access not only to the 
very best projectionists in this country and 
Canada, and now through a new affiliation, 
in England as well. Also, I have access to 
the engineering staffs of several of the 
largest sound equipment manufacturers and 
to that of the largest sound service organ- 
ization in the entire world. 
_ So you see, men, I really am in a posi- 
tion to find finally pretty nearly the correct 
answer to any question which may come 
up in connection with sound procedure. 
You men, however, can make matters much 
more valuable and interesting if you, like 
Brothers Caldwell and May, take an active 
part in the department. 



''No Blur-No Distortion" 
Ads of Philco Radio Are 
Hooked Up by Paramount 

A month-by-month hookup with Philco 
radio advertising has been effected by 
Paramount, and more than 130 jobbers and 
12,000 Philco dealers thus are tied in with 
the exhibitors of Paramount pictures. The 
deal was made with the Philadelphia Stor- 
age Battery Company, makers of the Philco 
radio receiving sets. 

The idea does not concern the exploiting 
of one picture alone, but each month one 
production will be selected by the organ- 
ization to be worked in on the tieup. The 
first picture to be exploited in this manner 
will be "The Love Parade," starring 
Maurice Chevalier. This will be followed 
by "The Vagabond King," with Dennis 
King, and Nancy Carroll's first starring 
vehicle, "Dangerous Paradise," and "Para- 
mount on Parade." 

The idea is founded upon the Philco se- 
ries of "No blur — no distortion" advertise- 
ments, which ingeniously illustrates the 
difference bteween clear radio reception and 
distorted reception. This is done by plac- 
ing adjacent photographs of famous per- 
sons in each advertisement, one sharp and 
clear, the other greatly distorted. The 
farnous persons in the Paramount-Philco 
series are to be Paramount stars, with every 
bit of advertising matter featuring the star's 
current production. 

The first of the advertising to appear in 
the series will be on January 18. 



TALKING PICTURE EPICS, INC. 

FRANK R. WILSON, PRESIDENT 

Offers Exhibitors Everywhere 

TWO SENSATIONAL FEATURES 
AND A SENSATIONAL SHORT 

Many More to Come Soon 




Commander G. M. DYOTT in 

"HUNTING TIGERS 
IN INDIA" 

A fascinating journey through a laud of mystery 

ALL TALKING 




And 



THE ONE AND ONLY AUTHENTIC RECORD 



jJlOUND^fx^ WORLD 

IRAF ZEPPELU& 



With 

COM. HUGO ECKENER— COM. C. E. ROSENDAHL 
LADY GRACE DRUMMOND HAY— SIR HUBERT WILKINS 

An Astounding Chronicle of an Epochal Event 

ALL TALKING 



And 



IN THREE REELS 

A Cinema Record of Change and Progress 

"TODAY-AND YESTERDAY" 

A collection of priceless films recording 
events of thirty-five years ago in 
contrast with the present development 
of the same events and personalities 

SYNCHRONIZED BY VICTOR RECORDING ORCHESTRA 



An Epics Representative in 
Every Columbia Exchange 

TALKING PICTURE EPICS, INC. 

M. J. WEISFELDT, DIRECTOR OF DISTRIBUTION 

11 West 42nd Street, New York City 



52 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1950 



Projectionists^ Sound Schools 

Over U.S. Aimed hyPhotophone 

Sound schools for projectionists in various cities are planned by R C A Photo- 
phone as a result of the success attending a school started for projectionists in 
the New York district. This instruction is being given at the service and installa- 
tion department of R C A Photophone at 438 West 37th street, through arrange- 
ments for a special course made after negotiations with Sam Kaplan, president 
of Projectionists Local No. 306 of New York City. 



A meeting held at the Photophone service 
address was attended by C. F. Eichhom, vice 
president of the local ; Frank Day, secretary, 
and Simon Terr, business agent; LeRoy Cox, 
chief projectionist of RKO; Harry Rubin, 
chief projectionist of Publix Theatres, and 
about ISO projectionists from various New 
York theatres. 

Definite plans were made for classes, as- 



signments, lectures and demonstrations. The 
first of these lectures and demonstrations was 
presented by H. B. Braun and A. R. Schulze, 
and was very favorably received. The regular 
school course got under way December 12, 
when two groups of twelve men each received 
personal instruction on the subject of the 
RCA Photophone soundhead, and were given 
reading matter, containing illustrations, for 



study in the week intervening between the 
first and second instruction periods. 

It is planned to continue these lectures and 
instruction periods until every projectionist in 
the territory covered by Local 306 has acquired 
a thorough working knowledge of Photophone 
equipment. RCA Photophone executives feel 
that arrangements made will be beneficial to 
all persons connected with sound projection, 
and are planning the establishment of similar 
schools in other cities. 

Pacent Makes 1,000 
Installations; Latest 
In Methodist Church 

With the installation of Pacent equipment 
in the Broadway Temple Methodist Episcopal 
church. New York, on December 17, Pacent 
Reproducer Corporation brought its total 
number of installations to 1,000. 

The installation in the Broadway Temple 
marks not only the thousandth Pacent ma- 
chine put in service, but also one of the first 
installations of talking picture equipment in a 
church. 

Pacent corporation made its first installa- 
tion of talking picture apparatus ten and one- 
half months ago, on January 26, 1929, and 
since that time equipment has been installed 
in every section of the United States and 
nearly all foreign countries where motion pic- 
tures are exhibited. 

Pacent corporation today has engineers and 
sales representatives in Canada, South Amer- 
ica, Europe, China, Mexico, Australia and 
New Zeajand. The company's foreign install- 
ations are expected to total over three hun- 
dred equipments by January 1. 



12 Per Cent of Mexico 
Theatres to Be Wired 
In 6 Months, He Says 

Twelve per cent of Mexico's theatres will 
have been wired within the next six months 
if the rapid progress of sound screen enter- 
tainment in Mexico during the past four 
months is maintained states George Pezet, 
Mexican sales representative of Pathe Inter- 
national Corp., who has been in New York for 
conferences with company officials. 

The general business of theatres showing 
sound pictures is good, he said. As yet, with 
but one exception, only American produced 
English dialog features have been shown. 
However, there have been numerous Spanish 
spoken scenes in news reels. 

There are about 500 theatres in Mexico. Of 
this number 35 are now wired. 

Alexander E, Reach 
Made Vice-President 
OfR CA Photophone 

Following the recent election of Charles J. 
Ross as executive vice president of RCA 
Photophone Inc. announcement is made by 
David Sarnoff, president of R C A Photophone 
Inc., of the election of Alexander F-. Reoch 
as a vice president of the company, at a meet- 
ing of the board of directors held in New 
York. Reoch was formerly vice president in 
charge of production of the Radio-Victor Cor- 
poration of America. 



New Company Organized 

KANSAS CITY, Dec. 31. — A group of Kansas City 
theatre owners have organized a new theatre com- 
pany for the purpose of erecting a theatre in Salina, 
Kan. The state charter board of Kansas has issued 
a charter to the Salina Theatre Company, which will 
build the house. 



NOW INSTALLED IN OVER 
1000 THEATRES 

MOVIE-PHONE 
Turntables $350.00 
Per Pair Complete 

With Pickups, Fader and Volume 
Control 



Heavy construction. Free from vibra- 
tion. Finest mechanical filter built 
within turntable eliminating tone waver. 
Adjustable Electrical Research pickups 
mounted on rubbers eliminating groove 
jumping. Ball bearings and hardened 
gears running in continuous oil bath. 
Guaranteed five years. 

MOVIE-PHONE fader and volume con- 
trol with graduated dial. Adaptable 
to all amplifiers. Adjustable pedestals 
with rubber feet and levelling screws. 
Connecting attachments for all makes 
of machines. Blue prints and full in- 
stallation instructions easy to operate 

and install. No upkeep or service 
charge. Twenty-four hour deliveries. 




Above illustration shows MOVIE- 
PHONE low type which will fit the 
smallest size booth. We also man- 
ufacture a high type which requires 
more room in booth. 6 tube am- 
plifier and tubes, booth speaker and 
two auditorium speakers $275.00 
additional. 



GOETZ MOVIE-PHONE CORP. 

724 So. Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111. 



Walt's Disc Talking Unit, without the base or pickup, can be purchased for only $65. 

Many exhibitors who have small projection booths are having wonderful results by 
attaching these units to a bracket on the projector or on a bracket fastened to the wall 
of the booth. 

This unit consists of a sixteen inch turntable, mounted on steel worm, bronze gear 

construction, in an adjustable steel head so 

that it can be used on either side of the 
proj ector. 

Tarms: Cash With Order. Immediate 
Shipment. 

Perfect Synchronization 
Guaranteed 




Walt's Theatre Company, Kenesaw, Nebr., U. S. A. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



33 



Announcing 

VITADISC 

Quality Talkie Equipment 

at a price you can afford to pay 



A scientifically designed 
Turn Table. Ball Bearings. 
No load on the Projector. 
Connects to the Main 
Crank Shaft. 




Vitadisc guarantees you 
absolute synchronization, 
quiet, vibrationless opera- 
tion and satisfaction. 
Spring suspended filter 
eliminates all unevenness 
and sour music. 



*200 



each complete with Pick 
Up and Fader 



Amplifiers and speakers at low 
prices 




Installation Men — Projectionists with 
Sales Ability — Let us hear from you 



VITADISC CO. 



92 Mortimer Street 



Rochester, N. Y. 



Tone-O-Graph Makes 

Six Installations 

Contracts have been closed by North Ameri- 
can Sound and Talking Picture Equipment 
Corp. for their Tone-O-Graph equipment in 
the following theatres : 

Colonial theatre, Brooklyn ; Dale theatre, 
Johnstown, Pa. ; Grand theatre, Sutesville, 
Pa. ; Bellmore theatre, Bellmore, Long Island, 
N. Y. ; Roosevelt theatre, Roosevelt, Long 
Island, N. Y. ; Lyric theatre, Waterbury, Conn. 

Asks Government to 

Produce Talking Films 

(From ihe Department of Commerce) 

WASHINGTON, Dec. 3L — Australian 
motion picture producers are meeting this 
week to consider a proposal that the Gov- 
ernment of the Commonwealth devote the 
money provided for annual prizes for an- 
nual pictures and scenarios to the purchase 
of a fully equipped sound recording unit 
to be used in the production of talking 
films in Australia, according to Trade Com- 
missioner Charles F. Baldwin. 



New British Sound Device 
Making Rapid Sales; Entire 
February Product Is Booked 

Manufacture of the new British Thomaston 
Houston talking film apparatus is proceeding 
at a rapid pace, and the whole of the Febru- 
ary apparatus output of the B.T.H. factory at 
Rugby, England, has been booked by exhibi- 
tors according to a despatch to Department of 
Commerce. Delivery of upwards of 20 sets 
starts in February, it is understood. The price 
of this apparatus is $6,250 for joint sound-on- 
film and disc sets. Orders have been received 
from all over the country, and production 
will be in full swing early in the New Year. 
At present the B.T.H. apparatus is running 
in one provincial house, which is being used 
for private demonstration purposes. 

Groivth of Pacent Foreign 

Installations Increases 

Pacent installations have increased consider- 
able during the past few months. The most 
outstanding is in Argentine and Uruguay, 
where progress is being made under the 
leadership of Max Glucksman. 



/. W. Raff erty Named 
To Executive Post 
Of R GA Photophone 

J. W. Raiferty has been narhed assistant 
sales manager of R C A Photophone Inc. He 
will have supervision over the educational and 
industrial department. It is the intention of 
RCA Photophone Inc. to immediately expand 
its activities in the field of education and in- 
dustry and Rafferty, who for some time has 
been manager of production for the Radio 
Corporation of America, will assume his new 
duties on January 1. His appointment is in 
line with the recent resignation of Edward 
Auger as assistant sales manager supervising 
the commercial department of R C A Photo- 
phone Inc. 



Dickenson Recovering from Accident 

KANSAS CITY. — Glen Dickenson, owner of a 
chain of 30 theatres in Kansas and Missouri, is re- 
covering from an automobile accident which occurred 
in a dense fog on a Kansas highway last week. Dick- 
inson's car, which was being driven by Winston 
Brown, an employee, crashed head-on with a milk 
truck. Dickinson was severely cut on the face and 
head. 



34 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



A New Tribute to Sound 

A complete combat division of 30,000 men could be housed in the new sound stage which 
Radio Pictures is rushing tor comph^tion early in 1930. The Hollywood project bristles 
with figures — largest sound stage, 150x500 feet; 20 steel trusses weighing 12 tons each, with 
148 feet span; tank capacity 100,000 gallons; 10,000 barrels of cement in foundation alone; 
1,000,000 feet of lumber; 2,500,000 square feet of soundproofing material; four sound stages 
under one roof. 




Coupon Campaign 
Goes Big as Chain 
Managers Compete 

_ John Danz of Seattle owner of the Ster- 
ling chain houses, has the right idea in a 
Christmas coupon campaign, which in- 
cidentally will gross upwards of $5,000 for 
its six-weeks work. The chain consists of 
the Columbia, Colonial, Capital, Winter 
Garden, State, Florence and Star. All em- 
ployes of each theatre worked furiously for 
one of the three prizes— the first $125, sec- 
ond $75 and third $50. Besides the cash 
prizes Danz ofiFered a diamond ring to each 
hoiise, votes depending upon the number of 
scrip books sold. 

The contest brought out some real "Hot" 
ideas with Harry Beale of the State leading 
when he allowed his ushers to exhibit some 
of their charms in abbreviated costumes, 
parading up and down the foyer selling the 
boys from the lumber camps and Alaska. 

Tone-O-Graph Moves 
To Larger Quarters 
In Godfrey Building 

For the second time in the past three months 
North American Sound and Talking Picture 
Equipment Corporation, distributor of the 
Tone-O-Graph sound device, has moved to 
larger quarters. Increased business caused the 
move. 

The corporation now occupies half of the 
thiid floor in the Godfrey building. 



London Manufacturer 
Markets New Device 

"Corophone," a new sound on film and 
sound on disc equipment, price ranges from 
$2,775 to $3,775, according to the size of the 
hall in which it is to be installed, is now ready 
for installing, according to a dispatch to the 
department of commerce. Except for the loud- 
speakers the set is made entirely in London, 
the factory of a well-known electrical firm 
having been taken over and further equip- 
ment installed. The first set has already been 
installed, and a number of orders have fol- 
lowed for halls in various parts of the 
country. 



Italian Producer Signs 

For Photophone Equipment 

The RCA Photophone system of sound 
recording has been chosen by the Societa 
Anonima Stefano Pittaluga of Turin, 
Italian producing and exhibiting organiza- 
tion for its modern Cines Studio at Turin, 
with RCA recording apparatus and one of 
RCA Photophone's latest coordinated 
sound trucks. 

The contract may presage a more promi- 
nent part for Italy in the world's motion 
picture industry. Italy, rich in traditions 
of history and music, offers a most roman- 
tic background for talking pictures. 



''Naughty Marietta'' M G M's 

Talking picture rights to Victor Her- 
bert's "Naughty Marietta," operetta, have 
been obtained by M G M. 



$145 Buys Theatre at Sheriff's Sale 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
CINCINNATI. — When the Ohio theatre, Prospect, 
Ohio, was put up at a sheriff's sale recently, it was 
purchased by W. N. Hatch, Marion, Ohio, for $145. 
Hatch says he will wire the house. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



35 




Two S yncr o - 
disks, two Pick- 
ups and Fader 
complete for 
only 



500 



Built by Weber, whose tra- 
dition is PRECISION— the 
only Turn-Table with Spring 
Suspension. 



If Your Talkies Sound Like 

Squawkies 

You May Be Sure Your Patrons Will 

Wave *'Goodbye"— and Patronize Some Other 

Fellow's House 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Why Take This Chance — Be Calm and Smart 



INSTALL 



Kf 



SYNCRODIS 

SYNCHRONIZED TURNTABLES • 

Here is the turntable that produces the sort of talkies your patrons have a 
right to demand and love to hear. 

They'll prove the latter with clinking coin at the box office window. 

Many an owner can testify to this as "nothing but the truth" — for there are 
now more than 700 complete installations in daily efficient operation. 

If you desire details or want to place an order just 

Write, Wire or Phone Glenwood 6520 

WEBER MACHINE CORPORATION 

59 Rutter St., Rochester, N. Y. 



"New Lamp for Old; Liberty at 
Seattle Stages Big Comeback 

Once again the name Liberty theatre will signify the home of the finest motion 
picture productions of the day, and the name will be placed in a huge Neon 
sign in the same place which it occupied for many years. 

Not only is the Liberty coming back but Jensen & Von Herberg, its original 
owners and managers, are bringing it back, and its gala opening will mark the 
return of the equally famed firm to the amusement field of downtown Seattle, 
a field which they left four years ago, after a prolonged period of tremendous 
success, duplicated in a number of Portland houses. 




What comeback! When the Liberty at 
Seattle prepared to reopen, Jensen & Von 
Herberg told the public about it in urv- 
mistakable terms in this newspaper ad- 
vertisement. A good study in effective 
advertising. The opening is to be early 
in January. 



At the time the Liberty v/as built it was the 
most imposing picture theatre on the Pacific 
Coast, and as a matter of fact there was none 
finer in the United States. It seats nearly 
2,00C and its design still ranks with _the mod- 
ern theatres. Identified v/ith the early picture 
history of Seattle, it retains the glamour of 
romance for many of the city's residents, par- 
ticularly for today's young fathers and 
mothers, who as sweethearts were numbered 
among its first patrons. 

J. G. Von Herberg now announces that it 
will be finer than ever when the Liberty re- 
opens its doors. It is being completely refur- 
nished and brought up to date with new seats 
and hangings, but even more important is the 
quality of its new projection equipment. It is 
being equipped with the latest Western Elec- 
tric apparatus for the showing of sound and 
dialog pictures. The acoustics have been re- 
tested and found perfect for sound _ pictures 
and the new wide screen has been installed. 
More than $100,000 is being expended in the 
installation oif equipment and the refurnishing 
of the theatre. 

C. S. Jensen and J. V. von Herberg opened 
their first picture theatre in Seattle nearly 



twenty years ago on a prominent downtown 
corner now occupied by a sky-scraper. Later 
they took over the Alhambra, which was built 
in 1909 by the Shuberts. The Liberty was 
built for Jensen & Von Herberg in 1914 and 
from the beginning was a great success. Later 
the partners added the Strand, _ Neptune, 
Coliseum in Seattle and 34 other picture the- 
atres in the Pacific Northwest. 



Pacent Installs Device 

In College; Students to 

Hear Films on Saturdays 

Holy College at Worcester, Mass., has 
installed a type 2 M D A Pacent Repro- 
ducer, The system was installed in the 
school by Pacent engineers and will show 
both sound-on-film and disc pictures. 

The Holy Cross installation is fully com- 
plete, just like the system mstalled in _ a 
theatre. Sound and talking pictures will 
be run for students on Saturday nights and 
the evenings of all holidays. 



— ^Jensen & von herberg 
take pleasure in making 
this advance announce- 
ment that they will bring 
back to Seattle theatre- 
goers an old friend of 
many years standing. 

soon, THE LIBERTY, 
Seattle's best known and 
best loved institution of 
entertainment will again 
be ablaze with light. ..to 
the thousands of men, 
women and children 
who have missed THE 
LIBERTY during its days 
of darkness permit us 
to state that in its re- 
opening no expense has 
been spared. IT WILL 
BE THE FINEST ME- 
DIUM OF SOUND AND 
MOTION PICTURE EN- 
TERTAINMENT IN THE 
ENTIRE NORTHWEST! 

This Is our pledge to the 
hosts of fans who still 
retain pleasant memories 
of the good old days. 



36 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



Extended Runs Becoming Rule 

As Result of Talking Pictures 

Extended runs are becoming the rule, rather than the exception, in San Fran- 
cisco downtown moving picture theatres, and sound is credited with the change. 
New patrons are being attracted and old ones are being drawn back more fre- 
quently than was the case even a year ago. There may be a difference of opinion 
as to whether or not talk on the screen is cheap, but there is no denying the fact 
that it is getting the money. 



Out of eight first run houses on Market 
street, six are holding over their screen 
attractions this week. One of the theatres 
making a change has just finished a long run 
and th"e other is operated on a regular weekly 
change schedule. 

It Is interesting to note that out of the six 
holdovers only two are of the song and dance 
t3'pe, "Rio Rita," in its fourth week at the 
Orpheum, and "The Gold Diggers of Broad- 
way," in its sixth week at the Embassy. The 
other offerings are "Welcome Danger" at the 
Granada, "The Virginian" at the St. Francis, 
"The Cock-Eved World" at the Warfield and 
"The Mightv" at the California. 

Exhibitors are free to acknowledge that the 
average production of today is better than for 
some years, with the story coming in for in- 
creased attention. Improvements in picture 
making and the recording of the sound and 
dialog" have played a great part in makmg 
screen attractions more popular than ever and 



Brilliant Pictures and 
Perfect Sound 

Clear, realistic pictures, free- 
dom from eye-strain, and nat- 
ural tone quality is necessary 
to win and hold your patronage. 
To insure projection as good as 
you had before Sound, to get 
the best reproduction from your 
sound outfit, you must have the 
right kind of a screen. 
Vocalite Sound Screen is prov- 
en best by scientific test. Many 
successful installations have 
proved it to be superior in 
light, definition, and tone 
quality. 

It is the only screen optically 
and chemically correct for the 
projection of Colored Pictures. 
Full information will be sent 
on request, cost no higher than 
any good screen. 
Approved by Electrical Re- 
search Products, Inc., Western 
Electric Co., and other makers 
of Sound Equipment. 

Fire Proof - Non Inflammable 

Porous But Not Perforated 



SoumdScffieeiii 

The First Screen Scientifically Perfected for Soumi Pirliiret 

Beaded Screen Corp. 
Roosevelt, New York 



RENIER TABLES 

solve the turn table problem 
for all time 

Renier Manufacturing Co. 

15 Michigan Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 



the importation of actors from the stage has 
also been of great value. The result has been 
that adult theatre patronage has been increased 
and at the same time the interest of young 
folk has been kept up. 



Emerson Whithorne 
Suite Presented on 
R C A'Victor Program 

"A A'^audeville," a suite written by Emerson 
WHiithorne, American composer, will be played 
by the symphony orchestra over the R C A- 
Viclor Company Inc., (formerly R C A- Victor 
Corjioration of America) program to be 
broadcast through the NBC system at 10 
o'clock, eastern standard time, Thursday eve- 
ning, January 2. This is one of the first of a 
series of programs the organization is plan- 
ning to broadcast each Thursday night during 
1930 through the N B C system. 

Whithorne's suite is impressionistic, written 
after a visit to a music hall. The humor to 
be found in it is suggested by the titles of the 
various divisions, which he announces as fol- 
lo\vs : 

"A Vaudeville." Overture. 1. The Dublin 
Tapsters (Alolly and Colleen). 2. The Four 
Flamingoes (trapeze kings). 3. Mr. Hwang 
Fu and his oriental blossoms. 4. The Three 
Flashes (skating wizards). 

The best available talent is the aim of the 
RCA-Victor Company Inc. in the series of 
programs. The divisions of the company will 
sponsor the programs in the following rota- 
tion : Victor, Radiola, Radiotron. 

The R C A-Victor programs started last 
Thanksgiving, when John McCormack was the 
featured artist. 




This spectacular effect in lights was 
achieved for the opening of Warner 
Brothers' Beacon theatre at Broadway 
and 74th street, New York, on Christmas 
Eve. 



Pacent Ships First Sound 

Device to British Indies 

Pacent shipped its first sound equipment 
to the British Indies last week. The deal for 
the equipment was closed by W. G. Humphrey, 
managing director of the Colonial Film Ex- 
change, Ltd., and the Pacent Reproducer 
Corporation. 

Two Pacent devices will be installed in 
Port-of-Spain ; two in Barbados ; one in 
Georgetown, British Guiana and one in 
Caracus, Venezuela. 



Ireland Places Heavy 

Tax on Sound Equipment 

A custom duty of 33 1 /3 per cent on all 
talking picture equipment coming into the 
free state of Ireland has been imposed on the 
Irish exhibitor. 




The Projectionist 
Model, newest type 
of electro-nuignelic 
pick-up, developed 
by the Presto Ma- 
chine Products Co. 



Ele c tro - Magn e tic 
Pick- Up Deve toped 
For Theatres^ Use 

A new type of electro-magnetic pick-up, 
known as the Projectionist Model, has been 
developed by the Presto Machine Products 
Co., 70 Washington St., Brooklyn. It was 
designed to meet the special and practical 
considerations involved in theatre and similar 
auditorium applications. 

It is pointed out by this firm, a leader in 
the independent phonograph industry for 



more than a decade, that its latest product 
has been based on the highest practical effi- 
ciency factor that could be coordinated with a 
maximum of quality. 

A ballbearing base and pivot construction 
of smooth action and permanent alignment 
were designed to withstand rough profes- 
sional use. There is provided an adjustment 
for needle pressure weight for 33 1-3 records, 
and the head or unit can be instantly replaced, 
mechanically and electrically, without need of 
tools. Low or high impedance units can be 
supplied to match given amplifiers and spe- 
cially designed units to increase sharpness in 
speech enunciation are available. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



37 




THE STUDIO 



New York Showings 



"Sally" 

'T'HE ston' of "Sally" was never a work of 
genius, so the principal interest in the pic- 
ture centered about the star. And it may be 
said with a loud huzza that Alarilyn ^»Iiller is 
a distinguished addition to motion picture 
ranks. It would be trite to say that she can 
dance magnificently, sing pleasant, act suc- 
cessfully, look great ; she does all these 
things on the screen. Incidentlly, she looks 
lovely. 

Some of the best songs of "Sally" are re- 
tained, and that means that Jerome Kern is 
properlj- represented on the screen. A few 
new numbers have been added and it is hardly 
likely that they will give the familiar Kern 
melodies much of a race. 

The picture version of "Sally" ought to be 
a great success in those cities where the stage 
play did not take the icing off the cake. The 
picture is lavishly mounted and ought to catch 
the eye of picture goers not yet satiated with 
a Long Island society garden party, (a la mo- 
tion pictures) at its swankiest. — P. V. 



"The Lost Patrol" 

PRO PATRIA PICTURES, a British con- 
cern, has a fine dramatic production in the 
synchronized picture, "The Lost Patrol" which 
has just finished its second week at the Cameo. 

It's a story of eleven men on a patrol in 
Mesopotamia, cut off by Bedouins in an oasis, 
their horses stolen, their slow decimation as 
they are picked off one by one by the too 
often unseen enemy. It's a story of sacrifice 
and cowardice and heroism, a story that tells 
itself largely without the use of captions a 
silent "Journey's End" laid in another land, 
and no talk of valor or patriotism or "stick- 
ing it out." 

As I said, it's a fine dramatic piece and, 
consequently, will get its best reception from 
audiences not too addicted to the frothy in 
entertainment values. Cyril McLaglen is 
starred.— D. F. 



"The Unwritten Law" 

ANOTHER British picture (and the only 
good British talker I've seen) which de- 
serves favorable mention is International 
Photoplay's "The Unwritten Law," which was 
included in the premier program of the Film 
Bureau's Little Picture House. Again a som- 
ber rather than an entertaining note is sounded 
in three short reels of murder, lust, love and 
then another murder on a bleak English moor. 
The tenseness which is the keynote of this 
film is sustained from start to finish, the act- 
ing is superb, the recording good. A jarring 
note is the introduction of bad and unneces- 
sary music in two of the most dramatic se- 
quences. Otherwise the thing is fine. — D. F. 



Coast Sees 1930 as Boom Year 
Even Though 1929 Was a Bust 

Paramount Starts on Extensive Expansion Program — Warners Buy 

"Scarlet Pages" for Production as Vitaphone Special — 

Fox Has 30 in Preparation or Production 

By DOUGLAS HODGES 

HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 3L — Prosperity ballyhoo to the contrary all agree 
that 1929 in Hollywood was a bust and that the jinx is off now for another 
year. 

Nineteen thirty will be a boom year, they say, and it has already taken a 
turn in that direction. 

Paramount, in addition to announcing new productions to be launched at 

on an extensive expansion 



once, explains this week that work is starting- 
program. 

A four-story administration building will 
replace that little one-story affair that 
houses business departments, estimators 
and bookkeepers. A new assembly shop; 
an overhead railway; new projection 
rooms; a portrait gallery; and 12 new 
stages. All are included in the plan. 



Warner Buys "Scarlet Pages" 

Jack Warner today announced the pur- 
chase of the play, "Scarlet Pages," for a 
Vitaphone special next year. It is a Broad- 
way show that met considerable favor in 
the East lately. 

Warner's lot has been dull for a long 
time, but took advantage of the holidays 
to shoot a variety called "The Potters," 
with the University of Southern California's 
football squad as a big feature. The foot- 
ballers needed practice for their New 
Year's game and had no classwork to keep 
them occupied. 

Their services were obtained, 'tis said, 
quite reasonably, too. 

30 on Boards at Fox 

Fox Films has a group of pictures either 
in work, to start shortly or in process of 
preparation aggregating 30 in number and 
of such diversified nature that every ele- 



Paris Theatre Open 
Steadily for 39 Hours 



(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— A cable 
received by E. E. Shauer, general 
manager of Paramount's Foreign de- 
partment stated that the Paramount 
theatre in Paris had to keep its doors 
open and the show going for 39 hours 
to accommodate the crowds which 
Hocked to see the screen version of 
"Abie's Irish Rose" during the 
Christmas holidays. The doors were 
opened at 11 o'clock on Tuesday 
morning and were not closed until 
1 :30 o'clock Thursday morning. 



ment that appeals to picture lovers is in 
evidence. 

The group mentioned includes musicals, 
stage successes, mystery stories, best sell- 
ers, blood red drama, modern Westerns, do- 
mestic dramas and the like. 

"The Girl Who Wasn't Wanted" will fea- 
ture George O'Brien and will be directed 
by A. F. Erickson. Owen Davis, Sr., is 
working on the adaptation and dialog with 
Dudley Nichols. Donald Davis, his son, 
will stage direct. 

In "On the Level," a Fox-Movietone pro- 
duction which goes into work at once, Vic- 
tor McLaglen will play the role of a riveter 
who works in the high and dizzy spots 
building New York City skyscrapers. Irv- 
ing Cummings will direct. 

John Ford, Fox Film director, is ready 
to start on "Louis Beretti," based on the 
novel by Donald Clarke. It is the story 
of a New York boy whose education was 
in the School of Experience on New York's 
teeming east side and who achieved a most 
unique ambition. Joseph Reilly and Joe 
Brown have already been cast. 

Inspired by the success scored by Moran 
& Mack in their first screen appearance. 
Paramount is determined to make their sec- 
ond offering even better. As a result they 
have assigned Richard Wallace to guide 
this team in "Two Black Crows in AEF." 
Joan Peers, Miss Farrington, Walter Mc- 
Grail, Frank Beal and Walter Weems are 
in the cast. 



Frank Reicher Goes to 
MGM Under New Contract 
As the Director of Dialog 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 31.— Frank Reicher 
has been signed as dialog director for MGM 
on a six months contract. He will move to 
that organization January 1 when this con- 
tract expires with Pathe. 

The contract came as the result of his work 
on the Vilma Banky film "Sunkissed" for 
M G M. Reicher directed the dialog on the 
German version of this film. He recently com- 
pleted the direction of dialog on "The Fire 
Walker" at RKO. Sally O'Neil played the 
leading role. Reicher's first assignment under 
the new contract has not been announced. 



38 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



Pathe Films Two Sound Shorts 
At Gramercy Photophone Studio 

Remarkable Progress Made by Paramount on "The Big Pond" 

Despite the Fact That Two Versions of This Bilingual 

Production Are Being Made Simultaneously 

By DOUGLAS FOX 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31. — Pathe is scheduled to make two short talking com- 
edies at the Gramercy RCA Photophone studio this week. They are tenta- 
tively titled "A Beauty Spot" and "I Told You So." Information on directors 
and casts was not forthcoming from John C. Flinn, Pathe Eastern produc- 
tion head. 

It is understood, however, that the arrangement with the Gramercy plant 
is only a temporary affair and that as soon as Pathe recovers from the after- 
math of the disastrous fire at Sound Studios, production will once more be 
on an even basis with some sort of certainty about what's what and why. 



They're using the American Chicle fac- 
tory in Astoria as one of the backdrops for 
"The Big Pond," Paramount's first bi-lin- 
gual picture, and last week they took the 
star. Chevalier, there to look it over. 
Chevalier learned that six million sticks of 
gum were made every day in this one fac- 
tory, that there were many other factories 
and that the gum per capita consumption of 
this country was something enormous. He 
hasn't quite figured it all out yet. But he's 




THE 

Doorway ol Hospiiality 




J.HE SOUTHLAND'S 
favorite hotel is the Hollywood Plaza. 
Here CaUfomians congregate when ia Loa 
Angeles. 

Located in Hollywood, this popular 
rendezvous is nearer to everything to see 
aud do. Beaches, the downtown shopping 
district, smart Hollywood shops, golf, night 
life and all sorts of diversions siuTound the 
hotel. 

Pig'n Whistle Dining Service insures the 
best of food. Therefore, when you are next 
in Los Angeles be sure to stop here. 

THE HOLLYWOOD 

PLA^A 
HOTEL 

Vine Street at Hollywood Boulevard 
LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA 



got the habit. As a matter of fact, he's 
had it for quite some time. 

Produce Two Versions at Once 

His picture is on schedule. When you 
consider that Paramount is really making 
two versions at once their progress is re- 
markable. The Frenchman sings four 
songs in each version — which means that 
he has to memorize eight — also the French 
dialog by no means conforms strictly to 
that of the English version, although, in the 
main, the script is the same. Consequently 
the star and his feminine lead, the soft- 
voiced Claudette Colbert, have plenty to 
keep them busy. 

They made a two reeler at the Astoria 
plant last week which, they say, will be 
worth seeing. It's called "The Twentieth 
Amendment" and is based on the premise 
that every man must marry as many 
women as he can support. In it are Jack 
Haley, Margaret Lee, Madeline Cameron, 
of "Follow Thru," Evalyn Hoey, of "Fifty 
Thousand Frenchmen," Evangeline Raleigh, 
lately of "Fioretta," and three motion pic- 
ture girls who have been doing quite a bit 
of good work at the studio, Mona Palmer, 
Erica Newman and Charlotte Terry. 

A Schwab-Mandel Picture 

It's partly a Schwab and Mandel picture 
and is a .side issue in line with the set-up 
whereby the musical comedy producers 
turn out at least one feature a year for 
Paramount. 

Giovanni Martinelli, tenor of the Metro- 
politan Opera Company, traveled to Brook- 
lyn last week to sing an aria from "Celeste 
Aida." With him was Adam Didur, for 21 
years basso of the Metropolitan. Olga 
Didur was the soprano. A large chorus 
and orchestra from the Metropolitan, con- 
ducted by Giuseppe Bomboschek, aug- 
mented the program. 

Two other numbers made at the East- 
ern Vitaphone Studios featured two vaude- 
ville and musical comedy stars, Lou Holtz 
and Herman Timberg. 

Elect Nihlo May fair Club 
President for 3rd Term 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 31.— Fred Niblo has 
been elected president of the Mayfair Club 
for the third time. Conrad Nagel is vice- 
president. Irving Thalberg was re-elected 
secretary and M. C. Levee, treasurer. Jack 
Warner is a member of the board of directors. 
Charles Christie was elected chairman of the 
board of governors. The club membership 
includes most of the prominent names in 
films. 



HOLLYWOOD 

SCREENINGS 



"Hit the Deck" 

COLOR does things for a show. "Hit the 
Deck" would have been another picture 
if it were all black and white. Its last three 
reels are all color with fadeout likewise. I'm 
not given to enthusing about pictures but if 
it's all the same to you I'll rave a little about 
this one. 

Jack Oakie's excellent but if he gets any 
ideas that he is any better than Polly Walker 
as Looloo he's wrong. Polly gives you pure 
undiluted hokum and how you go for it. 
Why not hokum? The Chinese like it. The 
Spaniards live on it. And the folks back 
home invented it. The hokum starts with 
Jack kissing Polly. From there on it gets 
rolling until your eyes are wet and your nose 
is sniffling. 

Oakie's gags; his ad libbing; his chatter 
and his mug are a good match for the pul- 
chritudinous Walker, whose voice is pretty, 
well controlled and rich. 

The color sets in when Polly's party gets 
under way on the flagship of the fleet. All 
the men are Smiths and all the girls are 
good looking. It's at the battleship ball that 
Polly finds her Smith and loses him to the 
jailer. 

Oakie and Walker are stage trained. Oakie 
has all the appearance of having been brought 
up near the footlights. 

Luther Reed has put to practice much of 
the fine experience he has had in the past 
year with sound pictures. That experience 
is valuable to him and has aided in making 
"Hit the Deck" one of the finer pictures of 
the year. 

Nate Slott and Andy Clark add several 
fine comedy touches to the picture. They are 
a good team. And — mark this down — this is 
the same Andy who used to be on the Herald- 
World in the Hollywood office. We're claim- 
ing him so give him a big hand ! — D. H. 



"Blaze O' Glory" 

MOLAZE O' GLORY" is Eddie Dowling's 
-D picture. It's a man's picture. War and 
court rooms. Betty Compson is in it but 
she has a rather insignificant role. And un- 
less America is fed up on war stuff it is a 
very good show. 

H. B. Walthall has the best role he has had 
for many annums and he does himself proud 
with it. His voice is suited to defense coun- 
sel such as he portrays ; so is his face and 
figure. It is Walthall's presentation of the 
final plea for the young man's puny life that 
probably sticks in your mind the longest of 
anything in the picture. The writer of the 
pleading deserves credit for possibly writing 
the best oration of its kind ever put on the 
screen. 

Renaud Hoffman directed the picture. He 
has handled the story in fine form and, ex- 
cept for the matter of cutting, which he may 
not have supervised, has turned out a very 
creditable job. 

Eddie Dowling is one of the finest enter- 
tainers who has come to the talking screen 
from the stage. His manner is that of a sea- 
soned actor. He has nothing of the stage 
fright or voice frogs that have put many of 
the erstwhile silent bimboes on the dead and 
dumb list. He still gets a little fixed when 
addressing the microphone but that is a habit 
that is more easily overcome than others you 
have tolerated. Actors and producers are 
finding that reading lines is an art not ac- 
quired over night. — D. H. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



39 



Herald- World's Production Directory 



STORY 


DIRECTOR CHIEF BRAND 
PLAYERS NAME 


STARTING 
DATE 


Christie Studios 


"Scrappily 
Married" 


A. Leslie Pearce Bert Roach 

Johnny Arthur 
Ruth Taylor 


Dec. 21 


Columbia Studios 


"Love of lil" 


Victor Heerman Sally Starr 

Johnny Arthur 


Nov. 19 


"Black Sheep" 


Archie Mayo Dorothy Revier 
Jack Holt 


Nov. 30 


Educational Studios 


NO PRODUCTION 


First National Studios 


"Bride of the 
Reeiment" 


John F. Dillon Vlvienne Segal 
Wallace Beery 
Walter Pidgeon 


Nov. 14 


"Back Pay" 


Wm. Seiter Corinne Griffith 


Nov. 29 


"Bright Lights" 


Michael Curtiz Dorothy Mackaill 
Frank Fay 
Noah Beery 


Dec. 16 


"His Woman" 


Wm. Beaudine Monte Blue 
Lila Lee 


Dec. 23 


"Other Men's 
Wives" 


Clarence Badger Billie Dove 

Sidney Blackmer 


Dec. 23 


Fox Studios 


"Golden Calf" 


Millard Webb All Star Cast 


Dec. 13 


"Temple Tower" 


Donald Gallaher Henry B. Walthall 

Marguerite Churchill 
Kenneth MacKenna 


Nov. 30 


"I Hear Yon 
Calling Me" 


Frank Borzage John McCormack 


Aug. 1 


"DoUar 

Princess" 


Alexander Korda J. Harold Murray 


Nov. 30 


Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios 


"Revne" 


Charles Reisner All Star Cast 


Dec. 9 


"On the Set" 


Ed Sedgwick Buster Keaton 
Anita Page 
Charles King 


Nov. 21 


"Fresh From 
College" 


Sam Wood Wm. Haines 
Phyllis Crane 


Nov. 19 


"Sunkissed" 


Victor Seastrom Vilma Banky (German Version) 


Nov. 4 


"House of Troy" 


Robert Leonard Ramon Novarro 


Nov. 19 


"The Song 
Writer" 


Marshall Neilan Leila Hyams 

Lawrence Gray 


Dec. 21 


Metropolitan Studios 



"Society Sinners" Walter Lang 



Lloyd Hughes 
Olive Borden 



"Hell's Angels" Howard Hughes Ben Lyon 

Jean Harlow 



"Chords of 
Memory" 



Robert Bruce 



Tom Dempsey 



(Cruze Prods.) Dec. 2 

(Hughes) Oct. 31, 1927 

(Bruce Prods.) Dec. 21 



STORY 



DIRECTOR 



CHIEF 
PLAYERS 



BRAND 
NAME 



Paramount Studios 



"Come Out of 
the Kitchen" 



"Slightly 
Scarlet" 

"Sarah & Son" 

"Burning Up" 

"Honey" 

"Two Black 
Crows in the 
A. E. F." 



Pathe Studios 



"Paris to 
Bagdad" 



Howard Higgin 



William Boyd 
Helen Twelvetrees 



R K O Studios 



"Strictly Lambert Hillyer Rod La Rocque 

Business" Dorie Kenyon 

"Sergeant Herbert Brenon Chester Morris 

Grischa" Betty Compson 



Roach Studios 



"Blotto" 



James Parrott Laurel & Hardy 



Tiffany Studios 



NO PRODUCTION, 



Tec-Art Studios 



"Hell Harbor" Henry King Lape Velez (Inspiration) 



United Artists Studios 



"Sailor's Geo. Fitzmavurice Dolores Del Rio 

Sweetheart" Edmund Lowe 



Universal Studios 



"King of Jazz John Murray Paul Whiteman 
Revue" Anderson 

"All Quiet" Lewis Milestone All Star Cast 



Warner Brothers Studios 



STARTING 
DATE 



Wm. Wellman 


Buddy Rogers 


Dec. 7 


Wesley Ruggles 


Nancy Carroll 


Dec. 2 


Frank Tuttle 


Gary Cooper 


Dec. 2 


Louis Gasnier 


Clive Brook 


Nov. 26 


Edwin Knopf 


Evelyn Brent 


Dorothy Arzner 


All Star Cast 


Nov. 18 


Edw. Sutherland 


Richard Arlen 


Nov. 9 


Wesley Ruggles 


Nancy Carroll 


Dec. 2 


Richard Wallace 


Moran & Mack 


Dee. 14 



Dec. 19 



Dec. 9 
Nov. 18 



Dec. 11 



Semit. 6 



Dec. 2 



Nov. 4 
Nov. 18 



NO SHOOTING 



40 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



THE SHORT FEATURE 



Scenics with Music and Dialogs 
Holding Interest^ Bruce Shows 

Recognition of the value attached to the talking and musical scenic short 
feature is evidenced in that fact that ten of these single reel novelty pictures 
have been completed by Robert C. Rruce Productions for release by Paramount. 
Two more are to be produced for winter release under the contract. 



Hisses Start Trouble; 
It's Only a Leaky Valve 

(Sjecial to the Hcrald-World) 

NEW ORLEANS, Dec. 31.— A 
loud and prolonged hissing at the 
performance of the mechanical voices 
in "Footlights and Fools" at the 
Strand theatre developed into some- 
thing more than a rude interruption. 
Patrons in the front part of the the- 
atre could see or hear nothing which 
should cause an irate person to hiss, 
so they decided the noise had a sin- 
ister note and became momentarily 
panicky, rising from their seats in a 
body. Several shouts to sit down and 
the continued voices of the actors on 
the screen calmed the alarmed ones 
almost immediately. Investigation re- 
vealed a defective valve in a radiator. 



Using the Metropolitan sound studios in 
Hollywood as a base of operations, and with 
Western Electric apparatus, Bruce is covering- 
scenic backgrounds throughout the West and 
in Canada. 

Four More Completed 

The four latest productions to be delivered 
include a wide range of subjects and are called 
"Salt Water Ballads," "Wanderlust," "Hill 
Billy Harmony" and "Voices of Lonely Men." 

"Salt Water Ballads," concerning a ship- 
wreck on the Northern California coast, has 
a big cast including Hank Mann, Jimmie 
Adams, Frank Yaconelli, Eddie Baker, Joe 
Marba, Gus Leonard and Otto Fries. 

"Wanderlust" has scenery from Alberta, 
British Columbia, Montana, Hawaii, Wyoming, 
Washington and Oregon, and is played by 
Anna Chance, Bill Gillespie, Otto Fries, and 
Billy Watson, Jr. There are tour separate 
and distinct sound tracks blended simultane- 
ously in one scene. 

Coyote's Howling Recorded 

"Hill Billy Harmony," laid in the Kentucky 
Mountains, is played by Gus Leonard, with 
four unique instruments of his manufacture, 
Tom Dempsey, Charles Coffey, Jules Allen, 



Andrew Swan, Dot Wolbert, and a group of 
oldtime fiddlers. 

"Voices of Lonely Men," filmed along the 
old Santa Fe Trail, presents the wagon train 
days of 1880 in New Mexico and Arizona. 
Jules Allen, known as the Cowboy Singer of 
New Mexico, is one featured musical artist. 
A novelty is a real coyote howding in the 
mooiilight back of the campfire of muleskin- 
ners and cowboys. 



Columbia to Issue Unique 
Press Sheet on East Series 
Of Short Subject Releases 

A four page press sheet of a magazine 
type has been devised by Columbia to help 
the exhibitor sell their short subjects. The 
sheet contains stories which are written so 
that they may be used either with the series 
as a unit or with any single release in the 
group. Posters and lobby displays on each 
series are also designed. 

The publication also contains special stories, 
teasers, catchlines, advertising suggestions, ad 
cuts, exploitation ideas and illustrations. 



Paramount News Man 
Gets Sound Pictures 
Of the Haitian Crisis 

Lou Hutt, Paramount sound news camera- 
man, flew 1,500 miles with 2,000 pounds of 
sound recording equipment to photograph the 
Haitian riots, shown in the current issue of 
the Paramount Sound News. 

Emanuel Cohen, editor of Paramount Sound 
News, in explaining how the beat was secured 
stated : 

"Through our connection with the Associ- 
ated Press we early received a hint of the 
seriousness of the story. Lou Hutt happened 
to be in Havana at the time with his sound 
man George Westbrook and a half a ton of 
sotmd equipment. Our news desk managed to 
reach him by telephone out at the race track 
which is within a few miles of the Havana 
flying field. Connections worked out perfectly 
and within an hour Hutt had packed all his 
sound equipment, his sound man and himself 
into a mail plane and was on his way by air 
to Haiti. 

"Two days after he arrived on the Island 
Hutt shipped aboard the mail plane sound 
pictures made of the revolt. The plane itself 
was met at Miami by another staff man, the 
pictures picked up, cleared through the cus- 
toms and again rushed on to Broadway. Hutt 
himself, once the picture beat had been se- 
cured, spent another two days mopping up 
the story and then embarking all his sound 
equipment and sound man aboard the mail 
plane again, he flew back to Havana in time 
to make pictures of the opening of the winter 
racing season." 

Jack Haskell to Direct 

Vitaphone Color Varieties 

Jack Haskell has been signed by W^arner 
Brothers to direct technicolor Vitaphone Va- 
rieties. Haskell was brought to Hollywood 
by Warner Brothers to stage dance numbers 
and ensembles in "Show of Shows." His first 
Vitaphone Variety will be "Evolution of the 
Dance." 



Metropolitan Makes 84 Talkers 
In Year and Plans More in 1930 

It is doubtful whether anyone would have predicted in January of 1929 that 
as many as 84 talking pictures would be completed in twelve months at the 
Metropolitan Sound Studios in Hollywood, particularly when one took into 
consideration the fact that the first talking long feature made there was com- 
pleted only a bit over a year ago. Not only has that record been achieved but 
the studio executives are expecting to increase the output of long pictures in 1930. 



Eighteen all-talking long pictures and 66 
short features have been produced there since 
Douglas MacLean's "The Carnation Kid" was 
completed. Among outstanding productions 
recorded there, with its Western Electric 
equipment, are Harold Lloyd's "Welcome 
Danger" ; Caddo's "Hell's Angels," on which 
interiors have been completed all in dialog; 
Sono-Art's "The Rainbow Man," and James 
Cruze's "The Great Gabbo." 

All the Christie two-reel talking plays for 
Paramount were recorded at this plant, with 
Western Electric sound on film and disc. 

There are now three complete sound chan- 
nels operating simultaneously for interior re- 
cording, besides the portable equipments which 
frequently are used, so that as many as five 
companies may be filming at once in the 
studios or on location. 

Most recently completed productions at 
Metropolitan are Halperm Brothers' "Danger- 
ous Business," with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., 



Jeanette Loff, Judith Barrie and Marie Pre- 
vost, which is for Tiffany release, and Sono- 
Art's "Blaze O' Glory" with Eddie Dowling 
and Betty Compson, which will be distributed 
through Sono Art-World Wide. Now being 
produced are James Cruze's "Society Sinners," 
with a large cast, and the Edward Small pro- 
duction for Columbia release, "Playing the 
Market." 



National Screen Lauded 

For Christmas Trailer 

National Screen's Christmas trailers in 
sound received many gratifying responses 
from exhibitors in letters to the New York 
office. Among the exhibitors that sent letters 
of appreciation were : E. H. Beck, of the 
Home theatre, Detroit, Mich. ; Joe Shagrin, 
Park theatre, Youngstown, O., and A. G. 
Hettesheimer, Orpheum theatre, Cincinnati, O. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



41 



COLUMBIA 

Victor Gems 

(One Reel) 

AT A TALKIE STUDIO, Buddy Doyle, directed by Basil 

Smith. Beleased Aug. li. 1929. 
PARLOR PEST, Boyce Combe, directed by Basil Smith. Ee- 

leased Am. iS, 1923. „ ., „ 

HARMONY CLUB, Geoffrey O'Hara. directed by Baal Smith. 

EelMsed Sept. 11, 1929. ^ ^ 

LISTEN. LADY, Grace LaKue. Hale Hamilton, directed by 

BasU Smith. B*ieased Sept. 25. 1929. 
ON THE BOULEVARD, Sweet and McNaughtoB. directed by 

Basil Smith. Released Oct. 9, 1929. „ „ „ 
BOY WANTED, Joe Phillips, directed by Basil Smith. Re- 
leased Oct. 23. 1929. . . o .1 
DAY OF A MAN OF AFFAIRS, A, Maurice Holland, 

directed by Basil Smith. Released Nov. 6, 1929. 



Short 
Features 
With Sound 



Silly Symphonies 

(One Reel) 



SKELETON DANCE. Released Aug. 29, 1929. 
EL TERRIBLE TORREADOR. Released Sept. 26. 1929. 
SPRINGTIME. 
HELL'S BELLS. 

Krazy Kat Kartoons 

(One Reel) 

RATSKIN. Released Aug. 15. 1929. 
CANNED MUSIC. Released Sept. 12. 1929. 
PORT WHINES. 

SOLE MATES. « . • 

EDUCATIONAL 

Mack Sennett Talking Comedies 

BRIDE'S RELATIONS. THE (136SJ. Johnny Burke. 
Thelma Hill. Andy Clyde. Johnny Burke and Ihelma Hill 
spend honeymoon with hick relations. 1723 ft. Released 
Jan. 13, 1929. ^ . . 

WHIRLS AND GIRLS (1364). Harry Grlbbon and Andy 
Clyde Harry and Andy get mixed up in a hornets' nest 
of flappers. 1790 ft. Released Feb. 24, 1929. 

BROADWAY BLUES (1362). Johnny Burke and 'Hielma 
Hill — a couple of ham actors who bring home tl«e bacon. 
1874 ft. Released March 10, 1929. ^ . j 

BEES' BUZZ, THE (1365). Harry Gnbbon and Andy 
Clyde. Harry and An<^ get mixed up in a hornet's nest 
while attempting to thwart the marriage of Andy's daughter. 
1908 ft Released April 7, 1929. ^ ™u , 

BIG PALOOKA, THE (1366). Gribbon, Clyde and Thelma 
mil in a modem shotgun wedding. 1970 ft. EeleaMd 
May 12. 1929. , ^ „ 

JAZZ mAmAS (788). Virginia Lee Corbin and Vernon 
Dent. First all-color, all-talking comedy. In absence of 
crime, international detectives frame robbery. 2 reels. 
(Disc only). Released June 30. 1929. 

aiRL CRAZY (1367). Andy Clyde. Vernon Dent and Alma 
Bennett. The follies of youth committed by a sexagenarian, 
and what a run for his money Alma gave him. 1862 ft. 
Released June 9, 1929. „,„ , 

BARBER'S DAUGHTER, THE (1368). Thelma Hill In the 
title role, and Andy Clyde as her father. Keeping tracls 
of her romances keeps Andy busier than his tonsorlal 
parlor. 1844 ft. Released July 21, 1929. 

CONSTABULE, THE (1369). An arresting comedy with 
Harry Gribbon, the constable, wrongly accusing Andy Clyde 
and Thelma Hill's fiance of a robbery. 2006 ft. Released 
Aug. 11. 1929. „ .^^ . , ^ . 

LUNKHEAD. THE (1370). Harry Gnbbon. Andy Clyde 
and Thelma Hill cooking a stew in a restaurant Harry 
wants to marry Thelma, but she has other plans. She 
"frames" Harry in a manner that cures him of her tor 
life. 1840 ft Released Sept. 1, 1929. , „, ^ 

■OLFERS, THE (1371). Harry Gribbon, Andy Clyde and 
Thelma Hill. Comedy as a matter of course. They aU 
"play at" pasture pool, but Charlie Guest, welUmown 
California pro. shows them how it should be done. 1874 
ft. Released Sept. 22. 1929. 

HOLLYWOOD STAR. THE (1372). Harry Gribbon. Andy 
Clyde and Marjorie Beebe. Satire on the old cowboy 
meller and the talking picture In which everything that 
could go wrong, does go wrong. 1790 ft. Released Oct. 
13 1929 

CLANCY AT THE BAT (1373). Harry Gribbon and Andy 
Clyde. Rolling the ball of fun on the diamond. As a 
batter. Harry proves to be slightly batty. 1954 ft. For 
release Nov. 3. 1929. 

NEW HALF-BACK, THE (1374). Harry Gribbon and Andy 
Clyde . Football taken not too seriously. 2 reels. For 
ivlcasp Nov. 24. 1929. 

OPPERCUT O'BRIEN (1375). Harry Gribbon, Andy Clyde. 
Marjorie Beebe. The two boys are opposite fight pro- 
moters. Ifini feet Release December 15. 1929. 

SCOTCH : Clvde. McPhail, Sevan. Tlielby. Released Janu- 
ary 19. 1930. Two reels. 

Coronet Talking Comedies 

Starring Edward Everett Horton 

ELIGIBLE MR. BANGS, THE (446). The amusing pursuit 
and capture of Edward Everett Horton by Florence El- 
dridge. 1895 ft. Released Jan. 13. 1929. 

ASK DAD (447). Edward Everett Horton and Ruth 
Benlck. Two men In love with a maid. Who won? Ask 
Dad. 1872 ft. Released Feb. 17. 1929. 

GOOD MEDICINE (451). Edward Everett Horton as a 
patient-less doctor who gets a position in a hospital 
through Olive Tell. Enid Bennett plays the part of the 
wife. 1.868 feet Released December 8. 1929. 

RIGHT BED, THE (448). Edward Everett Horton found 
a blonde. But his wife (Betty Boyd) was a brunette. 
1523 ft. Released April 14. 1929. 

TRUSTING WIVES (449). Mixing love sonnets with marsh- 
mallow cake . Edward Everett Horton and Natalie Moor- 
head in a battle of wits. 1699 ft. Released June 23. 1929. 

PRINCE GABBY (450). A silk-hat burglar who came to 
steal but stayed to conquer. 1615 ft. Released Sept. 15. 
1929. 

Jack White Talking Comedies 

HOT AND HOW: Harold Goodwin. PhyUls Crane. Re- 
leased in Januarv, 1930. Two reels. 

ZIPl BODMl BANGl (1663). Raymond McKee takes his 
family to the circus and has a wild time. Conlin and 
Glass in the supporting oast 1805 ft. Released Marcli 
17. 1929 

MADHOUSE, THE (1668). Eddie Lambert and Alonty 
Collins. Everytliing, includlnpr the kitchen sink, militates 
against a peaceful Sunday morning. 1643 feet. Released 
December 1, 1929. 

COLD SHIVERS (1664). Ghosts that are all In the spirit 
of fun. Al Thompson "plays dead" and plants ghosts In 
the house to test heroism of relations. Raymond McKee 
and Lucille Hatton win. 1741 ft Released May 19. 1929. 

LOVERS' DELIGHT (1665). Johnny Arthur and Pauline 
Qaron are a pair of the one-year-old lovebirds whose 
neighbors arc "cats." 1523 ft. Released .Tune 30, 1929. 

LOOK OUT BELOW (168S). Raymond McKee Is used *3T 
nielma Todd to make her husband Jealous and It develops 
Into a whoopee party on skyscraper girders. 1614 ft. 
Released Aug. 18, 1929. 



HUNTING THE HUNTER (1667). Raymond McKee and 
Harold Goodwin. Their wives didn't mind their hunting 

wild ammais, but they drew the line at wild women. 
1506 ft. Released October 20, 1929. 

Lloyd Hamilton Tcdking Comedies 

HIS BIG MINUTE (1005). Lloyd Hamiiton, a lad from 
the country, comes to Bloody Gulch and gets in wrong 
with a couple of bad men. 1805 ft. Released May 5. 
1929. 

DON'T BE NERVOUS (1006). Uoyd HamUton. who is afraid 
of his own shadow, is mistaken for a gangster. Even the 
gangster's moU makes the mistake and makes violent love 
to kim. 1718 ft Released July 7, 1929. 

GRASS SKIRTS (1010). Euth Hiatt marries Lloyd, an In- 
valid, in the thought that his death wiU make her eligible 
for the Jolly Widow's club. Lloyd, however, gets weU. 
1667 feet. Released December 22. 

HIS BABY DAZE (1007). Hamilton is nursemaid to little 
Billy, who turns out to be circus midget, bent on a 
nefarious mission. 1751 ft Released Aug. 18, 1929. 

PEACEFUL ALLEY (1008). Lloyd Hamilton tries to reform 
little Douglas Scott who has "taking ways." 1835 ft 
Released Sept. 29, 1929. 

TOOT SWEET (1009). Lloyd likes Lena and she plays him 
for all he's got and then leaves him flat for her apache. 
1802 ft. Released Nov. 10. 1929. 

Lupino Lane Comedies 

SHIP MATES (2613). Lupino Lane is a goofy gob, and his 

fellow-sailors make the most of his sappiness. 1570 ft. 

Released April 21. 1929. 
BUYING A GUN (2012). Fun In a gun shop with the 

brothers Lupino (Wallace and Lupino Lane.) 1531 ft. 

Released July 14. 1929. 
FIRE PROOF (2614). Lupino Lane starts an opposition Are 

house and his little four-year-old playmate tries to boost 

his business by starting llres. 1598 ft. Released Sept. 

8 1929. 

purely' CIRCUMSTANTIAL (2615). Lane is a newlywed 

against whose happiness circumstances seem m conspire. 
2 reels. Released Nov. 17, 1929. 

Mermaid Talking Comedies 

CRAZY NUT, THE (1436). Franklin Pangbom Imagined he 
had every imaginable Ulness. When the doctor told him 
he would die. he promptly proceeded to get well. John T. 
Murray and Vivien Oakland in the oast. 1480 ft. Ee- 
Is&scd iTuiis 2 1929 

ROMANCE DE' LUXE (1439). Monty CoUing and Nancy 
Dover. Love and danger generously mixed. Thrills of the 
high and dizzy type. 1335 feet. Released December 29. 
1929. 

TICKLISH BUSINESS (1437). Monty Collins and Vernon 
Dent are a couple of Tin Pan AUey guys, and women and 
songs are their major troubles. 1843 ft. Released Aug. 
25. 1929. 

TALKIES.' THE (1438). A funny idea of how a talking 
picture Is made. Monty Collins and Vernon Dent are the 
goofy "sound experts." 1522 ft. Released Oct. 27. 1929. 

Tuxedo Talking Comedies 

SOCIAL SINNERS (1880). A bug exterminator mingles In 
high society. Raymond McKee. Cissy Fitzgerald, Marion 
Byron. 1710 ft. Released Sept. 1. 1S29. 

DON'T GET EXCITED (1881). Lloyd Ingraham sails for 
Hawaii to get away from an annoying guitar-strumming 
neighbor, only to And him occupying the adjoining cabin 
on the boat. Harold Goodwin. Addie McPhail and EsteUe 
Rradlev 1444 ft Released Nov. 10. 1929 

DREAMING IT IN: Raymond McKee. Philip Smalley. Re- 
leased January 20, 1930. Two reels. 

FITZ 'PATRICK 

PEOPLE BORN IN SEPTEMBER: Horoscope, obtainable on 

disc and film. For release August 26. One reel. 
BARCELONA TO VALENCIA: Traveltalk. on disc only. 

For release August 26. One reel. 
LABOR DAY: Holiday short Obtainable on film only. 

For release August 26. 
PEOPLE BORN IN OCTOBER: On fllm and disc. For re- 

leass September 14. One reel. 
VALENCIA TO GRANADA: Traveltalk. On fllm and disc. 

For release September 21. One reel. 
COLUMBUS DAY: HoUday short On disc only. One reel. 

For release September 21. 
PEOPLE BORN IN NOVEMBER: Horoscope. On fllm and 

disc. For release October 3. One reeL 
GRANADA TO TOLEDO: Traveltalk. On fllm and diso. 

For release October 15. One reel. 
ARMISTICE DAY: Holiday short. On disc only. For re- 
lease October 15. One reel. 
THANKSGIVING DAY: HoUday short On disc only. For 

release October 15. One reel. 
PEOPLE BORN IN DECEMBER: Horoscope. On fllm and 

disc. For relea.w October 2. One reel. 
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR: Holiday short. Diso only. 

For release November 9. One reel. 
IN OLD MADRID: Traveltalk. Film and disc. For release 

November 15. One reel. 
PEOPLE BORN IN JANUARY: Horoscope. Film and disc 

For release Deo. 1. One reel. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

M G M Colortone Revue 

CLIMBING GOLDEN STAIRS (R-1). Released Aug. 3. 
1929. 

MEXICANA (R-2). Released Aug. 31. 1929. 
DOLL SHOP. THE (Tt-3). Released Sept. 28. 1929. 
GENERAL. THE (R-4). Released Oct. 26. 1929. 
SHOOTING GALLERY. THE (R-5). Released Nov. 23. 1929. 
GEMS OF M G M (R-5). Dec. 21. 1929. 

Charley Chase Hal Roach Comedies 

STEPPING OUT (1S47): Going out without wife to haye 

a good time. Release November 2. 
LEAPING LOVE (1847): Charlie falls In love with both 

mother and daughter but, marries cigarette girl. Release 

June 22. 



THE BIG SQUAWK (1710): In which bashful Charley wins 

his girl. Iteltiase May 26. 
SNAPHY SNEEZER (1729): Charlie has hay fever In this 

one. Release July 20. 1029. 
CRAZY FIGHT (1702): Charlie in a role as a dancer. 

Release September 7, 1929. 
REAL McCOY, THE: Charley Chase, Thelma Todd, Edgar 

Kennedy. Charley being chased by a cop for speeding. 

Directed by Warren Doane. 

Laurel and Hardy Hal Roach 
Comedies 

UNACCUSTOMED AS WE ARE (1940): Getting In dutch 
with the wife and neighbors. Release May 4. 

BERTH MARKS (1807): The life of two fellows sleeping 
in an upper berth in a speeding train. Release June 1. 

THEY GO BOOM (1864): Hardy playing doctor in helping 
Laurel with his terrific cold. In which the bed goes 
boom. Release September 21. 

ANGORA LOVE (1884): Trying to hide a goat from tbe 
hardboiled landlord. Release December 14. 1929. 

MEN 0' WAR (1822): Two sailors go rowing Into other 
people's boats. Release June 29, 1929. 

NIGHT OWLS: Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. The two 
boys volunteer to rob a house so a police officer can gain 
fame by the arrest. Directed by James Parrott. 

PERFECT DAY (1845): Laurel and Hardy going picnick- 
ing in an old flivver that causes a delay that never end<i. 
Release August 10. 1929. 

BACON GRABBERS (1862): Two detectives sent to bring 
back an unpaid radio that Is owned by a hardboiled In- 
dividual. Release October 19. 

Harry Langdon Hal Roach Comedies 

SKY BOY (1881): Harry landing on an ice-berg with tan 

rival boy friend. Release October 6. 
HOTTER THAN HOT (1765): Harry and a beautiful blonds 

locked in a building that's on fire. 
FIGHTING PARSON, THE: Harry Langdon. Nancy Dover, 

Thelma Todd. Eddie Dunn. Harry as a traveling minstrel. 

Directed by Fred Gulol. 
SKIRT SHY (C-223). Released Nov. 30, 1929. 

Our Gang Hal Roach Comedies 

SATURDAY'S LESSON (1577): The Gang refuses to work 

until a devil scares them into working. Release July 9. 
LAZY DAYS (1870): The Gang helps Farina earn fifty 

bucks. Release August 15. 
RAILROADIN' (1736): The Gang goes riding In a train 

with a crazy driver. Release June 15. 
SMALL TALK (2330): The Gang in an orphan home. 

Wbeezer is adopted and the Gang go to visit him ct 

his elaborate home. Release May 18. 
BOXING GLOVES (1603): The Gang runs a prize flght In 

which Joe Cobb and Chubby are the pugilists. Beleaie 

September 9. 

BOUNCING BABIES (1908): Wheezer getting rid of hli 
baby brother, who gets aU the attention in his home. 
Release October 12. 

Metro Movietone Acts 

DOLL SHOP, THE: Gus Edwards, Vincent Bryan. Louis 
Alter. Jo Trent. Dave Snell. Lionel Belmore. Buster Dees, 
Ci Kahn and M G M Ensemble. Directed by Sammy Lee. 

SEORGE LYONS (79). Numbers: a. "Beloved"; b. "Ah, 
Sweet Mystery of Life": c. "Don't Be Like That": d. 
"St. Louis Blues"; e. "Rainbow 'Bound My Shoulder." 
646 feet. For release August 3. 1929. 

CECIL LEAN AND CLEO MAYFIELD (80): Number: "HU 
Lucky Day." 1.736 feet. For release August 10, 1929. 

6E0RGIE PRICE (81): Numbers: a. "The One That I 
Love Loves Me"; b. "I'm Marching Home to You." 714 
feet For release August 17. 1929. 

PHIL SPITALNY and Hit Pennsylvania Orchestra (82). 
Numbers: a. "Medley of Musical Comedy Hits": b. "Fare- 
well Blues." 71 feet. For release August 24. 1929. 

VAN AND SCHENCK (83). Numbers: a. "That's How Tom 
Can Tell They're Irish"; b. "Rainbow 'Bound My Shoul- 
der"; c. "Bamona"; d. "The Dixie Troubadours." 838 
feet. For release August 31. 1929. 

GEORGE DEWEY WASHINGTON (84): Numbers: a. "Jnst 
Be a Builder of Dreams"; b. "Down Among the Sugar 
Cane." 632 feet. For release September 7. 1929. 

TITTA RUFFO (85) in "Credo" from "OtheUo." 625 feet. 
For release September 14. 1929. 

METRO MOVIETONE REVUE— "Bits of Broadway" (86). 
For release September 21. 1929. 

MADAME MARIA KURENKO (87). Numbers: a. "Tbe 
Jewel Song," from Faust, b. "II Baclo"; c. "The Last 
Rose of Summer." 840 feet For release September 28, 
1929 

KELLER SISTERS AND LYNCH (88). Numbers: a. "How 

D'Ta Do"; b. "Ka Krazy for Tou"; c. "If I Had Tou." 

727 feet. For release October 5, 1929. 
YVETTE RUGEL (89). Numbers: a. "Paradise Lost": b. 

"Marie"; o. "The Parting." 713 feet For release October 

12. W2* 

SONG WRITERS REVUE, THE: Gus Edwards. Dave Dreyer, 
Fred A. Ahlert, Roy Turk. Roy Heindorf. Nacio Herb 
Brown. Arthur Freed. Roy Egan. Fred Fisher and Jack 
Benny. Directed by Sammy Lee. 

BILTMORE TRIO (SO). Number: "JaU Birds." 860 feet. 
For release October 19. 1929. 

CLYDE DOERR (91). Saxophone act. Numbers: a. "Saxo- 
phone March"; b. "Sunny South"; o. "TechnlcaUtlei" ; 
d. "Bye, Bye, Sweetheart." 795 feet For release Octo- 
ber 26 1929 

TOM WARING (92). Numbers: a. "Glad Rag Doll"; b. 
".Tuft & Garden"; c. "I'm Marching Home to Tou." 568 
feet. For release November 2. 1929. 

TITTA RUFFO (93): Number: "L'Africalne." 620 feet. 
For release November 9, 1929. 

EARL AND BELL (94): Numbers: a. "La Spagnola": b. 
"Kiss Me Again"; c. "Blue Hawaii"; d. "Just a Mel- 
ody." 700 feet. For release November 16. 1929. 

OUCI DE KEREKJARTO (95): Numbers: a. "Serenade"; b. 
"Witches' Dance." 622 feet. For release November 23, 
1929 

IRVING AARONSON'S COMMANDERS (96). Numbers: a. 
"She's Nobody's Sweetheart Now"; b. "The Sailor's Sweet- 
heart"; c. "I'U Get By." 696 feet. For release Novem- 
ber 30. 1929. 

JIMMY HUSSEY (97). Number: "Uneasy Street" 841 feet 

For release December 7, 1929. 
ROY EVANS (assisted by Al Belasco) (98). In comedy 

sketch. Exclusive Columbia artist. 796 feet. For release 

December 14. 1929. 
THE REVELLERS (99). Numbers: a. "I'm Looking Over 

a Four Leaf Clover"; b. "Rose of WalWki"; c. "Breezing 

Along With the Breeze." 607 feet. For release December 

21 1929 

MADAME MARIA KURENKO (100). Numbers: a. "Shadow 

"Song" from "Dinorrah"; b. "Song of India." 714 feet. 

For release December 2. 1929. 
WALVER C. KELLY (101), in "The Virginia Judge." 803 

feet. For release January 4. 1930. 
VAN AND SCHENCK (102). Numbers: a. "Eyeiythlng's 

Going to Be All Right"; b. "Aain't Got Nothln' Now"; 

c. "St. Louis Blues." 799 feet. For release January IX. 

1930. 

CLYDE DOERR (103). Saxophone act. Numbers: a. "Wed- 
ding of the Painted DoU"; b. "If I Had Tou"; o. 
"Original Music." 672 feet. For release January 18. 1S30. 

BILTMORE TRIO (104) in "College Bomeos." 853 feet. 
For release January 26, 1930. 



42 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



PARAMOUNT 

Christie Talking Plays 

THE MELANCHOLY DAME. AU colored cast from Octanu 
Roy Cotien story, staged In colored cabaret 1809 feet, 
Koleased Feb. 2, 1929. 

A BIRD IN THE HAND. Lola WUson. Jason Robards, B07 
D'Arcy and Dot Farley, farcical sketcli between husband 
and wife over love and money. 1833 feet. Released Feb. 
16. 1929. 

POST MORTEMS. Raymond Qrlffltb, Tom Kennedy, Mabel 
Forrest, comedy playlet with gentleman burglar ilttlng In a 
bridge game with couple he came to rob. 2017 feet. Be- 
leaaed Mar. 2. 1929. 

MUSIC HATH HARMS. AU colored cast In Octarus Roy Cohen 
story about saxophone player who couldn't play th« sax 
and had a double. 1892 feet. Releaaed Mar. 16, 1929. 

MEET THE MISSUS. James and Lucille Qleason In Kenyon 
Nicholson play, about vaudeville husband and wife, former 
coming home a little Inebriated with a blonde. 1808 feet. 
Released Mar. 30, 1929. 

JED'S VACATION. Charley Orapewin, Anna Chance. In their 
own raudevilie sketch about adopting a baby. Introduction 
on musical comedy stage. 1909 feet. Released Apr. 13, 
1929 

THE FRAMING OF THE SHREW. AU colored caat In 
OctaruB Roy Cohen story of the negro who went on a 
hunger strike to get better treatment from bis laundress wife. 
1862 feet. Released Apr. 27. 1929. 

WHEN CAESAR RAN A NEWSPAPER. Raymond Hatton. 
Sam Hardy in Waldemar Young's travesty of Caesar as 
an editor. Main Antony as a press agent for Cleopatra. 
1821 feet. Released May 11. 1929. 

HOT LEMONADE. Louise Fazenda. Johnny Arthur and 
Walter Hiers. In a triangular comedy on board a steamer 
bound for Honolulu. 1850 feet. Released May 25. 1929. 

OFT IN THE SILLY NIGHT. AU colored cast In Ootavus 
Roy Cohen story about the chauffeur wlio sneaks out with 
his employer's car and daughter. 1787 feet. Released 
June 8, 1929. 

DEAR VIVIEN. Raymond Hatton and Sam Hardy in a 
clever comedy skit about a business man who wrote letters, 
with which a blackmailing blonde is holding him up. 
1891 feet. Released June 22. 1929. 

HER HUSBAND'S WOMEN. Lois Wilson, Harrison Ford. 
Nina Romano and Wanda Hawley In farcical sketch about 
a clever wife who fixes up the jams into whioli her artist 
husband gets himself with women. 1733 feet. Released 
July 6. 1929. 

A HINT TO BRIDES. Johnny Arthur and Ruth Taylor, in 
Kenyon Nicholson's playlet about a bridal couple who get 
chummy with the burglars and give away the wedding 
presents they don't want. 1692 feet. Released July 20. 
1929 

THE 'sleeping PORCH. Raymond Griffltk, Barbara 
Leonard and John Litel in sketch about a husband who is 
sleeping out in the snow to cure a cold and his scheme 
with a convict to get him out of It. 1650 feet. Released 
Sept. 7. 1929. 

LADIES' CHOICE. Charley Qrapewin and Anna Chance in 
sketch about a wife who learned to drive a car in fifteen 
minutes, with runaway auto in dizzy chase. 1727 feet. 
Released Sept. 14, 1929. 

THE LADY FARE. All colored cast and cabaret and chorus 
In revue type of entertainment built around an Ootavus 
Roy Col»en story. 1843 feet. Released Sept. 28, 1929. 

FARO NELL, or In Old Callforny. Louise Fazenda. Jack 
Luden and Franlt Rice in a travesty revival of an old 
western melodrama. Laid on the desert and In an old 
fashioned movie western saloon. 1819 feet. Released Oct. 
5. 1929. 

ADAM'S EVE. Johnny Arthur. Prances Lee, In a comedy 
sketch starting with a bridegroom's pre-marriage cdebration 
and ending in a mixup in the apartment of two chorus 
ladies. 1618 feet. Released Oct. 12, 1929. 

HE DID HIS BEST. Taylor Holmes. Carmel Myers and 
Kethryn McGuire, in farce comedy playlet of Holmes enter- 
taining a friend's wife for the evening, ending in a comedy 
sword duel. 1616 feet. Released Oct. 19. 1929. 

THE FATAL FORCEPS. Ford Sterling. Bert Roach and 
WiU King, in comedy of a dentist on trial for nearly 
murdering a saxophone player whose music had driven 
him crazy. 1664 feet. Released Nov. 2. 1929. 

THE DANCING GOB. Buster and John West, In com- 
bination of West's stage dancing and comedy taking place 
at a naval training station where the actors are mistaken 
for sailors. 1823 feet. Released Nov. », 1929. 

DANGEROUS FEMALES. Marie Dressier and PoUy Moran 
in a sx)medy of two old spinsters about to entertain either 
the evangelist or a dangerous criminal, with Dressier getting 
a Uttle intoxicated with the visitor. 1873 feet. Released 
Nov. 16, 1929. 

BROWN GRAVY. AU colored cast in Ootavus Roy Cohen 
story about a fake medium swindling the gullible patrons, 
novel feature is inclusion of Georgia JubUee Singers In 
spirituals. 1627 feet. Released Nov. 23. 1929. 

HE LOVED THE LADIES. Taylor Holmes, Helene Millard 
and Albert Conti, in farce comedy sketch of a near elope- 
ment of a wife and how Holmes, the husband, cleverly 
handles the situation. 1764 feet. Released Nov. SO. 1929. 

WEAK BUT WILLING. Will King. Billy Bevan and Dot 
Farley In a comedy In a cabaret, with the Hebrew comedian 
In a role of a hiisband being given a birthday party and 
not being able to get any food. 1627 feet. Released Dec. 
14. 1929. 

MARCHING TO GEORGIE. Buster and John West and 
Frances Lee in a comedy starting on a battleship, with 
Buster as sailor and John as comic captain, and ending 
in a mixup in a girl's boarding school. 1850 feet. Re- 
leased Dec 21 1929 

THAT RED HEADED HUSSY. Charley Orapewin and Anna 
Chance as a couple of old time vaudevillians in a martial 
sketch staging a fake quarrel In front of their fighting 
daughter and son-in-law. 1521 feet. Released Deo. 28, 
1929. 

FOR LOVE OR MONEY. Lois WUson. Bert Roach and 
Ernest Wood. In a comedy at the race track, with horse 
race atmosphere and Bert Roach proving Mb friend's wife's 
love. 1827 feet. Released Jan. 4, 1930. 

SO THIS IS PARIS GREEN. Louise Fazenda, Bert Roach 
and George Stone, in a burlesque of the Parisian Apache 
theme, laid in the cabarets and Latin quarter of Paris. 
Released Jan. 18, 1930. 

« • • 

PATHE 

George LeMaire Comedies 

AT THE DENTIST'S (0501) George LeMaire and Louis 
Simon. Scene: Dentist's olflce. Louis Simon, suffering 
from a toothache goes to George LeMaire for treatment. 
For release March 24. 1929. 2 reels. 

DANCING AROUND: (0502) George LeMaire and Joe Phil- 
lips. Scenes: Exterior and cabaret. George LeMaire and 
Joe Phillips take girls out for big time. Ivan BninneU's 
Montrealers play "My Album of Dreams" and Vivienne 
Johnson sings "Marie." For release AprU 21. 1929. 2 
reels. 

GO EASY. DOCTOR: (0503) George LeMaire, Louis Simon. 

George LeMaire as the bone-breaker — Louis Simon as the 

nut — and howl For release July 14, 1929. 
THE PLUMBERS ARE COMING (0504) George LeMaire, 

Louis Simon. LeMaire and Simon, two burglars, trying to 

act like plumbers. For release August 18. 1929. 2 reels. 
GENTLEMEN OF THE EVENING (0506). George LeMaire. 

Lew Beam, Evalyn Knapp. George LeMaire as the house 



detective. Lew Hearn as a delegate in Association of In- 
ventors of America convention and Evalyn Knapp as the 
girl In the case. For release Oct. 20, 1929. 2 reels. 

BARBER'S COLLEGE (U600). George LeMaire. Lew Heam, 
Sam Itayuor, Gladys Hart. Lew Heam as "Good Time 
Charlie," graduate of a barbers' coUege. creates havoc m 
a barber shop. For release Dec. 16, 1929. 2 reels. 

TIGHT SQUEEZE, A (0607). George LeMaire, Jimmy Conlln, 
Evalyn Knapp. The adventures of a pair of Impecunious 
young men who borrow dress suits to call upon their best 
girls. For release Feb. 8, 1930. 2 reels. 

Manhattan Comedies 

HER NEW CHAUFFEUR: (0511) Louis Simon. Veree Teas- 
dale, AveriU Harris. Veree Teasdale thinks Louis Simon 
is her new chauffeur, while he thinks Veree is bis bride- 
to-be. For release May 19. 1929. 2 reels. 

WHAT A DAY: (0512) Louis Simon, Kay MaUory. What 
a picnic he had when he started to take his family on a 
picnic. For release June 16, 1929. 2 reels. 

HARD BOILED HAMPTON: (0513) Harry Holman, Evalyn 
Knapp, Doris McMahon, Alice Bunn, Andy Jochlm. Hol- 
man is a hard boiled lawyer with a fast Une. For re- 
lease July 28, 1929. 2 reels. 

BIG TIME CHARLIE: (0514) Lew Hearn, Dick Lancaster. 
Evalyn ICnapp. A hick comes to New York to make 
whoopee on New Year's Eve. Eddie Elkins Orchestra plays 
in night club sequence. For release October 6. 1929. 2 
reels. 

LOVE, HONOR AND OH, BABY: (0515) Herbert Yost. 
Franklyn Ardell, Evalyn Knapp, Kay MaUory. A very 
modern version of "the worm that turned" theme. For 
release December 16, 1929. 2 reels. 

Checker Comedies 

THE SALESMAN: (0531) Frank T. Davis, Helyn Ebys-Bock. 
Frank T, Davis sells a car to Helyn Eby-Rock. For re- 
lease July 21. 1929. 2 reels. 

TURKEY FOR TWO: (0532) Frank T. Davis, WiUiam 
Frawley, Noel Francis. Two escaped convicts with a fond- 
ness for turkey come to a Westchester inn at Thanks- 
giving. Jack LeMaire's Golden Booster Orchestra features 
"I'll Say She's Pretty." For release August 25, 1929. 2 

SMOOTH GUY, THE (0533). Frank T. Davis and Evalyn 
Knapp. A bean salesman with a grand spiel tries bis 
line on a smaU town girl. For release Oct. 27, 1929. 
2 reels. 

ALL STUCK UP: (0534) Harry McNaughton, Olyn Landlck, 
Charles Howard. Evalyn ICnapp. Lester Dorr. Joe B. Stan- 
ley. How paper hangers go on strike and guests at 
newly weds' housewarniing try to finish the job with mirthful 
results. For release December 22. 1929. 2 reels. 

Melody Comedies 

SYNCOPATED TRIAL: (0571) Morgan Morly, Lew Sey- 
more. A musical mock trial. Eddie Elklns Orchestra and 
Ed. Prinz Dancers feature. For release September 8, 1929. 

AFTER THE SHOW (0672). Jack Pepper, Morgan Morley. 
Paul Garner. Jack Wolf. Numbers: "Can't Find a Girl." 
"A-Hunting We WUl Go." "Here We Are," "Jig-A-Boo- 
Jig." "Ain't That Too Bad." "Mississippi Mud." For 
release Nov. 10. 1929. 2 reels. 

NIGHT IN A DORMITORY, A (0573). Ginger Rogers. Ruth 
Hamilton, Thelma White. Morgan Morley. Eddie Elklns 
and Orchestra. Miniature musical comedy. Numbers: "Stay 
With It." "Song of the Volga," "I Love a Man in • 
Uniform." "Where the Sweet Forget-Me-Nots Remember," 
"Why Can't You Love That Way." "Dormitory Number." 
For release Jan. 6. 1929. 2 reels. 

Variety Comedies 

BEACH BABIES: Charles Kemper, Evalyn Knapp. Naomi 
Casey. Charles Kemper tries to shine in the eyes of 
Evalyn Knapp while Naomi Casey makes him appear ridicu- 
lous. For release August 4, 1929. 2 reels. 

HAUNTED: (0552) Bob Millikin. Evalyn Knapp. Charles 
Kemper. Mystery comedy embodying all the thrUls of 
"The Cat and the Canary." "The GoriUa." "The Bat," 
and others. For release September 1, 1929. 2 reels. 

END OF THE WORLD: (0553) Alexander Carr. Loriu Raker. 
Marcia Manning. A wealthy Hebrew. beUeving the world 
is about to end. gives his son thousands and his consent 
to the latter's marriage to an Irish maid. For release 
September 29. 1929. 2 reels. 

HIS OPERATION (0544). Charles Kemper. Sally Noble. 
He must have quiet, but what a racket they raise. For 
release Nov. 24. 1929. 2 reels. 

WEDNESDAY AT THE RITZ (0655). Charles Kemper, 
Evalyn Knapp. The almost -married young man and some 
girl and they meet "Wednesday at the Bitz." For release 
Jan. 19 1930 2 reels 

DOING PHIL A FAVOR (0656). Mackenzie Ward and Val 
Lester. A British society man is jealous of his wife and 
uses his friend Phil to test her fldeUty. For release March 
16. 1930. 2 reels, 

HIS BIRTHDAY SUIT: (0557) Dr. Cart Herman, Steve 
Mills. BiUy M, Green. Cliff Bragdon, What happens at a 
vaudeville show when two little boys attempt to aid the 
Great Hokey in his mystery act. For release May 4. 1930. 
2 reels. 

Folly Comedies 

HER HIRED HUSBAND: Released January 12, 1930. Two 

reels, 

FANCY THAT: (0541) WiUiam Frawley. Earle Dewey. What 
a party would look like if two hobos suddenly became 
millionaires, Frawley sings "Dearest One," For release 
September 22. 1929, 2 reels. 

SO THIS IS MARRIAGE (0542). Guy Voyer. Norma Pallat. 
Earle Dewey. Miniature musical comedy of marriage and 
its problems. Theme song: "After You Say 'I Love You.' ' 
For release Nov. 17. 1929. 2 reels. 

Golden Rooster Comedies 

GARDEN OF EATIN': (0561) James Gleason. LuciUe Web- 
ster GleasorL The story of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmle's beanery 
that tried to become ritzy — and what happened wheni 
Orchestra plays "Pouring Down Bain." For release Aug- 
ust 11 1929. 2 reels. 

FAIRWAYS AND FOuL (0662). James and LuclUe Webster 
Gleason. A tale of golfers and their ways as weU as the 
breaks of the game. A dash to Intrigue is added for 
laughing purposes. For release Oct. 13, 1929. 2 reels. 

RUBEVILLE (0563). Harry B. Watson, Reg. MerviUe, Jers 
Delaney. Josephine Fontaine, Miniature musical comedy. 
Numbers: "SaUy." "Maggie," "Sweet Long Ago," "Rag- 
ging the Scale." "She May Have Seen Better Days," "Swe« 
Sixteen." "Wabash." "Bedella," "Taka Hoola Hlcky 
Doola." "Over the Waves." For release Dec. 8. 1929. 
2 reels. 

FIFTY MILES FROM BROADWAY (9664). Harry B. Wat- 
son. Reg MervUle. Olga Woods. Miniature musical com- 
edy. Numbers: "How Is Everything Back Tome," "Trail 
to Yesterday," "Carolina Moon." "Oh. TlUle." "School- 
days." 'Summer Time," "Rosie, You Are My Posle," 
"Stars and Stripes," "Walt TIU the Sun Shines NeUie." 
"Give My Regards to Broadway." For release May 11, 
1930. 2 reels. 

RUBEVILLE NIGHT CLUB (0S66). Harry B. Watson. Reg 
MervUIe. Josephine Fontaine. Olga Woods. Miniature 
musical comedy. Numbers: "I'm Just a Vagabond Lover." 
"It's Always Fair Weather," "Sunrise to Sunset." "Mag- 
gie," "Harmonists," "Nola," "Doln' the Raccoon," "Under 



the Double Bagle." "Turkey In the Straw." "Mocking 
Bird." For release Feb. 2, 1929. 2 reels, 
CROSBY'S CORNERS (U66S). Reg MervUle. Felix Busk, 
Josephine Fontaine, George Patten. Miniature musical 
comedies. Numbers: "Down On the Farm," "I'U Do Any- 
thing For You," "Every Day Away From You," "What a 
Day," "1 Ain't Got Nothing For Nobody But You," "Sweet 
16," "Here We Are," "Ragging the Scale," "Good Night, 
Ladles," 'Merrily We RoU Along," "Jingle BeUs," "Auld 
Lang Syne." For release IVlarch 23, 1930. 2 reels. 

Buck & Bubbles Comedies 

BLACK NARCISSUS: (0521 Buck & Bubbles. WUdcat Is 
enmeshed in the wiles of a siren whUe trying to rescue 
his pal Denny from matrimony with another dusky 
charmer. Southern songs featured. For release September 
16. 1929. 2 reels. 

IN AND OUT (0622). Buck and Bubbles. Buck and Bub- 
bles as Wildcat and Denny do some funny stepping "in 
and out" of Jail. For release Nov. 3, 1929. 3 reels. 

FOWL PLAY (U623). Buck and Bubbles. The boys bam 
to deliver an ostrich. On the way they become entangled 
with a yaUer-sldimed vamp. Wliat happens Is plenty. 
Numbers: "Swanee River." "Oh, You Beautiful DoU." 
"When I Got You Alone Tonight." "Give Me a Little Kiss 
Will You Hun," "Coal Black Mammy of Mine," "Chicken 
Reel." For release Dec. 29, 1929. 2 reels. 

HIGH TONED (0624). Buck and Bubbles. When his dusky 
rival not only grabs his job of butler, but also his lady 
friend. Wildcat brings in Demmy and LlUy the goat to 
start something. Numbers: "My Old Kentucky Home," 
"Home, Sweet Home," "12th Street Rag," "Clarinot 
Marmalade," "Lonely Me." For release Feb. 23. 1939. 

OARKTO'WN FOLLIES (0625). Buck and Bubbles. Broke 
and hungry, WUdcat and Demmy show their samples of 
song, dance and joke and stumble onto the rehearsal of 
a Darktown FoUles and get the job. Numbers: "St. 
Louis Blues." "I'm Krazy For You," "RachmanlnoS'i 
Prelude," "Mean To Me," "Some Rahiy Day." For re- 
lease April 13. 1930. 2 reels. 

HONEST CROOKS (0626). Buck and Bubbles. A mysterious 
black bag. buried in a haystack by a couple of crooks, is 
found by the boys, fuU of money. When they try Ui 
return it. things happen — and howl Numbers: "Turkey la 
the Straw," "Old Black Joe." For release May 18, 19S0. 
2 reels. 

* • • 

RKO 

Record Breakers 
(Alberta Vaughn-Al Cooke) 
(All-Talking — Two Reels) 

AS YOU MIKE IT (0602). Eeleased Sept. 8, 1929. 
MEET THE QUINCE (0603). Released Sept. 22, 1929. 
LOVE'S LABOR FOUND (0604). Released Nov. 10. 1929. 
THEY SHALL NOT PASS OUT (0606). Released Nov. 34, 
1929. 

EVENTUALLY BUT NOT NOW (0606). Released Deo. 1, 
1929 

CAPTAIN OF HIS ROLL, THE (0607). Released Deo. 23. 
1929. 

Mickey McGuire 

(All-Talking — Two Reels) 

MICKEY'S MIDNITE FOLLIES (0701). Released Aug. IS, 
1929 

MICKEY'S SURPRISE (0702). Released Sept. 15. 1929. 

MICKEY'S MIX UP (0703). Released Oct. 13. 1929. 

MICKEY'S BIG MOMENT (0704). Released Nov. 10, 19t». 

MICKEY'S STRATEGY (0706). Released Dec. 8. 1929. 

RCA Shorts 

(AllTalking—Two Reels) 

BURGLAR. THE (0801). Released Aug. 11, 1929. 
ST. LOUIS BLUES (0802). Released Sept. 8. 1929. 
TWO GUN GINSBURG (0803). Released Oct. 13. 1929. 
HUNT THE TIGER (0804). Released Nov. 10, 1929. 

RCA Novelties 

(All— Talking— One Reel) 

HEADWORK (0901). Released Sept. 16. 1929. 
GODFREY LUDLOW & NBC ORCHESTRA (0802). BO' 
leased Nov. 10. 1929. 

RCA Marc Connelly 

(All-Talking — Two Reels) 

TRAVELER, THE (0907). Released Aug. 18, 1929. 
UNCLE, THE (0909). Released Oct. 13, 1929. 
SUITOR, THE (0910). Released Deo. 8, 1929. 

• • • 



UNIVERSAL 

Snappy Cartoon Comedies 
(Oswald the Rabbit) 
(Synchronized Only — One Reel) 

WEARY WILLIES. Released Aug. 6. 1929. 
SAUCY SAUSAGES. Released Aug. 19, 1929. 
RACE RIOT. Released Sept. 2. 1929. 
OILS WELL. Released Sept. 16. 1929. 
PERMANENT WAVE. Released Sept. 30. 1929. 
COLE TURKEY. Released Oct. 14, 1929. 
PUSSY WILLIE. Released Oct. 28. 1929. 
AMATEUR NITE. Released Nov. 11. 1929. 
SNOW USE. Released Nov. 26. 1929. 
NUTTY NOTES. Released Dec. 9. 1929. 

Collegians 
(All Star) 

(Talking — Two Reels) 

ON THE SIDELINES. Released Aug. 5. 1929. 
USE YOUR FEET. Released Aug. 19. 1929. 
SPLASH MATES. Released Sept. 2. 1929. 
GRADUATION DAZE. Released Sept. IS. 1921. 

Special 

(Talking) 

SWEETHEARTS: Rooney Family, two reels. Beletsed Sopt 

2 1929 

LOVE TREE. THE: Rooney Family, two reels. Beleaied 

Sept. 16. 1929. 

ACTOR, THE: Benny Rubin, one reel. Released Sept. U. 

1929 

INCOME TACT: Benny Rubin, one reel. Beleased Sept. 10, 
1929. 

ROYAL PAIR, THE: Rooney FamUy, two reels. Beleaud 
Sept. 30, 1929, , _ 

DELICATESSEN KID, THE: Benny Bubln, two reels. Be- 
leased Oct. 14. 1929, _ , . _ . 

LOVE BIRDS: Rooney FamUy, two reels. Beleased Oct. 
14 1929 

pop' and SON: Benny Bubln, one reel. Beleased Cot. M, 
1929. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



43 



SpOT 



MARKING TIME: Booney Family, two reels. Released Oct. 

^8 1929 

BROKEN STATUES: Benny Kubln, one reel. Belea.se<l Noi. 
11 1929 

THREE DIAMONDS, THE: Kooney Family, two reels. Be- 

leased Nov. 11, 1929. 
PILGRIM PAPAS: Benny Rubin, one reel. Released No*. 

26, 1929. 

HOTSY TOTSY: Benny Rubin, one reel. Released Deo. t. 
1929. 

Universal Comedies 

(Talking— Two Reels) 

BABY TALKS: Sunny Jim. Released Sept. 11, 1929. 
WATCH YOUR FRIENDS: All star. Released Oct. 9. 19n. 
NO BOY WANTED: Sunny Jim. Released Nov. 6, 1929. 
SUNDAY MORNING: All Star. Released Dec. 4, 1928. 

nting Youth 
(All Star) 

(Talking — Two Reels) 

LADY OF LIONS. Released Nov. 2S, 1929. 

HI JACK AND THE GAME. Released Deo. 9, 1929. 

Serials 

ACE OF SCOTLAND YARD, THE (Talldng and SUent- 

two reels). Craufurd Kent. 
No. I. FATAL CIRCLET, THE. Released Sept. 30, 1920. 
No. 2. CRY IN THE NIGHT, THE. Released Oct. 7, 192ti. 
No. 3. DUNGEON OF DOOM, THE. Released Oct. 14, 1929. 
No. 4. DEPTHS OF THE LIMEHOUSE. Released Oct. 21, 
1929. 

No. & MENACE OF THE MUMMY. Released Oct. U. 
1929. 

No. 6. DEAD OR ALIVE. Released Nov. 4. 1929. 
No. 7. SHADOWS OF FEAR. Released Nov. 11. 1929. 
No. 8. BAITED TRAP, THE. Released Nov. 18. 1929. 
No. 9. BATTLE OF WITS, A. Released Nov. 26. 1929. 
No 10. FINAL JUDGMENT, THE. Released Dec. 2. 1929. 
TARZAN THE TIGER (Synchronized and Silent). Fran* 

Merrill. Consists of 15 episodes released from Dec. t, 

1929 to March 17. 1930. 
JADE BOX, THE (Synchronized and Silent). Conalsta of 

10 episodes, released from March 24, 1930, to May 2(1, 

1930. 



VITAPHONE 



Vitaphone Varieties 

Star and Description 

ABBOTT, A I (2703) in "Small Town Rambles"; songs and 

ADAIR, JANET "(2629) In "Here Comes the Bridesmaid," 

told in narrative song. 
ADMIRALS, THE (477). A Naval Quartette harmonizing 

popular songs with ukelele accompaniment. 
ALDA, FRANCES (461) grand opera star singing "The Star 
Spangled Banner," accompanied by Vitaphone Symphony 
Orchestra. 

ALPERT. PAULINE (418) In "What Price Piano?" oCrerlng 

original piano arrangements. 
ALPERT, PAULINE (419). A piano medley of popular songs. 
AMATO, PASQUALE (419). A piano medley of popular songs. 

"Neapolitan Romance." Lillian Mines at the piano. Sings 

"Tormo Sariente" and "Toreador Song" from "Carmen." 
ARDATH. FRED & CO. (720) in "The Corner Store." a 

slapstick comedy with four songs. Directed by Bryan Foy. 
ARDATH, FRED & CO. (2255) in "Men Among Men," 

comedy of a man aliblng an intoilcated friend to his wife. 
ARISTOCRATS, FOUR (306). Vitaphone popular vocal and 

Instrumental group in a series of songs. 
ARISTOCRATS, FOUR (644). Vocal and Instrumental group 

in a new song offering. 
ARISTOCRATS, FOUR (545): Vitaphone's instrumental and 

vocal group in three songs. 
ARISTOCRATS, FOUR (546): Popular Vitaphone singers and 

instrumentalists in new songs. 
ARISTOCRATS, FOUR (547): Five songs by Vitaphone's 

vocal and instrumental group. 
ARNAUT BROS. (571): "The Famous Loving Birds" IB 

singing and whistling numbers. 
BAILEY AND BARNUM (2556) In "The Globe Trotters," 

singing three popular songs. 
BAILEY AND BARNUM (2557) In "Without a Band," a 

comedy singing and talking act. 
BAILEY AND BARNUM (2558) In "The Two White Ele- 
phants." In "high yaUer" make-up they sing populat 

Jazz songs. 

BAIRNSFATHER, BRUCE ((393). The creator of Old BID 
teUs of his origin and sketches him as the orchestra plays. 

BAKER, PHIL (724) in "A Bad Boy from a Good Family,*" 
gives four songs with accordion. A comedy number. 

BAKER. PHIL (725) In "In Spain." a hilarious farce with 
the Shuberts comedian as star. 

BARCLAY, JOHN (436). Musical comedy and concert star 
In operatic airs and an Impersonation of CHiallapin. 

BARCLAY. JOHN (437) In "Tamous Character Impersona- 
tions." Sines three sonzs. 

BARD, BEN (2910) In "The Champion Golfer," an original 
comedv sketch. 

BARRIOS, JEAN (2700) In "Feminine Types." This fe- 
male Impersonator sings three songs with his impersonations. 

BARTRAM & SAXTON (2144). "The Two Kentucky boys 
of lazz" In three song numbers, with guitar and orchestra 
accompaniment. 

BAUER, HAROLD (278). International pianist playlns 

Chopin's "Polonaise In A Flat." 
BAXLEY, JACK (2768) In "Neighbors." a comedy sketch 

witSi songs. 

BELL & COATES (2697). "The California Songbirds" In 
popular sones. 

BENNETT TWINS (476). "Uttle Bare Knee Syncopators" 
of stage and TaudevUle In a song and dance recital. 

BENNY, JACK (2597). Comedian in 'Bright Momenta," his 
noted monoloKue. 

BIFF & BANG (674). "FlstlcuiT Funsters" In a burlesque 
boiine match. 

BILLEE, LITTLE (2869). Versatile midget star In "The 
Flaming Youth"; original songs and fast tap dancing. 

BORN & LAWRENCE (2885) In "The Country Gentleman," 
a comedv skit with songs. 

BORN 4. LAWRENCE (2940) in "Pigskin Troubles," a com- 
edy of campus and the gridiron, with songs. 

BORN & LAWRENCE (2920) In "The Side Show" In which 
these musical comedy comedians recite, dance, sing and 
swap Jokes. 

BORN & LAWRENCE (2640) In "The Aristocrats" in which 
they employ their pantomime stunt In accompaniment to 
their songg. 

BOSWORTH, HERBERT (22S3) in "A Man of Peace." A 
gnlet man of the mountains becomes suddenly embroiled 
In a feud. 

BOWERS, BRUCE (2870) in "Artistic Mimicry" In which 

h» does a varietv of Imitations. 
BRADY. FLORENCE (2699) In "A Cycle of Songs." 
BRADY, FLORENCE (2734). Stage and valrety star In 

"CTiaractcT Studies" In songs. 
■ RADY, STEWART (2745). "The Song Bird," boy soprano 

la three songs. 



BRIAN, DONALD (2733). Musical comedy star in a quar- 
tet Ot SOUgb, 

BRITT, HORACE (614). Renowned 'cellist playing Masse- 
net's "Elegy" and Popper's "Serenade." 

BROCKWELL, GLADYS (2235) In 'HoUywood Bound," a 
satire on male beauty contests, with a cast of Uve. 

BROOKS & ROSS (2232). Vaudeville headllners in "Two 
Boys and a Piano." 

BROWNE, FRANK & KAY LAVELLE (2689) in "Don't 
Handle the Goods," xylophone singing and patter act. 

BROWN, JOE E, (269U) in "Don't Be Jealous." Famous 
stage comedian as dancing teacher to a pretty wife with a 
Jealous husband. 

BROWN & WHITAKER (2265) In "A Laugh of Two." 
Vaudeville headllners in gags and Jokes. 

BROWN & WHITAKER (2328) in 'In the Park," a 
humorous skit with music. 

BROWNING, JOE (496). Popular comedian In a talking and 
singing number. 

BROX SISTERS, THREE (2570) in "Glorifying the Ameri- 
can Girl." Popular trio of stage and variety in a trio 
of songs. 

BROX SISTERS, THREE (2571) In "Down South," In 
which they sing three haunting southern melodies. 

BUDDIES, FOUR (609). "Harmony Songsters" In four 
numbers. 

BURNS & KISSEN (2679). Popular comedians In comedy 

Greek makeup, singing funny songs. 
BYRON. ARTHUR & CO. (2704) in "A FamUy Affair," 

a comedy of mixed identities. The star la supported by 

Kate, Eileen and Kathryn Byron. 
CARLE, RICHARD (2179) In "Stranded," playlet of a 

stranded opera producer, with two songs. 
CARLE, RICHARD (2239). With May McAvoy to "Sunny 

California," story of a wife who Induces her husband 

to quit cold New York for glorious California. 
CARLE, RICHARD (2261). Stage star in a comedy sketch, 

"The Worrier." A man who does the worrying for othcs 

at so much per worry. Ends with a song. 
CARR, NAT (2309). Popular comedian, in a monologue of 

laughable Incidents. 
CARRILLO, LEO (607) In a clever monologue, "At the Ball 

Game." 

CARILLO, LEO (2369) In a dialect monologue, "The 
Foreigner." 

CARRILLO, LEO (2652). Noted stage star In a recitation 
of the most dramatic poem of the world war, "The Hell 
Gate of Soissons." 

CASE, ANNA (294). Opera star, accompanied by Metro- 
politan Grand Opera Chorus singing "Cachaca" and 
"Anhelo." 

CEBALLOS, LARRY REVUE (2562) In which Vitaphone 
Girls and Al Herman, sing and dance. 

CEBALLOS, LARRY (2627). "Roof Garden Revue." Beau- 
tiful girls and an adagio team in songs and dance. 

CEBALLOS, LARRY (2661). "Undersea Revue." Noted Va- 
riety stars and chorus in spectacular revue. 

CEBALLOS, LARRY (2693). "Crystal Cave Revue." with 
songs. 

CHANDLER, ANNA (2739) in "Popular Songs." 

CHASE, CHAZ (2696). "The unique comedian," who eaM 

everything — fire, paper, violins, flowers, shirts, etc. 
CHIEF CUPOLICAN (2598). "The Indian baritone." the 

only Indian who has sung In grand opera, in three classic 

songs. 

CLEMONS, JIMMY (2242). Vaudeville star. In "Dream 

Cafe," songs and dances. 
COOEE &. ORTH (27U9) In "Zwel und Vierstigsto Strasse," 

in German, with three songs. 
CODEE & ORTH (2798) In "Stranded In Paris," comedy 

skit. 

COHEN. SAMMY (2800) In "What Price Burlesque"; Imi- 
tations. 

COLEMAN, CLAUDIA (2244) 111 "Putting It Over," comedy 
Impersonations. 

COLLEGIATE FOUR, THE (2249) In "Campus Capers"; the 

college spirit in songs. 
COLONIAL GIRLS, THE THREE (2121) in "The Beauty 

of Old Time Music" ; harp, flute, 'cello and coloratura 

soprano. 

CONLEY, HARRY J. (2273) In "The Bookworm." comedy 

playlet which was the hit of "LeMaire's Affairs." 
CONLIN & GLASS (2677) in "Sharps and Flats," la 

amusing antics and songs. 
CONNOLLY & WENRICH (2583). Musical comedy star and 

famous composer In a number of Wenrich's songs. 
CONRAD, EDDIE (491). Broadway comedian In a com- 

6(ly sketch 

CONRAD, EDDIE (663) assisted by Marlon Eddy, In foul 
songs, 

COOK, CLYDE (2284) In "Lucky In Love"; comedy of a 
husband who extracts 5200 from his wife for a poker game. 

COOPER & STEPT (2159). Song hit writers. In several of 
their popular snngs. 

CORCORAN. RED (2769) in "I'm Afraid That's All." Four 
banjo niunbera. 

COSCIA & VERDI (2272) In a burlesque of operatic airs 
and the artlRtlc temperament. 

COSLOW, SAM (2659) in "The Broadway Minstrel," pre- 
senting four of hip most T>opular compositions. 

COWAN. LYNN (2245). Vaudeville headliner. In three of 
his original songs. 

COWAN, LYNN (2258). The "Community Singer." In five 
popular songs. 

COWAN, LYNN (2547). Leads audiences In choral singing 

— four numbpfs. 
COWAN. LYNN (2680) in a new collection of old songs. 
COYLE & WEIR (2253). Songs and dances by clever team 

of vnimgsters. 

CRANE, HAL (2133) In "The Lash," a dramatic playlet of 

The Tombs, written by Crane, a big hit In vaudeville. 
CRAVEN. AURICLE (2118). The dancing vloUnlst and 

singer. In three numbers. 
CROONADERS. THE (2685) In "Crooning Along." Four 

bovs in five lilting songs. 
CROONADERS. THE (2736) In "Melodious Moments"; four 

snncs. 

CROWELL & PARVIS (2140). Vaudeville's talented chil- 
dren, in songs and dances. 

CRUMIT. FRANK & JULIA SANDERSON (733) In "Words 
nf Tjove," giving three of Crumlt's own songs. 

CRUMIT, FRANK (727). Famous songster and composer, 
singing several nf his own composUIona. 

CRUSE BROTHERS (2120). The "Missouri Sheiks" In "Old 
Time Melodies in an Old Time Way." with violin, guitar 
and banjo. 

CRUSE BROTHERS (2126) In popular melodies and dittios. 

CUGAT, X. &. CO (254) In "By the Camp Fire." Caruso's 
violin accompanist, his mtisidans and dancers In five 
beautiful numhprs. 

CUMMINGS. DON (2125). The "drawing room roper" In a 
lariat exhibition, accompanied by Vitaphone orchestra. 

CUNNINGHAM & BENNETT (736). Popular singing com- 
posers. In three vocal numbers and an impersonation. 

D'ANGLO, LOUIS (509) assisting Giovanni Martlnelll in the 
duet from Aft IV of the opera. "La Juire." 

DEIRO, GUlOO (2968) famous plano-acoordlonlst In two de- 
lightful selections. 

DE LA PLAZA & JUANITA (2702) In "Siesta Time." 
Famoas tango artist and his company in thrilling dances 
and some songs. 

DELF, HARRY (2542), Broadway comedian. In songs and 
comedy monologue. 

DELF. HARRY (2551) In "Soup" which displays Us re- 
markable mimicry of a whole family eating soup. 

DELF. HARRY (2663-64) In "Giving In," supported by 



Hedda Hopper, directed by Murray Roth. An engugtng 

playlet. 

DC LUCA. GIUSEPPE & BANIAMINO GIGLI (618) In se- 

lecuous from Act 11 of the opera "La Uiouuada." 
DEMARCST, WILLIAM (22UU| In 'Papa's Vacation." a 

riuuiuus comedy playlet by Hugh Herbert and Murray ItoUi. 

Directed by Bryan Foy. 
DEMAREST. WILLIAM (2143) In "When the Wife's Away." 

comedy playlet directed by Bryan Foy; with three suugs. 
DEMAREST. WILLIAM (2138) In "The Night Court." 

Comedy playlet directed by Bryan Foy. 
DICKINSON, HOMER (2UU9) : Musical comedy star. IB 

three uoiigs. 

DIPLOMATS. THE (666): "High-hat syncopators of lazs" 
in lour selections. 

DISKAY. JOSEPH (2122): "Famous Hungarian tenor, coa- 
cen and radio artist. In two songs. 

DONER, KITTY (2668) In "A Bit of Scotch." Male Im- 
personations and six songs. 

DONER, KITTY (2669): Famous male Impersonator, and 
two assistants In four songs. 

DONER. TED (2298): Dancing comedian and his Sunklit 
Beauties, in a singing variety. 

OONOHUE. RED & U-NO (734) In "A Traffic Muddle." 
Famous clown ancl his mule In a comedy skit. 

DOVES, THE TWO (2146) In "Dark Days," comedy dialog 
and original songs. 

DOVES, THE TWO (2178) In "Flying High." Blackfaoe 
comedy of two aviators stranded at the North Pole. 

DOVES. THE TWO (2267) In a comedy of two negroes In 
a haunted house. 

DOWNING, HARRY & DAN (2127) In "High Dp and liOW 
Down." Songs, laughs and female Impersonations. 

DOYLE, BUDDY (442) In three songs In blackface. 

DREYER. DAVE (2889) in ■■Tin Pan Alley." Popular com- 
poser in popular compositions of his own. 

DUFFY & GLEASON (775) In "Fresh from HoUywood." A 
comedy skit with songs. 

DUNCAN, HERRING & ZEH (2116): Popular California 
singers in solos, a duet and some trios. 

ELMAN, MISCHA (276): Celebrated violinist, playlni 
Dvorak's "Humoresque" and Gossec's "Gavotte." 

FASHION PLATES OF HARMONY (2283): A quartet of 
distinctive concert voices in famous and original composi- 
tions. 

FERRIS, AUDREY (2238) In "The Question of Today." A 

dramatic playlet. 
FIELDS, SALLY (2147): Comedy entertainer In "The 

"Hostess," A laughing sketch with songs. 
FIELDS & JOHNSON (2588): Vaudeville headllners In a 

comedy skit, "Terry and Jerry." 
FLEESON & BAXTER (435) In "Song Pictures," A review 

of popular melodies with Miss Baxter at the piano. 
HOWARD, JOSEPH E. (2596): Composer of musical com- 
edies in a recital of his own songs. 
HOWARD, WILLIE & EUGENE (349): Musical comedy 

stars in a comedy sketch titled "Between the Acts of the 

Opera." 

HOWARD, WILLIE & EUGENE (643): Stage stars In a 

comedy sketch, "Pals." 
HOWARD, WILLIE & EUGENE (672) In a comedy aketcli 

with songs. 

HUGHES & PAM (2837) In "The FaU Guy," a sketch In 

which Bay Hughes sings and doss his comedy falls. 
HURLEY, PUTNAM & SNELL (2180): Popular song trio 

In Jazz and comedy songs. 
FLIPPEN, JAY C. (2581): Musical comedy and vaudevlUe 

star, in a fast comedy skit. "The Ham What Am." 
FLONZALEY QUARTETTE (466): World's foremost stringed 

Instrument ensemble, now disbanded, playing Mendelssohn'* 

"Canzonetta" and Pochon's "Irish Reel," 
FLONZALEY QUARTETTE (467): Famous stringed ensem- 
ble, playing Borodin's "Nocturne" and Mozart's "Minuet.' 
FLORENTINE CHOIR (2281): Italy's greatest ensemble at 

choral voices singing "Adoramus te Christe" and the 

"Toreador Song" from the opera, "Carmen." 
FLORENTINE CHOIR (2282): Oldest choral organization 

in the world — more than 800 years — singing "NInna, 

Nanna" and "Santa Lucia Luntana." 
FOLSOM, BOBBY (2839): Musical comedy actress In 'A 

Modern Prlscllla," contrasting the Puritan Prlscilla and 

the same girl today, 
FOX. ROY (2819): The whispering cometlst. in three se- 
lections and two band numbers. 
FOY, EDDIE & BESSIE LOVE (2575-76) In a clever playlet 

of back-stage life, "The Swell Head." starring the son of 

the famous stage clown and the screen leading woman. 
FOY FAMILY, THE (2579) in "Foys of Joys." A satire on 

talking motion pictures with Eddie Foy's family. Directed 

by Bryan Foy. _ . . 

FOY FAMILY, THE (2580) in "Chips of the Old Block." 

Presents the children of the famous comedian, Eddie Foy, 

In songs and dances and a monologue by Eddie Foy, Jr. 
FRANKLIN. IRENE (2706): Famous American comedienne. 

supported by Jerry Jamigan In three of his songs. 
FREDA & PALACE (2271) In "Bartch-a-Kalloop." OuH 

nationally famous vaudeville act. Comic antics and songs. 
FREEMAN SISTERS (625): "Sunshine Spreaders from 

Roxy's Gang" in popular selections with piano and ukulele, 
FRIGANZA, TRIXIE (2791): Stage and variety star, te 

"My Bag o" Trii." with two songs. 
GABY, FRANK (2188): Popular ventriloquist In "The 

Tout," a skit of comedy moments at the race track. 
GALE BROTHERS (610): Juvenile comedians. In fast 

dancing and songs, 
GIBSON. HOOT, TRIO (2132): The Hawaiian Serenade! 

engaged by Hoot Gibson, screen star, to play at his ranch 

on ukuleles and steel guitars. 
GIGLI, GORDON, TALLEY & DE LUCA (416) Ul the 

Quartet from "Rigoletto." 
GIGLI, BENIAMINO (414): Famous Metropolitan Opera 

tenor In scenes from Act II of Mascagnl's opera, "Caval- 

GIGLI. BENIAMINO (498): Celebrated tenor In four soma 

In English, French, Spanish and Italian. 
GIGLI. BENIAMINO (617) In selections from Act 11 ot 

Ponohlelli's opera, "La Gloconda." 
GIGLI, BENIAMINO AND GISUEPPE DE LUCA (518) iB 

a scene from Act I of Bizet's opera, "The Pearl Fishers," 

accompanied by the Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. 
GIGLI, BENIAMINO, & MARION TALLEY (499) In the 

duet, "Verranno a te sull'aura." 
GILBERT. MASTER (2260): Sensation child artist from 

vaudeville in an unusual routine of songs and dancea. 
GILLETTE, BOBBY (2838): Famous banjoist from the va- 
riety stage, assisted by Doris Walker, radio and stage 

artist, in four selections. 
GIVOT, GEORGE. PEARL LEONARD AND NINA HINDS 

(2107): "The College Boy" and "The Melody Girls" In 

popular songs. Directed by Bryan Foy. 
GOLDIE, JACK (704) In "The Ace of Spades." A fast 

singing and chatter act with the variety headliner In 

blackface. 

GORDON. GIGLI, TALLEY & DE LUCA (415) In the Quar- 
tette from "Rigoletto." 

GORDON, JEANNE (474): Assisting Giovanni Martlnein In 
a scene from Act II of Bizet's opera, "Carmen." 

GOTTLER. ARCHIE (2670): Famous song writer bi ■ 
medley of the songs which have made him celebrated. 

GOULD, VENITA (562): Famous Impersonator of stars, m 
Impersonations of four stars In some of their songs. 

GREEN, HAZEL & CO. (2112) In musical selections di- 
rected bv Misg Green who also sings, 

GREEN. JANE S. CO. (2746) In "Singing the Blues," TMt 
Brnadwav star in three numbers. Directed by Bryan Fw. 

GREEN, JANE (2750): "The melody girl" in three 



44 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



GREEN'S FLAPPERETTES (711): Three selections by this 

girls' jazz band. 
GREY, MISS ANN, AND HER BOY FRIENDS (2601) In 

live songs. Miss Qiej Is a, uopular radio artist. 
GREEN. CORA (825): The famous Creole singer in thret 

Negro aoiigu. 

GREEN, EDDIE & CO. (880) of "Hot Chocolates." • 
Broadway negro musical comedy. In "Sending a Wire." 
a comedy skit. 

HACKETT, CHARLES (392): Tenor of Chicago Civic Opera 

Co. In two solos from "Klgoletto." "yuesca O Uuella." 

"La Donna E Mobile." 
HACKETT, CHARLES (S52) : Noted tenor sings "Song cl 

the MUe" by Cadman and the "tjong of India" by 

Blmsfey-Korsakow. 
HACKETT, CHARLES (2379): Noted tenor, assisted oy 

Joyce Comptou, In two numbers, "Who Is Sylvia" and 

"Serenade." 

HAINES. ROBERT (2319): Noted stage star In "Ten Min- 
utes," a grippmg diama of a prisoner in the death cell. 

HALEY & McFADOEN (2269): Musical comedy and vaude- 
ville headllners In "Haleylsms," wittlsm and wise-cracks. 

HAPPINESS BOYS (S36): (Billy Jones and Ernest Uare, 
radio stars) four popular songs. 

HAPPINESS BOYS (537): Favorite radio stars In four 
new songs. 

HARRINGTON SISTERS (2262): From the "Passing Show, " 

In a garden of songs. 
HARRIS, VAL, & ANN HOWE (2767) In "Fair Days.' 

Val Harris Is noted "rube" comedian. 
HARRIS, VAL, & ANN HOWE (2759) in a comedy sketoh. 

"The Wild Westerner." 
HAVEL. ARTHUR & MORTON (769): Of the musical 

comedy stage, in a peppy playlet with song. "Maymates. "' 
HAYNES. MARY (2762) in her original sketch. "The Beauty 

Shop." with songs. 
HAYS, WILL (192): President of Motion Picture Producers 

and Distributers of America In an address welcoming 

Vitaphone to the motion picture industry. 
HEARST NEWSPAPER RADIO KIDS (612): Popular radio 

youngsters In a song recital. 
HEATHER, JOSIE (774): Character comedietme in Uirue 

songs. 

HERBERT, HUGH (2517-18): Character comedian In a 
sketch of married Ufe. "The Prediction." 

HERMAN, AL (2578): Blaclrface comedian in two songs. 

HILLBILLIES, THE ORIGINAL (715): Novel musical num- 
bers by players from the North Carolina hills. 

HITCHCOCK, RAYMOND (760): Noted musical comedy 
star. In a monologue. "An Evening at Home with Hltchy." 

HJLAN'S BIRDS (2110): "Cockatoos at Their Best," an 
unusual bird act. Directed by Bryan Foy. 

HOLIDAY IN STORYLAND: Featuring HoUywood Starlets 
Group Thirty Youngsters. Directed by Roy Mack. 

HONOLULU: Nat Madison comedy drama. Directed by 
Howard Bretherton. 

HORTON, EDWARD EVERETT (2237): Noted stage and 
screen star, with Lois Wilson in a playlet. "Miss in- 
formation." 

INGENUES, THE (2572): Girls' orchestra from Ziegfelfl 

"Follies," In four numbers. 
INGENUES, THE (2573): Five orchestra selections. 
IRWIN, CHARLES (2555): "The debonair humorist" of 

variety stage in a comedy monologue. 
JUNE (735): English musical comedy star. In two songs. 
KJERULF'S MAYFAIR QUINTETTE (2650): Consisting of 

three harpists, violinist and a vocalist, in three numbers. 
KLEIN BROS. (2553): Musical comedy stars in "Jest 

Moments," a comedy sketch of a doctor and his patient. 
KRAMER & BOYLE (2737): Stage comedians in a skit. 

"Idle Chatter." 

KREMER. ISA (748) In "The Second Minuet." singing two 

popular melodies. 
LAMBERT. EDDIE (702): Famous concert pianist in four 

selections. 

LA RUE. GRACE (739): Musical comedy star In two songs. 

Directed by Bryan Foy. 
LE NARR, ADELE (611): "The wonder kid in vaudeviUe," 

singing and dancing. 
LEWIS, FLO (2708): Broadway comedienne in a humorous 

sketch, "Give Us a Lift." 
LEWIS. JOE (2868): Night club favorite in four songs. 
LIGHTNER, WINNIE (2591): Musical comedy and screen 

star in tliree comic songs. 
LIGHTNER. WINNIE (2592): "Broadway's Tomboy" In 

three of her Inimitable comedy songs. 
LOVE. BESSIE. & EDDIE FOY (2575-6) in a two reel 

comedy playlet, "The Swell Head." 
LOWRY, ED (2565): "The Happy Jester" In three song 

selections. 

LYDELL & HIGGINS (2620) in their popular rustic act. 

"A Friend of Father's." 
LYONS, AL, & FOUR HORSEMEN (2789): Introducing 

the noted accordionist and liis three accompanista in 

"Musical Melange." 
MacGREGOR, BOB (617): Radio Scotch comedian in comedy 

monologue and songs. 
MacGREGOR, KNIGHT (613): Musical comedy and concert 

baritone in three songs, including "On the Road tn 

Mandalay." 

MARCELLE. MISS (716): Singing southern syncopated songa. 

Directed by Bryan Foy. 
MARLOWE & JORDAN (2741): BngUsh music hall favorites 

in "Songs and Impressions." 
MAUGHAN, DORA (2731): Star of the English music haile 

in "The Bad, Bad Woman." She sings three songg. 
MAUGHAN. DORA (2732) in song impressions, assisted &y 

Walter Fehl, tenor. 
MAYHEW. STELLA (728): Musical comedy star in songg. 
McKAY & ARDINE (708): Popular variety team in a fast 

comedy. "Back from Abroad." 
McLEOD. TEX (2694): Premiere rope spinner in a singing 

and lariat-throwing act. 
MERLE TWINS (612): Syncopating songsters In three popu- 
lar numbers. 

MEYERS &. HANFORD (2593): "l^e Arkansas Travelers" 
in barefoot dancing and down-south songs. 

MILLER & FARREL (623): Popular entertainers with man- 
dolin and miniature piano. In three selections. 

MONTGOMERY, HARRY (619): "The Humorologist" pre- 
senting a comedy of words in monologue. 

MORGAN, JIM & BETTY (712): VaudevDle headHners in 
"Songs as You Like Them." 

MOULAN, FRANK (608): Musical comedy star in three 
songs. 

MOUNTED POLICE QUINTETTE (2695): Offering char 
acteristic songs in "The Northern Patrol." 

MULHERN, MARY, & WILLIAM HALLIGAN (873) in com- 
edy skit, "Somewhere in Jersey." Directed bv Bryan Foy. 

MURRAY. JOHN T., & VIVIEN OAKLAND (849): Screen 
and stage nlavers in "Satires." 

NEAL SISTERS (719): Vaudeville headllners in a singing 
act. "Blondes That Gentlemen Prefer." 

NELSON. EDDIE & CO. (2548) in a comedy skit. "Stop 
and Go." 

NEWHOFF & PHELPS (2766): Variety favorites in an 

original sketch with songs, "Cross Words." 
NORMAN. KARYL (2663) in "Silks and Satins," further 

female impersonations and songs. 
NORTH, JACK (2756): Banjo wizard in "The Ban-Jokester. 
NORWORTH, JACK (2707): Stage and variety matinee idol 

in three songs. 

OAKLAND & MURRAY (889) In a burlesque murder trial. 

"The Hall of Injustice." 
OBER, ROBERT (2607-08): Stage and film star in a two 

reel playlet. "A Begular Business Man." 



O'BRIEN, NEIL, & JAMES J. CORBETT (842): Famous 
minstrel and the former heavyweigxit champion in comedy 
chatter. 

OH, SARAH: Jack McLellan and "Sarah" and Tony 

Labriola. Directed by jMuiray Itoth. 
OPERATION, THE: Edgar Bergen and CharUe MacArthur. 

Directed by Murray Koth. 
ORTH, FRANK (2710) In an original one act play, "Meet 

the Wife." 

O'CONNELL, HUGH (807) in a newspaper playlet, "The 
Familiar Face." Directed by Arthur Hurley. 

O'CONNELL, HUGH (838) in a newspaper comedy, "The 
Interview." Directed by Arthur Hurley. 

PARAGONS, THE (2S83) In an atmospheric presentation with 
songs. "In the Tropics." 

PEABODY, EDDIE (25B0) : King of banjo players with his 
partner, Jimmie Maisel, in live selections. 

PERSIAN KNIGHTS: Joyzelle, Helen Patterson, Jack Ran- 
dall, Adagio Four, Roger Davis, Ivan Lanliovv. Techni- 
color production. 

PLANTATION TRIO (2816) in "The Land of Harmony." 
Four songs. 

POLLARD DAPHNE (2554): English comedienne in an act 
in which she is internationally famous, "Wanted, a Man." 

POLLARD, DAPHNE (2567): IflngUsh comedienne in a com- 
edy sketch, "Cleo to Cleopatra." 

QUILLAN, EDDIE, & FAMILY (2574) in "A Little Bit ot 
Everything," two songs. 

RAISA, ROSA (2546): Singing "Plaislr d'Amour and "La 
Paloma." 

RANGERS, THE (2900) in "After the Round-Up." a cowboy 

carnival with songs. 
REDMOND & WELLS (2748) in "The Gyp," at satire on 

fake fortune telling. 
REGAN. JOSEPH (2628): America's foremost Irish tenor 

in three songs. 

ROGERS. CHARLES (2541) in his popular vaudeville com- 
edy. "The Ice-Man." 

RUBIN. BENNY (2539): Stage comedian in monologue and 
songs. 

RUBINI. JAN (2790): Violin vertuso, assisted by Vernon 
Rickard, Irish tenor, and Mona Content, in three songs. 

RUGGLES, CHARLES & CO. (2568-69): Stage star in a 
playlet. "Wives, Etc" 

RYAN, DOROTHY & ROSETTA (726) in a charming song 
act. "Mirth and Melody." 

SCHUMANN-HEINK, MME. (568): Beloved contraltor of 
the concert stage in three solors, "Der Erlkonig," "Trees," 
"Pirate Dreams." 

SEDANO, CARLOS (521): Famous concert violinist in Span- 
ish dances, Mozart's "Minuet" and Beethoven's "Turlrish 
March." 

SEELEY, BLOSSOM (648): Stage and variety star in a 

program of songs. 
SERENADERS, THE (2814) in red hot comedy presenting a 

double quartet of male voices. 
SHAW & LEE (2686): Known as the "Beau Brummels," 

in two songs. 

SHELLEY, FRANCES (713): Leading lady of "Bain or 
Shine." in two songs. 

SINCLAIR & LA MARR (753): Two wise-cracking ladies 
from vaudeville in "In at the Seashore." 

SPALDING, ALBERT (800): Great American violinist play- 
ing "Liebesleld" and "Cavatina." 

SPIDER. THE: Billy Lydell and Tom Fant. Directed by 
Murray Roth. 

STANLEY & GINGER (714): A variety song and dance 

team in "A Few Absurd Moments." 
STANTON, VAL & ERNIE (2587) in an act in which they 

have appeared on the stage,- "English as She Is Not 

Spolcen." 

STONE, IRENE (2783): Musical comedy star in "Songs as 

You Like Them." 
SWOR. BERT (2544): Musical comedy star in "Ducks and 

Deducts." 

SWOR, BERT (2543) In his famous sketch, "A Colorful 
Sermon." 

SYNCO PETS, THE FOUR (731): Variety artists in a 
semi-classica] instrumental number, "Musical Moments." 

TATE, HARRY (754-55): English comedian in a comedy 
sketch. "Motoring." 

TATE. HARRY (778-79) In a comedy, "Selling a Car." 

TERRY, ETHEL GRAY, (2666-67): Dramatic sketch, "Sharp 
Tools." 

TIMBLIN & RAYMOND (2755): Vaudeville headllners in 

"A Pair nf Aces" sing three songs. 
TO DO WITH A SMILE: Roy Stewart. Juliette Compton. 

Directed by William McGann. 
ULIS & CLARK (2758): Musical comedy stars in a sketch 

with songs, "In Dutch." 
VELIE. JAY (717): Musical comedy tenor, "A Journey of 

Songs." 

VELIE. JAY (2784) in a group of songs. 
VELIE. JAY (718) in songs of love. 

VERNON, HOPE (2815): Variety star In a group of four 

songs and imitation of violin sounds. 
WALDRON, JACK (2691): Talented stage actor In a song 

number, "A Little Breath of Broadway." 
WARD, FANNIE (721): Perennial flapper of the English 

and American stage, in "The Miracle Woman." 
WELLS, GIL (2735): Popular blues singer In three of his 

latest son<rs. 

WEST. ARTHUR PAT (2919) in a singing atmospheric 

comedy, "Rtiip Ahoy." 
WHITE, EDDIE (2689): Variety and musical comedy star 

in a monologue with songs, "I Thank You." 
WHITMAN, FRANK (703): "1*e surprising fiddler" who 

plays his violin with a card, bottle or a bow. Four 

selections. 

WHITMORE. DOROTHY (2538): Popular prima donna in a 
group of songs. 

YELLMAN, DUKE, & COLETTA RYAN (874) in "Song- 

ZARDO, ERIE. & GUIDO CICCOLINI (876): Concert pianist 
and new leading tenor in three classic songs. 

Playlets and Flash 

ACROSS THE BORDER (2664-65): With Sarah Padden, 
stage star in a thrilling playlet. Directed by Bryan Foy. 

AIN'T IT THE TRUTH (2648-49): A comedy of manners in 
two reels written by Ralph Spence. 

ALIBI. THE (2677-78): A stirring dramatio playlet In 
which Kenneth Harlan, famous screen star, has the lead- 
ing role. 

APOLLON. DAVE. & HIS RUSSIAN STARS (875): Dave 
ApoUon, comedian-musician playing American jazz; four 
songs. 

CEBALLOS' UNDERSEA REVUE, LARRY (2661): An 
undersea flash act directed by Bryan Foy. 

CEBALLOS' CRYSTAL CAVE REVUE. LARRY (2693): 
Flash. Larry CebaUos is famous for his eiotic and ec- 
centric arrangements. 

DIXIE DAYS (2566): The negro spirituals of the south 
are sung bv a group of Southern darkies. Four songs. 

DON'T BE JEALOUS (2590): With Joe E. Brown, musical 
comedy star, in a one-reel playlet. Directed by Bryan 
Foy. 

GIVING IN (2563-64): Harry Delf. the Broadway comedian. 

In an engaging playlet directed by Murray Both. Hedds 

Hopper Is in the cast. 
HALL OF INJUSTICE, THE (889): Starring the stage and 

screen players John T. Murray and Vivien Oakland. A 

takeolT on a modem murder trial. Directed by Murray 

Roth. 

HOW'S YOUR STOCK (2660): A story of the pitfalls of 
Wall St. as told by the ticker tape with Eugene Palette. 



Mary Doran, CSiarles Sellon and others. 

MUSI'C HATH CHARMS (885): Vltaphone's favorite com- 
edy stars, Ann Codee and Frank Orth, in a farce-comedy. 
The bashful music student takes vioUn lessons from a gold 
digging instructress. 

PREDICTION, THE (2517-18): Comedy of man whose life 
Is changed by the telling of his fortime. Hugh Herbert 
is featured. 

REGULAR BUSINESS MAN, A (2607-03): Dramatio play- 
let of a man who wins both wife and fortime on a quick 
Wall St. turnover. Starring Robert Ober. Others in tha 
cast of this story are Margery Meadows. Lucy Beaumont. 
John Saintolis. 

SEDLEY. ROY & HIS NIGHT CLUB REVUE (796): A 
complete night club revue with Roy Sedley as master of 
ceremonies, assisted by Beth Miller, a blues singer, and 
BiUy Smith, eccentric dancer. Three selections. 

SHARP TOOLS (2666-07): Ethel Grey Terry. William David- 
son and others in a dramatic sketch in which two crooks 
are brought to justice by the children of an officer killed 
by the gang. 

SWELL HEAD, THE (2576-76): A two-reel playlet starrllu 

Eddie Foy. son of the famous clown of vaudeville, and 
Bessie Love, film star, with iive musical numbers. Directed 
by Bryan Foy. 

THANKSGIVING DAY (2599): A deUghtful comedy by Ad- 
dison Burkhart in which two young doctors and an under- 
taker play the chief roles. Harry Kelly is in the cast. 

TINY TOWN REVUE (784): Clever dancing and singing 
by midgets less than three feet tall. Four musical num- 
bers. Directed by Bryan Foy. 

WIVES, ETC. (2568-69): Starring Charles Ruggles of stage 
fame with a supporting cast of four. Ruggles plays a 
young man who gets married while drunk and finds his 
wife a complete stranger. 

* * * 

Orchestras 

ARNHEIM, GUS. COCOANUT GROVE ORCH. (2584). 

ARNHEIM, GUS AND HIS AMBASSADORS (2586). 

ARNHEIM. GUS, COCOANUT GROVE ORCH. (2136). 

BROWN BROTHERS, SIX ORIGINAL (649). 

BURTNETT. EARL, ORCHESTRA (2294). 

BURTNETT, EARL, ORCHESTRA (2295). 

GREEN'S FADETTES (710). 

GREEN'S FLAPPERETTES (711). 

GREEN, HAZEL & CO. (2112). 

HALLET, MAL & ORCHESTRA (729). 

HALLET, MAL & ORCHESTRA (730). 

HALSTEAD, HENRY, ORCHESTRA (2114). 

HAWAIIAN NIGHTS (422). 

HENRY, TAL & ORCHESTRA (732). 

KAHN, ROGER WOLF & ORCH. (469). 

IMPERIAL RUSSIAN COSSACKS (2280). 

INDIANA FIVE, THE (869). 

INGENUES. THE (2572). 

INGENUES, THE (2573). 

LERDO'S MEXICAN ORCH. (705). 

LOPEZ, VINCENT & HIS ORCH. (390). 

LOWRY. ED & ORCH. (2561). 

LYMAN, ABE, & ORCH. (2338). 

MEXICAN TIPICA ORCH. (707). 

MOORE, PROFF & ORCH. (2276). 

MORGAN. GENE. ORCH. (2266). 

NEWSBOYS HARMONICA BAND (2300). 

NICHOLS, "RED" & HIS FIVE PENNIES (870). 

RICH, DICK & ORCH. (2996). 

ROSE. VINCENT & JACKI E TAYLOR'S ORCH. (2292). 
SPIKES. REB & HIS FOLLIES ENTERTAINERS (2123). 
STAFFORD. JESSE ORCH. (2730). 
TAJADO'S TIPICA ORCH. (706). 
WARING'S PENNSYLVANIANS (428). 
WAYMAN'S DEBUTANTES, HARRY (2261). 

Overtures, Marches and Concerts 

AMEER, THE (2499). Without* 

BY WIRELESS-GALOP (2459). Without. 

CINDERELLA BLUES (2450). Without. 

•Without means record without film. 
CLOISTER EPISODE, A (2470). Without. 
COHENS AND KELLYS, THE (2480). Without. 
DANCE OF THE HOURS (2389). Without. 
D'AMOUR (2918). Without. 
DESERT SONG OVERTURE (2930). Without. 
EVOLUTION OF DIXIE (462). With film. 
FIREFLY OVERTURE (2380). Without. 
FUNICULI FUNICULA (2530). Without. 
GOD SAVE THE KING (2527). Without 
GOLD AND SILVER (2428). Without. 
HIGH JINKS (2360). Without. 
KATINKA (2400). WithouL 
LA BARCAROLLE (2469). Without. 
LA MARSELLAISE (2528). Without. 
LIGHT CAVALRY OVERTURE (448). With Film. 
LINDBERGH FOREVER (2460). Without. 
MARCH LORRAINE (2438). Without. 
MARCIA REALE OF ITALY (2529). Without. 
MARIETTE-FRENCH 2-STEP (2440). Without. 
MEXICANA (2489). Without. 
MIGNON (263). Without. 
MLLE. MODISTE (2437). Without. 
MOON. MAID (2510). Without. 

MORNING. NOON AND NIGHT (450). With Film. 

MORRIS DANCE (2390). Without. 

NATIONAL EMBLEM MARCH (2429). Without. 

NOCHECITA (2490). Without. 

ORPHEUS OVERTURE (461). With Film. 

OUR GANG KID COMEDY (2488). Without. 

PHEDRE OVERTURE (2170). With Fihn. 

POET AND PEASANT (447). With Film. 

RAYMOND OVERTURE (449). With Film. 

SARI OVERTURE (2410). Without. 

SEMPER FIDELIS (2439). Without. 

SHEPHERD'S DANCE (2399). Without. 

SPEED MANIACS (2519). Without. 

SPIRIT OF 1918 (381). With Film. 

SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS (2449). Without. 

STARS AND STRIPES, OVERTURE (2330). Without. 

STAR SPANGLED BANNER (2520). Without. 

SUITE FROM THE SOUTH (2448). Without. 

TANNHAUSER OVERTURE (314). With Film. 

THREE TWINS (2509). Without. 

TORCH DANCE OVERTURE (2378). Without. 

UNDER THE STARRY BANNER (2419). Without. 

DARK STREETS (3349). 

DIVINE LADY, THE (2967). 

DRAG (3048), 

GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE, THE (2989). 

HARD TO GET (3078). 

HER PRIVATE LIFE (3365). 

HIS CAPTIVE WOMAN (2949). 

HOT STUFF (2977). 

HOUSE OF HORRORS, THE (2990). 

ISLE OF LOST SHIPS, THE (3363). 

LOVE AND THE DEVIL (2959). 

MAN AND THE MOMENT, THE (3069). 

PRISONERS (2979). 

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN (2998). 

SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN (2929) 

SMILING IRISH EYES (3410). 

SQUALL. THE (2997). 

TWIN BEDS (3020). 

TWO WEEKS OFF (2978). 

WEARY RIVER (2909). 

WHY BE GOOD (2960). 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



45 



SERVICE TALKS 



Incorporated in this department of the Herald-W orld, which is a department containing news, in- 
formation and gossip on current productions, is the Moving Picture World department, "Through 

the Box Office Window." 



"FOOTLIGHTS AND FOOLS" 

T 

X HIS, ladies and gentlemen of the cinema, 
is the next picture for you to look at, listen to 
and thrill over. That is, if you, like I, felt it 
was too bad about that Irish thing Colleen 
Moore got caught in. Because this is the pic- 
ture that you knew, as I did. Miss Moore was 
equal to, given the opportunity. No, it's more 
than that; it's better than even I thought she 
could do, and that makes it better than I 
thought any other actress in the business could 
do. I guess that makes it perfect. 

You've seen the girls of the silent pictures 
go into their dances, and you've heard them lift 
their voice in song, some of them with doubles 
and some with just plain nerve. Well, you 
haven't seen or heard anything until you've seen 
and heard Miss Moore sing, talk (French as 
well as English), laugh, sob — and until you've 
seen her step the principal role in a big Tech- 
nicolor musical show that is just part of the 
picture. She shows, as you've always known 
she would, just how much better she is than 
anyone of similar weight, style, type and gen- 
eral occupation in all of show business. 

The story, which could have been any old 
thing to suit me under the circumstances, is 
just as much better than the rest of these back- 
stage things as Miss Moore is better than these 
gals who've been doing them.^ It's about a 
Betty Murphy who is doing Mile. Fifi on and 
off a revue stage and whose love affair is a 
simple thing which quite probably has hap- 
pened to a great many young women in similar 
occupations. It is a strong narrative, with no 
distorting of reactions to make length, no manu- 
factured suspense, but with a world of humanity 
in it (and with the excellent Frederic March 
and Raymond Hackett as the two young men in 
the case). And they have the extremely good 
sense, having made an extremely good picture, 
to stop it at the finish. I'll say that's John 
McCormick. 

It gives an old heart like mine a great kick 
to come thus upon proof that the original judg- 
ment is still okay. I never consented to the 
belief that the talkies were too much for Miss 
Moore. I'm glad to add here that they (almost) 
aren't enough. I guess she's just too good for 
the other girls. 

"THE TAMING OF THE SHREW" 

H ERE, boys and girls, is magic right under 
your nose. I'm sure there isn't one among 
you who could not prove, logically and with 
precedent, that Shakespeare is a bust for pic- 
ture purposes. I could prove it myself. And 



By T. O, Service 

here, girls and boys, are Mary and Doug with 
proof that our proof isn't proof at all. They 
have made of "The Taming of the Shrew" a 
better comedy than Mr. Sennett ever dreamed 
of making. A better comedy than has ever 
been seen or heard on the screen. Quite prob- 
ably the best comedy ever made. 

I'm not going to take the time to tell you 
how they did it. That's their secret, and yours 
after you see the picture. How they get away 
with the blank verse, how Fairbanks contrives 
to incorporate his stunts, how Mary gets away 
in her traditionally sweet manner with the role 
of the shrew, and how they keep honors even as 
the thing finishes strictly according to text — 
these things I shall not tell you. These things 
belong to art. And art (which you'll learn to 
like when you get more of these samples of it) 
is what "The Taming of the Shrew" unques- 
tionably is. 

Move over, you Booth, and you, Barrett. 
Here's a couple of performers, born after you 
but enjoying no other noticeable advantage, 
who do their stuff at least as well as you did 
yours, possibly better, and they've a harder gen- 
eration to do it for. Move over, boys, and you 
too, Mme. Bernhardt. Make room for a pair 
of immortals — Mary and Doug. 

"DYNAMITE" 

T 

X HIS is beginning to look like the minutes 
of the last meeting of the Old Settlers of the 
Celluloid Silences. First item. Colleen Moore 
comes through and panics 'em. Second item, 
Mary and Doug give the world a laugh with— 
not at — Shakespeare. Third item, Mr. Cecil B. 
DeMille shows the world he's only been handi- 
capped all these years by lack of dialog and, 
now that he's got it, you common or garden 
variety directors gotta get busy or else. "Dyna- 
mite" is a bang! 



Bandits Fail to Appear; 
Manager's Plan Wasted 

(Special to the H crald-lVorld) 

KANSAS CITY, Dec. 31.— When 
Breckinridge Fagin, manager of the 
Plaza theatre, suburban house, re- 
ceived a tip that the theatre was to 
be held up Christmas night, he was 
well prepared for the visit. He noti- 
fied the police department which 
placed men in the lobby. But the 
robbers failed to appear. 



You knew, of course, that DeMille would 
make it flashy (but you didn't know how 
flashy). You knew he'd use a story with more 
kinks in it than a corkscrew, that it would have 
more kick than a mule, but you couldn't have 
guessed, just from the title, that it would ex- 
plode like "Dynamite" explodes. The rafters 
crack and the window panes bend when this 
thing gets to the big mine scene (and you jest 
haint never seen no mine wreck 'till you've 
seen this one). 

Mr. DeMille employs, as usual, a large cast. 
This one is headed by Miss Kay Johnson, who 
can give lessons to most of Hollywood's best 
little dramatic actresses without lifting a finger, 
Charles Bickford, who suggests no other actor 
save George Bancroft and is almost as good, 
Conrad Nagel, who needs no subcaption, and 
Julia Faye, ditto. These and the hundreds or 
thousands who work with them put on a show. 
And if this isn't a show, I'm crazier than you 
fondly imagine. That, of course, isn't possible. 

Yes, this shows that Mr. DeMille has only 
just begun to make motion picture entertain- 
ment. I expect to see bigger and better mani- 
festations of the talent that's been too long 
muffled in the silences of such celluloid as "The 
King of Kings," "The Ten Commandments," 
"Male and Female" and things like that. My 
guess is that he'll make these look like begin- 
ners' working models. And if he does, what'll 
you use for sideboards on that old box office of 
yours ? 

"HER OWN DESIRE" 

J^FTER "The Trial of Mary Dugan" and 
"The Last of Mrs. Cheney," which combined 
to set Miss Norma Shearer miles ahead of the 
nearest competitor in my estimation, it was too 
bad they chose "Her Own Desire." It isn't, 
perhaps, a bad picture. It may even be, in a 
sense, a good picture. But it isn't one-two-kick 
with either of those mentioned and I'm sorry 
about it. I hoped Miss Shearer had got away 
from scripts like this. 

This one's a gag about a gal whose father 
divorces her mother, whereupon she falls in 
love with the other woman's son. With that 
set of conditions, almost anything might have 
happened, almost anyone could have whittled 
out a plot, but nothing and nobody did. When 
they get into a tough spot, finally, they toss in 
a boat wreck, some stunt flying by Lewis Stone, 
a rescue and call it a day. Robert Montgomery 
and Belle Bennett are others who take the rap 
with Miss Shearer. None deserves it. 



46 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 




THE THEATRE 



What Special Play Do You Make to Win 
Women Patrons to Your Theatre? 



When Hal Reid came to San Fran- 
cisco to take charge of exploitation 
work in connection with the showing 
of "Flight" at the Orpheum theatre 
those who knew him in the old Turner 
& Dahnken days commenced to look 
for something out of the ordinary, and 
were not disappointed. Stunts and tie- 
ups followed in rapid succession and 
what was expected to prove a two- 
week engagement stretched into one 
of four weeks. 

Exploitation started off with a bang, 
when the Examiner gave "Flight" a front 
page story every day for a week. In re- 
turn, the Orpheum opened the engagement 
with a midnight matinee and turned the 
proceeds over to the Examiner Christmas 
Cheer Fund. 

A Wealth of Tieups 

There were tieups with manufacturers of 
sweaters, dealers in flying togs, opticians 
featuring goggles, and there was a remark- 
able display in the lobby of the theatre. 
The latter centered around a wind ma- 
chine and miniature plane installed through 
the courtesy of the Curtiss Airplane Com- 
pany, the exhibit representing an invest- 
ment of almost $20,000. This working 
model showed just how a plane is operated 
under all sorts of conditions, and never 
failed to attract a crowd. 

There was never a question but that the 
picture would attract men, so special efforts 



Triple Features for 
Double Price New Year's 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

ALBANY, Dec. 31.— The Mark 
Strand and the Mark Ritz theatres in 
Albany, N. Y., tried out something 
new in the way of a New Year's Eve 
show. Instead of running the regular 
show, each house presented three big 
pictures, charging double the admis- 
sion price, and running continuously 
from 6 p. m. until 12:30 a. m. Noise 
makers and favors also were given 
patrons. 



were made to interest women in the ad- 
vertising, and Lila Lee was played up 
strongly. Arrangements were made with 
the San Francisco News whereby tickets to 
the theatre were presented to those who 
found certain "Flight" ads in the want ad 
section. An especially effective piece of 
work was the distribution of 10,000 blotters, 
with "Flight" copy in shorthand, among 
girls in the office district. The presence of 
Amelia Earhart, trans-Atlantic flyer, in the 
city on a speaking tour, helped put over the 
feminine idea in good shape. 

Mayor Introduces Graves 

Ralph Graves made a personal appear- 
ance at the Orpheum and was introduced to 



the audience by Mayor James Rolph Jr., 
which was good for a lot of publicity, as 
was the shopping tour of Mrs. Graves. 

Organizations of flyers in Greater San 
Francisco attended the show in a body and 
the theatre management saw to it that 
members of the army and navy air corps 
were invited to see the picture. The game 
football squad of Carnegie Institute of 
Technology, after its gridiron encounter at 
Los Angeles, was invited by radio to attend 
the show and the invitation was accepted. 
The invitation over the radio was listened 
to by thousands and was excellent pub- 
licity. 

Offer Use of Theatre 

California exhibitors are also quite alive 
to the value of community goodwill. For 
example, when the Downtown Association 
signified its desire to give the children of 
Berkeley a Christmas party, Clarence Laws, 
manager of the Fox Theatres in that city, 
lost no time in donating the use of the 
U. C. theatre, together with the picture and 
music. 

The party was held on a Saturday morn- 
ing and the theatre was crowded with 
youngsters anxious to see Santa Claus. In 
addition to the screen attraction there was 
a stage show by local talent and com- 
munity singing of Christmas carols. At the 
conclusion of the entertainment Santa 
Claus gave each child a horn and candy, 
with the compliments of the Downtown 
Association. Almost every merchant of 
note in the city took part in the affair, 
either directly or indirectly, and a vote of 
thanks was extended the management of 
the theatre for its part in the civic event. 




From Karachi, India, comes the above pictures, sent to "The Theatre" by the management of the Capitol theatre, to show how Universal' s 

"Show Boat" was exploited for that house. A real replica of a show boat it was, too. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



47 





To Erie Wright, publicity director of the Mastbaum theatre in Philadelphia, one of the Stanley-Warner houses, goes chief credit for the Christ- 
mas Carnival held in the Grotto of the Mastbaum. Monumental represensation of the Coming of the Wise Men and of the Eve of the Nativity 
was at one end of the Grotto with life-size sculptured figures. The Santa Claus reindeer also attracted considerable attention. 



Sidney Lust Sets 
Himself Solidly in 
Newspaper Graces 

How solidly Sidney Lust, owner of a 
chain of theatres at Washington, D. C, has 
sold himself to the newspaper screen 
writers is exemplified by the following clip- 
ping from Andrew R. Kelly's column in the 
Washington Times: 

"Sidney Lust, who is Washington's largest 
independent exhibitor, notifies this depart- 
ment that the prospects of a Merry Christ- 
mas for the small movie proprietor are 
much better than they were one year ago. 

* * * 

"It looked for a time as though the small 
exhibitor was certain to sink in a sea of 
overhead costs swept in with the talking 
movies. The installation costs were stag- 
gering, the chattering features cost more, 
the gab by trailers for the new pictures 
meant extra money, more expense for the 
projection booths, the continued cost of 
music, records, etc. For all of this the 
little neighborhood exhibitor could get 5 
cents more, perhaps, at the box office, and it 
didn't appear to be enough. When I last 
talked with Mr. Lust he was as mournful 
as my friend who had eight straight losing 
days at Laurel. 

* * * 

"Yesterday Mr. Lust was as happy as a 
boy scout with a new jackknife. It seemed 
that Metro-Goldwyn, Fox, Paramount, 
Warner Brothers and Universal through 
their various exchanges have given the 
small exhibitor a chance to live. They 
want the neighborhood houses to thrive 
even as the first run houses. From the 
thousands of small theatres the big pro- 
ducers pick-up their profit 'gravy.' So the 
big producers through their various ex- 
changes have reduced rentals and inci- 
dental expenses to the point where the 
suburban palaces devoted to celluloid en- 
tertainment can keep their heads up and 
wade through to profitable operation. At 
least that is Mr. Lust's story and I have 
no reason to believe it is other than the 
exact truth. 

* * * 

"However, the spot news of this para- 
graph is that Mr. Lust has taken over the 
Cameo theatre in Mt. Rainier and that 700 
seat cinema is now showing nothing but the 
latest Hollywood talking and singing 
product." 



Try Child Radio Hour Hookup; 
Thoma Calls ItA-l Help for B. O. 

A real children's Christmas party with a magic train was achieved by the 
Dallas Majestic when it arranged a tieup with Station KRLD which broadcasts 
from the Adolphus hotel, Dallas, on its Sleepy Time Kiddies Hour, which runs 
from 5 to 6 p. m. and is presented by Old King Cole and Little Jack Horner. 
The entertainers started a Magic Train to the North Pole several weeks ago to 
get Santa Claus and each day the Sleepy Time entertainers announced the city 
at which the train had stopped and also announced that the Majestic Santa 
Claus Magic Train was on its way to the Majestic theatre of Dallas, to arrive 
Saturday afternoon December 21, at 1 p. m., with Santa Claus and forty elves, 
brownies and other magic tiny beings. 



They had said that on this magic train were 
thousands of toys, besides candy, oranges, ap- 
ples, and so on, and that the youngsters would 
meet this train at the Majestic on Saturdaj', 
December 21, also Monday, December 23, and 
Tuesday, December 24. This broadcasting 
took place each day. 

10,000 Children Enrolled 

This Sleepy Time Hour has a membership 
of 10,000 youngsters, and the announcer stated 
that he wanted all of them to be at the Ma- 
jestic so that he could meet them and also so 
they could see Santa Claus and the Magic 
Train. 

Old King Cole and Little Jack Horner were 
presented at the Majestic, where they put on 
their regular program through the micro- 
phones previous to presenting in full stage the 
Magic Train with Santa Claus and 40 other 
entertainers. The 40 children's entertainers 
were from a Dallas dancing school and they 
put on a Kiddies Revue in conjunction with 
the Santa Claus affair. 

A Christmas tree 25 feet high and with a 
20-foot spread was on the stage and each child 
that came to the theatre received a gift pack- 
age consisting of a toy, candy, box of choco- 
lates and Christmas nuts and fruit. 

Organizes Theatre Club 

John H. Thoma, manager of the Dallas Ma- 



jestic, instituted another very novel stunt on 
these days to bolster children's business for 
the coming year. When the thousands were 
in the theatre, announcement was made that 
this was the Majestic Booster's Club and was 
inaugurated by Old King Cole and Little Jack 
Homer The children each received a card on 
which they gave their name, address and age. 
This card entitled them to various shindigs, 
eats, drinks and prizes throughout the year. 

Thoma states that a Sleepy Time tieup of 
this kind is the greatest business builder for 
children that can be devised. The Dallas Ma- 
jestic boasts a Majesticland where the tiniest 
are taken care of by three nurses while the 
parents are attending the show. Merry-go- 
rounds, doll houses, nurseries and various 
other contrivances are at the disposal of the 
youngsters. 



Here's a Real Good Stunt 

Owen McKivitt advertised the Venetian 
theatre, Racine, Wis., on the front page of the 
comic section in the Sunday issue of the 
Racine Times-Call. At the bottom of the page 
he has a strip approximately two inches deep 
across the entire page. This is a trademark 
ad and no attractions are listed. 



( tell 'em with trailers 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 




WHOOPEE! 



A tie-up with a drug store at 5th and 42ud. New York, ivas made by United Artists when 
Gloria Swanson's "The Trespasser," played at the Rialto theatre. Stills of the picture were 
scattered in the drug store and a large photo of Miss Swanson in the middle of the display. 
Books of "The Trespasser" and sheet music were also displayed in the window. The stunt 

proved an eye-getter. 

Automatic Typewriter in Action 
Attracts ^Em to Mystery Film 

Gene Fox, publicity manager of the State theatre, Minneapolis, made a suc- 
cessful tieup with the Western Union to exploit the showing of Paramount's, 
"The Return of Sherlock Holmes." The Western Union installed a simplex 
recording machine at the entrance of the theatre. This machine, which was op- 
erated from the inside of the theatre, gave an account of Sherlock Holmes com- 
ing to the city and invited the public to see him at the State theatre. The 
message came out of the machine on ordinary tape that is used by the Western 
Union. 



This created a surprisingly lot of atten- 
tion. Large crowds stopped in front of 
the theatre and read the message as it 
came out of the machine on the tape. 

Along with this, another tieup was made 
with the Browning King Clothing com- 
pany. Ten thousand heralds were dis- 
tributed around town. The first three pages 
were devoted to advertising "The Return of 
Sherlock Holmes" and the back was given 
over to a display of Browning King's $30 
suit known as the Challenger. 

At the Astor theatre a 2,000,000 candle 
power emergency airport floodlight 
mounted on wheels was obtained from the 
Universal Aviation School and stationed at 
the front of the theatre to exploit William 
Haines in "Speedway." Many people had 
never seen one of these huge floodlights. 
They stopped to examine it and conse- 
quently a large number of them went in to 
see the picture. 



by Manager T. R. Tubman for a concert. 
As Sunday performances are barred in On- 
tario, tickets were not sold at the theatre 
but were previously disposed of at down- 
town offices. 



9? 



Tubman Turns House Over 

To Red Cross for Concert 

The Regent theatre, Ottawa, Ontario, 
was placed at the disposal of the Red Cross 
Society on Sunday evening, November 24, 



Star Contest and 
Music Tieup Help 
"Hollywood Revue 

A newsoaper campaign sponsored by 
Jack Pilgreen. manager of the Majestic the- 
atre, Tulsa, Oklahoma, helped put over his 
showing of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's "The 
Hollywood Revue." He was assisted by an 
M G M exploiteer. 

The newspaper campaign was started ten 
days in advance of the playdate. Eighteen 
days in advance of the playdate, the "Holly- 
wood Revue" concealed star contest was 
placed with the Tulsa Tribune. Counting 
the announcement of the winters, the total 
space secured was two hundred inches. 

A special music tieup was arranged with 
three large music houses. Radio Station 
KVOO played the song hits from the film. 



Pajamas! 



For Flappers and Shieks Only 

Hey, Hey and Yipp Yipp! 

L«Brn the latest styles in making syncopat- 
ed Whoopee! (VO DE OH DOO). Gel a 
' load of new ways of sofa wrestling, 

IBOOP POO DE BOOPI Tabes slant at 
all the 1930 necking methods ( PAA 
DUTIN DOOI. 

WANT A $6£0 COLLEGE COURSE 

^ Words ™i{f^ Music'' 

THE WILUAM KOX MOVIKTONE MFRTHQI AKK 




with 

LOIS MORAN 
TOM PATRICOLA 
DAVID PERCY 

Chorus of 100 cute lit- 
tle culiefi Kuaranleed 
NEVER tu walk homi- 
from a buggy ridel 



tranU jNow r laying 



Bryn Griffith, manager of the Strand 
theatre, Madison. Wis., exploited "Words 
and Music" with this throwaway. The 
handbills measuring 6x9 were attracting 
to students and helped considerable in 
putting over the Fox production. 



Snappy Handbill Helps 
Madison House Exploit 
Fox "Words and Music 

Hand bills measuring 6x9 inches and ap- 
pealing to the university students, aided con- 
siderably in putting across "Words and Music" 
when it appeared at the Strand theatre in 
Madison, Wis. The hand bills were gotten 
out by Bryn Griffith, manager of the Strand 
and were a hot sketch of the type which ap- 
peals to the student in this modern age. 

The copy on the hand bills ran something 
like this : "Whoopee ! Burn My Silk Pajamas ! 
For Flappers and Sheiks Only — Hey, Hey and 
Yipp Yipp ! Learn the latest styles in making 
syncopated Whoopee! (Vo De Oh Doo) Get 
a load of new ways of sofa wresting (Boop 
Poo De Boop). Take a slant at all the 1930 
necking methods (Paa Dutin Doo). 

"Want a $6.60 college course for 25 cents? 
Then see 'Words and Music,' the William 
Fox Movietone mirthquake." An attractive 
cut in connection with the hand bills boosted 
their collegiate effectiveness. 



Theatre Manager Named 
Citys Publicity Officer 
As Community s Tribute 

J. M. Franklin, manager of B. F. Keith's 
theatre, Ottawa, has received a municipal 
appointment for the publicity work of the 
Canadian capital in recognition of his 
voluntary services in boosting various fea- 
tures of community importance. Franklin 
will act in an advisory capacity during 1930 
with the civic industrial and publicity 
bureau. One of Franklin's schemes is the 
erection of an archway as a gate at the 
entrance to the city, which also would 
serve as a light beacon for intercity air 
traffic. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



49 



MUSIC AND TALENT 



Future of Stase Presentation Secure 



Good Exploiting 
Will Bring Back 
Music and Talent 

The Presentation Field Has 

Unlimited Possibilities Under 

Proper Policy 

By DON SAMSON 

Closer relationship between the mo- 
tion picture and the stage show will 
give the exhibitors the long-awaited 
perfect program. 

Exhibitors for the past two years have 
been trying to do away with the music 
and talent form of entertainment in 
motion picture houses. This they did 
because they seriously believed public 
opinion warranted the change. Today 
they find that the stage show is as popu- 
lar as ever and realize that the music and 
talent entertainment possess all of the 
elements upon which other forms of en- 
tertainment are based. 

Need Careful Exploitation 

■The stage show at the present time needs 
more talent and careful exploitation. The 
present condition of flesh entertainment is due 
more to the neglect of the exhibitors through 
the invasion of sound pictures than the sound 
picture itself. 

Fanchon and Alarco are inaugurating a new 
policy of establishing scenery and costume 
depots to refurnish their "Ideas" at key cities 
of their great circuit. This will go a long way 
toward bigger and better stage shows for each 
unit will be of the spick and span aspect, in- 
stead of having the appearance of being 
on tour. 

Now Unsettled, but — 

The entire amusement field at this time is in 
an unsettled condition, but through careful and 
sound business principals, and good showman- 
ship, the industry can be put again on a sound 
basis. 

\\'hen the motion picture and the stage show 
■walk forward hand in hand with either being 
considered as a secondary feature of the thea- 
tre, we have arrived to the long awaited 
medium of theatre entertainment. 



in the Bathtub" 



©f SHf>W% 




vvnilrf Iff u H iiii 

Sflf Aclkii Hi ra<:» 
<i. WaUr llf iltr 



Mil, 'I? rfi««t; 




Wl txm titMiUI t 

Srif Atlivii :u ra^f 
(ia? VV;il< r Ikaltr 



"Singing in the Batli Tub" which is M. 
Whitmark & Sons' newest song hit, is one 
of the many numbers featured in Warner 
Bros.' "The Show of Shows." This song is 
being exploited by a ne^v stunt devised by 
Sam Serwer of M. Whitmark & Sons to do 
cooperative advertising with the Self-Action 
Storage, Gas-Water Heater Co. Posters will 
be placed to an advantage in cities through the 
country. 



"THE PRIDE OF THE REGIMENT" 

DORIS ROCHE 

Featured in JACK PARTINGTON'S 

"OVER THE TOP" 



PUBLIX UNIT and PARAMOUNT VITA- 
PHONE SHORT FEATURE 

WEEK OF JAN. 4 — SAENGER, NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
DIRECTION — WM. MaRRIS 4CENCY 



STAGE SHOWS 



Chicago Avalon 



Week Ending December 26 

The stage presentation entitled "Candyland" at 
the Avalon theatre for the current week has an 
entire cast of juvenile players who offer the best 
program of its kind I have seen in a long while. 
The entire show, true to its name, is offered with 
a candy background, with each of the cast and the 
orchestra dressed to represent some form of candy. 
Charlie Crafts acts as master of ceremonies, and 
introduces the young players as they appear, the old- 
est not being over fourteen years of age. 

Two little girls enter and start things off with a 
snappy dance number assisted by the ballet who offer 
a clever dance routine that would make any first 
class ballet dancer take notice and worry about her 
job. 

A young man is next on the bill, offering some 
excellent violin selections. He plays beautifully and 
is very confident of himself, and is forced to do 
an encore which is greeted with equal applause. 

Next a little fellow sings some songs in the Al 
Jolson manner that take the house by storm. He 
offered several encores and then ran off the stage, 
with Charlie Crafts after him. He returned later 
though with another number. 

Charlie Crafts then introduced a young lady wno 
surely plays a hot saxophone, if you know what I 
mean. She gives a clever impersonation of Ted 
Lewis, high hat and all. that was very well received 
by the audience. 

The next act consisting of two brothers and their 
sister is the real hit of the show. Although each 
act was more than well received this one went over 
in a big way. First one brother offered a song and 
then asked the permission of the audience to intro- 
duce his little brother who also offered a song, then 
he in turn asked permission to introduce his little 
sister who also sang a number. I don't believe the 
oldest was over ten or eleven years of age. But how 
they could put across their numbers. The audience 
kept roaring their approval and the little enter- 
tainers kept offering encores. 

The finale is very well done, with each member of 
the cast dressed to represent some character of chil- 
dren's literature. Charlie Crafts and the boys offer 
a snappy number at the close. 



Minneapolis Minnesota 

Week Ending December 27 

"Snap Into It" was presented this week by Zizz 
Black at the Minnesota. This being Christmas week 
an added attraction, "Kiddie Revue" was presented 
on the stage. 

The presentation was opened with a scene called 
"Toyland Fantasy," presented by the Kiddie Revue. 
This was followed by a number of song and dance 
acts by the juvenile actors which were very good. 

Following this Val and Ernie Stanton made their 
appearance as playwrights. After a bit of jokes and 
nonsense Zizz Black made his appearance and Val 
tried to sell him one of his plays. In trying to 
come to an agreement the two went through a lot 
of jokes and wise-cracking. Very little of their stuff 
was original, but the boys had a way of putting it 
over that kept the audience in laughter. 

At this point the stage band was introduced. 
After playing an opening number the Patterson 
Twins, assisted by the Serova Ballet, took the stage. 
The Twins went through a very good dance, but they 
made very little hit with the audience and received 
only a scattered bit of applause. 

Val and Ernie were back again for their second 
number which was a scene in a dentist's office. Val 
{Continued on next page) 



50 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



took the part of the patient and Ernie that of the 
dentifit with Zizz Black assisting him. Val entered 
moaning and took his place in the dentist's chair. 
With Val in the chair, Ernie gras-ped the tooth with 
a forceps and Zizz went through the actions of run- 
ning a hat pin through the eeat of the chair, causing 
Val to jump, extracting the tooth. The scene 
ended with Val remarking that he had no idea that 
the roots went down that far. 

The next scene was very pleasing, at least to the 
eye. The Serova Ballet dressed in Indian costumes, 
with headdresses of many colored feathers, went 
through an Indian dance. 

Following this Val and Ernie Stanton made their 
third appearance as "Pilferers of the King's English." 
Val described imaginary experiences that he went 
through in different foreign countries. Describing 
different places he would get the various names mixed 
up in a comical manner and Ernie would explain 
what he meant. One or two of the jokes were 
rather raw, the kind that would be expected at a 
burlesque show and not at the Minnesota. The audi- 
ence apparently enjoyed the act for they gave the 
boys a big hand when they left. 

Zizz Black and the stage band then played a spe- 
cial number called "Bells," and Maxine Henry fol- 
lowed with a dance. The finale presented the entire 
cast merely posing until the curtain was drawn. 

San Francisco Fox 

Week Ending December 26 

Tiiis week's stage show at the Fox is that ever- 
delightful O'Neill Sisters' Kiddies Revue which makes 
its appearance every year at this time and gives the 
faithful Fanchon and Marco Idea a breathing spell. 
Its appearance also means a change of pace for 
genial Walt Roesner, master of ceremonies and di- 
rector of the Fox Concert Orchestra, since the or- 
chestra remains in the pit, for lack of room on the 
stage, and no announcing is done, in order that no 
time may be lost. 

"Musical Christmas Tidings" is the way the over- 
ture is billed, but it proves none other than Ruben- 
stein's "Kammenoi Ostrow," with full chimes and 
harp. 

When the curtain goes up it reveals a great room 
with an immense fireplace and side walls decorated 
with two huge wreaths and candles. A manful little 
chap in a Tuxedo makes his appearance and sings, 
while a bevy of very small girls in ruffled gowns 
offer steps of long ago. A solo dancer then dances to 
music from the "Vagabond King" and gets a great 
reception. 

The adagio, which has become a fixture in stage 
presentations, is not neglected and a husky boy and 
girl go through a difficult performance with a pre- 
cision scarcely expected of youngsters. A smiling 
young man sings "When My Dreams Come True" 
and is followed by four boy tap dancers who are 
soon joined by four girls. Real talent is displayed 
by this organization. Scarcely have they left the 
stage that four colored youngsters come on and sing 
and dance, getting a great hand. 

Thirty-two girls, none yet in their teens, dressed 
in rose tinted dresses, come on and do a dance and 
drill with the ease and assurance of a pony ballet. 
They are followed by a boy who gives the "Parade 
of the Wooden Soldiers" in dance. A girl also 
dances, much of the time on her hands. 

A novelty in black and white is offered by thirty- 
two small girls, this being in the form of a dance 
and drill. A siren in yellow velvet sings, "I'll Do 
Anything for You," directing her attention to Walt 
Roesner. 

Girls in ballet costumes of blue dance against a 
blue curtain and finally this rises on a huge Christ- 
mas tree against a background of stars and childish 
voices sing a Christmas hymn as it can be sung only 
by children. 

The O'Neill Sisters' Kiddies Revue is without fea- 
tured stars and no names are mentioned, but this 
year's production has several members whose names 
will doubtless soon be known to theatre goers. 
Fanchon and Marco have drawn on this training 
school for much of their talent and several of their 
featured stars have come from here. 



Kansas City Midland 

Week Ending December 27 

Harry Fox, musical comedy star, holds a prominent 
place on the week's bill at the Midland. His act 
is much the same routine of singing and dialog to 
be seen on every vaudeville bill, with a big laugh at 
the close when he calls out a chorus of comic ladies 



dressed in bath towels collected from various well- 
known hotels. 

Frank Conville perhaps creates more mirth in the 
audience than all the rest of the bill. He sings a 
little and plays the saxophone, but by far the most 
of the act is nonsense. He closes with an impersona- 
tion of Charlie Chaplin. 

The Angel Brothers open the bill with a number 
called "Aloft." It proves to be a ladder-balancing 
act, with a variation. The ladders have round brass 
knobs for tips, which make the act seem very difficult 
and breath-taking. 

Tracy and Hay are a dancing team who do some 
pleasing numbers. Two of their dances are comic, in 
the Bowery manner. Another is done in elaborate 
costumes, with an impressive set. The dancing is 
good. 

Hooper and Gatchett present "The Rookies," an 
A. E. P. skit. It is funny and gets ready response 
from the audience. 

Detroit Fox 

Week Ending December 19 

Fanchon and Marco took the old nursery rhyme 
about Cinderella and her Prince Charming and bent 
it all out of shape to get a semblance of a plot for 
their "Jazz Cinderella Idea," which played the Fox 
this week. 

Like most presentations which claim to have a 
plot, the theme of the piece disappeared a few mo- 
ments after the rise of the curtain and left nothing 
but a conglomeration of vaudeville acts. But it was 
a very good show withal. 

To begin with, the show opened in front of a 
drop on which were painted four fire places. Two 
little Cinderellas were in front of each fireplace and 
they sang, in chorus, a song bewailing the fact 
that they had no Prince Charming to take them 
places. 

Next, eight good fairies appeared and promised 
to remedy the situation. Just when the audience 
was all set for eight Prince Charmings to appear, 
and thus put the Cinderella theme over in a big 
way, in tripped Max Bradfield, master of ceremonies, 
to play the role. 

As Max exclaimed, when he found he had eight 
Cinderellas on his hands, it was a great break for 
him. He made a date with the eight Cinderellas to 
take them to a modern night club and the plot 
took a neat dive overboard, nevermore to reappear. 

The Fox is liberal with its dancing girls. They 
have 32, count 'em, in line and the girls danced 
out for a neat little routine. Their costumes were 
ornamented liberally with rhinestones. 

The curtain went up on full stage then, to dis- 
close the cabaret. The first act was Billy Randall, 
a versatile young man who plays a violin while 
doing an eccentric dance libei-ally sprinkled with 
variations of the Russian hock step. It was a 
difficult routine, and Billy never once missed a note 
on his fiddle while doing it. 

May TJsher was next, a brilliant blonde with a 
strong Jewish accent. She sang "It's Not So Good 
in Hollywood," a comedy song about the tribula- 
tions of a girl seeking fame in the movies, and 
"What Do I Care." In between, she and Max 
indulged in some fooling, during which the gag 
lines delivered by Miss Usher got pretty blue. 

Max stopped introducing people after that, so we 
will have to do some guessing on James Gaylord 
and Albert Hugo. Anyhow, one of them is a singer 
and the other a dancer. 

The singer put over a song about pretty girls 
being like a melody while the .'52 Fox Girls paraded. 
Then the dancer came forward to dance with the 
girls as they split into teams of two. Last of all 
came Dorothy and Virginia, a dancing team, and 
James, or maybe it was Hugo, danced with them, 
too, the close being a spin in which the man car- 
ries both of the girls on his shoulders. 

The close was a scene in which four of the girls, 
and wearing a minimum of clothes as do most of 
the girls in the Fanchon and Marco presentations, 
posed in front of a huge octagon of crystal which 
revolved flashingly in the spotlight. 

The Fox Symphony Orche-stra, conducted by 
Louis Gress, had an elaborate overture, the "Bac- 
chanale" from the opera "Samson and Delilah." In 
closing, it might be said that Otto Kreuger now is 
the flautist, just to show we know something about 
musical lingo, too, with the orchestra. Kreuger at 
one time was conductor of the Detroit News Sym- 
phony Orchestra which played for years over Radio 
Station WWJ and which was the first symphony 
ever organized expressly for the purpose of radio 
broadcasting. 



New Orleans Saenger 

Week Ending January 3 

A special holiday program for Christmas week and 
extending into the New Year was arranged for New 
Orleans show palace by the management assisted of 
course, by the Publix Unit, the stage band, the 
Saenger Grand orchestra, and last but not least 
Wesley Lord, at the wonder organ, the pride of the 
city — the organ ; but in this case the instrument 
would be useless without a master at the keys, which 
be Wesley, and at the same time, Wesley would be 
out of place drumming one of those derned portables 
used by traveling medicine companies. So there you 
are. 

The vaudeville, "Honeymoon Cruise," is a little 
bit of everything, ranging from Pat Rooncy to Mary 
Garden and Earl Carroll's productions. 

Opening on the deck of a private yacht with gaudy 
trimmings, the stage band nattily attired as regula- 
tion sailors, the Dorothy Berke Girls, dainty and 
petit with ankle dresses and cute little teddies, shak- 
ing a wicked hip as they dance not the tune of 
"What Are the Wild Waves Saying, Brother" (or 
Sister, as the case might be), but one of those what- 
youmaycallits arranged by a Publix director, the 
ingrediments unknown save to himself, but mighty 
pleasing nevei-theless, brings to mind the fable of a 
lazy summer trip arranged by a party of fatigued 
business men who left their wives at home to open 
the mail, but took their stenographers along to 
arrange business details for the coming winter season. 

It is a pretty set, well arranged, and brings credit 
to the producer, Boris Petroff, who by the way was 
in New Orleans on a tour of inspection of the 
Publix Houses a few weeks ago. 

Incidental to the trip, Joe and Willie Hale, one 
the captain and the other the sole crew, unless the 
members of the stage band takes turns in swabbing 
the deck and polishing the brass rails (not the rails 
you think of as we have prohibition now), do some 
clever comedy juggling which goes big ; it is a little 
out of the ordinary and pleases. 

However, the even tenure of the performance is 
interrupted occasionally by a bug who bobs up at 
the most iViopportune moment with the question 
"Wanta Buy a Duck ?" who later is introduced aa 
Joe Penner, principal comedian. His jokes are re- 
freshing, and his songs leave a taste for more. Some 
day his cigar is going to resent the manner in which 
it is juggled and burn his fingers good and proper. 

Others on the bill are: Luella Fleetag, Orville 
Rennie, Babe Morris, tap dancer, and she can dance, 
and Eugene Ramey, who during the performance 
delights with vocal selections. Lou Bresse, the new 
personality leader, plays a medley of old and new 
numbers on the banjo. 

The treat of the performance is Rubinoff, guest 
conductor of the Saenger Grand Orchestra, a wonder- 
ful violinist and a musician with a personality who 
is winning laurels for his work. Local newspaper 
critics claim he is the greatest who has visited this 
city. 

The feature film is "Pointed Heels." 



Atlanta Fox 

Week Ending December 27 

Don Wilkins, master of ceremonies, came on the 
stage and proceeded to make the customers feel at 
home. He plunked his banjo a couple of times and 
announced that he wanted the audience to join him 
m singing a few old favorites. Atlanta audiences, 
as a rule, are rather reluctant to take part in 
community singings but Don, assisted by Miss Wilk- 
ins and the organ, really got them started. "Let 
Me Call You Sweetheart" was the first song and by 
the time Don started on the third, "Singing in the 
Rain," the whole house was responding vociferously 
and gleefully. 

Then came the stage presentation, one of the 
Fanchon and Marco "Ideas" called "Beach Nights," 
an elaborate affair performed in beautiful settings. 
A team of three dancers and two Japanese jugglers 
gave the audience the hig punch of the program. 
Applause was plentiful and the stage performers 
worked with a vim to please. 

The feature picture followed. It was "Salute," the 
all-talking Fox film featuring George O'Brien and 
Helen Chandler. Fox Movitone News and an ani- 
mated cartoon were other highlights of the screen 
show. 



Pittsburgh Enright 

Week Ending December 26 

Jay Mills, m. c, calls his stage offering (produced 
by Al Kaye) "Jingle Bells," and it's a mighty 



UNIFORMS ATTACHES COSTUMES PRESENTATIONS BROOKS N. Y. Cil 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



51 



pleasing act thoroughly enjoyed by children and 
adults of all agee. 

The act has a pretty opening with the orchestra 
concealed behind a front drop, and playing "The 
Parade of the Wooden Soldiers." while the ensemble 
does a wooden soldier dance in front of the drop. 
At the conclusion of this number the drop rises 
and we see the orchestra in front of a dandy piece 
of scenery depicting a huge decorated Christmas tree 
with hundreds of toys scattered about. 

Jay Mills (in a white dress suit) first introduces 
Williams Midgets. These mites offer some clever 
tap dancing as well as many clever and dangerous 
acrobatic etunts. It's a whirlwind offering and scores 
heavily. 

The next turn is the Lassiter Brothers. This pair, 
garbed as sailors, do an eccentric dance which is a 
knockout, and repeatedly stopped the show throughout 
the week. 

Then the incomparable stage band plays "Moon- 
light and Roses," and gets one wow of a hand. 
And then comes some local talent. Pupils of the 
Heinrich dancing school offer a Kiddie Revue which 
is a big hit. The little three and four year olds 
showed all kinds of dancing and afforded delight- 
ful entertainment. 

Next we have Jim, the Wrestling Bear, in which 
offering much real fun is injected when comedians 
with the company attempt to wrestle the bear. 

And now for the finale. Stereopticon snow fall- 
ing over a darkened stage. Jay Mills, in white epot- 
light, playing "Silent Night" on his violin, when 
part of the back drop raises to reveal a scene show- 
ing the Three Wise Men gazing at the Star of 
Bethlehem. Suddenly the stage is lit, the tune 
changes to "Jingle Bells," and the ensemble (garbed 
in abbreviated white costumes wits white fur trim- 
mings and bells on their ankles) rushes onto the 
stage while again a back drop lifts to reveal a 
chorine swinging in the background from a huge 
silver bell. It's a peach of a finale. 



San Antonio Texas 

Week Ending December 26 

"Over the Top," the New York produced Publix 
unit stage show presentation was given here during 
Christmas Week. 

"Colonel" Vic Insirilo and His Melody-Boys fur- 
nished the music which made this a most Merry Xmas 
gift number. 

The headliner was Johnnie Burke, a former Mack 
Sennett movie star, appeared in person as the ta- 
mous doughboy comic of this Merry Military Musical 
Revue. He is a scream. 

Other entertainers on this holiday extravaganza 
are as follows: The Three Bernie Brothers, who do 
a tap dance clinched together ; Doris Roche, the belle 
of the barracks, sings "I've Got a Feelin' I'm Fallin", ' 
and she also a dainty dance turn. Don Rowan and 
the International Singers sing "Step by Step," which 
gets a nice big hand and goes over in a swell way. 

William ("Bill") Haines, Anita Page and Karl 
Dane in "Navy Blues," graced the Texas theatre 
screen for that week. A Paramount Sound News 
Reel, talking comedy and brief novelty shorts 
rounded out the film fare. 

L. Earl Abel, the finest organist down south, at 
the console of the mighty voiced Robert Morton organ 
played a musical Merry Christmas of his own, while 
Ernest Hauser, conducting the Texas Grande byin- 
, phony orchestra offered "Yuletide Greetings" as their 
overture, which was okay. 

This was the merriest Merry Christmas Show ever 
given at the Texa.-? theatre. A special New Year's 
stage show and a huge cast of Broadway favorites 
are underlined for the coming week. 



Portland Fox Broadway 

Week Ending December 26 

In "Baby Songs" idea, as outlined by Fanchon & 
Marco, we found a capable set of players, in a 
nursery setting even to a play yard just for Sam 
Jack Kauffman and his band boys to play in, and 
Sammy on a nice little hobby horse of his own — not 
a bad Christmas idea also. Rose Valyda, proved a 
most pleasant duo-voiced star ; Penny Pennington 
lived up to his reputation as the fastest moving 



comedian on the Coast ; Miller and Marx are a 
talented dance team, and the Toyland Beauties were 
of the really decorative types. 



Indianapolis Indiana 

Week Ending January 2 

"Painted Melodies" was the "new idea" stage 
show offering of Charlie Davis and his orchestra, 
assisted by a group of talented Publix entertainers. 

Harry Savoy was funny and put his entertainment 
over in a big way. Gags that have stood the test 
of time drew more laughs from the audience than 
when he used new ones. 

King and King, two tap dancers, had a splendid 
act, and the Dorothea Burke girls, a cleverly trained 
and beautifully costumed dancing ensemble, were 
another hit. 

Erwin Lewis, tenor soloist ; Irene Taylor, singer 
of blues, and Birdie Dean, an acrobatic dancer, all 
with good numbers, completed the Publix cast. 

Sparkling selections by regular Indiana theatre 
musicians added to the stage attraction. Ed Resencr 
conducted an overture, with Dessa Byrd and Charlie 
Davis in a two-piano arrangement of tunes from 
"No, No, Nanette." Miss Byrd also was featured in 
an unique organ solo. 



Kansas City Mainstreet 

Week Ending December 27 

On the Mainstreet stage, Harris and RadclifE per- 
form the headline act, called "Push 'Em and Pull 
'Em." The two are Negro entertainers of great 
ability, who put over an act of genuine darky 
comedy. It includes singing and dancing and gen- 
eral funny stuff, which wins favor with the audience. 

The Mascagno Four, a dancing quartet, open the 
bill. They are fairly good. Grace Doro, a composer- 
musician, "assisted by ten fingers and a baby grand," 
does some skillful piano playing. 

Clifford and Marion present an act called "Just 
Dumb," which has some funny dialog. 

Florence Richardson, violinist and directress, ap- 
pears with her "musical boy friends." The latter 
are her band. Sue Hasting's marionettes assist 
Florence and the band to present "The Wedding of 
the Painted Doll." The manikens are expertly han- 
dled. To specialists in the act ai'e Edna Sedgwick, 
a nimble dancer, and Sonny O'Brien, who sings. 



Oklahoma City Orpheum 

Week Ending December 20 

The big time R K O vaudeville bill at the Orpheum 
theatre this week includes Lottoe Atherton in a 
unique dancing offering, Lyttell and Fant in "Two 
Chocolate Cake Eaters," La Marr and Boice who 
were gracious entertainers in "Hostessing," and Jack 
McLallen and Sarah and Tony Labriola in a flock 
of entertainments, which were highly entertaining 
and pleasing. Five Avalons in novelty bits of 
versatility. 

On the screen is "Nix on Dames," Aesop's Fables, 
Fox Movietone News and Orpheum Movie events. 

The Orpheum Orchestra furnished excellent music, 
much appreciated by the large crowds present daily 
and throughout the week. 




mi 



^^^^ 

*?u" vOu" H.^^ °*{^roC.^ 
7A<? FOX TROT HIT 



Salt Lake RKO Orpheum V SWEETHEAOT 



Week Ending December 14 

Roses Royal Lilliputians have been drawing ca- 
pacity audiences to the Orpheum here this week, 
where they are the headline attraction. This com- 
pany of 25 midgets includes artists from all over the 
world and their brand of entertainment has been 
very favorably commented upon. They are dancers, 
singers, musicians and all-around entertainers. 
These little men and women ranee in age from 17 
to 45 and are thoroughly educated. 

Another outstanding act on this week's bill is Jay 
Dillon and Betty Parker, heading an intimate revue 
of merriment. Don Cummings, a lariat spinner, is 
well received. Marinoff's Russian canine circus par- 
ticularly delights the little folks. 

The screen offering in this connection is "Tanned 
Legs," and very good audiences have been enjoyed. 



weep EACH OTHER? 



THEME 



ON 



RJjBE- blooms descriptive MASTEPLPtece/ 

)$ONG(^theBAYOl"i 



"THE TAPPING FLAPPER AND THE TWISTING FUPPER" 

PAUL and FERRAL 

IN 

PUBLIX "RADIO ROMANCE" UNIT 

WEEK OF JAN. 4 — TEXAS, SAN ANTONIO WEEK OF JAN. 10 — METROPOLITAN, HOUSTON 

FORMERLY WITH SHUBERT'S "NIGHT IN SPAIN" . "NIGHT IN VENICE" 
THANX TO WM. MORRIS 




52 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



RUSSELL 
^ SAYS 



MUSIC aK^ TALENT 
CHfCAOO 



Texas Guinan, the queen of night clubs now located 
at the Gx'een Mill Cafe, tells me that she is all set 
to give the new year a great big hand Tuesday night. 
. . . Rick and Snyder, the kings of harmony, are 
back at the Vanity Fair for an indefinite engage- 
ment. Glad to see you back boys. Charlotte Van 
Dae, popular song and dancing star is another who 
will add to the season's festive occasion. . . . Wel- 
come, Archie, Oh, you know Archie Flecher who is 
president of the Joe Morris Music Co. will be in town 
this week to see how every thing is going. Irving 
UUman, who is the Cliicago manager, tells me that 
their song hit, "Sweetheai-t," is still going strong 
and also that "All That I'm Asking Is Sympathy" 
has turned out to be one of the year's best sellers. 
. . . Ted Lewis, the "High-hatted Tragedian of Song," 
is i-emaining for a second week at the Palace theatre 
in New York. Leave it to Ted to keep "Everybody 
Happy." . . . The Duncan sisters in their newest pic- 
ture opens at the Chicago theatre this week. The 
picture is "It's a Great Life" and offers many new 
songs among which are "Sailing on a Sunbeam" and 
"Whoosier Hop" which are two of the latest Irving 
Berlin tunes. . . . Beatrice Harrison, the world 
famous cellist, and Frederick Jagel, one of the chief 
tenors of the Metropolitan Opera Company, are to 
be heard over the Atwater Kent hour of WGN. . . . 
Henri Le Bel of the Fox theatre in Seattle is in his 
twentieth week as featured organist. He has ordered 
two new consoles, for future installation and is form- 
ing an organist quai-tette as a feature attraction at 
the theatre. . . . Charles Shultz, staff artist at 
WBBM, is still featuring that song hit, "H'lo Baby." 
This number you know is one of the season's hits. It's 
published by George and Arthur Piantadosi Music 
Co. ... I hear that Sam, the (Personality Kid), 
■who is piano player at Coffee Dans, is the big attrac- 
tion about the popular cafe these days. Drop around 
and see him. . . . Chick Castle of the Bobbins Music 
Corp. tells me that all of the managers of 
the company received a raise in salary and 
a nice bonus for Xmas. Who could ask for more? 
But they deserve it because as for promoting songs 
they have always got another hit somewhere up the 
sleeve. . . . Leo Zimmerman, who wrote the "Vaga- 
bond Lover" and "Love Made a Gipsy Out of Me" 
for Leo Feist Music Corp., tells me that he has a 
brand new number ready entitled "You Came, I Saw, 
You Conquer Me" which was written with Rudy Val- 
lee. He expects it to be equally as popular as his 
other tunes. . . . Charles (Chick) Sale, popular 
comedy character, will top the bill at the R K O 
Palace this week. Bill Robinson, who made a big hit 
last week with his comedy sketch, is held over for 
another week. . . . According to Mr. Shields, who is 
recording manager for the Victor Phonograph Corp., 
Wayne King, the popular Chicago orches-tra leader, 
made his first record for the Victor Corp. this past 
week. The song recorded was one of the Irving Ber- 
lin tunes, "To Be Forgotten." . . . Jules Herbuveaux' 
KYW orchestra has a new member in the name of 
Fred Waltc, who is a quite popular violinist. Wel- 
come to our city, Fred. ... I hear that the popular 
Mark Fisher, who is master of ceremonies at the 
Paradise theatre, has been given the title of "Master 
of Airemonies" when he announces and conducts the 
program over station WGES every Tuesday night. 
. . . Cecil Blair, famed eccentric and acrobatic 
dancer, now playing in the Publix "Cocoanut Grove" 
unit, never walked a step until she was eight years 
old. Today she is on the highroad to success at her 
chosen profession. . . . Illustration of the versatility 
of motion picture stars is supplied in the announce- 
ment that George K. Arthur has written both the 
words and music of the new song entitled, "Why 
Leave Me?" . . . Lynn Cater, who toured vaudeville 
recently with Al Shean, of the famous Gallagher 
and Shean team, is presenting a new act in E K O 
theatres, in which she is assisted by John Miller and 
the Lido Boys. ... I hear that Eddie Lambert, the 
vaudeville headliner, is acting as master of cere- 
monies in the talking "Screen Snapshots" for 
Columbia Pictures. . . . That's all this time, see 
you next week. 





Carlos Meier, who for three years was fea- 
tured organist at the Terminal theatre in 
Chicago, has been appointed master of cere- 
monies and featured organist at the New Fox 
theatre in Salem, Ore. Meier was formerly 
of vaudeville before his term as featured 
organist in the Terminal theatre. 

New Scenery and Costumes 
to Refurnish Fanchon 
and Marco "Ideas" 

Scenery and costume depots to refurnish the 
Fanchon and Marco "Ideas" with new dress and 
scenic equipment were established at St. Louis and 
Niagara Falls by Marco on his recent trip through 
the east. 

It is the producers intention to provide his "Ideas" 
with complete new sets of costumes at each of these 
points and to replace any worn pieces of scenery 
with new pieces, thus preventing the units from 
having the appearance of being on a tour. 

By this process, it was pointed out, the units will 
go into New York, St. Louis and other key cities 
with brand new stuff, and this same spick and span 
aspect is to be kept up all along the circuit. 

Each unit, for some time, has been carrying out 
of Los Angeles a complete set of replacement cos- 
tumes, which heretofore has been sufficient to meet 
the wear and tear of the trips. Roadmen in charge 
of the scenery with each unit have been instructed 
to order such repairs as might be needed in any 
town they were playing. 

Probably the costumes will be made in Los Angeles, 
where Fanchon and Marco operate one of the largest 
costume companies in the world. Fitters at Niagara 
Falls and St. Louis will adjust them to the girls 
of the company. 

Robert Ripley on R K O 
Circuit 

That famous "Believe It or Not" cartoonist and 
writer, Robert Ripley, is making his bow to vaude- 
ville audiences, playing a few weeks on the R K O 
circuit, in person. This famous author of "Believe 
It or Not," a book comprised of almost unbelievable 
and fascinating facts, and cartoonist on the New 
York American and syndicate service, tells on the 
stage some of the breath taking facts he compiled in 
his famous book, in a novel and fascinating act. 



THEME SONGS 



"New York Nights," Norma Talmadge's most re- 
cent United Artists picture with Gilbert Roland, John 
Ray and Lilyan Tashman, has as its theme song an 
Irving Berlin number, "A Year from Today." 

"The Song of the Condemned," which is the theme 
song of Ronald Colman's new picture, "Condemned," 
is also a Berlin number. Joan Bennett supports Mr. 
Colman in his latest for United Artists. 

The Duncan sisters' new picture for Metro-Gold- 
wyn-Mayer entitled "It's a Gi'eat Life" has several 
new tunes among which are "Sailing on a Sunbeam" 
and "Whoosier Hop" which are the featured numbers. 



Hollywood 
Tunes 

HOLLYWOOD TUNES 

HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 31.— Five song 
numbers will be heard in "The Big Party" 
for Fox. Dixie Lee will sing "Bluer Than 
Blue Over You" and "Good for Nothing 
but Love." The numbers were written by 
William Kernel! and Harlan Thompson. 
Whispering Jack Smith will sing two com- 
positions by Nelson and Pease called "Day 
Dreams" and "Fm Climbing Up a Window." 
Frank Albertson will do "Nobody Knows 
but Rosie." It was written by James Han- 
ley and Joe McCarthy. 

^ ^ ^ 

John McCormack has completed his first 
song in "I Hear You Calling Me." James 
Hanley and Joe McCarthy are responsible 
for the number titled "I Feel You Near 
Me." 

* * * 

Mary Nolan will appear in Paul White- 
man's "King of Jazz Revue" for Universal. 

^ ^ ^ 

Harry Lee, brother of Sammy Lee, dance 
director for M G M, is the latest to sign 
for the un-named revue which Chuck 
Reisner is directing. Lee plays with Weber 
and Fields in the film version of their pool 
room scene. Harry is a member of the 
team of Hoey and Lee, Orpheum head- 
liners. 

* * * 

The team of Weber and Fields will 
separate temporarily. Joe Weber will make 
a sea voyage to the South Seas. Lew Fields 
will return to New York where his asso- 
ciates are already making plans for a 
forthcoming production of "Huckleberry 
Finn" in musical form. Both are appearing 
in Chuck Reisner's revue at M G M. 

* * * 

Dimitri Tiomkin has left New York for 
Hollywood and M G M. The last time 
Tiomkin was in Hollywood he composed 
the music for "The Rogue's Song" and 
"Devil May Care." He is under contract 
to M G M. 

^ ^ ^ 

Alan Crosland will direct Warner 
Brothers operetta "Viennese Nights." 
Crosland is making a survey of talent in 
the radio, stage and screen professions for 
the cast of this film. 

^ ^ JjC 

Lee Kohlmar has been added to the cast 
of "The Song Writer" at M G M. He will 
play the veteran song publisher, partner of 
Lawrence Gray in the film. Marshall 
Neilan is directing. 

MADAME OCTAVE 



Southern Melodies Feature 
in Pathe Comedy 
"Fowl Play" 

Several of the best known Southern melodies fur- 
nish musical background in "Fowl Play," latest Buck 
and Bubbles comedy, which is a highlight on the 
Pathe Short Subject program for December 29. These 
numbers include "Suawanee River," "Coal Black 
Mammy" and "Chicken Reel." 

Buck and Bubbles, the celebrated negro comedians 
who have just returned to big-time vaudeville, are 
featured in this comedy, which tells the story of 
what happens when the boys are sent to deliver an 
ostrich and become entangled with a yaller-skinned 
vamp on the way. This comedy was directed by Carl 
Harbaugh, from an adaption by Sidney Lazarus of 
one of Hugh Wiley's Saturday Evening Post stories. 



January 4, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



53 




ALLEY a 




A Happy New Year, Everybody. — Here we are, 
started on another year, and probably a lot of new 
resolutions, mine is to try to give you all a better 
and more newsy column each week, and to make 
the Music and Talent department of the Herald- 
World an important and necessary factor in your 
lives. . . . We have many new features and beneficial 
things in mind for this department for the coming 
year and will bring them out as early as possible. 
... I would like to go over the important happen- 
ings in the music business in 1929, but there has 
been so many changes that it would take about ten 
columns to tell of them, so I had better get to the 
happenings of the past week. 

« « « 

The first is. that Spier and Coslow will soon in- 
crease their mechanical department with a live and 
kicking member, Larry Spier, Junior, kidding aside. 
Larry Spier is the proud father of a six pound baby 
boy, born December 21, just in time to observe all the 
Christmas festivities and help his daddy to arrange 
the Christmas tree. . . . Larry, Sr., is strutting around 
the "alley" like a powder-puff pigeon, with the big- 
gest smile on his face I have ever seen. . . . Larry 
says Mrs. Spier is in the best of health and just as 
happy as he is. . . . Congratulations, Larry. 

* * * 

Leon Navara, one of Loew's "Music Masters," is 
the latest of the m. c.s to become a song-writer. 
. . . He has a peach of a number placed with Milton 
Weil, of Chicago, called, "To Think That You Belong 
to Me." . . . This was written in collaboration with 
Joe Goodwin. . . . Another of his latest tunes is 
with Mills Music, and was written with Mitchell 
Parish, this is called, "In a Corner of My Heart." 
. . . Leon and his good friend, Ben Bard, the movie 
star, have just complete "Doesn't Matter," which is 
one of the sweetest melodies I have ever heard. . . . 
They haven't it placed as yet, but when it is sub- 
mitted, the publisher who takes it is assured of a 
"hit" in this number. 

Pat Flaherty, head of the Fox Red Star Music Co., 
tells me that his organization is starting to run 
smoothly now, and that their first numbers are, "A 
Little House to Dream" for the Fox picture, "Har- 
money at Home." Jim Brockman and Jim Hanley 
are the writers. . . . Another of their numbers is 
"Happy Days," by Joe McCarthy ; this is the theme 
song of "Happy Days" and is sung by Janet Gaynor 
and Charles Farrell, together with "Will Build a 
Little World of Our Own" in the picture. . . . The 
two "Jirrifi" wrote this one. 

* * * 

The boys in the Feist office are "chafing at the bit" 
because they have what many insiders say is a 
positive hit song, and they can't go to work on it. 
... It is the new Mabel Wayne waltz called "It 
Happened in Monterey" and those who have heard 
the manuscript say it will duplicate the success of 
Miss Wayne's "Little Spanish Town" and "Ramona." 
. . . John Murray Anderson picked it for the "spot" 
in Paul Whiteman's new picture, "The King of 
Jazz" and the agreement was that nothing would 
"break" on the song until the premiere of the pic- 
ture. . . . Meanwhile, the boys are just waiting and 
rarin' to go. 

In my column of last week I am sorry to say I 
misinformed you. I stated that a reproduction of 
Sam Serwer's clever exploitation stunt for the songs 
in "Show of Shows" would be found on our "Ex- 
ploitation Department," well, through some error at 
the printers, it was left out, but I have great hopes 
that it will be in this issue. 

I dropped into the offices of M. Witmark and Sons 
last Saturday afternoon looking for Ira Schuster, but 
I couldn't find him, big as he is, every thing there 
is turned topsy-turvy. They are packing up and 
moving to their new offices. . . . Perhaps Ira was 
carrying a load over, who can tell ? 

* * * 

Leo Feist is enthused over the music score and 
especially the "Caribbean Love Song," which Lupe 
Velez sings in her new United Artists' picture, "Hell 
Harbor." 



''Treasure Girl" Composer 
Has Jazz Composition 
Played by Symphony 

George Gershwin, whose "Treasure Girl" is soon 
to be put into a talking and musical picture by 
Pathe. is the first jazz composer to be honored by 
having one of his compositions played by a symphony 
orchestra. 

Recently the Manhattan Symphony Orchestra of 
New York, giving a series of concerts at Mecca 
Temple, had Gershwin as a guest. He conducted 
the orchestra in the playing of his own composition, 
"An American in Paris." The spirited and melodious 
work was enthusiastically received. 

It was in connection with "Treasure Girl" that 
Joseph Santley, the well known actor and stage pro- 
ducer who has recently been signed by Pathe, has 
been mentioned as probable director. 

The music of "Treasure Girl" is not quite so 
"highbrow" as the famous "Rhapsody in Blue" by 
the same composer. It has the same qualities as 
"Tiptoes," "Oh Kay" and "Lady Be Good." Gersh- 
win's musical background is different from that of 
any other composer of jazz music. He has had an 
exceptional musical education, is himself a thorough 
musician, well versed in the technique of music 
and harmony. 



Masters of Ceremonies 
Presentation Acts 
Organists 

Write for Information 
on the New 1930 
Motion Picture Almanac 

Your name may have been listed in last 
year's Edition. Be sure your Biographical 
Sketch is sent in. 




We have a limited number of the 1929 edi- 
tion we are offering to the profession for a 
Dollar the copy. 

Address the Home Office 

Exhibitors 
Herald-World 

407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



SID SAYS 

O&out 

SONGS 




BEST SELLERS 

Week Ending December 28 

No. I 

"Tip Toe Thru the Tulips"— (M. Wit- 
mark & Sons). 

No. 2 

"Painting the Clouds" — (M. Witmark 
& Sons). 

No. 3 

"Singing in the Rain" — (Robhins 
Music Co.). 

No. 4 

"Love, Your Spell" — (Berlin, Irving). 

"If I Had a Talking Picture"- — (De 
Sylva, Brown & Henderson). 

'"Aren't We Air—(De Sylva, Brown 
& Henderson). 

No. 5 

"Love Me"— (Leo Feist). 

"I May Be Wrong" — (Ager, Yellen & 
Bornstein). 

"All That I'm Asking Is Sympathy" — 
(Joe Morris). 

"H'lo Baby"— (George & Arthur 
Piantadosi). 

"Chant of the Jungle" — (Robbins 
Music Corp.). 

No. 6 

"Through" — (Donaldson, Douglas & 
Gumble). 
"Satisfied" — (Leo Feist). 

No 7 

"Congratulations" — (Green & Slept). 

"Sunny Side Up" — (De Sylva, Brown 
& Henderson). 

"Rio Rita"— (Leo Feist). 

"Lonely Troubadour" — (Santly Bros.). 

"You're Akvays in My Arms" — (Leo 
Feist). 

"Piccolo Pete" — (Jenkins). 
"My Song of the Nile" — (Witmark & 
Sons). 

"That Wonderful Something" — (Rob- 
bins Music Corp.). 

"Just Youi, Just Me"— (Robbins Music 
Corp.). 

"Pagan Love Song" — (Robbins Music 
Corp.). 

"Singing in the Bathtiib" — (M. Wit- 
mark & Sons). 

"YOU DO SOMETHING TO ME"— (Harms, Inc.) 

— very pretty number that is the hit song of the 
new Broadway production (not a picture) "Fifty 
Million Frenchman." The show is a big hit. Lyrics 

and miisic by Cole Porter. 

* * * 

"WHAT A FOOL I'VE BEEN"— (Grossman & 

Lewis) — A waltz ballad with a powerful lyric that 
will give it that double angle as an orchestra num- 
ber and also a stage ballad. Words and music by 
Al. Eldridge. 

* * * 

"FUNNY, DEAR, WHAT LOVE CAN DO"— (Leo 
Feist, Inc.) — Three local boys have in this number 
a song that looks like a real hit. Is already being 
played a lot and looks like the goods. Words and 
music by Joe Bennet, Geo. A. Little and Charley 
Straight. 

* * * 

"YOU'LL FIND YOUR ANSWER IN MY EYES" 
— (De Sylva, Brown & Henderson) — The waltz ballad 
theme song of the Fox picture "Romance of the Rio 
Grande." Has real merit and will no doubt sell. 
Words by L. Wolfe Gilbert, music by Abel Baer. 

* * 

"DUKE OF KA-KI-AK"— (Donaldson, Douglas & 
Gumble) — A real funny song that is featured in the 
new Fox picture "Hot for Paris." Fi-om reports this 
picture looks like another "Cockeyed World." Victor 
McLaglen sings this song himself which should also 
add to it's popularity. Words and music by Edgar 
Leslie and Walter Donaldson. 



54 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1950 




QUICK REFERENCE PICTURE CHART 



Amkino 



•A ELITA (D): Eggert-Solnzewa. (L) 2,900f. (R) Mar. 
23, 1929. 

•AFGHANISTAN (D) : Special cast. (L) G.OOOf. (E) Sept. 
28. 1929. 

•ARSENAL (D) S. Svashenko. (L) 7,250. (E) Nov. 2, 
1929. 

•FLAMES ON THE VOLGA, or Bulat Batvr: Anna Wozjlk. 

TaroslavBtev. (L) 7000f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929. 
♦FOREST PEOPLE (D) : Special cast. (L) 5.800. (R) 

Sept. 5, 1929. 

•GENERAL LINE (D) : Special cast. Forthcoming release. 
•GIRL WITH THE BANDBOX (D) : Anna Stenn. (L) 

6.000. (R) Sept., 1929. 
•HER WAY OF LOVE (D) : Special cast. (R) 6.008. 
•IN OLD SIBERIA (D) : A. Zhilinsky, V. Taskin. (L) 6500f. 

(R) July 20. 

•KATORGA (D): A. Zhilinsky, T. Taskin, V. Popov. (R) 

June 1, (L) 7500f. 
•KRASSIN: Special cast. (L) 7000f. (R) Feb. 19, 1929. 
•LASH OF THE CZAR, THE: Kachalov. Meyerhold, Stenn. 

(L) 6800f. (R) Feb. 9, 1929. 
•MAN WITH THE CAMERA (D) : Special cast. (R) Sep- 
tember. (L) 6.000. 

•MOSCOW TODAY (D) : Special cast. (R) April 11. (L) 
5000f. 

•NEW BABYLON (D) : Sophia Magarill, Sergei Geraslmow, 
Peter SobolewsM, Elena Kusmina. (B) Jiine 29. (L) 

snoof. 

•PRISONERS OF THE SEA: O. Knipper, Tschechowa, N. 

Kutusow. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. 
•SCANDAL (D): L. Fillsovskaya. (L) 7,200. (E) Oct. 

26 1929 

•SEEDS OF FREEDOM (D) : L. M. Leonidoff. (L) 6,800. 

(R) Sept. 7, 1929. 
•SPARTAKIADE (D) : Special cast. (L) 5,000. (R) July 

G, 1929. 

•TWO DAYS: F. E. Samytschkovpslvy. (L) 6500f. (R) Feb. 
1 1929. 

•VILLAGE OF SIN (D) B. Cessarskaya. (L) 6,500. (E) 
May 18, 1929. 



Key to Symbols 

The following appear immediately after tha 
title to indicate the nature of the production: 



Artclass 



•UNMASKED (D-AT) : Eobert Warwick, Sam Ash, Milton 
Krims, Lyons Wickland, Susan Corroy, William Corbett. 
Charles Slattery. Kate Ecemer. Waldo Edwards, Eoy Byron, 
Clyde Dillson, Helen Mitchell. Marie Burke. (L) Talk- 
ing, 5449f. (R) Dec. 15, 1929. 

Audible Pictures 

•IN OLD CALIFORNIA (D AT) : Henry B. WalthaU, Helen 

Ferguson. George Duryea, Ray Hallor, Orral Humphrey, 

Larry Steers, Richard Carlyle, Harry Alien, Lew Stem 

Paul ElUs, Charlotta Monte. Gertrude Chorre (NP) 
Dee, 14. (L) 5,400f. 



Chesterfield 

*^i£'-'*,* 7"^ DEADLINE (D-Underworld) : Barbara Worth 
Frank Leigh, J. P. McGowan, Walter Merrill, Arthur 
Eankm, Virginia Sale, •■Tiny" Ward, Lou Gory, Fred 
Tl^ii""- Patton, Charles Hickman, Mike Donlin (L) 

5500f. (R) May 1. 1929. (NP) May 25. 

♦CAMPUS KNIGHTS (CD): Raymond McKee, Shirley Palm- 

.r?.Dn¥,^»^o-r9'i;!J^"' Laverty. (R) June 15, 1929. 

•CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE (D) : Helen Poster, Cor- 
??Ji1^ Keefe, Alice I^ke, Charles Gerrard, Ray Hallor. (Ll 

»u«??o,- tP> 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 

OF SECRETS (D-AT): Maroia Manning, Joseph 
btriker, Elmer Grandin, Herbert Warren, Francis M. Cerdi 

rT?^'^,'J,„?"^''S°^''°- H. Southard, Edward Ringham. 

(L) OlOOf. Sound only. 

♦JUST OFF BROADWAY (M) : Donald Keith, Ann Christy. 
Larry Steers, DeSacia Mooers, Jack Tanner, Syd Saylor 
Beryl Roberts, Albert Dresden. (L) 6200f. (R) Feb 15 
1929. (NP) Mar. 3. 1929. 

•PEACOCK FAN, THE: Lucien Preval. Dorothy Devau 
Tom O'Brien, Rosemary Theby, Carlton King. Gladden 
James. David Findlay, James Wilcox, Fred Malatesta, Alice 
?i'"'^4„£l'™<^"" Jolin Fowler. (L) 5300f. (R) Mar. 

15, 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 

Columbia 

♦ACQUITTED (D-AT): Lloyd Hughes, Margaret Livingston, 
Sam Hardy, Charles West, George Rigas, Charles Wilson 
'R' 26. 1929. (L) Sound 5.781. 

•BACHELOR GIRL, THE (D-TME) : William CoUier, Jr , 
JacQuehnc I^gan. Edward Hearn. Thelma Todd (R) May 
•'^""^ 22. (L) TaUiing, 5967f: silent. 6245f. 

•BEHIND CLOSED DOORS (My): Virginia Valli, Ga.stou 
Glass, Otto Mattesen, Andre De Segurola, Fanny Midgley 
Torben Meyer. Broderick O'Farrell. Otto Hoffman. (L) 
5897f. (R) Feb. 24, 1929. (NP) June 15. 1929 

•BROADWAY SCANDALS (D-AT): Sally O'Neil, Jack Egan, 
Carmel Myers, Tom O'Brien, J. Barney Sherry, John 
Hyams, Charles WiUion, Doris Dawson. Gordon Elliott 
'I*' No^- 1929. (L) Sound 6,395. 

♦COLLEGE COQUETTE (CD-AT) : Ruth Taylor, John Hot- 
land, William Collier, Jr., Jobyna Ralston, Edward Plel. 
Jr. (L) Talking. 6149f: silent, 5566f. Recording on fllm 
and disc. (R) Aug. 5. 1929. (NP) Nov. 2. 

•DONOVAN AFFAIR, THE (D-AT): ,Tack Holt, Agnes Ayers 
Dorothy Revier, William Collier, Jr., John Roche Fred 
Kelsey, Hank Maim, Wheeler Oakman, Virginia Brown 
Faire, Alphonse Ethier, Edward Hearn, Ethel Wales, John 
Wallace. (L) Talking, 7140t; silent, 7189f. (B) Apr 11, 
1929. (NP) May 18. 

•ETERNAL WOMAN, THE (D) : Olive Borden, Ralph 
Graves, Euth Clifford, John Miljan, Nena Quartaro, Joseph 
Swickard, Julia Swayne Gordon. (L) 5812f. (R) Mar 18 
1929. (NP) Apr. 6, 1929. 

•FAKER, THE (D) : Jacqueline Logan, Charles Delaney, 
Warner Oland, Charles Hill MaUes, Gaston Glass Flora 
Finch. David Mir, Lon Poff, Fred Kelsey. (L) 5651f. 
(R) Jan. 2. 1929. (NP) Feb. 9, 1929. 

•FALL OF EVE, THE (CD-AT): Patsy Ruth Miller, Ford 
Sterling. Jed Prouty, Gertrude Astor. Arthur Rankin, Betty 
Farrlngton, Fred Kelsey. (L) Sound, G245f. Silent 5799f. 
(B) June. 1929. (NP) July 20. 

•FATHER AND SON (D-TME): Jack Holt. Dorothy DeTier. 
Helen Chadwick. Mickey McBan, Wheeler Oakman. (L) 



C — Comedy 

D-"Drama 

CD — Comedy-Drama 

Mel— Melodrama 

My Mystery 

W — Western 



AT — All-talking 
TME — Talking, musical 

score and effects 
MC — Musical Comody 

O Operetta 

ME — Musical Score, Ef- 

EXAMPLE: C-AT, all-talking comedy. (MC 
and O indicate the entire nature of the pro- 
duction, both as to sound and dramatic ap- 
peal.) 

The following appear after the cast: 
L— Length 

NP — Description in New Pictures of issue 
named. 

TOS— Comment by T. O. Service in issue 
named 

R — Release on date named. 

NOTE: An asterisk preceding the title indi- 
cates either that there is a silent version or that 
the picture was produced only in silent form. 



Talking, 6765f; silent, 6310f. (E) Apr. 22. 1929. (NP) 
May 18, 1929. 

♦FLIGHT (D-AT): Jack Holt, Ralph Graves, LUa Lee, Alan 
Eoscoe, Harold Goodwin, Jimmy de la Cruze. (NP) 
October 19. (TOS) Nov. 2. (E) Nov. 1, 1929. (L) 
Sound 10,670. 

♦FLYING MARINE, THE (D-TJDS) : Ben Lyon, Shirley 
Mason, Jason Eobards. (NP) June 29. (E) June 5, 1929. 
(L) Talking, 5951f; sOent, 5736f. 

♦HURRICANE (D-AT): Hobart Bosworth. Johnny Mack 
Brown, LeUa Hyams, Allan Roscoe, Tom O'Brien, Lelia 
Mclntyre, Joe Bordeaux and Eddie Chandler. (NP) Sept. 

21. (R) Sept. 30, 1929. (L) Sound 5735. Silent 5842. 
♦LIGHT FINGERS (D-AT): Ian Keith, Dorothy Revier, Car- 
roll Nye, Ralph Theodore, Tom Rickets. (L) Talking, 5700f. 
(R) July 29, 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (L) Silent 5578f. 
Sound 5700f. 

♦LONE WOLF'S DAUGHTER (D AT) Bert Lytell, Gertrude 
Olmstead. Charles Corrard. Lilyan Tashman, Donald 
Keith, Florence Allen, Robert Elliott and Euth Cherrington 
(L) Sound 7,154. Silent 6,186. (E) January 13, 1929. 
(NP) Nov. 2. 

♦MURDER ON THE ROOF (D-AT): Dorothy Revier. David 
Newell and others. 

•OBJECT ALIMONY (D) : Lois Wilson. Ethel Grey Terry, 
Douglas Gilmore, Roscoe Karns. Carmelita Geraghty, Dickey 
Moore. Jane Keckley, Thomas Curran. (L) 6266f. (R) Dec. 

22, 1928. (NP) Jan. 12. 1929. 

•POWER OF THE PRESS, THE (D) : Douglas Fairbanks, 
Jr., Jobyna Ralston, Mildred Harris, PhUo McCullough, 
Wheeler Oakman, Eobert Edeson, Edward Davis, Del 
Henderson, Charles Clary. (L) 6456f. (R) Oct. 31, 
1928. (NP) JIar. 9, 1929. 

♦QUITTER, THE (D) : Ben Lyon. Dorothy Revier, Fred 
Kohler. Charles McHugh, Sherry Hall, Jane Daly, Henry 
Otto. Claire McDowell. (L) 5671f. (R) Apr. 1, 1929. 
(NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 

♦RESTLESS YOUTH (D) ; Marceline Day, Ralph Forbes, 
Norman Trevor, Eobert Ellis, Mary Mabery, Gordon EUiott, 
Coy Watson. (L) 6085f. (E) Nov. 30. 1928. (NP) 
Dec. 22. 1928. 

•SIDESHOW, THE (D) : Marie Prevost. Ralph Graves, "Lit- 
tle Billy," Alan Eoscoe, Pat Harmon. Texas Madesen, 
Martha McGruger, Esteban Clemento, Janet Ford, Paul 
Dismute, Bert Price, Chester Morton, Jacques Eay. (L) 
5999f. (E) Dec. 11. 1928. (NP) Feb. 16. 192». 

•SONG OF LOVE (D-AT): BeUe Walker. Ealph Graves, 
David Durnnd, Eunice Quedens, Arthur Houseman, (Sharks 
Wilson. (E) Nov. 25, 1929. (L) Sound 7.720. 

♦SUBMARINE (D-TME): Jack Holt, Dorothy Eevler, Ralph 
Graves, Clarence Burton. Arthur Rankin. (L) Synchro- 
nized, 8374f; silent. 8192f. (E) Nov. 12. 1928. (NP) 
Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) Dec. 1, 1928. 

♦TRIAL MARRIAGE (D-TME): Norman Kerry, Sally Eilers, 
Jason Eobards, Thelma Todd, Charles Clary, Naomi C!hild- 
ers, Eosemary Theby, Gertrude Short. (L) Talking. 6639f; 
silent. 6506f. (E) Mar. 10. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
(TOS) Anr. 20. 1929. 

♦YOUNG GENERATION, THE (D-TME): Jean Hersholt, 
Lina Basquette, Eosa Eosanova, Ricardo Cortez, Rex Lease, 
Martha Franklin, Julanne Johnston, Jack Eaymnnd. Sydney 
Crossley, Otto Fries, Julia Swayne Gordon, Donald Hall, 
Bernard Siegel. (L) Synchronized. 7866f; silent. 7246f. 
(E) .Tan. 24, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 
13. 1929. 



Excellent 



•BROKEN BARRIERS: Helen Costello. (L) 5947f. (E) 
Dec 1, 1928. 

♦CLEANUP, THE: Delaney and Blake. (L) 56G0f. (E) 
•Jan. 25. 1929 

♦CONFESSIONS OF A WIFE: Helene Chadwiek. (L) 6047f. 

(E) Dec. in. 1928. 
♦DREAM MELODY: Eiche and'Thelby. (L) 5050f. (E) 

Jan. 20, 1929. 
♦DAVID VALLORY: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
♦FANNY HAWTHORNE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
♦LI FES CROSSROADS: Hulette and Hamilton. (L) 5355f. 
♦HEARTS AND MODELS: Forthcoming 1929 release. (E) 

Oct. 20. 1928, 

•MASQUERADE MARRIAGE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

•MELLOWING MONEY: Forthcoming 1929 release. 

♦ONE SPLENDID HOUR: Viola Dana. George Periolot, Allen 

Simpson, Lewis Sargent, Jack Richardson, Lucy Beaumont, 

Florence Cooper, Ernie Adams, Hugh Saxon, Charles Hlch- 

man. (L) R12Pf. (E) Mav 1. 1929. 
♦ORCHID WOMAN, THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
♦PASSION SONG, THE: Noah Beery and Olmstead. (L) 

SlOflf. (E) Oct. 20, 1928. 
♦PENNY PRINCESS: Forthcoming 1929 release. 
♦ROSES OF PICARDY: (E) Apr. 15. 1929. 
♦WRECKERS, THE: Forthcoming 1929 release. 



First Division 

•LINDA (D-ME): Warner Baxter, Helen Foster, Noah 
Beery, JMitcheU Lewis, (L) 6776f, 

First National 

♦BROADWAY BABIES (M-TME) : Alice White, Charles De- 
laney, Fred Kohler, Tom Dugan, BodU Eosing, Sally 
Euers, Marion Byron, Joselyn Lee, Louis Natheaux, Maurice 
Black (L) 8067f. (E) June 3», 1929. (NP) June 22. 

♦CALIFORNIA MAIL (W) : Ken Maynard, Dorothy Dwan, 
Late McKee, Paul Hurst, C. E. Anderson, Fred Bums. 
(L) 5446f. (E) Apr. 7, 1929. (NP) Apr. 20. 1929. 

♦CAREERS (D-TME): Billie Dove, Antonio Moreno, Thelma 
Todd, Noah Beery, Holmes Herbert, Carmel Mjers, Eobert 
Frazer, Sojin. (L) 8435f. (R) June 2. 1929. (NP) June 

22. (TOS) June 29. 

•CARELESS AGE, THE (CD-TME) : Douglas Fairbanks. Jr., 
Loretta Young, Carmel Myers, Holmes Herbert, Kenneth 
Thomson. George Baxter. Wilfred Noy, Doris Lloyd, Ilka 
Chase, Raymond Lawrence. (NP) Aug. 17. (L) Sound, 

•CHEYENNE (W) : Ken Maynard, Gladys McConnell, James 
Bradbury, Jr., Tarzan, WUliam Franey, Charles Whittaker. 
(E) Feb. 3. (L) 5944f. 

♦CHILDREN OF THE RITZ (CD-MB) : Dorothy MackalU, 
Jack MulhaU, James Ford, Eddie Bums, Lee Moran, 
Kathryn McGoire, Evelyn HaU, Doris Dawson, Aggie Her- 
ring, Frank Crane. (E) Mar. 3. (L) Sound, 6566f. 
Silent. 6287f. (TOS) Mar. 2. 

♦DANCING VIENNA (D) : Lya Mara, Ben Lyon, Herman 
Picha, Kurt Garron, Olga Engl, George Burghardt. Gustav 
Charle, Julius Falkenstein, Arnold Korff, Eugene Burg, 
Albert Paulig. (E) Jan. 1. (L) 5683f. (NP) Feb. 2. 

♦DARK STREETS (D-AT): Jack MulhaU, LUa Lee, Aggie 
Herring, Earl Pingree, WiU Walling, E. H. Calvert. Maurice 
Black. (NP) Aug. 10. (L) Sound, 54ief; silent, 5514f. 

♦DIVINE LADY, THE (D-TME): Corinne Griffith, Victor 
Varconi, H. B. Warner, Ian Keith, Marie Dressier, Doro- 
thy Cummings, WUliam Conkin, Montague Love, Julia 
Swayne Gordon, Michael Vavitch. (L) 9035f. (B) Mar. 
31. 1929. (NP) Apr. 6, 1929. (TOS) May 11, 1929. 

♦DRAG (D-AT): Eichard Barthelmess, Lucien Littlefleld, 
Katherine Ward, AUce Day, Tom Dugan, LUa Lee, Mar- 
garet Fielding. (L) 7642f. (B) July 21, 1929. (NP) 
July 13. (TOS) August 10. 

♦FAITHFUL (D-AT): BUlie Dove, George Barraud, Montague 
Love and others. 

•FAST LIFE (D-AT): Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Loretta Young, 
Chester Morris. WUliam Holden. Frank Sheridan, Bay 
Hallon, John Sainpolis. (L) Talking, 7541f, (B) Sept. 2», 
1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (TOS) Oct. 5. 

♦FORWARD PASS (D-AT): Douglas Fairbanks. ,Tr., Loretta 
Young, Guinn WUliams, Peanuts Byron, Phyllis Crane, 
Bert Eome, Lane Chandler, AUen Lane, Floyd Shackle- 
ford. (NP) Nov. 9. 

♦GIRL FROM WOOLWORTHS (D-AT): Alice White, Charles 
Delaney, Wheeler Oakman, Ben HaU, Rita Flynn, Gladdon 
James, Bert Moorehouse, Patricia Caron, 'WlUiam Orla- 
mond, MiUa Davenport. (NP) Nov. 3. 

♦GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE, THE (D-TME): Loretta 
Young, CarroU Nye. Matthew Betz, Lucien Littlefleld, Ralph 
Lewis, George Stone, Julia Swayne Gordon, Majel Coleman, 
Charles Sellon, Eobert Haines, (E) June 22, 1929. (NP) 
.Tune 15. (L) Talking. 7159f: silent. G705f. 

♦GREEN STOCKINGS (D-AT): Dorothy MackaiU and others. 
Forthcoming 1930 release. 

•GREAT DIVIDE (MD-AT) : Dorothy MackaiU, Ian Keitn. 
Lucien Littlefleld, Ben Hendricks, Myrna Loy, Frank Ta»g, 
Creighton Hale, George Fawcett, Jean Laverty, Claude 
GiUingwater. Eoy Stewart, James Ford, Jean Lorraine and 
Gordon EUiott. (NP) Sept. 21. (TOS) Nov. 16. 

•HARD TO GET (CD-AT): Dorothy MackaiU. Jimmie Fin- 
layson, Louise Fazenda, Jack Oakie, Edmund Burns. 
Clarissa Selwynne, Charles Delaney. (NP) Aug. 10. (TOS) 
Sept. 28. (L) Sound, 7324f; silent, 5981f. 

♦HER PRIVATE LIFE (D-AT): Billie Dove, Walter Pldgeon, 
Holmes Herbert, Montagti Love, Eoland Young, Thelma 
Todd, Mary Forbes. Brandon Hurst and Zasu Pitts. (NP) 
Sept. 21. (NP) Oct. 5. 

♦HIS CAPTIVE WOMAN (D-TME): Milton Sills, Dorothy 
MackaiU, Gladden James. Jed Prouty, Sidney Bracey, 
Gertrude Howard. Marion Byron, George Fawcett, WiUlam 
Holden, Frank Reicher, August ToUaire. (L) 8305f. (R) 
Apr. 7. 1929. (NP) Mar. 2, 1929. 

♦HOT STUFF (CD-TME): AUce White, Louise Fazenda. 
William Bakewell, Doris Dawson, Ben Hall. Charles Sel- 
lon, Buddy Messinger, Andy Devine, Larry B^nthlm. (L) 
G774f. (R) May 5. 1929. (NP) Mar. 22, 1929. 

•HOUSE OF HORROR (MvC-ME) : Louise Fazenda, Chester 
Conklln, .Tames Ford. Thelma Todd, William V. Mong, 
Emile Chautard. WiUiam Orlamond, Dale Fuller. Tenan 
Holtz, (L) 5919f. (R) Apr. 28, 1929. (NP) Apr. 13, 
1929. 

♦ISLE OF LOST SHIPS, THE (D) : .Tason Robards, Vir- 
ginia VaUi, Clarissa Selwynne, Noah Beery, Robert 
O'Connor. Harry Cording. Margaret Fielding. Katherine 
Ward. Robert Homans, Jack Ackroyd and Sam Baker. 
(P) Sept. 21. 

♦LAWLESS LEGION, THE (W) : Ken Maynard. Nora Lane, 
Paul Hurst, J. P. McGowan, Frank Rice, Howard Trues- 
dale, Tarzan. (E) Mar. 3, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
(L) 6109f. 

♦LITTLE JOHNNY JONES (D-AT): Eddie Bnizzel, Alice 
Day, Edna Murphy. Eobert Edeson, Wheeler Oakman, Don- 
ald Eeed. (NP) November 9. 

♦LOVE AND THE DEVIL (D-TME): Milton SiUs, Maria 
Corda, Ben Bard, Nellie Ely Baker, Amber Norman, (L) 
R431f. (E) Mar. 24. 1929. (NP) June 29. 

♦LOVE RACKET, THE (D-AT): Dorothy MackaiU, Sidney 
Blackmer. Edmund Burns, Myrtle Stedman, AUce Day, 
Edith Yorke, Martha Mattox, Edward Davis, Webster 
Campbell, Clarence Burton, Tom Mahoney and Jack Curtis. 
Length. 6.118. (NP) Nov. 30. 

♦MAN AND THE MOMENT. THE (D-TME): BiUie Dove, 
Rod LaEocaue, Gwen Lee. Robert Schable, Charles Sellon, 
George Bunnv. (L) Talking, 7086f; silent, 6539f. (E) June 

23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23, 1929. (TOS) August 3. 
♦MOST IMMORAL LADY, A (D-AT): Lcatrice Joy. Walter 

Pidgeon. Sidney Blackmer, Montague Love, .Josephine 
Dunn, Robert Edeson, Donald Reed, Florence Oakley, Wil- 
son Benge. (NP) September 28. 
♦PAINTED ANGEL (D AT): BiUie Dove. Edmund Lowe, 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



55 



George MacFarlane, J. Farrcll MacDonald, Cissy Fitzgerald. 
Wellie Bly Baker, Will Stanton, INoniia Selby, Douglas 
Gerrard, Sliep Camp, I'eter HigBliis, lied Stanley. (NP( 
Nov. 30. 

•PARIS (D-AT): Irene Bordoni. Jack Buchanan. Louise 
Closser Hale, Jason Robards, Margaret Fielding, Zasu 
Pitts. (JSP) October lU. 

•PRISONERS (D-TAIE); Corinno Griffith, James Ford. Bela 
Lugosi, Ian Keith. Julanne Johnston, Ann Schaeffer, Baron 
Hesse, Otto Matieson, Harry Northrup. (L) 7800t. (It) 
May 19, 1M9. (NP) Julj- 2U. 

•ROYAL RIDER, THE (W) : Ken Maynard. (L) 5957f. (R) 
May 5 1929. 

SALLY (MO) : Marilyn MiUer, Alexander Gray, Joe E. 
Brown, T. Roy Barnes, Pert Keltou. Ford Sterling, Maude 
Turner Gordon. Nora Lane, E. J. Radcliffe, Jack Duffy. 
(L) Sound 9.277. (MP) December 28. 

•SATURDAY'S CHILDREN (D-TME) : Corinne Griffith, 
Grant Withers, Albert Conti, Alma TeU, Lucien Littlelleld, 
Charles Lane, Ann SchaetTer, Marcia Harris. (L) 79501. 
(R) Apr. 14, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) May 25. 

•SCARLET SEAS (D-TME): Richard Barthelmess. Betty 
Compson, Loretta Young, James Bradbtu-y, Sr.. Jack Cur- 
tis, Knute Erickson. (L) 6237f. (R) Dec. 9, 1928. (NP) 
Dec. 1, 1928. (TOS) Feb. 2. 1929. 

•SEVEN FOOTPRINTS TO SATAN (MT-ME) : Creishton 
Hale, Thelma McNeill, Thelma Todd, Sheldon Lewis. Wil- 
liam V. Mong, Sojin, Laska Winters, Ivan Christy, De- 
Witt Jennings, Nora Cecil, Kala Pasha, Harry Fitzgerald, 
Alonzo Rositto, Harry Tenbrool;e. (L) 54051. (R) Feb. 
17. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 

♦SONG OF THE FLAME (D-AT): AUce Gentle. Alexander 
Gray and others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

•SHOW GIRL IN HOLLYWOOD (D-AT): Alice White and 
others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

•SMILING IRISH EYES (D-AT): Colleen Moore, James 
Hall. Claude Gillingwater, Robert Homans, Aggie Herring. 
Betty Francisco, Julanne Jolmston, Robert O'Connor, John 
Beck, Edward Earl, Tom O'Brien, Oscar Apfel, Fred Kel- 
sey. Otto Lederer. (L) 85501. (R) July 31. 1929. (TOS) 
Sept. 7. (NP) July 27. 

•SQUALL, THE (D-AT): Myrna Loy, Alice Joyce, Richard 
Tucker. Carroll Nye, Loretta Young. (L) 9629f. (R) 
May 26, 1929. (TOS) June 29. 

•SYNTHETIC SIN (D-ME) : Colleen Moore. Antonio Moreno. 
Kathryn McGuire. Edythe Chapman. Montague Love. Ger- 
trude Astor, Gertrude Howard, Ben Hendricks, Jr., Ray- 
mond Tucker. (L) 68521. (B) Jan. G. 1929. (NP) 
Mar 2 1929. 

•TWIN BEDS (C-TME): Jack MiOhaU, Patsy Ruth Miller. 
Armond Kaliz, Gertrude Astor, Knute Erickson. Edythe 
Chapman. Joceljn Lee. Nita Martan. ZaSu Pitts. Eddie 
Gribbon. Ben Hendricks,. Jr., Carl Levinnes, Alice Lake, 
Bert Roach. (R) July 14, 1929. (NP) July 30. (L) 
Talldng. 72G6f. ^ , 

•TWO WEEKS OFF (CD-ME) : Dorothy Mackaill, Jack 
Mulhall. Gertrude Aster. Jimmy Fiulayson. Kate l^ice. Jed 
Prouty, Eddie Gribbon. Dixie Gay. Gertrude Messinger. 
(L) 80171. (B) May 12. 1929. (NP) May 11, 1929. (TOS) 
June 8. „ 

•WEARY RIVER (Mel-TME): Richard Barthelmess, Betty 
Compson, George Stone. William Holden, Louis Natheaux, 
Raymond Turner, Robert O'Connor. (L) 797Gf. (R) Feb. 
10. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) May 18. 

•WEDDING RINGS (D-AT): Lois Wilson, H. B. Warner. 
Olive Borden, Kathleen Williams, Aileen Manning. James 
Ford, HaUam Cocley. (NP) Dec. 14. 

•WHY BE GOOD (CD-MD) : CoUeen Moore, Neil Hamilton. 
Bodil Bosing, John Sainpolis, Edward Martindel, Eddie 
Clayton. Lincoln Stedman, Louis Natheaux, Collette Merton, 
Dixie Gay. (L) 75071. (R) Mar. 17, 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 30. 1929. 

•YOUNG NOWHERES (D-AT): Richard Barthelmess, 
Marian Nixon. Bert Roach. Anders Randolf, Raymond Ttir- 
ner, Joselyn Lee. (NP) October 9. (TOS) Nov. 23. 



Fox 



•AIR CIRCUS, THE (CD-ME): David Rollins, Arthur 
Lake, Sue Carol, Charles Delaney, Heinie Conklin, Louise 
Dresser, Earl Robinson. (L) 77021. (R) Sept. 30, 1928. 
(NP) Oct. 20, 1928. (TOS) Jan. 5. 1929. 

•BEHIND THAT CURTAIN (MY-AT) : Warner Baxter. Lois 
Moran, Gilbert Emery. Claude King. Philip Strange, Boris 
Karloff, Jaraiel Hassen. Peter Gawthome, John Rogers, 
Montague Shaw, Finch Smiles, Mercedes De Valasco, E. L. 
Park. (L) 8300f. (B) June 30, 1929. (TOS) Aug. 31. 
(NP) July 6. 

•BIG TIME (D-AT): Lee Tracy, Mae Clarke, Daphine Pol- 
lard, Josephine Dunn, and Stepin Fetchit. Directed by 
Kenneth Hawks. (NP) Oct. 5. (L) 7.480. (B) Sept. 29. 

•BLACK MAGIC (D-ME): Josephine Dunn, Earle Foxe. 
John Holland, Henry B. Walthall, Dorothy Jordon, Fritz 
Feld, Sheldon Lewis, Ivan Lindow, Blue Washington. (L) 
58351. Silent, 5855f. (E) June 2, 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 

•BLACK WATCH, THE (D-AT): Victor McLaglen, Myrna 
Iioy, David Torrence. David Percy. Joseph Diskay, Joyzelle, 
David Rollins, Lumsden Hare, Boy D'Arcy, Mitchell Lewis, 
Cyril Chadwlck, Francis Ford. Walter Long, Frederick 
Sullivan, Richard Travers, Pat Somerset. Claude King. 
(L) 8487f. (B) May 26, 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) 
July 6. 

•BLINDFOLD (D-ME): Lois Moran. George O'Brien, Earl 
Foxe, Don Terry, Maria Alba, Fritz Feld, Andy Clyde, 
Craufurd Kent, Bobert E. Homans, .John Kelly, Philips 
SmaUey. (L) 55981. (B) Dec. 9. 1928. (NP) Dec. 8, 
1928. 

•BLUE SKIES (CD-ME): Helen Twelvetrees, Prank Albert- 
son, Rosa Gore, William Orlamond, Claude King, Car- 
mencita Johnson. Freddie Frederick, Ethel Wales, Adele 
Watson. Helen Jerome Eddy. (L) Silent, 5367f; sound, 
5408f. (R) Mar. 7, 1929. (NP) Apr. 6. 1929. 

•CAPTAIN LASH (D-ME): Victor McLaglen, Claire Windsor, 
Arthur Stone, Albert Conti, Clyde Cook, Jean Laverty. 
Frank Hagnev, Boris Charsky, Jane Winton. (L) 5453f. 
(R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Feb. 16. 

•CHASING THROUGH EUROPE (D-TME): Sue Carol, Nick 
Stuart. Gustav von Sevffertitz. Gavin Gordon. E. Alyn 
Warren. (L) Silent, 56221; sound, 5581f. (R) June 9, 
1929. (NP) Aug. 10. 

•CHRISTINA (D-AT): Janet Gaynor, Charles Morton, Ru- 
dolph Srhildkraut, Lucv Dorraine. Harry Cording. (L) 
6955f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929. (NP) Auff. 3. 

•CITY GIRL (D-AT): Charles FarreU, Mary Duncan. David 
Ton'cnce. Edith Yorke, Dawn O'Day. Guinn Williams. Dick 
Alexander, Tom Maguire, Edward Brady. (NP) December 
28 

•COCK-EYED WORLD, THE (D-AT): Lily Damita, Victor 

McLaglen. Edmund Lowe. Lelia Kamelly. Bobby Burns. 

Jean Bary. Joe Brown. (L) 10,611f. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) 

Oct. 5. (R) Oct. 20. 
•DRY MARTINI (D-AIE) : Mary Astor, Matt Moore. .Tocelyn 

Lee, Sally Ellers. Albert Gran. Albert Conti. Tom Rickets, 

Hugh Trevor, John T. Dillon, Marcelle Corday. (L) 7176f. 

(R) Oct. 7, 1928. (NT) Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) Dec. 

1. 1928. 

♦EXALTED FLAPPER, THE (CD-ME): Sue Carol. Barrv 
Norton, Irene Rich. Albert Conti. Sylvia Field. Stuart 
Irwin, Lawrence Grant. Charles Clary. Michael Visarnff, 
Don AUen, Landers Stevens. (R) May 26, 1929. (NP) 
.Tune 22. (L) 58061. 

♦FAR CALL, THE (D-ME): Charles Morton. Leila Hyams. 
Ulrich Haupt, Stanley J. Sanlord. Warren Hymer. Arthur 
Stone, Charles Middleton, Pat Hartigan, Ivan Linow. Dan 
Wolheim. Randolph Scott, Charles Gorman. Bernard Siegel. 
Willie Fung, Harry Gripp, Frank Chew, Sam Baker. (L) 



Sound, 63131; silent, 52S5f. (B) Apr. 28, 1929. (NP) 
Jime 1. 

•FAST WORKERS (D-AT): Joseph WagstafT, Lola Lane, 
Sharon Lynn, Frank Richardson, Walter Cutlett, Dixie Lee, 
Charles Judels, Ilka Chase, Larry Steers. 

•FOUR DEVILS (D-TME): Janet Gaynor, Mary Duncan, 
Charles Morton, Barry Norton. Farrell MacDonald, Nancy 
Drexel. (L) 9.496. (NP) July 20. (TOS) Nov. 9. (R) 
Sept. 15. 

•FOUR SONS (D-MB): Margaret Mann, James Hall, Francis 
X. Bushman, Jr., Charles Morton, George Meeker, June 
CoUyer, Wendell Franklin. Earlc Foxe, Albert Gran, August 
Tollaire, Frank Reicher, Jack Pennick, Hughie Mack, Ruth 
Mix. (L) 89621. (R) Sept. 2, 1928. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 
(TOS) Jan. 12, 1929. 

FOX MOVIETONE FOLLIES (MC-AT) : lola Lane, Frank 
Richardson, David I'ercy. Sue Carol, Dixie Lee, David 
Rollins, Sharon Lynn. John Breedon. Stepin Fetchit. (L) 
82911. (R) May 25. 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) June 29. 

•FROZEN JUSTICE (D-AT): Lenore Ulric. Robert Frazer, 
Louis Wolheim, DUrich Haupt, Laska Winter, Tom Pat- 
ricola, Alice Lake, Gertrude Astor, Adele Windsor, War- 
ren Heymer, Neyneen FarreU, Arthur Stone and others. 
(NP) Nov. 16. (L) 7.170. (R) Oct. 13. 

•FUGITIVES (Mee-ME): Madge Bellamy, Don Terrj'. Arthur 
Stone, Earle Foxe, Matthew Betz, Lumsden Hare, Hap 
Ward, Edith Yorke, Jean Laverty. (L) 5356f. (R) Jan. 
27. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 

♦GHOST TALKS, THE (My-TME) : Special cast. (R) Mar. 
30, 1929. (L) 64281. 

•GIRL FROM HAVANA (D-AT): Paul Page, Lola Lane. 
Natalie Moorhead, Kenneth Thomson, Warren Hymer, 
Joseph Girard and Adele Windsor. Directed by Benjamin 
Stoloff. (NP) Sept. 21. 

♦GIRLS GONE WILD (CD-ME): Sue Carol, Nick Stuart, 
William BusseU, Roy D'Arcy, Leslie Fenton, Hedda 
Hopper, John Darrow, Mathew Betz, Edmund Breeze, 
Minna Ferry. Louis Natheaux. Lumsden Hare. (L) Talk- 
ing. 53321. (R) Feb. 24. 1929. (NP) March 23. 1929. 

•HEARTS IN DIXIE (D-AT): Stepin Fetchit. Clarence 
Muse. Eugene Jackson. Dorothy Morrison, Bernice Pilot, 
Clifford Ingram, Mildred Washington, Zach Williams, Ger- 
trude Howard, Vivian Smith, Robert Brooks, A. C. H. 
Billdrew, Richard Carlysle. (B) Mar. 10. (L) Sound. 
74631.; silent, 6444f. (TOS) May 25. 

HOLLYWOOD NIGHTS (D-AT): AU-star cast. Forthcom- 
ing 1930 release. 

•HOMESICK (C): Sammy Cohen, Harry Sweet, Marjorie 
Beebe, Henry Armetta, Pat Harmon. (L) 51531. (B) 
Dec. 16. 1928. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 

•HOT FOR PARIS (CD-AT) : Victor McLaglen, Fill Dorsay. 
El Brendel, PoUy Moran, Lennox Pavvie. August Tollaire, 
George Fawcett, Charles Judels. Eddie Dillon, Rosita Mars- 
tini. Agostino Borgato, Yola D'Avril, Anita Murray, Dave 
Valles. (NP) December 28. 

•IN OLD ARIZONA (W-AT) : Warner Baxter, Edmund 
Lowe. (L) 87241. (B) Jan. 20, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 23, 
1929. 

♦JOY STREET (CD-ME): Lois Moran. Nick Stuart. Bex BeU, 
Jose Crespo, Dorothy Ward, Ada Williams. Maria Alba, 
Sally Phipps, Florence Allen, Mabel Vail, John Breedon. 
(B) Apr. 7. 1929. (L) SUent. 57541.; sound. 57481. 
(NP) May 11, 1929. 

•LONE STAR RANGER (W-AT): George O'Brien. Sue 
Carol. Walter McGrail. Warren Hymer. Russell Simpson. 
Lee Shumway, Roy Stewart, Colin Chase, Richard Alexan- 
der, Joel Franz. Joe Ricksop. Oliver Eckhardt, Caroline 
Rankin, Elizabeth Patterson. (NP) Dec. 21. 

•LOVE, LIVE AND LAUGH (D AT): George Jessel. Lila 
Lee, David BoUins, Henry Kolker. Kenneth MacKenna. 
John Beinhart. Dick Winslow Johnson. Henry Armetta, 
Marcia Manon and Jerry Mandy. (NP) Dec. 7. (L) 8,090. 
(R) Nov. 3. 

♦LUCKY STAR (D-TME): Charles Farrell. Janet Gaynor, 
Hedwiga Eeicher, Guinn (Big Boy) Williams. Paul Fix, 
Gloria Grey, Hector V. Samo. (L) Talking, 88951. ; 
silent. 87251. (B) Aug. 18. 1929. (TOS) Sept. 28. 

•MAKING THE GRADE (CD-TME) : Edmund Lowe, Lois 
Moran, Albert Hart, Lucien LitUefleld. James Ford, Sher- 
man Boss. John Alden. Gino Conti, Bolfe Sedan, Lia 
Tora, Mary Ashley. (L) Talking, 59031.; silent, 50241. (E) 
Feb. 10. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 

♦MARRIED IN HOLLYWOOD (D AT): J. Harold Murray, 
Norma Terris, Walter Catlett, Irene Palaska, Tom Pat- 
ricola, Lennox Pawie and John Garrick. (NP) Nov. 30. 
(L) 9.700. (E) Oct. 27. 

♦MASKED EMOTIONS (D-TME): George O'Brien. Nora 
Lane, Farrell MacDonald, David Sharpe, Edward Peil, Sr., 
Frank Hagney. (L) Silent, 5389f. ; sound, 54191. (B) May 
19, 1929. (NP) June 15. (L) 54191. 

♦MASQUERADE (CD-AT): Alan Birmingham, Leila Hyams. 
Clyde Cook. Farrell MacDonald. Arnold Lucy, (Jeorgp 
Pierce, Rita Le Boy, John Breeden, Jack Pierce. Pat 
Moriarity. Jack Carlisle. Frank Richardson. (N) July 27. 
(L) Talking. 56431. (E) Julv 14. 

MEN WITHOUT WOMEN (CD-AT): Kenneth MacKenna. 
Franli Albertson. Paul Page. Walter McGrall, Warren Hy- 
mer, Farrell MacDonald, Stuart Erwin, George Le Guere, 
Ben Hendricks. Jr., Harry Tenbrook, Warner Bichmond, 
Boy Stewart. Charles Gerard, Pat Somerset. (E) Feb. 9. 

•NEW YEAR'S EVE (D-TME): Mary Astor, Charles Morton. 
Arthur Stone, Helen Ware. Freddie Frederick, Florence 
Lake, Sumner Getchell, Virginia Vane. Stuart Erwin. 
(E) Feb. 24, 1929. (L) Silent. 50591; sound. 5984f. 
(NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

♦NIX ON DAMES (D-AT): Mae Clarlte. Eobert Ames, Wil- 
liam Harrigan. Maude Fulton. George Macfarlane. Camille 
RoveUe. Grace Wallace. Hugh McCormack, Benny Hall. 
Gilly (jolvin. Frederick Graham and Louise Beaver (NP) 
Dec. 7. (L) 5.988. (E) Nov. 24. 

♦NOT QUITE DECENT (D-TME): .Tune Cnllyer. Lotiise 
Dresser. Allan Lane. Oscar Apfel. Paul Nicholson. Marjorie 
Beebe. Ben Hewlett. Jack Kenney. (L) Talking. 49651; 
silent. 46531. (R) Mar. 24. 1929. (TOS) June 22. (NP) 
May 18. 1929. 

♦ONE WOMAN IDEA, THE (D-ME): End La Eoctiue. 
Marceline Day, Sharon Lynn, Sally Phipps, Shirley Dorman. 
Ivan Lebedeff. Douglas Gilmore. Gino Cnrrarto. Joseph W. 
Girard. Arnold Lucj', Frances Eosay. Guy Trento. Daniel 
Hasson, Tom Tamarez. Coy Watson. (L) Talldng, 61111; 
silent, 61061. (R) .Tune 2. 1929. (NP) .Time 22. 

♦PLASTERED IN PARIS (C-ME) : With Cohen. Pennick and 
Linow. (L) 5e40f. (R) Sept. 23. 1928. 

♦PLEASURE CRAZED (D-AT): Marguerite Churchill. Ken- 
neth Macenna, Dorothy Burgess. Campbell GuUan. Douglas 
Gilmore. Henrv Kolker. Frederick Graham. Rex Bell. 
Chariotte Merriam. (E) July, 1929. (NP) July 20. (L) 
Talking. SSm. 

•PROTECTION (Mel-ME): Dorothy Burgess, Eobert Elliott, 
Paul Page. Ben Hewitt. Boy Stewart. Dorothy Ward. Wil- 
liam H. Tooker, Joe Brown, Arthur Hoyt. (R) May 12. 
(L) 55111. 

♦RED WINE (CD-ME): .Tune Collyer. Conrad Nagel. Arthur 
Stone, Sharon Lynn. E. Alyn Warren. Ernest Hilliard. 
Ernest Wood. Marshall "Babe" Ruth. Dixie Gay. Margaret 
La Marr. (L) 61941. (E) Dee. 23, 1928. (NP) Mar. 
9, 1929. (TOS) Jan. 26. 1929. 

♦RILEY THE COP (CD-ME): J. Farrell MacDonald. Louise 
Fazenda, Nancy Drexel. David Rollins, Harry Schultz. Mil- 
dred Boyd. Ferdinand Schumann Heink. Tom Wilson. Del 
Henderson. Russell Powell, Otto H. Fries, Billy Bevan, 
Mike Donlin. 

♦RIVER, THE (D-TME): Charles Farrell, Mary Duncan, 
Ivan Linow, Margaret Mann, Aldredo Sabato. (L) 7,704. 
(NP) .Tuly 20. (TOS) Nov. 23. (B) Oct. 0. 

ROMANCE OF THE RIO GRANDE (D-AT): Warner Bax- 
ter, Antonio Moreno, Mary Duncan, Mona Maris, Bobert 



Edeson, Agostino Borgato, Albert Koccardl, Mrs. Jiminez, 
Majel Coleman, Charles Byera. Merril McCorinick. (NP) 
Dec. 21. 

•ROMANCE OF THE UNDERWORLD (D-ME): With Astor 
and Boles. (L) 61621. (11) Nov. 11. 1928. (TOS) Jan. 
19, 1929. 

"SALUTE (D-AT): George O'Brien, William Jimey, Frank 
Albertson, Helen Chandler, Joyce Compton, Clifford Demp- 
scy, Limjsden Hare, Stephin Fetcliit, David Butler, Rex 
Bell, John Breeden. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) Oct. 26. (L) 
8,500. (R) Sept. 1. 

•SIN SISTER (CD-ME): Nancy Carroll, Lawrence Gray, 
Josephine Dunn, Myrtle Stedman, Anders Eandolph, Rich- 
ard Alexander, Frederick H. Graham, George Davis. David 
Callis. (L) 60721. (R) Feb. 3, 1929. (NP) Mar. 0, 
1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929. 

•SONG OF KENTUCKY. A (D-AT): Lois Moran. Joe 
Wagstair. Dorothy Burgess. Douglas Gilmore. Hedda Hop- 
per. Edward Davis, Herman Bing, Bert Woodruff. (NP) 
November 9. (L) 7,125. (R) Nov. 10. 

♦SPEAKEASY (CD-AT): Paul Page, Lola Lane, Henry B. 
Walthall, Helen Ware, Warren Hymer, Stuart Erwin, 
Sharon Lynn, ErviUe Alderson, James Guilloyle, Helen 
Lynch, Marjorie Beebe, Sailor Vincent, Joseph Cawthorne. 
Ivan Linow. (L) 57751. (R) Mar. 24, 1929. (NP) Apr. 
6, 1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929 

•STRONG BOY (D-ME): Victor McLaglen, Leatrice Joy, 
Farrell MacDonald, Slim Siunmerville, Kent Sanders. "Tom 
Wilson, Jack Pennick. Robert Ryan. David Torrence, 
Dolores Johnson (L) 55671. (R) Mar. 3. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) May 4. 1929. 

•SUNNY SIDE UP (D-AT): Janet Gaynor, Charles Far- 
rell, Sharon Lynn, Frank Richardson, El Brendel. Mar- 
jorie White. Joe Brown, Mary Forbes, Alan Paull, Peter 
Gawthorne. Length 11,131. (NP) Nov. 30. (R) Dec. 29. 

♦TAKING A CHANCE (D) : Rex Bell, Lola Todd. Richard 
C)arlyle. Billy Watson, Jack Byron, Martin Cichy, Jack 
Henderson. (L) 48701. (R) Nov. 18, 1928. 

•THEY HAD TO SEE PARIS (CD-AT): Will Rogers, Irene 
Rich, Marguerite Churchill. Fill Dorsey. Owen Davis. Rex 
Bell, Ivan Lebedeff, Christiane Yves, Edgar Kennedy, 
Marcelle Corday, Marcia Manon, Theodore Lodi, Bob Kerr, 
Andre Cheron, Gregory Gay. (NP) Sept. 21. (TOS) 
Dec. 7. 

♦THREE SISTERS (D AT): June Collyer. Tom Dresser. 
Louise Dresser, Keimeth MacKerma. Joyce Compton. Addle 
McPhail. Clifford Saum. Paul Porcasi, John Sainpolis 
and Sidney DeGrey. (NP) Nov. 30. 

•THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES (D AT): Mary Duncan. 
Edmund Lowe, Warner Baxter, Earle Foxe Donald Gal- 
lagher, Florence Lake. (R) Apr. 7, 1929. (L) 51661. 
(NP) May 11, 1929. (TOS) June 8. 

•TRENT'S LAST CASE (MY-TME): Raymond Griffith, Ray- 
mond Hatton, Marceline Day, Donald Crisp, Lawrence 
Gray, Nicholas Soussanin, Anita Gravin, Ed Kennedy. 
(R) May 31, 1929. (L) Silent, 58001. ; sound. 5834f. 
(NP) May 18. 1929. 

•TRUE HEAVEN (D-ME): George O'Brien, Lois Moran, 
Philip SmaUey, Oscar Apfel, Duke Martin, Andre Cheron, 
Donald MacKenzie. Hedwig Reicher, Will Stanton, (L) 
5531f. (E) Jan. 30, 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 6. 1929. 

•VALIANT, THE (D-AT): Paul Muni, Marguerite ChurehlU, 
John Mack Brown, DeWitt Jennings, Henry Kolker. Edith 
Yorke, Bichard Carlyle. Clifford Dempsey, Don Terry. (R) 
(L) 6132f. (E) Nov. 25. 1928. 

•VEILED WOMAN. THE (D-ME): Lia Tora, Paul Vincentl. 
Walter McGrail, Josef Swickard, Kenneth Thompson, Andre 
Cheron, Ivan Lebedeff, Maude George. (L) Silent, 5185f. 
Sound, 51921. (E) Apr. 14, 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 

♦WHITE FLAME, THE (D-AT): AU-star cast. Forthcom- 
ing 1930 release. 

•WORDS AND MUSIC (CD-AT): Lois Moran. David Percy, 
Helen Twelvetrees, WilUam Orlamond, Elizabeth Patterson, 
Duke Morrison, Prank Albertson, Tom Patricola. Bubbles 
Crowell. Biltmore Quartet. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) Sept. 21. 
(L) 6.500. (E) July 21. 



General Pictures 



•BACHELORS CLUB, THE (D) : Eichard Talmadge. Barbara 
Worth. Edna Murphy. Edna EUsmere, V. Talbot Hender- 
son. Herbert Hayes. Barry Palmer. (L) 5600f. (NP) 
.Tune 15. 

•BACK FROM SHANGHAI (D) : Vera Eeynolds. Sojin, 
.Toseph W. Girard, Henry Sedley. (L) 54001. (R) Mar. 15. 

'HEROIC LOVER (D) : Leonard St. Leo. Stuart Holmes. 
Barbara Bedlord, Ted Snell. Hugh Metcalf, William. 
Franey. (R) Feb. 5. (L) 5500f. 



Gotham 



•HEAD OF THE FAMILY, THE: Virginia Lee Corbto, 
Wm. Russell, Mickey Bennett, Eichard WaUing. {Jjj 
5587. (E) October, 1928. 

•KNEE HIGH: Virginia Corbin. (B) October, 1929. 

♦MODERN SAPPHO, A (T) : Betty Bronson. (R) Septem- 
ber, 1929. 

•RIVER WOMAN, THE (D-ME): Jacquehne Logan, Lionel 
Barrymore, Charles Delaney, Harry Todd, Mary Doran, 
Sheldon Lewis. (L) 8 reels. (R) AprU, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 30, 1929. 

♦TIMES SQUARE (CD-T) : Alice Day. Eddie Kane. Emile 

Chautard John Miljan. Natalie Joyce. Joseph Swickard. 

(L) 10.5(101. (E) March. 1927. (NP) Mar. 30, 1929. 
•THROUGH THE BREAKERS (D) : Margaret Livingston, 

Holmes Herbert, Clyde Cook, Natalie Joyce. (L) 5148. 

(E) September. 1928. 



Edward h. Klein 



•ADVENTURES OF MAYA: (L) Silent. 5400f. (B) Apr. 

28 1929 

•PRESIDENT, THE (D) : Ivan Mosjoukine, Suzy Vernon. 
Nikolai Malikoff, Hemrich Schroth, Luigi Serranti. (L) 
81001. 

James Leong Prod. 

•LOTUS BLOSSOM (Silent drama). TuUy Marshall. Noah 
Beery. Anna May Wong, Lady Tseu Meil, Jack Abee. (L) 
5.800f. 

♦VENDORS OF WOMEN (M) : Edwin Carewe and aU-star 
cast. (L) 4,500f. 



Ernest Mattison 



♦IN DALARNA AND JERUSALEM (D) : Hanson and Veidt. 
(L) 14.000f. Forthcoming 1929 release. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

♦ALIAS JIMMY VALENTINE (Mel-TiVIE) : William Haines, 
Lionel Bairymore. LeUa Hyams, Karl Dane, TuUy Mar- 
shall, Howard Hiclanan, BUIy Butts, Evelyn MiUs. (L) 
8.000f. (R) Jan. 26, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. (TOS) 
Mar. 9. 1929. 

♦ALL AT SEA (C) : Karl Dane. George K. Arthur, Josephine 
Dimn. Herbert Prior, Eddie Baker. (L) 5345f. (B) Feb. 
9. 1929. (NP) Feb. 23, 1929. 

•ANNA CHRISTIE (D-AT): Greta Garbo, Robert Ames 
and others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

♦BELLAMY TRIAL. THE (D-AT): Leatrice Joy. Betty 
Bronson. (L) 7542f. (E) Mar. 2, 1929. (NP) Sept. 29, 
1928. (TOS) Apr. 13. 1929 
.•BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY, THE (D-ME): Lily Damita, 
Ernest Torrence, Raquel Torres, Don Alvarado, Duncan Bi- 
naldo, Heniy B. Walthall. Mikhail Vavltoh. Emilv Fitzroy, 
TuUy MarshaU. (L) 7880f. (E) Mar. 30, 1929. (NP) 
May 18. 1929. 



56 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



•BROADWAY MELODY, THE (MC) : Anita Page, Bessie 
Love, Cliailes Kiiin, Jed Prouty, Kenuetli Tliomaon, Ed- 
ward Dillon. Mary Doran, Eddie Kane, J. Emiuett Beck, 
Marsliall Rutli, Drew Demarest. (K) Mar. 9. 1929. (L) 
Sound, 0372r.; silent, 5943f. (NP) Mar. 30, 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 20, 1929. 

•BROTHERLY LOVE (C-TME) : Karl Dane, George K. 
Arthur, Jean Arthur, Richard Carlyle, Edward Connelly, 
Marcia Harris. (L) 6053f. (It.) Oct. 13, 1928. (NP) Oct. 
13, 1928. 

•CAMERAMAN, THE (C) : Buster Keaton, Marceline Day, 
Harold Goodwin. Sidney Bracy, Harry Gribbon. (L) 6995f. 
(R) Sept. 15, 1928. (NP) Sept. 15, 1928. 

•CHINA BOUND (CD): Karl Dane, George K. Arthur, Jose- 
phine Dunn, Polly Moran, Hatty Woods. Carl Stockdale. 
(L) eOOOf. (R) May 18, 1929. (NP) May 11, 1929. 

•DESERT NIGHTS (D-WE) : John Gilbert, Ernest Torrence, 
Mary Nolan. (L) G177f. (R) Mar. 9, 1929. (NP) Mar. 
16. 1929. (TOS) Mar. 16, 1929. 

•DESERT RIDER, THE (W) : Tim McCoy, Raquel Torres, 
Bert Roach, Edward Connelly, Harry Woods, Jess Cavln. 
(R) Ma^ 11, 1929. (L) 4943f. (NP) June 22. 

•DREAM OF LOVE (D) : Joan Crawford, Nils Asther, AUeeu 
Pringle, Warner Gland, Carmel Myers, Harry Beinbardt, 
Harry Myers, Alphonse Martell. Fletcher Norton. (L) 
7987f. (R) Dec. 1, 1928. (NP) Deo. 22, 1928. (TOS) 
Deo. 8, 1928. 

♦DUKE STEPS OUT, THE (CD-ME) : WiUiam Haines, 
Joan Crawford. Karl Dane, Tenen Holtz, Eddie Nugent, 
Jack Roper, Delmer Davis, Luke Cosgroye, Herbert Prior. 
(L) Silent-G210f. Sound-6206f. (B) Mar. 16, 1929. (NP) 
Mar 30 1929 

♦FLYING ' FLEET, THE (D-ME) : Ramon Novarro, Ralph 
Graves. Anita Page, Edward Nugent, Carroll Nye, Sunmer 
Getchell, Gardner James. Alfred AUen. (L) 9044f. (R) 
Jan. 19, 1929. (NP) Feb. 2, 1929. (TOS) Jan. 19, 1929. 

•GIRL IN THE SHOW, THE (CD-AT) : Bessie Love, Ford 
SterUng, Raymond Hackett. (TOS) Aug. 31. 

•HALLELUJAH (DAT): Nina Mae McKinney, WiUlam 
Fountaine, Daniel L. Haynes, Harry Gray, Fannie Bell 
De Kniglit, Everett MoGarrlty, Victoria Spivey, Milton 
Dickerson, Robert Couch, Walter Tail, Dixie JubUee Sing- 
ers. (L) Talking. 9650f. (NP) Nov. 30. 

•HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT (D-AT) : John Gilbert. Katberine 
Dale Owen. Nance (yNeil, Gustav von Seyflertitz, Hedda 
Hopper, Tyrell Davis, Gerard Barry, Madeline Seymour, 
Richard Carle, Eva Dennison, Youcca Troubletzkoy, Peter 
Cawtborne. (NP) October 19. (TOS) Oct. 26. 

HOLLYWOOD REVUE, THE (MC) : Bessie Love. Charles 
King, Marion Davies. Norma Shearer, William Haines, 
Gu3 Edwards, Joan Crawford, John Gilbert. Marie Dressier, 
PoUy Moran, Bros Sisters. Anita Page, Buster Keaton, 
Albertina Ballet. (L) Talking, ll,699t. (TOS) Nov. 16. 

•HONEYMOON (CD): Polly Moran. Eddie Gribbon. Bert 
Roach. Flash. (L) 4823f. (R) Deo. 22, 1928. (NP) Mar. 
9 1929 

•Id'le RICH, THE (D AT): Conrad Nagel. Bessie Love, 
Leila Hyams, Robert Ober, James NeiU, Edythe Chapman, 
Paul Kruger. Kenneth Gibson. (L) 7351f. (R) June 15, 
1929. (NP) June T. (TOS) June 22. 

•KISS, THE (D-ME): Greta Garbo, Conrad Nagel, Anders 
Randolf. Holmes Herbert, Lew Ayres and George Davis. 
(NP) Nov. 30. (TOS) Dec. 21. 

♦LADY OF CHANCE, A (D-ME): Norma Shearer. LoweU 
Sherman. Gwen I<ee, John Mack Brown, Eugenia Besserer, 
Buddy Messinger. (L) 7126f. (R) Dec. 22. 1928. (NP) 
Mar 9 1 929 

♦LAST 'of MRS. CHEYNEY, THE (D-AT) Norma 
Shearer, Basil Rathbone, George Berraud, Herbert Bunston, 
Hedda Hopper, Moon Carrol, Madeline Seymour, Cyril 
Chadwiok, George K. Arthur (in sound print only). Finch 
Smiles, Maude Turner. (NP) July 20. (L) Talking, 
8651f. : silent. 6484f. 

♦LOVES OF CASANOVA (D) : Ivan Mosoujkine. Diane 
Kerenne, Suzanne Bianchetti, Jenny Jugo, Rina de Lig- 
uoro, Nina Kochltz, Olga Day. Paul Guide. Decoeur. 
Bouamerane, Rudolf Klein-Bogge. (L) ei79f. (K) Feb. 
16. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. 

♦MADAME X (D-ATl : Lewis Stone. Ruth Chatterton. Kay- 
mond Hackett, Holmes Herbert. Eugenie Besserer, John P. 
Edington, Mitchell Lewis, Ulrich Haupt, Sidney Toler, 
Richard Carle. Claud King, ChappeU Dossett. (L) 8806f. 
(NP) June 29. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

♦MAN'S MAN, A (CD-ME): William Haines. Josephine- 
Dunn, Sam Hardy, Mae Busch. (L) 6683f. (R) May 25. 
1929. (NP) June 22. (TOS) June 22. 

•MARIANNE (CD-ATI: Marion Davies, Oscar Sliaw. Robert 
Castle, Scott Kolk, Emil Chautard, Mack Swain, Oscar 
Apfel. Robert Ames. Recorded on film and disc. (R) July 
20, 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (TOS) Oct. 19. 

♦MORGAN'S LAST RAID (W) : Tim McCoy, Dorothy Se- 
bastian. Wlieeler Oakman. Allan Garcia, Hank Mann, 
Montague Shaw. (L) 5264f. (R) Jan. 5, 1929. (NP) 
March 9. 1929. 

♦MYSTERIOUS ISLAND, THE (D-TME) : Lionel Barrymore. 

Jane Daly, Lloyd Hughes, Montagu Love, Harry Gribbon. 

Snitz Edwards, Gibson Gowland, Dolores Brinkman. (NP) 

Oct. 19. (TOS) Nov. 23. 
•NAPOLEON (D): Waldimir Roudenko. Albert Dieudrnne, 

Alexandre Koubitzky, Harry Krimer, Edmond Van Daele, 

Antonin Artaud. Gina Manes, Nicholas Koline (L) 6893f. 

(HI Oct. 27. 1928. (NP) Oct. 27, 1929. 
♦OUR MODERN MAIDENS (D-TME): Joan Crawford. Rod 

La Rocque, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.. Anita Page, Edward 

Nugent, Josephine Dimn, Albert Gran. (NP) Sept. 14. 

(TOS) Nov. 9. 

♦OVERLAND TELEGRAPH, THE (W) : Tim McCoy. Doro- 
thy Janis. Frank Rice, Lawford Davidson, Clarence Geldert, 
Chief Big Tree. (L) 4815f. (R) Mar. 2, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16, 1929. 

•PAGAN, THE (D-ME): Ramon Novarro, Renee Adoree. 
Dorothy Janis, Donald Crisp. (L) Silent, 7150f; sound, 
7359f. (B) Apr. 27. 1929. (NP) May 15. 1929. 

♦SHOW PEOPLE (CD-TE>: Marion Davies, William Haines, 
Dell Henderson, Paul Ralli, Tenen Holtz, Harry Gibbon, 
Sidney Bracy, Polly Moran. Albert Conti. (TOS) Oct. 
27. 1928. 

♦SINGLE MAN, A (CD): Lew Cody, Aileen Pringle. Mar- 
celine Day, Edward Nugent, Kathlyn Williams, Eileen 
Manning. (L) 5596f. (R) Jan. 12. 1920. (NP) Feb. 9. 
1929. 

♦SINGLE STANDARD. THE (D) : Greta Garljo, Nils Asther 
John Mack Brown, Dorothy Sebastian, Lane Chandler, 
Robert Castle, Mahlon Hamilton. Kathlyn Williams, Zef- 
fie Tidbury. (NP) Aug. 17. (L) 6569f. (TOS) Aug. 1. 

♦SIOUX BLOOD (W): Tim McCoy. Robert Fraser. Marion 
Douglas. Clarence Geldert. Chief Big Tree, Sidney Bracy. 
(L) 6811f. (B) Apr. 20. 1929. (NP) Apr. 27. 1929 

SO THIS IS COLLEGE (CD-AT): EUiott Nugent. Robert 
MontEomer.v, Sally Starr. Cliff EWwards. (TOS) Dec 14. 

♦SPEEDWAY (CD-TME): William Haines. Anita Page, Ern- 
est Torrence, Polly Moran, Karl Dane. John Milian. (TOS) 
Sept. 14. (NP) Sept. 14. 

•SPI ES (Mel) : Rudolph-KIein-P.osge. Gerda Maurus Lien 
Deyers, Ijouis Ralph, Craighall Sherry, Willy Fritsch Lupu 
Pick. Fritz Rasp. (L) 7999f. (NP) June 15 

♦SPITE MARRIAGE (CD-ME): Buster Keaton. Dorothy Se- 
bastian. Edward Earle. Leila Hyams, William Bechtel, 
John Byron. (L) 7047f. (B) Apr. 6, 1929. (NP) Apr. 
27 1929 \ ' f 

♦SUigKISSED (D-AT): Vilma Banky and others. 

TRADER HORN (D-AT): Edwina Booth, Harry Carey and 
others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

•THIRTEENTH CHAIR. THE (Mel-AT) : Conrad Nage'. 
Leila Hyams. Margaret Wycherly, Helen Milliard, Holmes 
Herbert. Mary Forbes, Bela Lugosi, John Davidson, Charles 
Quartermaine. Moon Carrol. (NP) Nov. 9. 

♦THUNDER (D-ME): Lon Chaney, James Murray. Phyllis 



Haver, George Duryea, Francis Morris, Wally Albright. 
(L) 7783f. (B) Juno 25, 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. (TOS) 
Aug. 17. 

♦TIDE OF EMPIRE (D-ME): Renee Adoree and Duryea, 
ID 6552f. iR) Mar. 23, 1929. 

♦TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN (D AT) : Norma Shearer, Lewis 
Stone, H. U. Warner, Raymond Hackett, Lilyan Tashman, 
Olive Tell, Adrienne D'Anibrlcourt, Mary Doran, Dewltt 
Jennings, Wilfrid North, Landers Stevens, Charles Moore, 
Claud Allister. (NP) May 25. (L) lO.UOOf. (R) June 8. 
(TOS) July 13. 

•TRAIL OF '98, THE (D-ME): Dolores Del Rio, Ralph 
Forbes, Harry Carey, Tully Marshall, Emily Fitzroy, Tenen 
Holtz, Russell Simpson, Karl Dane, Cesare Gravina, George 
Cooper, John Down, E. Alyn Warner. (L) 8799f. (Jt) 
Jan. 5, 1929. (NP) Dec. 29. 1928. (TOS) Mar. 23, 
1929. 

•UNTAMED (D-AT): Joan Crawford, Robert Montgomery, 
Ernest Torrence, Holmes Herbert, John Miijan, Gwen Lee, 
Edward Nugent, Don Terry, Gertrude Astor, Milton Farney, 
Lloyd Innram, Grace C'unard, Tom O'Brien and Wilson 
BeUKC. (NP) Nov. 23. (TOS) Dec. 14. 

•VIKING, THE (D-ME): Donald Crisp, Pauline Starke, 
LeRoy Mason, Anders Randolph, Richard Alexander, Harry 
Lewis Woods, Albert MacQuarrle, Roy Stewart, Torben 
Meyer, Claire MacDowell. Julia Swayne GordoiL (L) 
8186f. (NP) Mar, 9, 1929. All in technicolor. (TOS) 
Oct. 26. 

♦VOICE OF THE CITY, THE (D AT): Robert Ames, Wil- 

lard Mack. Sylvia Field. James Farley, John Mlljan, 

Clark Marshall, Duane Thompson, Tom McGulre, Alice 

Moe, Beatrice Banyard. (L) Sound. 74a7f. (R) Apr. 13. 

1929. (NP) Apr. 27. 1929. (TOS) May 18. 
♦WEST OF ZANZIBAR (D-ME): Lon Chaney. Lionel 

Barrvmore. Warner Baxter, Mary Nolan. Jane Daly, Roscoe 

Ward. Kalla Pasha, Curtis Nero. (L) 615Uf. (It) Nov. 

24, 1928. (NP) Dec. 8, 1928. 
♦WHERE EAST IS EAST (D-TME): Lon Chaney, Lupe 

Velez, Estelle Taylor. Llovd Hughes, Louis Stem, Mrs. 

Wong Wing. (L) 6500f. (R) May 4, 1929, (NP) June 

22. (TOS) June 15. 
♦WHITE SHADOWS OF THE SOUTH SEAS (D-TME): 

Monte Blue, Batiuel Torres, Robert Anderson. (L) 7965f. 

(R) Nov. lO. 1928. (NP) July 7, 1928. (TOS) Deo. 1, 

1928. 

♦WILD ORCHIDS (D-ME): Greta Garbo. Lewis Stone, Nils 
Asther. (L) 9235f. (R) Feb. 23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 2, 
1929. (TOS) Feb. 23. 1929. 

♦WISE GIRLS (D-ATl: Elliott Nugent. Norma Lee. Roland 
Young, J. C. Nugent, Clara Blandick, Marion Shilling, 
Leora Spellman, James Dolan. (NP) October 12. 

♦WOMAN OF AFFAIRS (D-ME): Greta Garbo. John Gil- 
bert. (L) 8319t. (R) Deo. 15, 1928. (TOS) Feb. 16, 
1929 

♦WONDER OF WOMEN (D-TME): Lewis Stone, Leila 
Hyams, Peggy Wood, Harry Myers, Sarah Padden, George 
Fawcett, Blanche Frederici, Wally Albright, Jr., Camen- 
cita Johnson, Anita Louise Fremault, Dietrich Haupt, UU- 
ric Haupt, Jr. (L) Talking. 8796f: silent, 6835f. (R) 
July 31, 1929. (NP) July 27. (TOS) Aug. 17. 



Paramount 



♦ABIE'S IRISH ROSE (CD-TME): Charles Rogers, Nancy 
Carroll, Jean Hersholt. J. Farrell MacDonald, Bernard 
Grocey, Ida Cramer. Nick Cogey. Camillus Pretal, Rosa 
Rosanova. (L) Silent, 10,187f: sound, 10,471f. (R) Jan. 
5, 1929. (NP) Nov. 3, 1928. (TOS) Feb. 2. 1929. 

♦APPLAUSE (D-AT): Helen Morgan, Joan Peters, Fuller 
Mellisa, Jr., Jack Camerson, Henry Wadsworth, Dorothy 
Cuming. (NP) October 19. (R) Jan. 4, 1930. (L) 
Sound. S.079. Silent. 6.896. 

♦AVALANCHE (W) : Jack Holt. Doris Hill. Baclanova, John 
Darrow, Guy OUver. Richard Winslow. (L) 6099f. (NP) 
Dec. 1. 1928. (R) Nov. in. 1928. 

♦BATTLE OF PARIS (D-AT): Gertrude Lawrence, Charles 
Ruggles. Walter Petrie. Gladys Du Bois, Arthur Treacher 
and .Toe King. (NP) Nov. 16. (R) Nov. 30. 1929. 

♦BEGGARS OF LIFE (Mel-TME) : Wallace Beery, Louise 
Brooks, Richard Arlen. Edgar Blue Washington, H. A. 
Morgan, Andy Clarke, Mike Donlin, Roscoe Kams, Robert 
Perry, Johtmie Morris, George Kotsonaros, Jacque Chapin. 
Robert Brower, Frank Brownlee, (L) 7S05f. (R) Sept. 
15 1928. (NP) .Tuly 7. 1928. (TOS) Oct. 20. 1928. 

♦BEHIND THE GERMAN LINES (D): Foreign cast. (L) 
Sound. 8254f. (R) Jan. 12, 1929. 

•BETRAYAL (D-ME): Emil .Tannings, Gary Cooper, Esther 
Ralston, Jada Weller, Douglas Hais, Bodil Rosing, (L) 
SUent. 6492f: sound. 6641f. (B) May 11, 1929. (NP) 
Apr. 27. 1929. (TOS) June 1. 

BURNING UP (D-AT): Richard Arlen, Mary Brian. Fran- 
cis McDonald. Sam Hardy, Charles Sellon and TuUy Mar- 
shall. (NP) Dec. 21. 

♦CANARY MURDER CASE, THE (My-AT) : William Powell, 
James Hall, Louise Brooks, Jean Arthur, Gustaf von 
Seyifertitz. Charles Lane, Eugene Pallette, Lawrence Gray, 
Ned Sparks, Louis John Bartels, E. H. Calvert. (L) Talk- 
ing. 7171f; silent, 5943f. (B) Feb. 16, 1929. (NP) June 15. 

♦CARNATION KID, THE (C-AT): Douglas MacLean. Fran- 
ces Lee, William B. Davidson. Lorraine Eddy, Charles Hill 
Mailes. Francis McDonald, Maurice Black, Bert Swor. Jr., 
Carl Stockdale. (L) Silent, 6290f: sound, 7267f, (K) Feb. 
23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

•CASE OF LENA SMITH, THE (D-ME): E.stlier Ralston. 
James HaU, Gustav von Seyffertitz. Emily Fitzroy, Fred 
Kohler, Betty Ahc, Lawrence Grant, Leone Lane, Kay 
DesLys, Alex Woloshin. Ann Brody, Wally Albright, .Tr., 
Warner Klinger. (L) 7229f. (B) .Tan. 19, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Jan. 26. 1929. 

•CHARMING SINNERS (D-TME): Ruth Chatterton. Clive 
Brook, Mary Nolan. WiUiam Powell. Laura Hope Crews, 
Florence ESdridge, Montagu Love, Jtiliette Crosby, Lorraine 
Eddy, Claude Allister. (L) 6164t. (B) July 6, 1929. 
(NP) Aug. 10. (TOS) Aug. 3. 

♦CHINATOWN NIGHTS (D AT): Wallace Beery, Florence 
Vidor, Warner Oland. Jack McHugh, .Tack Oakie. Tetsu 
Komai, Frank Chew, Mrs. Wing, Peter Morrison, Freeman 
Wood. (L) Silent. 7145f; sound. 7081f. (R) Mar. 23, 
1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 6, 1929. 

♦CLOSE HARMONY (CD-AT): Charles Rocers. Nancy Car- 
roll. Harry Green. ,Tack Oakie, Richard (Skeets) Gallagher, 
Matty Roubert. Ricca Allen, Wade Boteler, Baby Mack. 
Oscar Smith. Greta Grandstedt. Gus Partes. (L) Sound. 
6271t. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. (NP) Mar. 30, 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 13. 1929. 

COCOA NUTS. THE (C-AT): Four Marx Brothers. Mary 
Eaton, Oscar Shaw, Katherine, Francis, Margaret Dumont. 
Cyril Ring, Basil Ruvsdael. Sylvan Lee, Gamby-Hale Girls, 
Allan K Foster Girls. (L) 8613f. (B) May 23, 1929, 
(NP) July 13. (TOS) July 20. 

♦DANCE OF LIFE. THE (D-AT): Nancy Carroll. Hal 
Skellv. Dorothy Revier, Ralph Theador, Charles D. Brown. 
Al St. .Tohn. May Boley. Oscar Levant, Gladys DuBois, 
James T. Quinn. .Tames Farley. George Irving. (L) Talk- 
ing. lO.eiOf; (R) Sept. 14. Silent, 7488f. (TOS) Sept. 21. 

•DANGEROUS CURVES (D AT) : Clara Bow. Ri'^hard Ar- 
len. Kav Francis. David Newell. Anders Randolph. May 
Bolev, T. Roy Barnes, Joyce Compton, Charles D. Brown, 
Stuart Erwin, Jack Lude. (R) July 13, 1929. (NP) 
Aug. 3. (L) Talking. 7278f: silent, 6539f. (TOS) July 20. 

♦DANGEROUS WOMAN. A (D-AT): Baclanova. Clive Brook. 
NeU Hamilton. Clyde Cook. Leslie Fenton, Snitz Edwards, 
(L) Sound. 6fi43f. (B) May 18. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16, 
1929. (TOS) May 18. 

DARKENED ROOMS (M-'rarE) : Evelyn Brent. Neil Ham- 
ilton, Doris Hill, David Newell. Gale Henry. Wallace Mc- 
Donald, Blanche Craig, E. H. Calvert, Sammy Bricker. 
(NP) October 10. (R) Nov. 23. 1929, (L) Sound 6. DOG 



♦DIVORCE MADE EASY (CD-AT): Douglas MacLean. 
Marie Prevost, Johnny Arthur, Frances Lee, Dot Farley. 
Jack Duffy, Buddy Watles, Hal Wilson. (R) July 6, 
1929. (NP) July 13. (L) Talking, 638tif; silent, 6270f. 
(TOS) July 6. 

♦DOCTOR'S SECRET, THE (D-AT): Ruth Chatterton, H. B. 
Warner, John Loder, Robert Edeson, Wilfred Noy, Ethel 
Wales, Nancy Price, Frank Finch-Smiles. (L) Sound. 
5823f. (N; Mar. IB, 1929. (TOS) Feb. 16, 1929. 

♦DUMMY, THE (D-AT): Ruth Chatterton, Frederic March, 
John Cromwell, Fred Koliler, Mickey Beimett, Vondell 
Darr, Jack Oalde, Zasu Pitts, Rlctiard Tucker, Eugene 
Pallette. (L) Bound, 5357f. (B) Mar. 9, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 6, 1929. 

•FASHIONS IN LOVE (D-AT): Adolphe Menjou, Fay 
Compton. Miriam Seegar, John Miljan, Joan Standing, 
Robert Wyne, Russ Powell, Blllie Bennett, Jacques Vaa- 
aire (L) Talking, 6325f; silent, 6024f. (it) June 28, 
1929. (NP) July 13. (TOS) July 6. 

•Fast CuMHANY (CD-AT): Jack Oakie, Skeets Gallagher, 
Evelyn Brent. Gwen Lee. (TOS) Sept. 7. (R) Sept. 14. 
(L) Sound. G.SiiS: silent, 0,459. 

•FLEET'S IN, THE (CD-ME): Clara Bow, James Hall, 
Jack Oakie. Bodil Rosing. (L) 6918f. (R) Oct, 13, 1928. 
(NP) Sept. 22, 1928. (TOS) Sept. 15, 1928. 

♦FLESH OF EVE (D-TME): Nancy Carroll. Richard Warner' 
Oland, Gustav von Seyifertitz, Francis MacDonald, George 
Kotsonaros, Dorothea Wolbert, Clarence H. Wilson, Evei>Ti 
Selbie, WUlie Fung, Wong Wing and Lillian Worth. 
(NP) Nov. 30. 

♦FOUR FEATHERS (D-ME): Richard Arlen, Fay Wray. 
William Powell, Cllve Brook, Theodore von Eltz, Noab 
Beery. Zack Williams. Noble Johnson, Harold Hightower, 
Phillipe de Lacey, Edward Ratclffe, George Fawcett, Au- 
gustine Symonds. (L) Sound. 7472f; silent, 7472f. (TOS) 
Sept. 14. 

•GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS (D-AT): Walter Huston, 
Katherine Francis, Charles Ruggles, Betty Lawford, Nor- 
man Foster, Duncan Perwarden, Lawrence Leslie. (L) 
Sound, 717Bf. (R) May 4. 1929. (NP) Apr. 13, 1929. 

♦GLORIFYING THE AMERICAN GIRL (D-AT): Mary 
Eaton, Edward Crandall, OUve Shea, Dan Healy, Kaye 
Renard, Sarali Edwards. In revue scenes, Eddie Cantor, 
Helen Morgan and Rudy VaUee. (iST) Dec. 7. (R) Dec. 
7. 1929. (L) Sound, 8.071: silent. 6. 780. 

•GREENE MURDER CASE, THE (My-AT): WUliam PoweU, 
Florence Eidrtdge, Ulrich Haupt, Jean Arthur, Eugene 
Paliett, E. fl. Calvert, Gertrude Norman, LoweU Drew, 
Morgan Farley, Brandon Hurst, Augusta Burmester, Mards 
Hariss, Mildred Golden, Mrs, Wilfred Buckland, Helena 
Philips, Shep Camp, Charles E. Evans. (NP) July 20, 
1929. (L) Talking, 6383f. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

•HALF WAY TO HEAVEN (D-AT): Charles "Buddy" 
Rogers. Jean Arthur. Paul Lucas, Helen Ware, Oscar 
Apfel, Edna West, Irvin Bacon, Al Hill, LucUle WilUams, 
Richard French, Freddy Anderson. Nestor. Aber. Ford 
West and Guy Oliver. (L) Sound 6254. Silent 5179. (NP) 
Dec. 7. (TOS) Dec. 14. 

♦HOLE IN THE WALL, THE (My-AT): Claudette Colbert. 
Edward G. Robinson, David NcweU, Nelly Savage. Donald 
Meek, Alan Brooks, Louise CJlosser Hale, Katherine Em- 
met, Marcia Kagno, Barry MacoUum, George McQuarrie, 
Helen Crane. (L) Sound, 5850f. (B) Apr. 27. 1929. 
(NP) Apr. 6, 1929. 

♦HOMECOMING (D) : Lars Hansen, Dita Parlo. Gustav 
FiohUch. (L) 8156f. (R) Feb. 16, 1929. (NP) Feb. 
9 1929 

♦HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY (D-TME): A Ufa picture. LU 
Dagover. Willy Fritsch. Dita Parlo. Fritz Greiner, GiseUa 
Bathory. Erich Kaiser Tietz. Leopold Kramer. (NP) 
Aug. 3. (L) 61G5f. (R) Aug. 3. 1929. 

♦ILLUSION (D-AT): Buddy Rogers. Nancy Carroll. June 
Collyer. Knute Erickson. Eugenie Bresserer, Kay Francis, 
Maude Turner Gordon, Eegis Toomey, WUliam McLaughlin, 
Katherine Wallace, William Austin, Frances Raymond, 
Eddie Kane, Michael Visaroff, Bessie Lyle, Emelie MelvUle, 
Carl Lukas, Col. G. L. McDonneL (L) 7536t; sUent, 
7588f. (NP) July 27. (TOS) Sept. 28. 

♦INNOCENTS OF PARIS (D-AT): Maurice Chevalier, Sylvia 
Beecher, Russell Simpson. George Fawcett, Mrs. George 
Fawcett, John Miljan, Margaret Livingston, David Durand, 
Johnny Morris. (L) SUent. 7816f; sound. 6148f. (B) 
May 25. 1929. (NP) May 4, 1929. (TOS) June 15. 

♦INTERFERENCE (D-AT): WiUiam PoweU. Evelyn Brent. 
CUve Brook, Doris Kenyon, Tom Rickets, Brandon Hurst, 
Louis Payne, Wilford Noy, Donald Stuart, Raymond Law- 
rence. (L) Silent, 6643f: sound, 7487f. (R) Jan. 5, 1929. 
(NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Feb. 9, 1929, 

JEALOUSY (D-AT): .Tearme Bagels, Frederic March, Halli- 
well Hobbes. Blanche Le Clair, Henry DanieU, HUda 
Moore. (NP) Sept. 28. (TOS) Oct. 19. 

♦KIBITZER (CD-AT): Harry Green, Mary Brian, Neil 
Hamilton, David NeweU, Lee Kohlmar, Henry Fink, Tenen 
Holtz, Guy Oliver, Albert Gran, Eddie Kane, (NP) 
Aug. 17. (R) Jan. 11, 1930. (L) South 7273. Silent 
G5G9. 

LADY LIES, THE (CD-AT): Walter Huston, Claudet Col- 
bert, Charles Ruggles. Betty Gorde. Tom Brown, Patricia 
Deering. (TOS) October 12. (R) Sept. 21. (L) 7004. 

♦LAUGHING LADY, THE (D AT) : Ruth Chatterton. Clive 
Brook, Dan Healv, Nat Pendleton, Raymond Walbum, 
Dorothy Hall. Hedda Harrigan, LiUian B. Tonge, Margaret 
St. John, Hubert Druce, Alice Hegeman, Joe King, Helen 
Hawlev. Bettv Bartlev. (R) Dec. 28. (L) Sound 7.371. 

♦LETTER. THE (D-AT): .Teanne Eagels. O. P. Heggie. 
Reginald Owen, Herbert Marshall, Irene Brown, Ijady 
Tsen Mel, Tamaki Yoshiwara. (L) Silent, 5490f; sound. 
5778f. (R) Apr. 13. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) 
May 18. 

♦LOOPING THE LOOP (D-ME): Werner Kraus. .Tenny Jugo. 
Warwick Ward, Gina Manes. (L) Silent, 6G76f; sound, 
67G9f. (R) Mar. 16. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929. 

♦LOVE DOCTOR (CD-AT): Richard Dix. .Tune CoUyer. 
Morgan Farley, Miriam Seegar. Winifred Harris, Law- 
ford Davidson, Gale Henry. (NP) September 28. (TOS) 
Oct 19. (R) Oct. 5. (L) Sound 5,503. SUent 5,378. 

♦LOVE PARADE. THE (CD-AT): Maurice Chevalier, 
Jeanette MacDonald, Lupino Lane, Lillian Roth, Edgar 
Norton. Lionel Belmore, Robert Roccardl, Carleton Stock- 
dale, Eugene Pallette, Russell PoweU, Margaret Fealy. 
Virginia Bruce. (NP) Aug. 3. (R) Jan. 18, 1930. (L) 
Sound. in.fi22. 

♦MAN I LOVE. THE (D-AT): Richard Arlen. Mary Brian, 
Baclanova. Harry Green, Jack Oakie, Pat O'MaUey. Leslie 
Fenton, Charles SuUivan. William Vincent. (B) May 25, 
1929. (L) 66691; silent, 6524f. (NP) Apr. 6, 1929. 
(TOS) May 25. 

♦MARQUIS PREFERRED (D) : Adolph Menjou. Nora Lane. 
Chester Conklin, Dot Farley, Mischa Auer, Alei Melesh. 
Michael Visaroff. (L) 5o06f. (R) Feb. 2. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. 

♦MARRIAGE PLAYGROUND, THE (CD-AT): Mary Brian, 
Frederic March, Lilyan Tashman. Huntley (3ordon, Kay 
Francis, WiUiam Austin, Seena Owen, Philippe de Lacy. 
Anita Louise. Little Mitzl. BUly Sey. Ruby Parsley, 
Donald Smith. .Tocelyn Lee. Maude Turner Gordon. David 
NcweU. (R) Dec, 21. (L) Sound, 7182. SUent. 6610. 
(NP) Nov, 16, (TOSl Dec. 21. 

♦MEN ARE LIKE THAT (CD-AT): Hal Skelly, Doris 
Hill, Charles SeUon, Clara Blandick, Morgan Farley, 
Helene Chadwlck, WiUiam Davidson, Eugene PaUette and 
George Fawcett. (NP) Nov. 23. (R) Feb. 15. 1930. 

♦MIGHTY, THE (D AT): George Bancroft, Esther Ralston, 
Warner Oland, Raymond Hatton, Dorothy Hevler, Morgan 
Farley, O. P. Heggie. Charles SeUon, E. H. Calvert, John 

Cromwell. (R) Nov. 16. (L) Sound 6802. Silent 6097. 
(NP) Nov. 9. (TOS) Nov. 23. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



57 



•MYSTERIOUS DR. FU MANCHU. THE iMy-AT): Winner 
UlHUd, Jean Arthur. NeU Hamilton, O. P. Heggle, William 
Austin. Claude King. Charles Stevenson. IMoble Johnson. 
Kvelyii Selble, Charles Blbljn. Donald Mackenzie. Lawford 
Uanason, ijask Winter, Charles Stevens. Chapuel Dosset. 
Tully MarshaU. (NP) July 27. (i.) Talking, 76e3r. 
(TOS) July 2U. 

•NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH (CD-AT) : Kiihaid Dii:. 
Uerton Churchill. Louis John JJartels. Ned Sparks. Wyimo 
Churchill, Helen Kane. Dorothy Hall. Madeline Gray, 
Manty Ityon. (L) Sound, 725iif. (li) Apr. 2U, 1S29. 
(NP) Apr. 20. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929. 

♦PATRIOT, THE (D-ME) : Emil Janninss, Florence Vidor, 
Lewis Stone. Vera Voronina, Neil Hamilton, Harry Cord- 
ing. (L) 10,173f. (11) Sept. 1, 1U2S. (NP) Sept. S. 

1928. (TOS) Sept. 22, 192S. 

POINTED HEELS (D-AT) : William Powell. Fay Wray, 
Helen Kane. Kichard '■Skeets" Gallagher, Phillips Holmed, 
Adrienne Dore. Eugene PaUette. (11) Deo. 21. (L) 
Sound 5089. (NP) Nov. 10. 

•RAINBOW MAN. THE (DAT): A Sono-Art picture. 
Eddie DowUng. Marian Nixon, Frankle Darro, Sam Hardy, 
Lloyd Ingraham, George Hayes. (L) Talking, 85U0r. (U) 
May 18. 1929. (NP) June 22. (TOS) June 22. 

•REDSKIN (D-ME): Richard Dix, Gladys Belmont. Jane 
Novak. Larry Steers, Tully Marshall, Bernard Suegel, 
George Kigas, Augustlna Lopez, Noble Johnson, Joseph W. 
Girard. Jack Dunne, Andrew J. Callahan, Philip Ander- 
son, Loraine Itivero, George Walter. (L) Silent, 7204f: 
sound. 7042f. (K) Feb. 23, 1929. (NP) Feb. 16. 1929. 
(TOS) Feb. 2. 1929. 

•RETURN OF SHERLOCK HOLMES, THE (D AT): Olive 
Brook, H. Reeves Smith, Betty Lawford, Charles Hay, 
Phillips Holmes, Donald Crisp, Harry T. Morey. Hulbert 
Bruce and Artliur Mack. Talking footase, 7,1()2. Silent. 
C37S. (R) Oct. 26. 1929. (TOS) Nov. 10. (NP) Nov. 23. 

♦RIVER OF ROMANCE. THE (CD-AT): Charles (Buddy) 
Itogers, Mary Brian, June Collyer. Henry B. Walthall. 
Wallace Beery. I'red Kohler, Natalie Kingston, Mrs. George 
Fawcett, Anderson Lawler, George Reed, (L) Talking, 
7009f; sUent. 7028f. (R) July 20, 1929. (NP) June 29. 
(TOS) Aug. 3. 

•SATURDAY NIGHT KID, THE (DAT): Clara Bow, 
James Hall, Jean Arthur, Charles Sellon, Ethel Wales, 
Frank Ross, Edna May Oliver. Heymen Meyer. Eddie 
Dun, Leone Lane, Jean Harlow. (B) Oct. 26. (L) Sound 
6015. (Silent) 6392. (NP) Sept. 28. (TOS) Nov. 2. 

•SEVEN DAYS LEAVE (D-AT): Gary Cooper. Beryl Mer- 
cer. Dalsey Belmore. Nora Cecil, Temple Pigett, Arthur 
Hoyt. Arthur Metcalfe. (NP) November 16 under title 
of ■•Medals." (E) January 25, 1930. (L) Sound 7,656. 
SUent. 7.656. 

•SHOPWORN ANGEL (CD-TME): Nancy CarroU. Gary 
Cooper, Paul Lukas (L) Silent. 7112f; sound, 7373f. (R) 
Jan. 12, 1929. (NP) Feb. 9, 1929. (TOS) Jan. 19. 1929. 

♦STAIRS OF SAND (D-TME) : Wallace Beery. Jean Arthur. 
Phillips B. Holmes, Fred Kohler, Chester Conklin. Guy 
Oliver, Lillian Worth, Frank Rice, Clarence L. Sherwood, 
(L) 4900f. (R) June 8. 1929. (NP) May 18. 1929. 

•STUDIO MURDER CASE, THE (My-AT) : Neil Hami".on. 
Warner Oland, Frederic March. Florence Eldridge, Doris 
Hill, Eugene Pallette, Chester Conklin. Lane Chandler, 
Gardner James, Guy Oliver, E. H. Calvert. Donald Macken- 
zie. (L) Talking. 6500f: silent, 6070f. (R) June 1, 1929. 
(NP) June 8. (TOS) June 22. 

♦SUNSET PASS (W) : .Tack Holt, Nora Lane. John Loder. 
Christian J. Frank. Pee Wee Holmes, Chester Conklin. 
Pat Harmon. Alfred AUen, Guy Oliver. (L) B862f. (R) 
Feb. 9. 1929. (NP) Feb. 23. 1929. 

♦SWEETIE (CD-AT): Nancy Carroll. Stanley Smith, Helen 
Kane, Joseph Depew, Jack Oakie, William Austin, Stuart 
Erwin, Wallace MacDonald, Aileen Manning. (R) Nov. 2, 
(L) Sound, 8859. SUent, 6303. (NP) Aug. 17. (TOS) 
Dec 7 

♦THUNDERBOLT (D-AT): George Bancroft. Richard Arlen. 
Fay Wray, TuUy MarshaU, Eugenie Besserer, James Spotts- 
wood, Fred Kohler, Mike Donlin, S. S. R. S. Stewart, 
George Irving, WiUiam Thorne. E. H. Calvert, King Tut. 
(L) Talking. 8571f; silent, 7311f, (B) June 22. 1929. 
(NP) June 1. (TOS) Aug. 3. 

♦VIRGINIAN. THE (D-AT): Gary Cooper. Walter Huston. 
Richard Arlen. Mary Brian. Chester Conklin, Eugene Pal- 
lette, E. H. Calvert. Helen Ware. Victor Potel. Tex Young. 
Charles Stevens. (L) 8717f. (NP) July 20. (R) Nov. 
9 19''^9 

♦w'eDdInG MARCH, THE (D-ME): Georse Fawcett, 
Maude George, Erich von Stroheim, George Nichols, Zasu 
Pitts, Huffie Mack, Matthew Betz, Cesare Gravina, Dale 
Fuller. Fay Wray. Syd Bracey. (L) 10.400f. (R) Oct. 
6, 1928. (NP) Oct. 27. 1928. (TOS) Jan. 26. 1929. 

♦WELCOME DANGER (CAT): Harold Lloyd. Barbara 
Kent. Noah Young, Charles Middleton, WUliam WaUing. 
(NP) November 9. , „. „ , 

♦WHEEL OF LIFE. THE (D-AT): Richard Dix. Esther 
Ralston. O. P. Heggie, Arthur Hoyt, Myrtle Stedman. 
Larry Steers, Begls Toomey, Nigel de Bmlier. (L) 5153f; 
sUent, 5305f. (R) June 22, 1929. (NP) Apr. 27, 1929. 
(TOS) .Tuly 8. ^ 

WHY BRING THAT UP (CD-AT): Moran and Mack. 
Evelyn Brent. Harrv Green. Bert Swor. Freeman S. Wood. 
Ijawrence LesUe, Helene Lynch, Selmer Jackson, Jack 
Luden, Monte Collins. .Tr., George Thompson. Eddie Kane. 
Charles Hall. (L) 7882f. (NP) October 19. (TOS) Nov. 2. 

♦WILD PARTY, THE (CD-AT): Clara Bow. Frederic March, 
Marceline Day, Shirley O'Hara, Jack Luden. Jack Oakie. 
Arthur Rankin, Lincoln Stedman, Joyce Compton, Ben 
Hendricks, Jr., Jack Redmond, Adrienne Dore, Jean Ix>r- 
raine, Virginia Thomas, Kay Bryant. Alice Adair. Amo 
Ingram. Benee Whitney. Marguerite Cramer. (LI Silent. 
603Gf; sound. n67f. (B) Apr. 6, 1929. (NP) Mar. 23, 

1929. (TOS) Apr. 13. 1929. 

♦WOLF OF WALL STREET, THE (D AT) : George Ban- 
croft. Baclanova. Paul Lukas, Nancy Carroll, Lane Chand- 
ler. Brandon Hurst. Paul Guertsman. Craufurd Kent. (L) 
SUent, 6396f: sound. 6810f. (R) Feb. 9. 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9. 1929. (TOS) Mar. 16. 1929. 

♦WOLF SONG (D-TJrE) : Lupe Velez. Gary Cooper. Louis 
Wolheim. Constantlne BomanofT. Michael Vavitch. Russell 
Colombo, Augustine Lopez. George Bigas. (L) Silent, 
BOfiOf; sound. 6769f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929, (NP) Mar. 9, 
1929. (TOS) Apr. 6. 1929. „ ^ 

♦WOMAN TRAP (Mel-AT) : Hal Skellv. Evelyn Bren*. 
Chester Morris. Leslie Fenton, Effle Ellsler, William B. 
Davidson. Guv Oliver. Charles Giblyn, Wilson Hummell. 
(L) 6168f: silent, G384f. (NP) July 20. (TOS) Sept. 28. 

Parthenon 

♦WILD HEART OF AFRICA, THE (Animal Picture): (NP) 
June 22. 

Pathe 

♦AWFUL TRUTH. THE (D AT): Ina Claire. (L) G129f. 

(R) Aug. 10. 1929. (TOS) Sent. 7. (TOS) Oct. 19. 
♦BACHELOR'S SECRET, A (CD-AT): AUan Hale. (R) 

June 2. 1930. 

•BIG NEWS (My-AT): Robert Armstrong. Carol Lombard. 
Tom Kennedy. Warner Richmond. Wade Boteler, Sam 
Hardy, Charles SeUon, Robert Dudley. (L) Talking. 6028f. 
Recorded on film and disc. (R) Sept. 7, 1929. (NP) 
Sept. 7. 

♦BIG SHOT, THE (D AT): (R) Feb. 8. 1930. 

♦CAPTAIN SWAGGER (D-ME): Rod La RocQue, Sue Carol, 

Richard Tucker, Victor Potel, Dlrich Haupt. (L) 6312f. 

(R) Oct. 14. 1928. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 
♦CLOTHES (D-AT): Constance Bennett. (R) May 3, 1930. 



"CRASHING THROUGH (D AT) : William Boyd. (K) June 
7. 1U3U. 

"DEVIL'S TWIN (W): Leo Maloney. 

•FLYING FOOL, THE (D AT) : WUliam Boyd, Marie Pic- 
vost, Tom O'Brien, Russell Gleason. (L) Talltlng, 6746f; 
silent, 6700f. (NP) July 27. 

*.45 CALIBRE WAR (W) : Don Coleman. Ben Corbett, Al 
Hart, Edward Jones, Duke R. Lee, Floyd Ames. Jeanette 
Loir. Murdock MacUuarrie, Orln Jackson. (11) Feb. 17, 
1929. (L) 47'JOf. (NP) Mar. 10. 1929. 

•GERALDINE (CD-TME): Eddie CJuUlan. Marian Nixon, 
Albert Gran, Gaston Glass. (L) 5587f. (B) Jan. 20, 1929. 
(NP) May 25. 1929. 

•GODLESS GIRL, THE (D-TME): Lina BasQuette, Marie 
Prevost, George Duryea, Noah Beery, Eddie QulUan, Mary 
Jane Irving, Julia Faye, Viola Louie, Emily Barrye, Clar- 
ence Burton, Dick Alexander, Kate Price, Hedwig Belchei. 
(L) Talking. !)32St; silent, 9ulUf. (U) Mar, 31. 1929. 
(NP) June 1. 

♦GRAND PARADE. THE (MC): (B) .Tan. 11. 1930. 

•GREENWICH VILLAGE FOLLIES (MC): (R) Feb. 27, 1930. 

•HAWK OF THE HILLS (W): Ailene Ray. Robert Chandler. 
Jack Ganshorn. Frank Lackteen, Paul Panzer, Wally Oct- 
tel, Harry Semels, Walter MUier, Jack Pratt, Parky Jones, 
Frederick Dana. John T. Prince, Chief White Horse. 
George Magrill, Evangeline Russell, Chief Yowlache. (L) 
4840f. (R) Mar. 17. 1929. (NP) Mar. 30, 1929. 

♦HER PRIVATE AFFAIR (D AT): Ann Harding. Han-y 
Bannister. Oct. 5, 1929. (NP) Oct. 5. (TOS) Nov. 9, 

•HIGH VOLTAGE (D AT): William Boyd. Owen Moore, 
Carol Lombard, Diane Ellis. BiUy Bevan. PlilUlps SmaUey. 
(L) 5743f. (NP) June 29. 

•HIS FIRST COMMAND (D-AT): WUliam Boyd. (R) Dec. 
28 1929. 

♦HOT AND BOTHERED (CD-AT): Eddie QuiUan. (R) 
June 28. 1030. 

•KING OF KINGS (D-ME): H. B. Warner. Jactiuellne 
Logan. Dorothy Cummings, Ernest Torrence, Joseph SchUd- 
kraut, Robert Edeson, Sidney D'Albrook, Rudolph Schild- 
kraut, Sam DeGrasse, Victor Varconi, William Boyd, Matt 
Moore, JiUia Faye. Kenneth Thomson, Alan Brooks. (L) 
13,500f. (B) Sept. 30. 1928. (TOS) Mar. 10. 1928. 

♦LEATHERNECK, THE (D-TME): WiUiam Boyd. Alan 
Hale, Robert Armstrong, Fred Kohler. Diane Ellis, James 
Aldiue, Paul Wiegel, JiUes Cowles, Wade Boteler, Fhilo 
McCuUough, Joe Girard, MitcheU Lewis. (L) 6898f. (R) 
Feb. 24. 1929. (NP) Apr. 20, 1929. (TOS) June 1. 

♦LUCKY IN LOVE (D AT): Morton Downey, Betty Daw- 
ford, Colin Keith-Johnson, HalUweU Hobbs, J. M. Kerri- 
gan, Richard Tabor, Edward O'Cormor, Mary Murray. 
Mackenzie Ward. Louis Sorin, Sonia Karlov, TyrreU Davis, 
Elizabeth Murray, (L) 6870f. (H) Aug. 17, 1929. (NP) 
July 27. 

•MARKED MONEY (D) : Coghlan. (L) 5506f. (E) Nov. 
4, 1928. 

•MANMADE WOMEN (D) : Leatrice Joy. (L) 5762f. (R) 
Sept. 9. 1928. 

•MOTHER'S BOY (D-AT): Morton Downey. Beryl Mer- 
cer. John T. Doyle, Brian Donlevy, Helen Chandler. Osgood 
Perkins, Lorin Baker, Barbara Bennett, Jennie Moskowitz, 
Jacob Frank, Louis Sorin, Robert Glecker, Tyrrell Davis. 
Allan Vincent, Leslie Stowe. (L) 7423f. (NP) Apr. 6, 
1929 

•NED McCOBB'S DAUGHTER (D-TME): Irene Rich. Theo- 
dore Roberts, Robert Armstrong. George Barraud, Edward 
Hearn, Carol Lombard, Louis Natheaui. (L) 6070f. (E) 
Dec. 2, 1928. 

•NEGLIGEE (D-AT): Ina Claire. (E) March 15. 1930. 

•NOISY NEIGHBORS (CD-TME): Eddie Quillan. Alberta 
Vaughn. QiiiUan FamUy. Theodore Rol)erts, Ray Hallor, 
RusseU Simpson, Robert Perry, Mike Donlin, Billy Gil- 
bert. (L) 5737f. (R) Jan. 27, 1929. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 

♦OFFICER O'BRIEN (D AT) : WilUam Boyd. (R) March 
1. 1930. 

•OFFICE SCANDAL (D-TME): PhyUis Haver. Leslie Fen- 
ton. Raymond Hatton, Margaret Livingston, Jimmy Adams, 
Jimmy Aldine. (L) 6511f. (R) Mar. 3. 1929. (NP) 
May 25. 1929. (TOS) .Tuly 27. 

♦OH, YEAH (D-AT): Robert Armstrong, James Gleason. 
Zasu Pitts. Patricia Caron. (R) Oct. 5, 1929. (NP) 
Oct. 19. (TOS) Oct. 26. 

♦PARIS BOUND (D-AT); Ann Harding. Frederic March. 
George Irving. Leslie Fenton, Hallam Cooley, Juliette 
Crosby, Charlotte Walker, Carmellta Geraghty, Ilka Chase. 
(L) Talking, 6684f. (R) Aug. 3, 1929. (NP) July 20. 
(TOS) Aug. 10. 

♦PLAY BOY (CD-AT): Eddie Quillan. (R) Feb. 2. 1930. 

♦PAINTED DESERT (D-AT): WiUiam Boyd. (R) Jan. 11. 
1930. 

•PARACHUTE (D-AT): Robert Armstrong, Carol Lombard. 

(R) March 22, 1930. 
•RACKETEER (D-AT): Robert Armstrong. Carol Lombard. 

Roland Drew, Jeanette Loff, John Loder, Paul Hurst. (R) 

Oct. 12, 1930. (NP) Nov. 30. 
•RED HOT RHYTHM (CD-AT): Alan Hale. Walter 

O'Keefe. Kathrvn Crawford, Josephine Dunn, Anita Garvin, 

Ilka Chase. (R) Oct. 19, 1929. (NP) Nov. 9. 
•RICH PEOPLE (D-AT): Constance Bennett. Regis Tooney. 

Robert Ames, Mahlon Hamilton. (B) Nov. 9, 1929. (TOS) 

Oct. 19. 

•SAILORS' HOLIDAY {(TD-AT) : AUan Hale, Sally Eiiers, 

George Cooper, Paul Hurst, Mary Carr, Charles Clary. 

(NP) Sept. 21. (E) Sept. 14. (L) 5260f. 
♦SARATOGA (D-AT): Constance Bennett. (R) Mar. 15. 1930. 
♦SHADY LADY, THE (D-TME): PliyUis Haver, Robert 

Armstrong, Louis Wolheim, Russell Gleason, (L) TalMng. 

6132f: silent, 5808f. (R) Jan. 20, 1929. (NP) June 1. 
♦SHOW FOLKS (CD-TME): Eddie Quillan. (L) 6581f. (E) 

Oct. 21. 1928. 

♦SIN TOWN (CD): Elinor Fair. Ivan LebedeiT. Hugh AUan. 
Jack Oakie. (L) 4554f. (E) Jan. 20, 1929. (NP) June 1. 

♦SOPHOMORE, THE (CD-AT): Eddie QuiUan. Sally O'NeU. 
Stanley Smith, Jeanette Loff, Russell Gleason, Sarah Pad- 
den, Brooks Benedict, Spec O'DonneU. (L) Talking. 6526f. 
(R) Aug. 24. 1929. (TOS) Aug. 24. 

♦SPIELER. THE (D-TME): Alan Hale. Renee Adoree. (L) 
5816f. (E) Dec. 30. 1928. (TOS) Mar. 9, 1929. 

•SQUARE SHOULDERS (Mel-TMEO : Louis Wolheim. .Tunior 
Coghlan, PhiUppe De Lacey, Anita Louise, Montague 
Shaw, .Tohnny Morris, Kewpie Morris, Clarence Geldert. 
(L) 5477r. (R) Mar. 31. 1929. (NP) Mar. 30, 1929. 

•STRANGE CARGO (D-AT): Lee Patrick. June Nash. 
George Barraud, Kyrle Bellew. Russell Gleason, Prank 
Reicher, Claude King, Ned Sparks, Josephine Brown, 
Charles Hamilton, Andre Beranger, Otto Matieson. (L) 
Talking, 7099f: silent, 6134f, (E) Mar. 31. 1929. (NP) 
June 1. 

♦THIS THING CALLED LOVE (D-AT): Constance Bennett. 
Edmund Ijowe, Eoscoe Karns. Zasu Pitts. Carmellta 
Geraghty. John Ronhe. Stuart Erwin, Ruth Taylor. Wilson 
BenRe, Adele. (NP) Dec. 14. 

•TREASURE GIRL (MC) : (E) Nov. 23. 1929. 

♦UP AND AT 'EM (CD-AT): Alan Hale. Eddie QuiUan. 
(R) Feb. 8. 1930. 

♦WAR AND WOMEN (D-AT): William Boyd. Ann Hard- 
ing. Robert Armstrong. (E) Dec. 1. 1929. 

•WOMAN AFRAID. A (D AT) : (E) Feb. 1, 1930. 



Short, Art Rowland. (L) 5261f. (R) Jan. 1, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16, 1<J29. 

•BROTHERS (D): Bedford. Keefo. (L) G092f. (11) Feb. 
15. 1929. 

'DEVIL'S CHAPLAIN, THE (D): C. Keefc, Virginia Brown 

Falre. (L) 5451f. (R) Mar. 15. 1929. 
•HANDCUFFED (MD-AT) : Virginia Brown Faire. Brod- 

erlck O'Farrell, Frank Clarke, Charles West. (NP) Sept. 7. 
•ISLE OF LOST MEN, THE (D) : Santsclii, Connor. (L) 

5800f. (R) Octoljcr, 1928. 
•SHANGHAI ROSE: Irene Rich. (L) GD39f. (R) Mar. 1, 

1929. (NP) May 18. 
♦SHIPS OF THE NIGHT (M) : Jacqueline Logan, Sojin, 

Jack Mower, Andy Clyde, Arthur Rankin, Glen Cavender, 

Thomas A. Curran, Frank Lannlng. J. P. McGowan, Frank 

Moran. (L) 5U40f. (R) Dec, 1928. (NP) Mar. 23, 1929, 
•SOME MOTHER'S BOY (D): Mary Carr, Jason Kobaids, 

.fobyna Ralston, M. A. Dickinson, Henry Barrows, (L) 

6001f. (11) Feb. 15, 1929. 
PAINTED FACES (D AT): .Toe E. Brown. Helen Foster, 

Barton Hepburn. Dorotliy Gulliver, Lester Cole, Sojin and 

Jack Iticliard.son. (NP) Dec. 14. 
♦TWO SISTERS (D): Viola Dana, Rex Lease, Claire Du- 

Brey, Irving Bacon, Boris Karloff, Tom Llngham, Thomas 

A. Cunan, Adalyn Asbury. (L) 5161f. (R) Apr. 1, 1929. 
(NP) May 25. 1929. 
♦WHEN DREAMS COME TRUE (D) : Hclene Costello. Eex 

Lease, Claire McDoweU, Ernest HiUiard, Enmiett King, 

George Periolat, Danny Hoy, Buddy Brovra, Ranger, Rags. 

(L) G242f, (R) Jan. 15, 1929. (NP) Feb. 16, 1929, 



RKO 



Rayart 



♦ANNE AGAINST WORLD (D) : Shirley Mason. Jack Mower, 
,Tames Bradbury, Jr.. Isabel Keith. Thomas A. Curran, 
Henry Roquemore, Belle Stoddard. Bill Franey. (L) 5732f. 
(R) Apr. 15. 1929. (NP) June 29. 

♦BLACK PEARL, THE (My-ME) : Lila Lee, Ray Hallor, 
Carlton Stockdale, Thomas Curran, George French, Howard 
Lorenz, Sybil Grove, Baldy Belmont, Adele Watson, Lew 



♦AIR LEGION, THE (D) : Ben Lyon. Antonio Moreno, 
Martha Sleeper, John Gough, Colin Chase, (L) 6361f. 
(R) Jan. 6, 1929. (NP) Jan. 12, 1929. 

♦AMAZING VAGABOND. THE (M) : Bob Steele. Tom Ling- 
ham, Jay Morley, Perry Murdock, Lafe McKee, Thelma 
Daniels, (L) 5081f. (E) Apr. 7, 1929. (NP) Apr. 8. 
1929. 

•BIG DIAMOND ROBBERY, THE (W) : Tom Mix. (L) 

6114f. (R) May 13. 1929. 
♦BLOlCKAiDE (Dl : Anna Q. Nilsson. McDonald. (L) 6409f. 

(R) Jan. 30. 1929. 
♦COME AND GET IT (W) : Bob Steele. Jimmy Quinn, .lay 

Morley, Betty Welsh, James B. Leong, WiUiam Welsh, 

Marian Sais. (R) Feb. 3. (L) 5254f. 
•DANCE HALL (D-AT): Olive Borden. Alice Lake and 

others. Serial No. 0205. (E) December 22, 1929, 
♦DELIGHTFUL ROGUE, THE (D-AT): Rod La Eocque, 

Bebe Daniels. (R) Sept. 22, 1929. Serial No. 0203, 6532f. 
•DRIFTER, THE (W): Tom Mix. Dorothy Dwan. Barney 
Furey, Al Smith, Ernest Wilson, Frank Austin, Joe Eick- 

son, Wynn Mace. (E) Mar. 18. (L) 5896f. 
•FIRE WALKER (D-AT): Unnamed cast. (E) November 

24. 1929. Serial No. 0507. 
•FRECKLED RASCAL (W) : Buzz Barton. Milburn Morante, 

Tom Langham, Lotus Thompson, Pat O'Brien, BUI Faton. 

(E) Mar. 31. (L) 4884f. 
•FURY OF THE WILD (D) : Ranger. Barbara Worth, Robert 

Homans, Pat O'Brien, Al Smith. (E) Jan. 6. (L) 4899f, 
•GUN LAW (W): Tom Tyler, Barney Furey, Ethlyne Clair, 

Frankie Darro, Lew Meehan, Tom Brooker, Harry Woods. 

(E) Mar. 3. (L) 4688f. 
♦HALF MARRIAGE (D-AT): Olive Borden. Morgan Parley 

Ann Greenway, Sally Blaine, Ken Murray, Anderson Law- 

lor, Hedda Hopper, Kichard Tucker. (L) Tallcing, B481f. 

(E) Oct. 13. 1929. 
♦HARDBOILED (D): Sally O'Neil, Donald Eeed, Lilyan 

Tashman. Bob Sinclair, Ole M. Ness. Tom O'Grady, 

Alphonz Ethier. (B) Feb. 3. (L) 5940f. 
HIT THE DECK (MC) : Polly WaUter. JacMe Oakie and 

others. (R) December 15. 1929. 
HUNTED (D-AT): Unnamed cast. (E) December 29. 1929, 

Serial No. 0501. 
♦JAZZ AGE (D-TME): Douglas Fairbanks. Jr.. Marceline 

Day, Henry B. Walthall, Myrtle Stedman, E. J. Eatclifte, 

Gertrude Messinger, Joel McCrea, WiUiam Bechtal, lone 

Holmes and Ed Dearlng. (E) Feb. 10. (L) 6245f. 
♦IDAHO RED (W-ME): Frankie Darro, Tom Tyler. Patrica 

Caron, Lew Meehan, Barney Furey. (E) Apr. 21. (L) 

Sound, 4783f: silent, 47G9f. With sound effects. 
♦JAZZ HEAVEN (D-AT): Sally O'NeU and others. Serial 

No. 0509. (E) November 3. 1929. (L) 6372f. 
•LAUGHING AT DEATH (D) : Bob Steele. Natalie .Toyce, 

Captain Vic, Kai Schmidt, Ethan Laidlaw, Armand TrUior, 

Hector V. Sarno. (R) June 2. (L) 5500f. 
♦LITTLE SAVAGE (W) : Buzz Barton. Milburn Morante. 

Willard Boelner. Patrica Palmer, Sam Nelson, Ethan 

Laidlaw. (R) May 19. (L) 4781f. 
♦LOVE IN THE DESERT (D-TME): Olive Borden. Hugh 

Trevor, Noah Beery, Frank Leigh, WilUam Tooker, Ida 

Darling, Alan Eoscoe, Fatty Carr, Charles Brinley, Pearl 

Varnell. Gordon Magee. (E) March 17. (L) Sound, 5365f: 

silent, 6365f. 

♦LOVE COMES ALONG (DAT): Bebe Daniels starred. 

Forthcoming 1930 release. 
♦NIGHT PARADE (D-AT): Hugh Trevor and others. Serial 

No. 0204. (R) Oct. 27. (L) G671f. 
♦ONE MAN DOG (W) : Ranger. Sam Nelson. Edward Hearn. 

Virginia Bradford, William Patton, Henry O'Connor, Art 

Bobbins. (R) March 3. (L) 4481f. 
♦OUTLAW (W): Tom Mix. Sally Blane. Prank M. Clarke, 

Al Smith, Ethan Laidlaw. Al Ferguson, Barney Furey. 

(R) .Tan. 21. (L) G057f. 
♦OUT TO KILL (D-TME): Joseph Schildkraut starred. Feb. 

23, 1930. 

♦PRIDE OF PAWNEE (W) : Tom Tyler. Franlrie Darro, 
Ethlyne Clair, Barney Furey, Jack HllUard, Lew Meehan, 
Jimmy Casev. (L) 4750f, (E) June 9, 1929. (NP) 

.Tune 22. 

•RED SWORD. THE (D) : Marian Nixon, William Collier, 
Jr., Carmel Myers, AUan Eoscoe, (L) 6243f. (E) Feb. 
17 1929. 

RIo' RITA (MC): Bebe Daniels, .Tohn Boles. Don Al- 
vardo, Dorothy Lee, Bert Wheeler, Robert Woolsey, Georges 
Benevant. Helen Kaiser, Tiny Sandford, Nick de Ruiz, 
Sam Nelson, Fred Burns, Eva Eosita and Sam Blulm, 
Release Sept. 15. (TOS) Nov. 2. Length 15.044. 

♦SEVEN KEYS TO BALDPATE (D AT) : Richard Dix and 
Miriam Seegar. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

♦SIDE STREET (D-AT): Tom. Matt and Owen Moore. 
Kathrvn Perry, Emma Durm, Fraiik Sheridan. (L) Talk- 
ing 6465f. (R) Sept. 8, 1929. Serial No. 0202. 

♦STREET GIRL (CD-AT): Jack Oalde. Neb Sparks. .Tohn 
Harron, Joseph Cawthom, Betty Compson. (L) Talking, 
8188f. (E) Aug. 11, 1929, (NP) Sept, 28. (TOS) 
Sept. 21. 

♦SYNCOPATION (D-AT): Fred Waring and Band. Barbara 
Bennett, Bobby Watson. Ian Hunter. Morton Downey, Os- 
good Perkins, Mackenzie Ward, Verree Teasdale. Dorothy 
T^e. (L) 784Sf. 

♦TANNED LEGS (D-AT): .Tune Clyde. Arthur Lake. Sally 
Blane, Allen Kearns, NeUa Walker, Albert Gran, Ed- 
mund Burns. Dorothy Bevier, Ann Pennington, Lincoln 
Stedman, Lloyd Hamilton. (E) Nov. 10. (L) 6377f. 
(NP) Nov. 30. 

♦VAGABOND LOVER (D AT): Rudy Vallee. Sally Blane 
and others. (B) November 24. 1929. Serial No. 0105. 

♦VERY IDEA, THE (D-AT): Prank Craven, Hugh Trevor, 
Theodore von Bltz, Olive TeU, Doris Eaton, Adele Watson, 
Oeaime de Bard, AUen Kearng, Sally Blane. (L) Talk- 
ing, 6139f. (R) Sept. 15. 1929. Serial No. 0303. 



Tiffany 



'BROADWAY FEVER (CD): Sally O'NeU, Roland Drew, 
Corliss Palmer. (R) Jan. 1. (L) 5412f. 



58 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



•LUCKY BOY (CD-TilE): George Jessel. Margaret Quimby, 
Kosa Hosanora, WlUiam Sirauss, Owen Ixa, Itiehara 
iUL-ker, Gayne Whltiuan. Mary JJoran. (11) Keb. 

♦JOURNEY'S END (D-AT) : AU star east. 
*LOST ZEPPELIN, THE (D-TME) : Tiffany air tlirUler. 

wall Conway Tearle, Virginia Valli. Kicardo Cortez, Dulie 
....iliii^' K^itliryn MeGuire and Winter Hall, (Nl-*) Dec. 21 

MIDSTREAM (D-TME) : Claire Windsor, Montague Love, 

l^arry Kent. Helen Jerome JSddy. Louis Alvarez. Leslie 

Brlgham, Genevieve Shrader. (L) 7353f. (Ml") Oct. 12. 
*MISTER ANTONIO (D-AT): Leo Carrillo, Virginia Valli, 

Jranlt Keleher, Jiugenle Besserer. Franklin Lewis. Gareth 

Hughes. (MP) October 1!). 
*MY LADY'S PAST (D-TME) : Belle Bennett, Joe E. Brown, 

Alma Bennett, Kussell Simpson, Joan Standing, Blllie 

Bennett. (Wl-) June 15. (L) Talking. 7»48f. 
•NEW ORLEANS (D-TME): William Collier, Jr., Ricardo 

Cortez, Alma Bennett. (L) 67(;5f. (H) Aug. 1, 1929. 

(MP) Oct. 12. 

•TROUPERS THREE (D-AT): Bex Lease. Dorothy Gulliver 
and others. 

•TWO MEN AND A MAID (D-TME): William Collier. Jr.. 
Alma Bennett. Eddie Gribbon, George E. Stone. (L) 
Talking, 6423f, (II) Aug. 1, 1929. (NP) Oct. 12. 

•WOMAN TO WOMAN (D-AT): Betty Compson, George 
Barraud. Juliette Compton. Margaret Chambers. Reginald 
Sharland. Georgie Billings. Winter Hall. (TOS) Nov 23 

•WRECKER. THE (D-TME): Special cast. (L) Sound. 
6520f. No sUent print. 



(L) 62G8f. 



(NP) 



United Artists 



♦ALIBI (Mel- AT): Chester Morris, Pat O'Malley Ham- 
fctubhs. Mae Busch, Eleanor Griffith. Irma Harrison. 
Regis Toomey, Al Hill. James Bradbury. Jr.. Elmer Bal- 
lard, Kerman Cripps. Purnell B. Pratt, DeWitt Jennings. 

Brady. (L) Talking, 1867f. (R) Apr. 20, 1929. 
(NP) June 1. (TOS) Sept. 21. 
•BE YOURSELF (CD-AT) : Fannie Brice starred. Forth- 
coming release. 

•BULLDOG DRUMMOND (DAT): Ronald Colman. Joan 
Bennett, Lilyan Tashman, Montague Love, Lawrence Grant 
Wilson Benge, Claud AUister. Adolph Millar, Charles' 
Sellon, Tutsu Komal. (L) Talldng, S37Gf. (R) Aug. 3. 
( TOS ) Oct. 19. 

♦COQUETTE (D-AT): Mary PicMord. John Mack Brown, 
Matt Moore, John Sainpolis, William Janney, Henry 
Ivolker, George Irving. Louise Beavers. (L) Silent, 6s931'. 
(R) Apr. 12, 1929. (NP) June 1. 
•CONDEMNED (D-AT): Ronald Colman starred. (R) De- 
cember 7. 1929. 

•ETERNAL LOVE (D-ME) : John Barrvmore. Camilla Horn 
Victor Varconi. Hobart Bosworth, Bodil Rosing, Mona Rico 
Evelyn Selbie. (R) May 11, 1929. (L) 6948f; silent. 
631Sf. (NP) June 15. (TOS) June 1. , 

•EVANGELINE (D-ME): Dolores Del Rio, Roland Drew, 
Alec B. Francis, John Holland, James Marcus, Paul 
McAllister, Lawrence Grant. Bobby Mack, George Marion. 
(L) 82G8f. (NP) June 1. (R) Aug. 24. (TOS) Nov. 9. 

•IRON MASK, THE (D-TME); Douglas Fairbanks. Belle 
Bennett, Marguerite de la Motte, Dorothy Eevier, Vera 
Lewis, Rolfe Sedan, William Bakewell, Gordon Thorpe, 
Nigel de Brulier, Ulrich Haupt, Lon Poff, Charles Stevens, 
Henry Otto, Leon Barry, Standley J. Sandford, Gino Cor- 
rado. (L) Talking. 885of; silent. 8G59f. (R) Mar. 9. 
1920. (NT) June 15. 

•LADY OF THE PAVEMENTS (D-TilE) : Lupe Velez, Wil- 
liam Boyd, Jetta Goudal, George Fawcett, Albert Conti, 
H(;nry Armetta. (R) Feb. IG. (L) Sound, 8329f; silent, 

•LOCKED DOOR, THE (D AT) : Stanwyck, Rod La Rocque, 
William Boyd, Betty Bronson. (E) November 16. (L) 

6S44f. 

♦LUMMOX (D-AT): Winifred Westover, Ben Lyon, Wil- 
liam Collier, Jr. 

•NEW YORK NIGHTS (D-AT): Norma Talmadge starred. 
(R) December 28. 

•PUTTING ON THE RITZ (D-AT); Harry Richman, Joan 
Bennett. James Gleason. Lilvan Tashman. 

•RESCUE. THE (D-ME): Ronald Colman. Lily Damita, 
Alfred Hickman. Theodore von Eltz. John Davidson. Phillip 
Strande, Bernard Siegel, Sojin, Harry Cording, Laska 
Winters, Duke Kahanamoku, Louis Morrison. George Rigas. 
Christopher Martin. (L) Musical. 708nf; silent. 7910f. 
(R) Jan. 12. 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) Jan. 19. 

•SHE GOES TO WAR (D-TME): Eleanor Boaidman. ,Tohn 
Holland, Edmund Burns, Alma Rubens, Al St. John, Glen 
Waters, Margaret Seddon, Tola D'Avril, Evelvn HaU, (L) 
8864f. (R) July 13, 1929. (NP) June 1. CTOS) Aug. 10. 

•TAMING OF THE SHREW. THE (DAT) ; M.irv Pickford. 
Douglas FairbanlLS. (R) October 26. (L) 6,116 

♦THREE LIVE GHOSTS (D-AT): Allister McNaughton, 
Montgomery. Bennett. (R) Sept. 15. (L) 7.486. 

•THIS IS HEAVEN (D-TME); Vilma Banky. .Tames Hall. 
Fritzie Rldgway. Lucien Littlefield, Richard Tucker. (L) 
7n48f. (R) June 22, 1929. (NP) June 1. (TOS) July 20. 

♦THREE PASSIONS, THE (D-ME); Alice Terry. Ivan 
Petrovitch, Shayle Gardner, Leslie Faber, Andrew Engel- 
man, Claire Eames. (L) Talking, 6646f; silent, 7576f. 
(R) June 1, 1929. 

♦TRESPASSER. THE (D-AT): Gloria Swanson. Kav Ham- 
mond, William Holden. Robert Ames, Henry Walthall, 
Pnrnell Pratt, Wally Albright. (R) October 5. (L) 8,223. 
(TOS) Nov. 16. 

♦VENUS (D-ME): Constance Talmadge. Andre Roanne, 
Jean Murat, Max Maxudian, Baron Fils and Jean Mer- 
canton. (L) Sound 6882f. (NP) June 1. (B) Oct. 12. 



Universal 



ACE RIDER (W): Hoot Gibson. Eugenia Gilbert, Harry 
Tod, Joseph Girard. Monty Montague, John Oscar, Jim 
Farley, Pete Morrison and Joe Bonomo. 

(NP) Dec. 21. 

♦BARNUM WAS RIGHT (CD-AT); Glenn Tryon, Merna 
Kennedy. Otis Harlan. Basil Radford. Clarence Burton. 
Lew Kelly. Isabelle Keith. Gertrude Sutton. (L) Silent 
4.477. Sound 5,140. (NP) November 9 
•BEAUTY AND BULLETS (W) ; Ted Wells, Duane Thomp- 
son. Jack Kenney. Wilbur Mack. (L) 479f. 
♦BODY PUNCH, THE (D): Jack Dougbertv, Virginia Brown 
Kotsonaros, Wilbur Made. Monte Montague. 
(L) 478Gf. (R) July 14, 1929. (NP) July 27. 
•BORDER WILDCAT, THE (W); Ted Wells, ICathryn Mc- 

Guire. (R) Mav 12. (L) 4259f 
♦BORN TO THE SADDLE (W) ; Ted Wells, Duane Thomp- 
f?"^.-^^'' White. Merrill McCormick, Bryon Douglas, Nelson 
McDowell. (R) Mar. 10. (L) 4126f 
•BROADWAY (D-AT); .Glen Tryon. Merna Kennedy Evelyn 
Brent, Thomas Jackson. Robert Ellis. Otis Harlan Paul 
Porcasi, Marion Lord, Fritz Field, Leslie Fentou Arthur 
Housman, George Davis, Betty Francisco, Edvthe Flynn, 
frj2J'|'?<^L°"'l'^''- K^by McCoy. (L) 9330f. (li) Sept. 15. 

( ivol iNOV, lb. 

♦BURNING THE WIND (W) : Hoot Gibson. Cesswe Gravine 
Virginia Brown Falre. Boris Karloff, Robert Holmes Re- 
leased Feb. 10. (L) 5202f. (NP) Jan. 12 

CHARLATAN. THE (D-TME); Holmes Herbert, Rockcliffe 

5'972r'so™d\"0Cf''"'"'''°°- 
•CLEAR THE DECKS (CD-TME) : Reginald Denny. Olive 

Hasbrouck. Otis Harlan, Colette Merton, Lucien Littlefleld 

Brooks Benedict, Robert Anderson, Elinor Leslie (R) 

Mar. 3. (L) Sound. 5792f. Silent, 5740f. 
•COHENS AND KELLYS IN ATLANTIC CITY (CD-TME)- 

George Sidney. Mack Swain, Vera Gordon, Kate Price 



Ctirnelius Keefe, Nora Lane. Virginia Sales, Tom Kennedy. 
.^UV, ^^l- i^A.. Sound. 740UI. Silent, 7752f. 

n . Fh*^^ o°,y^ (D-AT): George Lewis. Eddie Phillips, 
Dorothy Gulliver, ChurchlU Itoss. Hayden Stevenaon, 
S^gj>erJ3etcheU. (L) Talking 6846f. (R) July 7. 1929. 

*'^S'^^ ACROSS (M-TME): Lena Basquette. Reed Howes. 
Flora Finch, Craufurd Kent, Gustav von Seyffertitz, Clarissa 
Selwynne. (B) June 30. 1929. (NP) July 27. (L) Talk- 
ing, 53301; silent, 5593f. 

"•^P-K"!"^' '^ATS (W): Hoot Gibson and others. 

(R) Deo. 15. 
•DEVIL'S PIT (D): With a foreign cast. 

(NP) Nov. 2. (R) Dec. 8. 
♦DRAKE CASE, THE (Mel-AT) : Gladys BrockweU. 

Sept. 28. (TOS) Sept. 21. (R) Sept. 1. 
♦EMBARRASSING MOMENTS (CD-AT): Reginald Denny. 
Mfirna Keimedy. Otis Harlan, William Austin, Virginia 
Sale, Greta Grandstedt, Mary Foy. (NP) Oct. 25. (L) 
5230f. (R) Jan. 5, 1930. 
•EYES OF THE UNDERWORLD (W) : BiU Cody. Sally 

Blane. (R) Apr. 28. (L) 4208f. 
♦FIGHTING LEGION (W-TME) : Ken Maynard, Dorothy 

Dwan and others. 1930 release. 
♦GIRL ON THE BARGE (D-TME): Jean Hersholt, Sally 
O'Neil, Malcolm McGregor, Morris Mcintosh Nancy Kelly, 
George Offerman, Henry West, Bex. (R) Feb. 3. (L) 
Sound. 7510f. Silent. 6908f. 
•GIRL OVERBOARD (D-TME): Mary Philbln, Fred 
Maokaye, Otis Harlan. Edmund Breese, Francis McDonald. 
(L) Talking, 7391f; silent. 7531f. (R) July 28. 1929. 
(NP) Sept. 21. 

♦GRIT WINS (W): Ted Wells. Kathleen ColUns. Al Fer- 
guson, Buolt Coimers, Nelson McDowell, Edwin Moulton. 
(B) Jan. 27. (L) 4596f. 

♦HARVEST OF HATE (W): Rex, Jack Perrin, Helen Foster. 
Tom London. (L) 47-9f. 

♦HIS LUCKY DAY (CD-TME): Reginald Denny, LoRayne 
Duval, Otis Harlan, Eddie Phillips, Cissie Fitzgerald, 
Harvey Clark, Tom O'Brien. (L) Talking 6713f; silent. 
5603f. (R) June 30. 1929. (NP) June 22. 

♦HOLD YOUR MAN (D-AT): Laura LaPlante. Walter 
Scott. Eugene Borden, Mildred Van Dom. (NP) Oct. 26. 
(L) 5794f. 

•HOOFBEATS OF VENGEANCE (W) : Rex, Jack Perrin, 
Helen Foster. Al Ferguson. Starlight. (R) June 16. (L) 
4525f. 

♦IT CAN BE DONE (CD-TME): Glenn Tryon. Sue CaroJ. 
Richard Carlyle. Jack Egan, Tom O'Brien. (R) March 
24. (L) Sound 6560f; silent 6090t. 

♦KID'S CLEVER (CD): Glenn Tryon, Kathryn Crawford, 
Russell Simpson, Lloyd Whitlock, George Chandler, Vir- 
ginia Sales, Joan Standing, Max Asher, Florence Turner. 
Stephin Fetchit. (R) Feb. 17. (L) 5729f. 

♦KING OF JAZZ REVUE (MC) : Paul Whiteman stars. 
1930 release. 

♦KING OF THE CAMPUS (CD-AT): George Lewis, 
Dorothy Gulliver, Eddie Phillips, Hayden Stevenson. 
Churchill Boss, Collette Merton. 

•KING OF THE RODEO (W) : Hoot Gibson, Kathryn Craw- 
tague. Slim Summerville, Charles K. French, Monty Mon- 
tague, Joseph W. Gerard. (B) Jan. 20. (L) 5509f. 

♦LA MARSEILLAISE (D-AT): Laura LaPlante. John Boles 
and others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

♦LARIAT KID, THE (W) : Hoot Gibson, Ann Christy, Cap 
Anderson, Mary Foy, Francis Ford, Walter Brennan, Andy 
Waldron, Bud Osborne, Joe Bennett, Jim Corey. (L) 
5247f. (E) June 23. 1929. (NP) June 15. 

♦LAST PERFORMANCE, THE (D-TME); With Conrad 
Veidt. Mary Philbln, Leslie Fenton. Fred MacKaye, Gustav 
Paros, William H. Turner, Anders Bandolf, Sam DeGrasse 
and George Irving, Length (sound), 5799f; (silent) 5799f. 
(NP) Nov. 16. 

♦LAST WARNING, THE (Mel-TME) : Laura La Plante, 
Montagu Love, John Boles, Boy D'Arcy. Bert Boach, Mar- 
garet Livingston, Mack Swain, Burr Mcintosh, Carry 
Daumery, George SummerviUe, Torben Meyer, D'Arcy Cor- 
rigan. Bud Phelps, Charles French, Fred Kelsey. Tom 
O'Brien, Harry Nothrup. (L) Talking, 798flf; silent, 7731f. 
(B) Jan. 6, 1929. (NP) June 29. (TOS) Jan. 26. 

♦LONG, LONG TRAIL, THE (W) ; Hoot Gibson, Sally Filers. 
Kathryn McGuire. James Mason, Archie Eicks, Walter 
Brennan, Howard Truesdell. (NP) Oct. 26. (L) six reels. 

♦LONESOME (CD-TME); Glenn Tryon. Barbara Kent. (E) 
Jan. 20. (L) Sound 6761f; silent 6142f. 

•MAN, WOMAN AND WIFE (D-ME): Norman Kerry. 
Pauline Starke, Marion Nixon, Kenneth Harlan, Craufurd 
Kent, Byron Douglas. (L) 6589f. (E) Jan. 13, 1929. 
(NP) June 29. 

♦MELODY LANE (D-AT): Eddie Leonard. Josephine Dunn, 
Eose Coe, George Stone, Huntley Gordon. (L) Talking, 
6350f. (E) Julv 21. 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. 

♦MISSISSIPPI GAMBLER (D-AT); Joseph Schildkraut, 
Joan Bennett, Carmelita Geraghty, Alec B. Francis, Otis 
Harlan, Billy Welsh. (NP) Nov. 9. (L) Sound, 5,432. 
Silent, 5,025. (TO'S) Nov. 16. 

♦MODERN LOVE (CD-AT): Charley Chase, Jean Hersholt. 
Kathlyn Crawford. Edward Martindel. (B) July 14. 1929. 
(NP) June 22. (L) Talking. 6501f; silent. 5730f. 

♦ONE HYSTERICAL NIGHT (CD-TME): Beginald Denny. 
Nora Lane, E. J. Eatcliffe, Fritz Field, Slim SummerviUe, 
Jules Cowles, Joyzelle, Walter Brennan, Harry Otto, Mar- 
garet Campbell. (NP) Oct, 26. (L) GlOlf. 

♦PARADE OF THE WEST (W AT); Ken Maynard. Gladys 
McConnell, Otis Harlan, Prank Bice. Bobbie Dunn, Jackie 
Hanlon, Fred Burns, Franlt Taconelll. Stanley Blystone, 
Blue Washington, Tarzan and Bex. (NP) Nov. 23. (B) 
Jan. 19, 1929. 

♦PARADISE AHOY (CD-AT): Glenn Tryon starred. 1930 
release. 

♦PLUNGING HOOFS (W) : .Tack Perrin, Bex, Barbara 

Worth, J. P. McGowan, David Dunbar. (L) Silent, 4344f. 

(B) Apr. 14. (NP) May 18. 
♦POINTS WEST (W): Hoot Gibson. Alberta Vaughn, Frank 

Campeau, Jack Baymond. Martha Franklin, Milt Brown, 

Jim Corey (L) 5491f. (NP) Sept. 28 
♦RED HOT SPEED (CD-TIME); Reginald Denny, Alice Day, 

Charles Byer, Tliomas Ricketts, De Witt Jennings, Fritz! 

Ridgeway, Hector V. Sarno. (L) 6621f. (R) Jan. 27. 

1929 (NP) .Tune 29. 
♦RIDIN' DEMON, THE (W) ; Ted Wells, Kathleen Collins, 

Lucy Beaumont, Otto Bibber. (L) 4380f. (R) Aug, 18. 
1929. (NT) Aug. 3. 
♦RIDIN' KID, THE (W-TME): Hoot Gibson. Forthcoming 

1930 release. 

♦ROARING ADVENTURE, A (W) ; .Tack Hoxie, M^rv Mc- 
AJister, Marin Sals, Francis Ford and the Universal 
Ranch Riders. (NP) Dec. 7. 

•TIP OFF, THE (W): William Cody, George Hackathorne. 
Duane Thompson, L. .T. O'Connor, .Tack Singleton Robert 
Bolder, Monte Montague, Walter Shumway (L) 4109f. 
(R) .Tune 2, 1920. (NP) July 13. 

•SCANDAL (D-TME): Laura LaPlante. John Boles. ,Tane 
Winton, Huntley Gordon, Nancy Dover, Eddie Phillips, 
Julia Swayne Gordon. (E) May 4. (L) Sound. 6675f: 
silent. 6475f. (TOS) June 13. 

♦SENOR AMERICANO (W-AT) : Ken Maynard. Kathrvn 
Crawford. Gino Corrado, J. P. McGowan, Frank Taconelll, 
Frank Beaie and Tarzan. Footage, Sound, 6,662. Silent, 
5,528. (NP) Nov. 23. 

•SHANGHAI LADY (D) : Mary Nolan. -.Tames Murray, 
VSTieeler Oakman. Anders Randolph, Lydia Teamans Titus, 
Tola d'Avril, Mona Rico, Irma lowae. (NP) Nov 16. 
(TOS) Dee. 7. 

•SHANNONS OF BROADWAY (D-AT): James and Lucile 
Gleason. Charles Grapewin. Mary Philbln. John Breedon., 
Tom Santschi, Harry Tyler, Gladys Crolius. Helen Mehr- 



mann, Robert T. Haines. Slim SummerviUe Tom Tr™ 
•SHOW^BQ^/"fn ?;^f°^°T <NP) N?v™'' 

ISfiJ I^L^o? =Ot£^"itrl^.^\°JSu^SV^^J^^; 

\triTj72Ttu^,:'lZ,o\''' MoD-onald.''Ne^l7Edwi^! 
®'y„nn^," ?.^^''^x,°"T (CD-AT): Glenn Tryon Mema 

mm i- Eadcliffe. Burr Mcintosh, Lloyd ViitloT 

Wmiam Welsh. Katherine Kerrigan. Frc^derick iTe Jack 

•SMILING TERROR, THE (W): Ted Wells Dereivs Perdue 
^NF^'^^Tis""' «25f.'^'(B') Jun?30 1929.' 

''''"''^^.^'^""''■^■''"ERS (D-TME): Charles Bickford Rav- 
monil Hatton, Fred Kohler. Fritzie Ridgeway 

nomfHT Walter JaS. * 

ION GHT AT TWELVE D AT) : Madge Bellamy Georea 

&n"°&r-^;,,r-C-?o^^^^^^^^ 

,^0"nd 6335f; silent, 5679T (NP) Sept 29 (B °Senf 
Ta^^N^sl^a"!"' \"„^ (W): Hoo? Gibson. Euthfde?- 

Isilt" (^-j fJLV%f: 1^^!° .^i^r^iuiy^!?^" 
Warner Bros. 

'"rd'ture^^elels"^ = ^^^^"^ Norton starred. 

"''warier^ gfadvs Br ^ '^?f^-^^' ' Th°">^^ Meighan. H. B. 

Aug 31. °fif%fo\7^'^'^^- ^''^ Bert Boach. (TOS) 

♦CONQUEST (DAT):' Monte Blue, Lois Wilson TT n 

. r^run^ i^r jan.'^'2 <^)^- 19.^192^9: 

S>fzZ'i-, ^E^dw^rrertiid-e^'' J^ac'kVa?t"^SS^o ^^J" 
S^-(l?{-Sy-!\.^^i;|5-^^ ^"<^'^i| 

r-MNUr BAGGAGE (D-TME); Audrey Ferris Mvrna i^tj 

*S : "Monies. S 

Heni^ B W^thau h^'^'S" Williams, Lionel BelmoFe, 

Ha°,^^v'' 5'^". (D-TIIE): Efn-Tin-''^'i*n.'mvey Lee Lew 
SP¥E^^T^^^ ^A-rthV^S 

^'l^'^e^etease^"'^'^'^ '°"^^'= John Barrymore starred. Fu- 
G(3LD DIGGERS OF BROADWAY (MC) • Nick Lucas Ann 
Pennington, Conrad Tearle, Nancy WelfOTd Win?fe Ti^t 

& ^^^f iS^s; 

^^o?°rlfe!se-^?o^o.'^-^^>= ^"'^ ^^^^ 
•GREYHOUND LIMITED (D-TME'): Monte Blue Edna 

»hi.«r ^3-(Lt=,- gS -sS; 

♦HARDBOILED ROSE (D-TME): Myrna Loy, William Col- 



Silent. 4875f. 

""tSre°rel''a"^^"""^ <^'^-°' ^ With an aU-star cast. Fu- 
•HONKY TONK (CD-AT): Sophie Tucker, Lila Lee Audrey 
Ferris George Duryea, Mahlon Hamilton JotaT'MuiTav 
Sept. iT • 2- '^Osi aZ 31. (NT)" 

*"n?Tt5'^'*'B'^' T"^ (CD-AT): Edward Everett Horton and 
^.^.'■'^''Jf; Pre-release August 10. (L) 7 241f 

THE HEADLINES (D-AT): Gran WUhers Marian 
Nixon. Clyde Cook, Spec O'Donnell and Ss Pre" 
release August 31. (L) 6.427f (TOS) Oct "' 
•IS EVERYBODY HAPPY (D-At) With Ted Lewis and 
band starred. (TOS) Deo 21 

*'feleLe'' ^^'^'^''^ (D-TME); Monte Blue starred. Future 

* M!?rr,h!;°\nhr,'?,"'^M^'= S""^"^ ^^S'''' ^'"'^ WUsou, Edna 
^"("T^y- J?bn Davidson, Tom Dugan and Edward Earle! 

♦ I'l^Vii'^'^-wM'r.JR ^273f; sUent 5G58f. 
♦LITTLE WILDCAT (D-TME); George Fawcett Robert 

^lem^SlGu""''^ '^'^ 5- 'I-* sW.d 6644f! 

*'Vt?n°f^^^y.°'' AVENUE A (D-AT): Dolores Costello. 
§o(?m,x,^'T*''''\v Louise , Dresser. Douglass Gerard. Otto 
Juno 2T 1929. "^^If; 5294f. "S) 

'"HHV'"^ COLLAR (D-TME): RIn-Tin-Tin 

Matty Kemp, Evelyn French, Tommy Dugan Allen PavlS' 
Plulo McCullough, Grover Liggon (R) Feb 9 (iJp) 
March 16. (L) Sound 5561f: silent 4878f ' ' 

M*,"'^T,'^'"^ t'°',™^^'- ^"^ore^ Costello,' George O'Brien 
Noah Beery, Lotilse Fazenda, Guinn Williams, Paul M?: 
Allister, Ande^ Randolf, Nigel de Brulier, Armand Kaliz 
M?8f?snent m2f"" White™) SoCd 

♦MAMM'Y (D-AT): ' Al ,Tolson starred. Future release 
♦MAN, THE (D-AT): John Barrymore starred. Future re- 

♦MY MAN (CD-AT): Fannie Brice, Guinn WilUams, Andre 
de Segurola Ann Brody, Richard Tucker, Billy Sealv 
mP) ^Sne" 29' ^^^^'^ Silent. 613Gf; 

*"^?ora°n^^lXn'°ctr"vU. rifam^'5^?;ok^r ^Sfa^' D^! 

rRrAp?."l^j9T9!'='"iNp')"!Tu»^- 

°Mn)?'v''WDlv"^.^"^"',."*^^'=>,'^"'' Compson. Sam Hardy, 
Molly ODay, Joe E. Brown, Sally O'Neil, Louise Fazenda. 
William Bakewell, Purnell Pratt, Fairbanks twins 
Wheeler Oak-man, Sam Hardy, Thomas Jefferson, Lee 
nZ^' £?'""'£' ^^'■'hir Lake. Josephine Houston. 

Four^ A^'pi',, '^S",, Hoffman, Ethel Walters, Harmount 
TtOS) Aug 17 ' ' 

♦ONE STOLEN NIGHT (D-TME): Betty Bronson, Mitchell 
Trdd'' i""''"; Nina Quartaro. Hanr 

J'f,?'^/; Angelo Eossitto, Jack Santaro, Harry 

fi?e",}r-47l?f^*'(V1"i[||-rch'?^ ^"^^ '''''^ 

*'\1';l?"r>,,^^J^''V?-™^'- Ri"-Tin-TIn. Jobyna Ealston, 
.o^'l,",? ^Chandler. Walter Miller. 1930 release. 

tT';*'"^' , the (D-TME): Pauline Frederick 
starred. Future release. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



39 



CLASSIFIED 
Advertising 

Ten cents per word, payable in advance. Minimum charge, 
$1.00. Copy and checks should be addressed Classified Ad Dept. 
Exhibitors Herald-World, 407 So. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 




The Recognized National Classified Advertising Medium 



Managers' Schools 



WANTED THEATRE EMPLOYEES to learn 
modern theatre management and theatre advertising. 
The Institute's training leads to better positions. 
Write for particulars. Address Theatre Managers 
Institute, 325 Washington St., Elmira, N. Y. 



Equipment for Sale 



BIG BARGAINS in rebuilt Simplex Powers 6-B 
and 6-A motiograph machines, all motor driven, in 
guaranteed condition, as well as used low intensity 
arc reflector lamps with or without machines at 
reasonable prices. Big stock of rebuilt exhaust and 
oscillating fans for AC and DC current. Generators, 
all makes, ticket selling machines, film containers, all 
at bargain prices for immediate shipment. Write for 
bargain list. Address Illinois Theatre Equipment 
Company, 12-14 East Ninth street, Chicago, Illinois. 



THEATRE EQUIPMENT, new and used. Opera 
chairs, projectors, screens, generators, rectifiers, re- 
flecting arc lamps, etc. Write for bargain list and 
catalogue. Address Movie Supply Co., 844 Wabash, 
Chicago. 



FOR SALE — Reflector Arc Lamps and accessories, 
also guaranteed rebuilt Powers 6-A and 6-B and Sim- 
plex Heads. Best prices. Write Joseph Spratler, 
12- 14 E. Ninth street, Chicago, 111. 



Theatres for Sale 



IN COUNTY SEAT town in Kansas. No compe- 
tition, fully equipped, talkies, Simplex machines. Will 
also sell building or lease. Address Box 461, Exhib- 
itors Herald-World, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



COLONIAL THEATRE, Colfax Illinois. On 
route 165. Investigate. Address Mrs. Faye Corpe. 



MOST ATTRACTIVE three hundred seat new 
theatre in Indiana. Drawing population three thou- 
sand. Will sell equipment and lease or all. Ad- 
dress J. H. Meadows, Foseyville, Ind. 



Cameras for Sale 



AKELEY: (Bell-Howell professional). Write for 
booklet. Address Wood, 204 Inland Bank, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 



Position W anted 



PROJECTIONIST— 2 years' experience Simplex 
machines. References. Address Bert Younkin, 
Huron, S. Dak. 



ATTENTION THEATRE OWNERS. Specially 
trained managers, assistant managers, advertising 
men, service men, available for employment at short 
notice. Address Theatre Managers Institute, Elmira, 
N. Y. 



ORGANIST — Married man, 30. Competent, union. 
Address Box 455, Exhibitors Herald-World, 407 S. 
Dearborn St., Chicago, 111 



SOUND PROJECTIONIST— Western Electric card. 
Simplex machines. References. Address Bert Youn- 
kin, 679 Fourth, Huron, S. D. 



CHICAGO YOUNG MA"N, age 25, wishes oppor- 
tunity ot learn show business. Five years' amusement 
experience. Will consider anything that might lead 
to real future. Address Box 437, Exhibitors Herald- 
World, 407 South Dearborn street, Chicago, Illinois. 



Chairs for Sale 



1,600 HIGH GRADE, spring constructed uphol- 
stered theatre chairs, made by the Heywood-VVake- 
field company. Upholstered in imitation Spanish 
leather, at very reasonable prices. 500 upholstered 
theatre chairs, back and seat covered in broadcloth. 
1,000 upholstered seats covered in Spanish imitation 
leather. Veneered back and squab seats, very reason- 
able. 1,000 heavy 5-ply veneer chairs, 14 in. back. 
1,500 light S-ply veneer chairs at very reasonable 
prices. 300 folding chairs in sections of 2. Also a 
large stock of chair parts to match any style seat. 
In fact, everything for the theatre. We assure you 
great savings. For information, prices and literature 
on our merchandise, write Illinois Theatre Equip- 
ment Company, 12-14 East Ninth street, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



BIG BARGAIN in used Opera chairs, 600 uphol- 
stered, 800 Veneer. Address Movie Supply Co., 
844 Wabash avenue, Chicago, 111. 



2500 USED 3 PLY VENEERED theatre chairs in 
good condition. $1.00 each. Immediate delivery. 
Address Illinois Theatre Equipment Company, 12-14 
East Ninth street, Chicago, 111 



FOR SALE — 1200 plush upholstered theatre chairs 
in good condition. Must be sold at once. Apply 
William J. Dunn, Academy building. Fall River, Mass. 



OPERA CHAIRS, seats and backs for all makes, 
five ply, at prices that save you money. Jobs in new 
and used chairs. Address Redington Company, 
Scranton, Pa. 



Equipment Wanted 



WANT SEVERAL MERCURY RECTIFIERS, 
good, bad or incomplete, cheap. Address Preddey, 
188 Golden Gate avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 



WANTED — Peerless or Simplex projectors, also 
Strong reflector arc lamps. State price, condition 
and number of machines. Will pay cash, or one 
third down and balance C.O.D. Address Box 337 
Exhibitors Herald- World, 407 S. Dearborn street, 
Chicago, 111. 



HIGHEST PRICES paid for used opera chairs, 
projection machines, etc. Address Movie Supply Co., 
844 Wabash, Chicago. 



Stationery 



"NEARGRAVURE" ("Neargravurembosso" plate- 
less embossing) processes. Special Neargravure 2S0 
envelopes, 500 814x71/," letterheads $3.33, or SyixW 
$4.44, postpaid. Sollidays, EXH-124, Knox, Indiana. 



Projector Repairing 



SKILLED MECHANICS, specialized tools, and a 
shop equipped for but one purpose can offer you 
nothing but the best in repair work. That is what I 
have, and I can offer you the best in the overhauling 
of your motion picture machinery equipment. One 
of the oldest repair men in the territory, and serving 
some of the largest houses. Relief equipment fur- 
nished free. For results bring vour work to Joseph 
Spratler, 12-14 E. Ninth St., Chicago, 111. 



BEST SHOP for repairing projection machines. 
Prompt service, reasonable prices. Address MoTie 
Supply Co., 844 Wabash, Chicago. 



Help Wanted 



A POSTER ARTIST FOR CLASS A THEATRE. 
State salary, experience and give references in first 
wire or letter. Address Box 460, Exhibitors Herald- 
World, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



Miscellaneous 



DO YOU WANT Sunday Movies? We can help 
you get them. Campaigners, attorneys and publicity 
directors furnished. Address National Association 
Opposed to Blue Laws, Inc., Hamilton Hotel, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



Your Classified Ad Will Do the Work 

Exhibitors Herald- World has helped hundreds of Theatre owners in solving many a problem. The classified advertising 
department has placed organists all over the country, has helped in obtaining equipment, in selling equipment, and in 
solving many another problem that seemed difficult. The rates are but 10c per word payable with order, 10% discount 
if run for 3 insertions. See this week's classified pages. Maybe you are in need of something that is being advertised this 
week. The cost is small, the results are great. 



60 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



THE VOICE OF THE INDUSTRY 

LETTERS FROM READERS 



A Very Good Suggestion 

WELL, THERE ARE TWO THINGS 

that I love, and they are Jenkins' "Colyum" 
and the "Squawker's Column" in the Herald- 
World. Of course, I read the thing from 
cover to cover and since the Herald-World 
is giving us this column I think we ought to 
make use of it. I would say that every ex- 
hibitor should write at least one letter and 
tell the rest of his troubles, also how he is 
overcoming them. 

The biggest problem that I had this year 
was sound. In June, 1928, I took sick with 
spinal meningitis and when the doctors, 
nurses and hospitals finally got through with 
me I was as flat as a pancake financially. I 
was with my back against the wall. The 
towns round me were all putting in sound and 
my patrons were driving away to other towns. 
We we losing business every day. _ 

As necessity is the mother of invention, I 
got busy and started to build my own sound 
advice. After about three weeks work I had 
it done and I put on my first show. We 
played Columbia's "The Donovan Affair" and 
it certainly went over fine. Have been play- 
ing sound ever since and haven't had a single 
slip-up, never made a stop or have had to 
stop and rewind. I built a resynchronizing 
device and it surely works fine. I had a non- 
sync and use the same horns and amplifier. 
The two synchronizer heads cost me about $70. 

We played "Flight" December 15, 16, 17, and 
many told us that they understood every word 
that was spoken. How about the music? Oh 
yes, in "Flight" we had stringed instruments', 
piano and gongs and we handled it very well. 
Here again I made something different. I 
drive my heads by momentum and not by 
solid connection. This takes out all the weave 
and makes the tables run smooth and steady. 
If any of you boys with your backs against 
the wall want to try and build a machine for 
yourself I shall be very glad to help you out 
by telling you how to go at it if you will 
send a stamped envelope for reply. 

Yours for the little fellow that is up against 
it. — O. E. Simon, Rex theatre, Menno, South 
Dakota. 



''King of Them All" 

I WAS VERY GLAD TO SEE MY LITTLE 
article in last week's issue and thank ail for 
their kind cooperation. It will not be long be- 
fore your fine, ever-beaming magazine will be 
the only one of its kind, the king of them ail, 
and the rest of the trade journals will cease, 
because right now they are literally slaves to 
the aforesaid.— J. VICTOR SCHOLEFIELD, 
JR., 6801-03 South Carpenter street, Chicago. 



"Cause and Effect" Column 

MR. RICHARDSON'S ARTICLES ON 
sound are highly interesting but as they 
appear to deal mostly with Movietone system 
and are somewhat too technical for the "tall 
timbers" exhibitors, it seems to me that a 
column of "effects and causes" in regard to 
disc equipment would be of considerable in- 
terest not only to those unfortunates at pres- 
ent wired but particularly to the hundreds 
who will be wiring their houses in the spring. 
We all know that talking pictures bring grief, 
not necessarily financial, to the exhibitor, and 
in order to lessen the grey hairs of those 



about to install I think if we all pooled our 
experiences through the medium of your 
journal, considerable valuable information 
could be made available. 

My experience so far is that most of the 
troubles develop in the pick-ups and I con- 
sider it imperative that a spare pick-up should 
be kept for emergencies. We have saved our 
skins more than once by using our non-sync 
pick-ups on the sync equipment. 

I am listing my "griefs" with the symptoms, 
diagnosis and treatment in order relatively: 

Harsh note and no volume unless volume 
control and fader advanced to highest points. 
Vibrator in pick-up bent probably by letting 
fall with needle still in. Send to factory 
but in emergency can occasionally be ad- 
juster by straightening out vibrator with fine 
screw driver. 

Discordant squawks and disconnected re- 
production. Needle broken in pick-up. Re- 
place needle making sure that all pieces are 
removed. 

Rumble or roar. Vibration in amplifier. 
Pull amplifier switch for a few moments. — 
B. R. Johnson, Orpheum theatre, Kerrobert, 
Sask., Canada. 



It Won't Be Long Now! 

THE WORLD'S SMA.LLEST THEATRE 

is to be equipped with Western Electric 
sound system. 

In order to make extensive improvements, 
my theatre will be closed from January 2 un- 
til January 19. Am reseating with leather 
upholstered chairs, redecorating, two new 
Simplex machines, two new low intensity arc 
lamps and a new motor generator. 

According to all film peddlers, this is the 
ninth wonder of the world. As soon as I am 
opened on talkies, I'll report on every subject 
so the boys in the tank towns like mine will 
know what to do. 

I plan on having the best equipped and cozi- 
est theatre in North Nebraska and if they 
still don't come I will never know the reason, 
because, brother, I'm giving them the works. 

Have a unique advertising and ballyhoo 
campaign that I'm going to work on my open- 
ing night and I'll send you photos and write- 
ups as soon as I possibly can after the open- 
ing. Was the first to install homemade talkies 
in these here sandhills and the first to take 
them out. All towns around me are running 
sound and mv silent business is terrible. But 
it won't be long now. — A. G. Miller, Lyric 
theatre, Atkinson, Neb. 



A Tribute to Carl Laemmle 

I SEE THAT YOU RECENTLY GAVE 
Carl Laemmle a big write-up and he is 
worthy of same. As he came into the game a 
New York crowd tried to put out of business 
all the small theatre ovmers in the United 
States. A man named Gillingham of Grand 
Rapids, Mich., a big theatre owner at that 
time, came to me and said that all theatre 
men would have to pay a tax to run their 
own picture machines. And I said no, I 
wouldn't do it. 

And about that time Carl Laemmle came out 
with a circular letter to all theatres and said, 
"Don't sign any contracts with anyone," and 
that he would make all the pictures that we 
needed at a living price, and he has. I com- 
menced to get my shows from him and have 
been getting from his company ever since, be- 
fore any exchange in Detroit got shows out 



Your New 
Contract 



Official statements from the two na- 
tional exhibitor organizations, and from 
the distributors setting forth their reac- 
tions to the recent conferences held in 
New York for the purpose of re-drafting 
the standard exhibition contract are pub- 
lished on page 20. 



of Grand Rapids, Mich., then out of Detroit. 
I have always had extra good service. 

My first machine was an Edison, then 
Powers and Powers No. 5 then 6 and 6-A. I 
got the best service from them. If I want 
to buy any more, it would be Powers B. 

There is only one oldtimer that I know of 
in the state who is in the game yet and that is 
George Nichols of Grand Rapids, Mich. It 
was we oldtimers that helped Carl Laemmle 
to make good with the help of the boys who 
came into the game later. A lot more could 
be said that helped to make the good good. I 
am in the same location today that I started 
in, only that I have built a new house on the 
same lot. I am going on my sixty-seventh 
year and many years in the show game. If any- 
one has a better record, let him show it. — 
F. N. Harris, The Amuse theatre. Hart, Mich. 



Kaplowitz and Reston 
Form Engraving Concern 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Harry Kaplowitz 
and Henrjr Reston, photo-engraving sales and 
service men, formerly connected with the Key- 
stone Photo-Engraving Co., have combined 
and formed their own company, to be known 
as the City Photo-Engraving Company, with 
oflSces at 250 West S4th St. 

They will specialize in cuts and plates of 
all kinds for screen advertising and publicity. 
Modern equipment has been installed in the 
new plant and Fred Neunzig has been made 
superintendent and manager. They will op- 
erate a day and night service. 



Midland Realty Gets 

Sites for Two Theatres 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
CINCINNATI, Dec. 31.— Midland Realty 
Company, which recently purchased a site for 
an elaborate theatre at Hamilton, Ohio, also 
has acquired a site for a similar house at 
Middletown, Ohio, both houses to be leased 
and operated by Paramount, according to 
reports. 

Paramount is also said to have taken over 
a prominent site for a new house at Columbus. 



14 Winnipeg Operators 
Organize Sound Society 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
WINNIPEG, Dec. 31. — Fourteen projection- 
ists of Winnipeg have organized a local branch 
of the American Projectionists Society for the 
purpose of schooling themselves in the art of 
audien presentation. William Hale has been 
elected president with Joseph Cooper secretary 
and E. W. Ross treasurer. Meetings are being 
held bi-monthly when lectures are featured. 



Motion Picture Workers' 
Union Reelects President 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
SEATTLE, WASH., Dec. 31.— At the 
monthly meeting held December 22, Motion 
Picture Workers' Union reelected Ira Brown 
as president; C. E. Goldthorpe, reelected fi- 
nancial secretary and Fred Tucker, recording 
secretary. 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS. HERALD-WORLD 



01 



WHAT THE PICTURE DID FOR ME 

Verdicts on Films in Language of Exhibitor 



Copyright, 1930 

KEY TO SOUND SYMBOLS: AT (All-Talking) designates pictures in which all speaking to be observed 
in the essential action is recorded, the designation including any musical score which the picture may 
have; TME (Talking-Musical Score-Sound Effects) designates part-talking pictures, the designation in- 
cluding the musical score necessary in such pictures and any sound effects; MC (Musical Comedy) desig- 
nates pictures corresponding to the type of stage production called "musical comedies," being extrava- 
ganzas or revues featuring musical acts and dancing and with all sounds essential to the action, including 
dialog, recorded; O (Operetta) designates pictures corresponding to the light operas of the stage called 
"operettas"; ME (Musical Score, Effects) designates pictures which have a musical score, may have inci- 
dental effects, but which have no scenes with dialog. When no symbols appear directly after the title, 

the picture was run in silent form. 



Columbia 

FALL OF EVE (AT): Special cast— Nice little 
picture with excellent sound (disc). — J. A. Bailey, 
Strand theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — General patron- 
age. 

FALL OF EVE (AT) : Patsy Ruth Miller— De- 
cember 7. A good clean comedy. Ford Sterling is a 
K. O. Give him a chance by himself once, Columbia. 
Seven reels. — Larry Woodin, Arcadia theatre, Wells- 
boro. Pa. — Small town patronage. 

0BJE(3T MATRIMONY: Lois Wilson— Boy, 
go get this one, step on it. If your patrons 
don't like it, you write me telling me I'm a liar. 
I find Columbia has a bunc^h of good pictures, 
cheap in price. If some other companies had 
them they would class them as specials and 
charge accordingly. Six reels. — S. B. Callahan, 
Arrow theatre. Broken Bow, Okla. — General 
patronage. 

COLLEGE COQUETTE (AT) : Special cast— A 
good little picture with excellent sound (disc.) — J. 
A. Bailey, Strand theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

First National 

WHEEL OF CHANCE: Richard Barthelmess— 
November 25. A most satisfactory picture, with 
Barthelmess portraying a most convincing double 
role. They'll like this picture. Seven reels. — H. B. 
Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. Car. — Small 
town patronage. 

TWO WEEKS OFF: Mulhall-Mackaill— De- 
cember 11. The most satisfactory silent picture 
that I have played. The entire production is 
well done and is sure to please. Seven reels. — 
R. W. Van Hook, Rialto theatre, Morrilton, Ark. 
— General patronage. 

PRISONERS (TME): Special cast— December 2-3. 
Absolutely no good in any way. One young lady 
remarked, "First National should be sent to jail 
seven years for a thing like that." Eight reels. — 
R. D. Carter, Fairfax iheatre. Kilmarnock, Va. — 
General patronage. 

CAREERS (AT): Billie Dove— November 6-7. 
Not so good. Very poor story, too much muck and 
filth. Our patrons disappointed, they want to see 
Billie Dove serene and beautiful. Recording on disc 
fair. Seven reels.— R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, 
Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 

HAROLD TEEN: Arthur Lake— December 9. 
Here's a "tweet tweet" picture. F\ill of "younguns" 
and college pep. Plenty of laughs. Seven reels. — 
H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. Car.— 
General patronage. 

VALLEY OF THE GIANTS: Milton Sill.s— De- 
cember 2. A story of the lumber camps among the 
big trees of California, with beautiful shots of the 
immense trees. Also a very good story and picture. 
Six reels.— H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, 
S. Car. — Small town patronage. 

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN: Corinne Griffith— De- 
cember 9. If you haven't sound, don't play this one. 
No sense to the picture, and they will walk out on 
you. All that saved me on this picture was my 



NEW SOUND SYMBOLS 

CHANGES in methods are never very 
welcome, and it is the policy of this 
department to avoid them as much as 
possible. But sometimes they become 
necessary — at least, if there is to be im- 
provement. Especially concerning sound. 

When reports began to come in on 
audible pictures, we made a set of sym- 
bols to indicate the different kinds. The 
symbols worked all right for a time, but 
just as sound pictures themselves have 
changed, so have the requirements for 
the symbols to indicate them. We felt, 
moreover, that now that sound produc- 
tions are pretty well settled as to type, 
we could simplify the old code of sym- 
bols. The result of said cogitations, as 
'twere, is now beneath the heading of this 
department, and since the new symbols 
are to be used from now on (and forever 
more, we hope!), we ask very earn- 
estly that exhibitors give them due 
examination. 

We wish also to point out the fact that 
the new symbols to be used for this de- 
partment are identical with the new 
sound symbols used in the "Quick Ref- 
erence Picture Chart." And that repre- 
sents a step toward simplification, too. 

There will be no resulting change, 
however, in the manner of making out 
the reports. You may indicate the na- 
ture of the sound as you have been 
doing. 

—GEORGE SCHUTZ. 



vaudeville. They tolerated the picture and waited. 
Eight reels.— R. W. Van Hook, Rialto theatre, Mor- 
rilton, Ark. — General patronage. 

TWIN BEDS (AT) : Jack Mulhall— December 
11-12. This could hav^been a good talking pic- 
ture, but somehow it falls short. It has a few 
amusing situations in it and does manage to hold 
the crowd, which is more than a lot of pictures 
do. It is all talk, and the talk is all clear and 
good. I would consider it just shade better than 
the average program picture. — M. W. Larmour, 
National theatre, Graham, Tex. — General patron- 
age. 

ISLE OF LOST SHIPS (AT) : Special cast— De- 
cember 16-17. Although the story is somewhat 
rough, it is a very entertaining picture. Recording 
is extra-clear and lifelike. But best of all. First 
National seems to have fired their loud-playing or- 
chestra and substituted a violinist who is quiet dur- 
ing part of the dialog. I was sure they would learn 
some day. — M. W. Larmour, National theatre, Gra- 
ham, Tex. — General patronage. 

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN (TME): Corinne 



Griffith — November 27-28. Middling only. Ck>rinne 
Griffith's voice not good. Charles Lane and Grant 
Withers both have good voices. A part-talking pic- 
ture, and most people like them all-talking or all- 
silent. This is the first Griffith picture we have 
made money on, and that was because we played it 
Thanksgiving. Eight reels.— R. D. Carter, Fairfax 
theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 

THE ROYAL RIDER: Ken Maynard — November 
16. One of the very best super- Westerns we have 
ever run. Good from beginning to end. Splendid 
riding by Maynard. The scenes beautiful. Pleased 
and did a fine business. They just worship this 
young man. You will never go wrong on a May- 
nard picture, they are all good, clear and pleasing. 
Six reels. — R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmar- 
nock, Va. — General patronage. 

A MOST IMMORAL LADY: Leatrice Joy— De- 
cember 1-2. This might be all right with sound, but 
as a silent it is poor. — Six reels. — W. T. Biggs, Adair 
theatre, Adair, la. — Small town patronage. 

THE MAD HOUR: Sally O'Neill— December 16. 
An interesting picture, no doubt true to life, but it 
did leave one with a sense of injustice that the 
woman had to pay for their "mad hour" with the 
sentence, "the wages of sin is death," while the man 
went scot-free. Six reels. — H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills 
theatre, Bath, S. Car. — General patronage. 

WHY BE GOOD: Colleen Moore — Thought my 
patrons had forgotten Colleen, but they liked this 
picture. The kind of a picture the younger class 
liked. You make no mistake by booking and ad- 
vertising it. Eight reels. — S. B. Callahan, Arrow 
theatre, Broken Bow, Okla. — General patronage. 

THE DIVINE LADY: Corinne Griffith— Decem- 
ber 16. This type of costume picture may go in for- 
eign cities, but I know it won't go in a small town. 
Had several walkouts. Too long and drawn out. 
Paid a big price for this picture, lost plenty on it. 
For myself, I don't care for this type of picture. 
Twelve reels. — S. B. Callahan, Arrow theatre. Broken 
Bow, Okla. — General patronage. 

Fox 

THEY HAD TO SEE PARIS (AT) : Will Rogers 
— This one from Fox is a real show. Will Rogers 
gets across in good shape, has good talking voice 
and is an actor. Support is fairly good. My disc 
equipment gave good reproduction on this show, as 
recording is fairly good. Ten reels. — Guy S. Ab- 
bott, New Homeline theatre, Estelline, S. Dak. — 
General patronage. 

BIG TIME (TME) : Special cast— Lee Tracy is 
funny, and the picture is good entertainment. Step- 
in Fetehit is always funny, and he is in this one. 
Nine reels. — Larry Woodin. Arcadia theatre, Wells- 
boro. Pa. — Small town patronage. 

SALUTE (AT) : George O'Brien— December 
11-12. One you can plug and know you have a 
show that will please. Army-Navy football game 
in sound good. Nine reels. — Larry Woodin, Ar- 
cadia theatre, Wellsboro, Pa. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

WHY LEAVE HOME (TME) : Special east— De- 
cember 13-14. A dandy laugh show that is good. 
Pleases everyone. — Larry Woodin, Arcadia theatre, 
Wellsboro, Pa. — Small town patronage. 



■ 



62 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES (AT): Special 
cast— This picture didn't please very well. The re- 
peating of the murder story three different ways 
got tiresome, but as far afi recording is concerned, 
this wafi the best we ever got from Fox. Just a 
fair picture.— J. H. Jenkins, The Douglas theatre. 
Lee's Summit, Mc— General patronage. 

BEHIND THE CURTAIN: Special cast— Decem- 
ber 7. This was a very good picture that did fair 
business. Does not follow the book very closely, 
but is a good picture for those who have not read 
it.— Paul B. Hoffmann, Legion theatre, Holyrood, 
Kan. — Small town patronage. 

MARRIED IN HOLLYWOOD (AT): Special cast 
—December 1. I had this booked for Thanksgiving 
show. Opened Wednesday night and pulled it. then 
drove 180 miles for another show, yet Fox insists 
that this is a good show. If it does anything but 
fiop for any of you boys, let me know, as I want 
to find out how poor a judge of pictures I am. Re- 
cording is not so bad, but there's no entertainment 
there Maybe I'm all wet, but look it over before 
you make any big noise, and don't advertise it as 
having colored sequences, unless you can furnish 
your people with colored glasses. Twelve reels.— 
Guy S. Abbott, New Homeline theatre, Estelline, S. 
Dak. — General patronage. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

WISE GIRLS (AT): Special cast-November ^9. 
The excellent acting of the Nugents should put this 
picture over for any audience. Title of Kempy 
should have been retained, as it has more selling 
power than "Wise Girls." Drew fairly good on a 
terrible night for business, and they seemed satis- 
fied for the effort of coming out. Eleven reels.— 
Wilbur S. Bckard, Opera House, Ashland, O.— Gen- 
eral patronage. 

WISE GIRLS (AT) : Special cast— Here is one of 
the finest disc recordings that I have ever heard on 
any equipment. Clear, natural talking, and no 
record noise of any kind. It's a swell little show 
in every way, and if you are having trouble with 
your sound, play this and see what real recording 
will do. Metro will let you live, too. — Guy S. Ab- 
bott, New Homeline theatre, Estelline, S. Dak.— 
General patronage. 

THE THIRTEENTH CHAIR (AT): Special cast- 
December 13. This one is terrible. I don't think it 
pleased over 20 per cent. Hurt business to have 
such trash shown.— Leslie Hables, Reel Joy theatre. 
King City, Cal. — Small town patronage. 

THE IDLE RICH (AT) : Special cast— November 
11-12. Just a fair program picture for any theatre. 
Too much fuss and noise. Not about rich people 
at all, but the middle class. Conrad Nagel's voice 
is very good. Recording on disc good. Did fairly 
well first night, away off the second. Eight reels.— 
R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va.— 
(General patronage. 

ALL AT SEA: Dane-Arthur— December 13. 
These two boys are always good, and my patrons 
always like them. I sat through this picture and 
thought it was one of the best they had ever made. 
Don't understand why my patrons kicked so, but it 
didn't seem to please. Maybe it was because of 
Friday the 13th. Anyway, I say it's 100 per cent 
Dane-Arthur comedy. Six reels. — R. W. Van Hook, 
Rialto theatre, Morrilton, Ark.— General patronage. 

HALLELUJAH (AT): Special cast— December 
17-18. We of the motion picture industry may well 
doff our hats to King Vidor and Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer for the conception and production of "Halle- 
lujah." While this picture may not attain the over- 
whelming box office success of "The Cockeyed World" 
and "Gold Diggers of Broadway," it is of infinitely 
more importance to each and every exhibitor, be- 
cause if our industry is to retain its place in the 
sun throughout succeeding decades, it will be through 
the creative genius of such men as Vidor in furnish- 
ing us "Hallelujahs" from time to time. No suc- 
cessful box office production, in the experience of 
the writer, has displayed such originality of treat- 
ment and superb directional skill as does this one. 
Just a simple little story of an unsophisticated child- 
like race, but told in a manner that holds one spell- 
bound throughout its 12 reels. You forget it's just 
a picture as life itself passes before your eyes in all 
the varied hues of reality. Incidentally, I might re- 
mark that the picture did a very satisfactory busi- 
ness, with disagreeable weather and during the 
worst business week of the year, the week before 
C:hristmas. It is true that not all my patrons were 
enthusiastic about "Hallelujah," but whether they 
liked it or not, they went out talking about it, and 
this helped the second night's business. Twelve 
reels. — W. J. Powell. Lonet theatre, Wellington, O. 
— Small town patronage. 

HALLELUJAH (AT) : Special cast— December 3. 
This one did not please or araw. Might be a good 
bet some places, but I don't know where. — Leslie 



A TRIBUTE 

It is not often that those who make 
their living by selling motion picture en- 
tertainment direct to that mysterious but 
well known quantity called the general 
public, are sympathetic toward artistic ef- 
fort enough to praise it even though they 
may think it of no box office value. It 
would be strange if they were, for busi- 
ness is business. It is therefore worthy 
of note that just such a sympathetic ex- 
pression has come to this department, in 
a report from W. J. Powell of the Lonet 
theatre, iVellington, O. It is more than 
an expression of sympathy, it is an en- 
thusiastic tribute to those who made 
"Hallelujah," well thought out and com- 
posed. But Brother Powell does see some 
good to the box office even in the so- 
called artistic picture — a benefit none-the- 
less real because it is indirect. The re- 
port is in part as follows (the entire re- 
port appearing in the regular position): 

We of the motion picture industry may 
well doff our hats to King Vidor and Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer for the conception and produc- 
tion of "Hallelujah." While this picture may 
not attain the overwhelming box office success 
of "The Cockeyed World" and "Gold Diggers 
of Broadway," it is of infinitely more impor- 
tance to each and every exhibitor, because if 
our industry is to retain its place in the sun 
throughout succeeding decades, it will be 
through the creative genius of such men as 
Vidor in furnishing us "Hallelujahs" from time 
to time. No successful box office production, in 
the experience of the writer, has displayed such 
originality of treatment and superb directional 
skill as does this one. Just a simple little story 
of an unsophisticated, child-like race, but told 
in a manner that holds one spellbound through 
its 12 reels. You forget it's just a picture as 
life itself passes before your eyes in all the 
varied hues of reality. ... It Is true that not 
all my patrons were enthusiastic about "Halle- 
lujah," but whether they liked it or not, they 
went out talking about it, and this helped the 
second night's business. 



Paramount 



Hables, Reel Joy theatre, King City, Cal.— Small 
town patronage. 

BROADWAY MELODY (MC) : Special cast— De- 
cember 10. This sure is a dandy show. Did not 
draw at all here, but had basketball, skating rink 
and home talent play to buck. It sure should be 
played everywhere. — Leslie Hables, Reel Joy theatre. 
King City, Cal. — Small town patronage. 

SPITE MARRIAGE: Buster Keaton — Decem- 
ber 6. Buster Keaton always gets me a crowd, 
and here is a picture that will come up to all 
your expectations. Step on it, 'cause it's worth 
all you can give it. Nine reels. — R. W. Van 
Hook, Rialto theatre, Morrilton, Ark. — General 
patronage. 

OUR MODERN MAIDENS (AT) : Joan Crawford 
— The stars help to draw, but consider it only 
trifling. No story. Recording good. — J. H. Jenkins, 
The Douglas theatre, Lee's Summit, Mo. — General 
patronage. 

TIDE OF EMPIRE: Special cast — ^December 4. A 
good picture of the Gold Rush, but not a picture 
that will please for Saturday date. Eight reels. — 
E. W. Van Hook, Rialto theatre, Morrilton, Ark. — 
General patronage. 

THE VIKING (M): Pauline Starke — November 
27. Well done picture in colors. Drew some excel- 
lent comments but no particular business. Ten reels. 
— Wilbur S. E'ckard, Opera House, Ashland, O. — ■ 
General patronage. 

THE VIKING: Special cast — December 3-4. 
I was afraid of this one, but it was fine. The 
color made the show. Nine reels. — W. T. Biggs, 
Adair theatre, Adair, la. — Small town patronage. 
SPEEDWAY (TME): William Haines— December 
6. This seemed to hit the spot, and no kicks. — Lee- 
lie Hables, Reel Joy theatre. King City, Cal. — Small 
town patronage. 



SPECIAL WINDOW CARDS 

Your ov/n copy, no stock cards, lowest 
prices in U. S. Quick Service. Write for 
price list and samples. 

BOWER SHOW PRINT 

12 Ade St. FOWLER, INDIANA 



FAST COMPANY (AT): Special cast— December 
7. This is okay as a comedy-drama. Had to do lots 
of work on this print, quite a few frames missing, 
something we are not accustomed to. — The Colonial 

theatre, Hondo, Tex. — Small town patronage. 

THE CARNATION KID (AT): Special cast— De- 
cember 9-10. Interesting and amusing because of 
the mix-up. Not a crook story, yet it is all about 
crooks. MacLean's voice and the music both good, 
other recording fair. Seven reels. — ^R. D. Carter, 
Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patron- 
age. 

ILLUSION (AT): Nancy Carroll— A picture 
that you can advertise big. Pleased 100 per cent, 
and the disc recording is perfect. — S. F. Ewing, 
Amusu theatre, Bude, Miss. — General patronage, 
THE SATURDAY NIGHT KID (AT): Clara Bow 
— November 28. Clara's voice not so good. Jean 
Arthur saves the picture. She is plenty good. — The 
Colonial theatre, Hondo, Tex. — Small town patron- 
age. 

DANGEROUS CURVES (AT): Clara Bow— Pret- 
ty good story ruined by rotten recording (disc). — • 
J. A. Bailey, Strand theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

DANGEROUS CURVES: Clara Bow— December 1. 
It's a pleasure to me to get to report on a picture 
like this one, to advise ray brother exhibitors to lay 
off this one of Miss Bow's. She's entirely out of 
her class in a picture of this type, and where did 
the title come from ? I say it is one of her worst 
pictures. A few like this one and she'll be a dead 
star. — S. B. Callahan, Arrow theatre. Broken Bow, 
Okla. — General patronage. 

THE RAINBOW MAN (AT): Eddie Dowling— 
November 18-19-20. Here is real entertainment for 
any theatre. Don't pass it by. A simple story, 
sweet and clean. A picture that is bound to please. 
The recording on disc good, and the singing beau- 
tiful. Some said it was sad, but all were satisfied 
and asked for more. Nine reels. — ^E. D. Carter, 
FairfaxT theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patron- 
age. 

FOUR FEATHERS: Special cast— December 8-9- 

A very good picture that pleased for me. Some very 
unusual scenes, but they are good. Eight reels. — W. 
T. Biggs, Adair theatre, Adair, la. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

RIVER OF ROMANCE (AT): Buddy Rogers- 
Good picture, good sound (disc), which is something 
rare from Paramount. — J. A. Bailey, Strand theatre, 
Greensburg, Ind. — General Patronage. 

THE MAN I LOVE: Special cast— December 8- 
A good program offering that pleased a small house. 
— Paul B. Hoffmann, Legion theatre, Holyrood, Kan. 
— Small town patronage. 

WOLF SONG: Special cast — For some reason this 
picture did not draw, but I thought it a very good 
picture. Just a program. Pleased about 50 per 
cent. — S. B. Callahan, Arrow theatre. Broken Bow, 
Okla. — ^General patronage. 

THE CANARY MURDER CASE (AT): William 
Powell — November 13-14. A very interesting murder 
case, but not court room, nor is it in any way grue- 
some. William Powell's voice not so good in this 
one. The recording on disc was only good enough 
to just get by. An interesting picture, good for any 
theatre. Six reels. — R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, 
Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 

DIVORCE MADE EASY (AT): Douglas MacLean 
— A good clean little comedy that Johnny Arthur 
steals from the star. Pleased the few who came to 
see it. Disc recording excellent. — S. F. Ewing, 
Amusu theatre, Bude, Miss. — General patronage. 

THE MYSTERIOUS DR. FU MANCHU (AT): 
Special cast — A good picture. Plenty good comments 
on this one. — The Colonial theatre, Hondo, Tex. — 
Small town patronage. 

THE WHEEL OF LIFE (AT): Special cast- 
Rotten picture and rotten sound (disc). — J. A. Bailey, 
Strand theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — General patronage. 

THUNDERBOLT (AT) : Special cast— A fair pic- 
ture, but sound poor (disc). — J. A. Bailey, Strand 
theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — General patronage. 

THE LOVE DOCTOR (AT): Richard Dix— No- 
vember 25. Good entertainment. Pleased 100 per 
cent. Good recording. — The Colonial theatre, Hondo, 
Tex. — Small town patronage. 



Pathe 



BIG NEWS (AT) : Special cast— A newspaper 
story that is fairly good. Recording fair. — -J. H. 
Jenkins, The Douglas theatre. Lee's Summit, Mo. — 
General patronage. 

[Reports continued on page following Jaysee] 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



65 



DEAR HERALD-WORLD: 



ODESSA, TEX., 
December 5, 1929. 



Should you drive from Riverside, Cal., to Odessa, Tex., and you 
don't say it is the longest 1,800 miles through the most lonesome, 
desolate country you ever drove over, then you will have to agree that 
Death Valley is a tulip garden fringed with American Beauty roses. 
Every little ways along this highway you will come to a quarantine 
station where you will be stopped and asked all manner of questions. 

Should you be going from Arizona into California, the California 
station will ask you if you have any oranges or other kinds of fruit 
from Arizona. If you are going into Arizona from California, the 
Arizona station will ask you if you have any oranges or other kinds 
of fruit from California. 

New Mexico wants to know if you have any oranges or other kinds 
of fruit from any state in the tjnion. She isn't satisfied with just 
California and Arizona, but she includes Texas, Arkansas and Florida 
as well. All of them ask you if you have any cotton, cotton sacks, 
nuts, honey, shrubbery, canned goods, limburger cheese, or saurkraut. 
The only thing they failed to interrogate us about was French fried 
potatoes and dill pickles. 

One station stopped us and gave us a card to be filled and mailed, 
stating where we were from, where we were going, how many persons 
in the car and what state the car was registered in. All very important. 
After we entered Texas we supposed we had a clean bill of health, 
but — just as we were driving through a little tank town a car drove 
up alongside, and a cop blew his whistle and motioned us over to the 
curb. We wondered if it was another speeding charge and looked 
around to see if we could see Hodges and Larry. Then the cop came 
over to the car and said, "Mister, did you come from Mexico?" And 
we replied, "No, sir, we didn't. If you don't believe it, smell of our 
breath. We came from Hollywood." Then the cop said, "Well, in 
that case I guess I better look you over. What have you in that grip?" 
And we replied, "Well, sir, we've got two shirts, both clean; two 
pair of socks, ditto; a lip stick, a power puff and a deluxe edition of 
'How I Broke Into the Movies' bound in calf with the tale inside 
printed in nine different languages and on sale at all first-class news 
stands." 

Then he looked at us again and said, "Did you say you came from 
Hollywood?" And we answered, "Sherlock, you have us right." Then 
he said, "Oh, I know you now, you are Richard Dix. Funny I didn't 
recognize you at first, Mr. Dix, sorry to have detained you and I beg 
your pardon." Then we swelled up a little and said, "Oh, that's 
nothing, officer. Don't let a little thing like that worry you. The 
mistake is made so often that we have become accustomed to it." 
Then we drove on. You can see now how we are adding to Dick's 
popularity, but he doesn't appreciate it. 

There is just one more station these states ought to place on this 
highway, and that's a station where the officers ask you if the pups all 
lived and the exact date when your last baby cut its first tooth. It's 
a dum shame that the public is denied this information. But maybe 
we shouldn't complain, for these stations give a lot of boys some soft 
jobs who might not be worthadam for anything else. 

For several hundred miles this highway runs quite close to the 
Mexican border, but if we ever drive it again, it will be when the 
home brew boys are all on vacation. We like the Canadian border a 
whole lot better. Up there you can depend on the label. 





Since coming into Texas we find the state no different from what 
it was two j'ears ago, notwithstanding she paralyzed the world at the 
recent election. The folks are treating us just lovely, just as they 
always do. They're honest and upright people, and the only criticism 
we could offer is that they are feeding us too much solids. When we 
were here before we received such nice treatment that we just couldn't 
help but break into poetry to give vent to our feelings, and as we 
recall it now, one verse ran something like this: 
Everything's fine here in Texas, 
From Brownsville clear up to Colexus; 
The long horns are putting on fat in the pens, 
The roosters are friends with the Plymouth Rock hens, 
And the girls have shed theirs and now are wearing men's. 
So everything's jake here in Texas. 

* * * 

Midland has reasons for being about as proud as any city in the 
state. The Southwestern Theatres Company, Inc., of which Mr. T. S. 
Hogan is president and largely the owner, has built for Midland a 
theatre that would do credit to the Loop in Chicago. The Yucca was 
built at a cost of approximately $300,000, and the draperies and other 
stage equipment cost $30,000 more. The architect and supervisor of 
construction was Mr. Wyatt C. Hedrick of Ft. Worth, and the theatre 
is certainly a monument to his ability. The house seats around 1,700 
and is equipped with RCA Photophone, which is said to be giving 
perfect satisfaction. 

The Yucca was opened December 5, with "Rio Rita," starring Bebe 
Daniels. To the picture program was added a stage presentation con- 
sisting of several acts by a company of 30 people. The house did ca- 
pacity business at $2. Midland has reasons to be proud of many 
things, among them her enterprising citizen, Mr. Hogan, the Yucca 
theatre, and Mr. John S. Bonner, who will direct the future destinies 
of the house. We know Mr. Bonner quite well and we feel war- 
ranted in stating that Midland has one of the best theatre managers 
in the state, and we predict that the Yucca will enjoy the confidence 
and patronage she is justly entitled to enjoy, during his manage- 
ment. We wish there were more such congenial managers as Mr. 
Bonner. 

* * * 

Today we had the pleasure of meeting again our old friend, Milton 
Overman, who manages the Publix houses at Abilene. Milt used to 
sell us Select service out of Omaha when Charlie Taylor was man- 
ager for that company. The last time we saw Milt, he was managing 
a house in Paris, Tex., and we were pleased to meet him again and 
talk over old times. It made us both feel better. 

:i! * * 

We are in Cisco tonight, and through the courtesy of Mr. K. N. 
Greer, who manages the R. & R. houses, we were privileged to witness 
a showing of the "VIRGINIAN," with Gary Cooper, Walter Huston, 
Richard Arlen and Mary Brian. 

We have seen Miss Brian in a number of pictures when we thought 
her acting could have been improved by the injection of a little more 
pep and feeling, but in this picture she gives the part all that could 
be desired. Mr. Huston as Trampas, is so good that he is surprising, 
and Gary Cooper and Richard Arlen are always dependable. 

There must be something about Texas that a lot of other states 
lack. Down here one notices the absence of the flapper type of girls 
that is so common on the streets in some other states. The young 
men and boys are clean-cut and gentlemanly, and one seldom meets 
with the Smart Alek type. The more we see of Texas, the better we 
like her. She's a great state. 

J. C. JENKINS, 
The HERALD-WORLD man. 
P. S.— The HERALD-WORLD covers THE field like an APRIL 
SHOWER. 



64 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1930 



(Contmucd from page 62) 

OFFICE SCANDAL: Phyllis Haver— November 
25-26. A very good silent picture. Newspaper pub- 
lishing background. Interesting, well balanced story, 
well played. Good for any theatre. Seven reels. — 
R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — 
General patronage. 

OH YEAH (AT) : Special cast— Railroad 
story of two tough, fighting brakemen. Pretty 
rough at times. Good dialog all the way through. 
You can't go wrong in showing this one. Boost 
it. — J. H. Jenkins, The Douglas theatre. Lee's 
Summit, Mo. — General patronage. 

HIGH VOLTAGE: William Boyd— November 8-9. 

While made as a talker, this is a good silent pic- 
ture. Some good snow scenes, some little comedy. 
A picture that gave satisfaction. Six reels. — R. D. 
Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General 
patronage. 

THE AWFUL TRUTH (AT): Ina Claire- 
Thought the name of Ina Claire would bring them 
in, but it didn't. Not a small town picture. Re- 
cording only fair. — J. H. Jenkins, The Douglas the- 
atre. Lee's Summit, Mo. — ^General patronage. 

PARIS BOUND (AT) : Ann Harding— People dis- 
appointed in this story, which is very slim. Re- 
cording just fair, but people could not get interested 
in it. — J. H. Jenkins, The Douglas theatre. Lee's 
Summit, Mo. — General patronage. 

KING OF KINGS: Special cast— December 8. 
Played a repeat date on this and am sorry. Never 
again will I bring any picture back to my town. 
Lost money and did not please the regulars. — Leslie 
Hables, Reel Joy theatre. King City, Cal.— Small 
town patronage. 

SAL OF SINGAPORE: Phyllis Haver— December 
14. This was a nice program offering that pleased. 
Good light entertainment. — Paul B. Hoffmann. Le- 
gion theatre, Holyrood, Kan. — Small town pati'onage. 

THE LEATHERNECK: William Boyd— November 
23. Good picture that pleased our Saturday night 
crowd, and did a nice business, too. Pathe's pic- 
tures have done very well for us, for most of them 
have pleased and made something for us, too. Seven 
reels.— R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, 
"Va. — General patronage. 



RKO 

RIO RITA (MC): Special cast— December 4-5-6. 

One of those shows that are shows. Wonderful 
sound and color. Come on, RKO, give us some 
more like this one. It's a wow. Fifteen reels.— 
Larry Woodin, Arcadia theatre, Wellsboro, Pa.— 
Small town patronage. 

SIDE STREET (AT) : Special cast— November 17. 

In spite of the underworld theme, this picture would 
have possibilities if the recording was up to par. 
Drew a few, but they were disappointed. — Wilbur 
S. Eckard, Opera House, Ashland, O.— General pat- 
i'onage. 



United Artists 

THE WOMAN DISPUTED: Norma Talmadge— 
December 5. A wonderful production that pleased 
every one present. It's good. Eight Reels.— H. B. 
Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. Car.— General 
patronage. 

THE BATTLE OF THE SEXES: Special cast 
— December 12. One of the best pictures ever 
produced. Saw it twice, and it brought the tears 
both times. The laughs are there, too. Also ex- 
citement. In fact, just about everything you 

want in picture entertainment. Ten reels. H. 

B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, S. Car. 

General patronage. 

TEMPEST: John Barrymore — November 21. A 
wonderful production, magnificent scenes and scenes 
of magnificence both, but the box office pull is not 
there for the small town, if our attendance is rep- 
resentative. Only 33 per cent. Lost money, as 
usual. Nine reels.— H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills the- 
atre, Bath, S. Car. — Small town patronage. 

STEAMBOAT BILL. JR.: Buster Keaton— No- 
vember 28. Literally a scream. Our patrons 
laughed from beginning to end without a letup. 
Seven reels.— H. B. Grice, Aiken Mills theatre, Bath, 
S. Car. — Small town patronage. 

Universal 

THE WAGON MASTER (AT): Ken Maynard— 
Disc recording fair. This picture outdrew anything 
that I have had in the last six months. People who 



Three Former Directors 
Have Roles in "Hit the Deck" 

(Special tu the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Dec. 31.— Three for- 
mer directors took roles in Radio 
Pictures' musical comedy, "Hit the 
Deck," just completed. Dell Hen- 
derson, who was director for Uni- 
versal, Bio graph. Triangle and Fox, 
plays the part of an admiral. The 
role of "Bunny" is played by Harry 
Sweet who once directed Ben Tur- 
pin, Harry Langdon and Clark and 
McCuUough. Wallace McDonald, 
who directed at Educational and 
First Division, has a leading roman- 
tic part in this picture. 



do not like Westerns liked this one. "The Wagon 
Master" has more action than any silent Western 
that I ever played. — S. F. Ewing, Amusu theatre, 
Bude, Miss. — General patronage. 

THE WAGON MASTER (AT) : Ken Maynard— 
December 13-14. This was played here on disc. It 
has talking, music and sound effects. It proved to 
be the best box office attraction in months. Sound 
or silent, I believe it will prove one of the best action 
Western released in some time. The talking was 
clear in spots and fuzzy in spots. The fact that 
loud music was played during pai-t of the dialog 
kept it from being considered an outstanding talking 
picture. — M. W. Larmour, National theatre, Graham, 
Tex. — General patronage. 

THE WAGON MASTER (AT) : Special ca'st— 
October 31. This is supposed to be one of Universal's 
good ones, and it is, nothing wrong with it. Not a 
special, however. — The Colonial theatre, Hondo, Tex. 
— Small town patronage. 

SHOW BOAT (MC) : Special cast— Disc re- 
cording perfect. This is one of the greatest 
pictures that I have ever seen. Pleased 100 per 
cent. If bought right, will make any exhibitor 
money. — S. F. Ewing, Amusu theatre, Bude, 
Miss. — General patronage. 

SENOR AMERICANO (AT) : Special cast— A good 
Western. Sound good (disc). Plenty of action. — 
J. A. Bailey, Strand theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — ■ 
General patronage. 

THE LONG LONG TRAIL: Hoot Gibson— De- 
cember 13-14. Another real good Western. This is 
the type of show that makes a good Saturday's busi- 
ness. If they like outdoor Westerns, this is fine. 
Six reels. — W. T. Biggs, Adair theatre, Adair, la. — 
Small town patronage. 

THE LONG LONG TRAIL (AT) : Hoot Gibson- 
November 23. Now, lets get started right. This is a 
bear cat, and I am not getting paid for this report. 
Book it and use as a short Paramount's "Cow Camp 
Ballads," and you have IT. Hoot comes out with 
that personality here. He will ruin the record that 
Ken Maynard set up in "The Wagon Master," I'm 
thinking. Ken had a better story than Hoot did, at 
that. — The Colonial theatre, Hondo, Tex. — Small town 
patronage. 

TONIGHT AT TWELVE (AT) : Special cast— No- 
vember 7. This one hit all right. Not as good as 
"Hold Your Man," but can't report it a bad picture, 
at that. Just above fair. Madge Bellamy, George 
Lewis and good cast. — The Colonial theatre, Hondo, 
Tex. — Small town patronage. 

COLLEGE LOVE (AT): Special cast— October 
28. Cast good. Picture of college life. The last 25 
feet of the film are worth the price of admission. 
The picture is okay all the way through. Being a 
campus picture, it is a little noisy. — The Colonial 
theatre, Hondo, Tex. — Small town patronage. 

COLLEGE LOVE (AT): George Lewis— Disc re- 
cording fair. This is one of the noisiest pictures 
that I have ever played, but it certainly does draw 
at the box office, and how they like it ! Had more 
compliments on this one than anything I've played 
lately. — S. F. Ewing, Amusu theatre, Bude, Miss.— 
General patronage. 

MISSISSIPPI GAMBLER (AT): Special cast- 
December 5. I didn't see this one. Repoi-ts came in 
all right. Did not have any complaints. Those I 
asked said it was all right, however they didn't rave 
over it. Class it above average after summing it all 
up. — The Colonial theatre, Hondo, Tex. — Small town 
patronage. 

HOLD YOUR MAN (AT) : Laura La Plante— No- 



vember 4. Showed up good here. Just a dandy good 
picture, not big. Will please any audience. Good 
recording. — The Colonial theatre, Hondo, Tex. — Small 
town patronage. 

THE SHANGHAI LADY (AT) : Mary Nolan- 
Disc recording fair. Nothing to get excited over. 
May have been a wow in New York, but nothing 
other than a program picture in a small town. 
Played it Thanksgiving, so made a little money on 
it. — S. P. Ewing, Amusu theatre, Bude, Miss. — 
General patronage. 

THE SHANGHAI LADY (AT): Special cast— An 
ordinary program picture with very poor sound 
(disc). Had plenty of walkouts on this one. — J. A. 
Bailey, Strand theatre, Greensburg, Ind. — General 
patronage. 

ONE HYSTERICAL NIGHT (TME) : Reginald 
Denny — Disc lecording terrible. This is one of the 
poorest talking pictures that I have ever seen. — • 
S. F. Ewing, Amusu theatre, Bude, Miss. — General 
patronage. 

Warner Bros. 

ON WITH THE SHOW (AT) : Special cast— All 
to be desired. Recording good. — J. H. Jenkins, The 
Douglas theatre. Lee's Summit, Mo. — General pat- 
ronage. 

ON WITH THE SHOW (AT): Special cast— A 
musical comedy in color. Very good entertainment. 
Good recording on disc. Business fair. — J. L. Seiter, 
Selma theatre, Selma, Cal. — Small town patronage. 

SAY IT WITH SONGS (AT) : Al Jolson— De- 
cember 9-10. We did capacity business. The folks 
liked the picture. The recording was very, very good. 
Personally, I did not think the picture anything to 
rave about. The sound novelty is wearing off now 
and the industry is sadly in need of some pictures 
with good stories, direction, photography and acting. 
— M. W. Larmour, National theatre, Graham, Tex. — - 
General patronage. 

THE GAMBLERS (AT) : Special cast— Very good 
drama. Recording good, and picture very well liked. 
— J. H. Jenkins, The Douglas theatre. Lee's Sum- 
mit, Mo. — General patronage. 

DESERT SONG (O) : Special east— This is an 
operetta. Fair story, but the small town patronage 
may wonder what all the singing is about. Talking 
good, good singing ; in fact, everything in it wae 
okay. Pleased about 75 per cent. — J. H. Jenkins, 
The Douglas theatre. Lee's Summit, Mo. — General 
patronage. 

THE HOTTENTOT (AT) : Edward Everett 
Horton — Racehorse story, a comedy that can't 
be beat. Everett Horton is great. Your pa- 
trons will eat this up. No walkouts — they may 
stay over on it. Recording perfect, both words 
and music. All about horses. A good picture 
either for Saturday or Sunday. — J. H. Jenkins, 

The Douglas theatre. Lee's Summit, Mo (Jen- 

eral patronage. 

SKIN DEEP (TME): Special cast— Very good 
story, well acted. Sound good mostly all the way 
through. Didn't draw on account of not being 
known in the big houses, but those who saw it were 
well pleased. — J. H. Jenkins, The Douglas theatre. 
Lee's Summit, Mo. — General patronage. 

THE SAP (AT) : Edward Everett Horton— No- 
vember 28-29. In general, the patrons liked this pic- 
ture, but it is nothing exceptional. One cash cus- 
tomer went so far as to say "Rotten, just rotten." 
On the whole it is satisfactory light entertainment. 
Eight reels. — Wilbur S. Eckard, Opera House, Ash- 
land, O. — General patronage. 

MADONNA OF AVENUE A (TME) : Dolores 
Costello — December 2-3. Just a good clean program 
picture. Good sound. Doesn't draw. Eight reels. — 
Lai-ry Woodin, Arcadia theatre, Wellsboro, Pa. — Small 
town patronage. 

EVIDENCE (TME) : Pauline Frederick— Poor. 
For small town patronage build this one up with 
plenty of comedy. Recording not so good for War- 
ners. I believe they are falling down on recording. 
■ — J. H. Jenkins, The Douglas theatre. Lee's Sum- 
mit, Mo. — General patronage. 

NOAH'S ARK (TME): Dolores Costello— A big 
spectacular picture that will draw just out of 
curiosity. They have just got to see it even if they 
don't like it. Recording good. — J. H. Jenkins, The 
Douglas theatre. Lee's Summit, Mo. — General pat- 
ronage. • 

NOAH'S ARK (TME): Special east— Very good 
production with very little talking. Really a silent 
picture with score. Recording good (disc). Business 
fair. — J. L. Seiter, Selma theatre, Selma, Cal.— 
Small town patronage. 

THE SINGING FOOL (TME): Al Jolson— All to 



January 4, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLU 



65 



be desired. Recording good. We could hear Davey'e 
voice every word. — J. H. Jenkins, The Douglas the- 
atre. Lee's Summit, Mo. — General patronage. 



Serials 



QUEEN OF THE NORTHWOOD: (Pathe)— Just 
one of the best serials made, because it is a big draw. 
The North scenes are beautiful. The story is most 
baffling because of the Wolf -Devil. If you want a 
good serial, here it is.— R. D. Carter, Fairfax the- 
atre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 

SCARLET BRAND: (Home State) Neal Hart— 
As good a Western serial and as good a star as I 
ever ran. Some of the larger companies may tell 
you they .ai'e the only ones who can make good serials, 
but they are wrong. Book it, and boost it. I make 
money on such serials as this one. They keep com- 
ics. — S. B. Callahan, Arrow theatre. Broken Bow, 
Okla. — General patronage. 



Miscellaneous 



THE DELIGHTFUL ROGUE: (FBO) Rod La 
Rocque — December 15. This was an excellent picture 
and one that received many favorable reports. With 
this picture we closed our house. — Paul B. Hoffmann, 
Legion theatre, Holyrood, Kan.— Small town pat- 
ronage. 

DOG LAW: (FBO) Ranger—Novembcr 2. This 
is one of the best dog pictures we have ever run. 
If you are looking for a good silent action picture, 
here is one that will give satisfaction. Six reels. — 
R. D. Carter, Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va.— 
General patronage. 

SALLY'S SHOULDERS: (FBO) Lois Wilson- 
December 1. Sure had lots of fine comments on this 
picture. Did not see it myself, but the verdict of the 
patrons is what counts anyway, and it pleased them. 
Seven reels.— R. W. VanHook, Rialto theatre, Mor- 
rilton. Ark. — General patronage. 

SIMBA: (State Rights)— Don't be foolish and 
think that you only have a jungle picture, 'cause you 
have something here that you won't have a chance 
to show often. Although I had rain, snow, etc., this 
picture brought people in this house that have never 
been in before, and if I had had decent weather, I 
believe this one would have taken the record. Eight 
reels.— R. W. VanHook, Rialto theatre, Morrilton, 
Ark. — General patronage. 

VOICE OF THE STORM: (FBO) Karl Dane- 
December 8. A very good program picture that 
pleased them all. Seven reels.— R. W. VanHook, 
Rialto theatre, Morrilton. Ark.— General patronage! 

Short Features 

(SILENT) 
M GM 

CHARLEY CHASE COMEDIES, 2.— "Leaping 
Love." Funny Charley Chase makes a funny face 
when he eats rock alum for rock candy and then 
tries to sing. It's funny, all right. (R. D. Carter 
Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va.— General patron- 
age.) 

CLIMBING GOLDEN STAIRS, 2.— A wonderful 
two-reeler, as good if not better than "Mexieana," 
another colored revue. Sure helps any show. (Les- 
lie Hables, Reel Joy theatre. King City, Calif.— Small 
town patronage.) 

FUZZY KNIGHT, l.-I didn't think it was going 
over, but on talking to friends, found that it left 
more impression than any sound act I ever had. 
Knight has his own brand of foolishness. (Wilbur 
S. Eckard, Opera House, Ashland, O.— General pat- 
ronage.) 

LAUREL-HARDY COMEDIES, 2.-"Unaccustomed 
As Wc Are." Not so hot. Hope the rest of their 
talkies are better. (Leslie Hables, Reel Joy theatre 
King City, Calif.— Small town patronage.) 

PARAMOUNT 

COW CAMP BALLADS.-This is good stuff. Cow 
hands with voices that will set you up for more. 
Put this on with a weak feature and you won't fall 
far. (The Colonial theatre, Hondo, Tex.— Small town 
patronage.) 

UNIVERSAL 

THE ACTOR.-Bennie Ruben. This one was okay. 
Bennie talks too fast, not plain enough. It gets clear 
along toward the last part. (The Colonial theatre, 
Hondo, Tex.— Smal town patronage.) 

PAT ROONEY COMEDIES, 2.-"The Love Tree " 

These Rooneys are pretty good so far. Used on 
Saturaay. Good dancing in them. "The Royal Pair." 



This one will register about the same as "The Love 
Tree," possibly a little better. (The Colonial theatre, 
Hondo, Tex. — Small town patronage.) 

SONNY JIM SERIES.— "Baby Talks." This one 
was plenty good. Sonny can fix things for you. 
Book it. Good recording. (The Colonial theatre, 
Hondo, Tex. — Small town patronage.) 

DELICATESSEN KID — Rotten, terrible. Bennie 
Rubin addresses a negro as Mr. Roberts. I 
refused to pay for it. If you have it 
coming up, screen it before you show it to 
your patrons. It is a disgrace and a slam on 
the white race. Get a screening on this one just for 
fun and write your opinion. (The Colonial theatre 
Hondo, Tex. — Small town patronage.) 

WARNER BROS. 

JUNE (Act No. 735) — Just another act. Not as 
good as the average. Recording very lifelike. (M. W. 
Larmour, National theatre, Graham, Tex.— General 
patronage. ) 

JOE LEWIS (Act No. 2668).— Punk, rotten, no 
good, was the comments of my patrons. Why, oh 
why, do they make 'em like this? (M. W. Larmour, 
National theatre, Graham, Tex.— General patronage.) 

(SOUND) 
EDUCATIONAL 

CAMEO COMEDIES, 1.— "Kitty Kitty." A very 
good one-reel subject. (Leslie Hables, Reel Joy the- 
atre. King City, Calif .—Sinall town patronage.) 

MGM 

EIGHT VICTOR ARTISTS, l.-A great bunch of 
entertainers. (Larry Woodin, Arcadia theatre, Wells- 
boro. Pa. — Small town patronage.) 

HARRY LANGDON COMEDIES, 2.— "Sky Boy." 
Good enough that I'm looking forward to the next 
Langdon. Audience reaction good. (Wilbus S. 
Eckard, Opera House, Ashland, O.— General patron- 
age.) 

LAUREL-HARDY COMEDIES, 2.— "Men O War." 

Absolutely a knock-out, one of this team's best. G*et 
it if you want a good one. (R. D. Carter, Fairfax 
theatre, Kilmarnock, Va.— General patronage.) 

MAN HIGHER UP. 2.-PennsyIvania censors 
killed the story. Too bad, was entertaining if censors 
had let it alone. (Larry Woodin, Arcadia theatre, 
Welleboro, Pa.— Small town patronage.) 

PRINCESS OF DESTINY. 2.-This is a school pic- 
ture for a history class, not a theatre. (Larfy 
Woodin, Arcadia theatre, Wellsboro, Pa.— Small 
town patronage.) 

i ' 

paramounIt 

A HINT TO A BRIDE. 2.-Good comedy, high 
class. A young wife suggests the burgler take some 
of the wedding gifts, thinking there is insurance 
but there is no insurance. (R. D. Carter, Fairfax 
theatre, Kilmarnock, Va.— General patronage.) 

FARO NELL, 2— No comedy, hardly film, and 
thats getting pretty low. If you don't believe it 
run It ana spoil your show. I screened it and shipped 
rt back wouldn't run it. (The Colonial theatre, 
Hondo, Tex.— Small town patronage.) 

HER HUSBAND'S WOMEN.-Lois Wilson- 
Booked this for a comedy and it did not satisfy 
It IS a sophisticated playlet. Avoid this. (J L Sei 
ter. Selma theatre, Selma, Cal.-Small town patron- 
age.) 

SLEEPING PORCH.-Pretty good, not so hot. 
Will get over without petting. (The Colonial theatre 
Hondo, Tex.— Small town patronage.) 

PATHE 

BULL FIGHTERS, 2.-01d, but very good. Much 
better than most of the new ones. (R. D Carter 
Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va.— General' patron- 
age.) 

CHARLEY CHASE COMEDIES, 2.— "Now I'll Tell 
One." Very good. Yes it's old, but that makes no 
difference with a good comedy. (R. D. Carter, Fair- 
fax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 

MOTORING MAMAS. 2.— A terrible piece of 
cheese. Wish they had kept it in the exchange. 
(Leslie Hables, Reel Joy theatre. King City, Calif.— 
Small town patronage.) 

SMITH FAMILY COMEDIES, 2.— "Smith's Cook." 

Very good, anything with this thi-ee is bound to be 
good. "Smith's Pony." Very good. (R. D. Carter, 
Fairfax theatre, Kilmarnock, Va. — General patronage. 

R K O 

THE BURGLAR. 2 — Why was this made? (Larry 



NEW 

PICTURES 



In "New Pictures" the EXHIBITORS 
HERALD-WORLD presents in concise 
form information on current and forthcom- 
ing attractions. 

The facts as presented will serve exhib- 
itors in booking and in the preparation of 
their advertising campeiign. 

LILIES OF THE FIELD: First National all-talking 
drama, with Corinne Griffith, John Loder, Freeman 
Wood, Patsy Paige, Eve Sothern, Rita LeRoy. Jean 
Bary, Betty Boyd, May Boley, Virginia Bruce. 
Directed by Alexander Korda. 

TYPE AND THEME: Madred Barker is accused 
by her husband's lawyer of improperly entertaining 
other men. Her husband is given a divorce and the 
custody of their child. Mildred sets out to make a 
living for herself by ivorking in a cabaret. Here 
she meets Ted Willing, who proposes to her. She 
refuses. After two years Mildred is still going on 
ivith 7'ed. There is ai whoopee party. A telephone 
rings. Ted answers it, to hear that Mildred's baby 
is dead. Mildred, rushing out of the house, is picked 
up by the police, tvho think she is drunk. Ted saves 
her and again asks for her hand. This time she 
accepts, resolving to live a true life with him. 

SHOW OF SHOWS: Warner Brothers all-talking, 
singing, dancing revue with 77 stars, including John 
Barryraore, Monte Blue, Ted Lewis, Richard Bar- 
thelmess, Sally Blane, Irene Bordoni, Dolores Cos- 
tello, Frances Lee, Douglas Fairbanks. Jr., Frank 
Fay, Winnie Lightner, Nick Lucas, Jack Mulhall, 
Rin-Tin-Tin, Ben Turpin. Grant Withers and 
others. Directed by John C. Adolfi. 

TYPE AND THEME: Picture contains singing 
acts, dancing acts, comedy acts, dramatic acts, band 
numbers, etc. John Rarrymore in a dramatic act, 
dancing act with eight sisters, band act ^vith Ted 
Leivis, dancing act ivith SOO taking part. Filmed 
in Technicolor. 

BEHIND THE MAKE-UP: Paramount all-talking 
drama, with Hal Skelly, William Powell, Fay Wray, 
Kay Francis, E. H. Calvert, Paul Lukas and Agos- 
tino Borganto. Directed by Robert Milton. 

TYPE AND THEME: Hap Brown befriends 
Oardoni and the two become partners on the stage. 
Hap writes several stories but none clicks. Gardoni 
disappears and ivhen Hap sees him next he is a 
stage celebrity tising one of Hap's novels and call' 
ing it his own. Gardoni also steals Hap's girl, 
Marie. They marry and Hap's heart is broken. 
Gardoni falls for Kitty, a vamp. After he has 
spent all his money on her, Kitty gives him the 
air. He dies tragically. Hap and Marie plan to 
go along together. 

STREET OF CHANCE: Paramount all-talking 
drama, with William Powell, Jean Arthur, Kay 
Francis. Regis Toomey. Stanley Fields, Brooks 
Benedict, Betty Francisco, John Risso, Joan 
Standing, Maurice Black and Irving Bacon. Di- 
rected by John Cromwell. 

TYPE AND THEME: .John Marsden. known as 
"Natural Davis" and a gambler, separates from his 
tvife. He sends his brother. Babe, $10,000 foi- a 
wedding present. Babe, hoivever, is unaware of his 
brother's gambling habits. Babe comes to town, 
having run the $10,000 up to $50,000 through 
gambling. Joli/n finds out and plans to break his 
brother to teach him a lesson. He sends Fields to 
play cards with Babe. Instead, Babe breaks Fields, 
who thinks it a frame%ip. John admits to his 
brother tJiat he is a gambler. Fields. John and 
Babe get in a game of cards. John cheats in an 
effort to break his kid brother. Fields catches him. 
According to the unwritten laiv cheating means 
death. Babe resolves to quit gambling. When 
morning coynes, John is found dead from a bidlet. 



Woodin, Arcadia theatre, Wellsboro, Pa. — Small town 
patronage. 

HEADWORK, 1 Some humorous cracks, but they 

didn't register. (Wilbur S. Eckard, Opera House, 
Ashland, O. — General patronage.) 

MICKEY McGUIRE COMEDIES, 2.— "Mickey's 
Big Moment." Clean comedy, audience satisfied. 
Mickey and the kids start a night club. (Wilbur S. 
Eckard, Opera House. Ashland, O. — General patron- 
age.) 

UNIVERSAL 
COLLEGIANS SERIES, 2 — Hero rushes in and 
saves the game in the last minute of play. What 
matter which chapter it is? They're all the same. 
Thank Heaven I'll soon be through with them. (Wil- 
bur S. Eckard, Opera House, Ashland, O. — General 
patronage.) 



66 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 4, 1950 



CHICAGO PERSONALITIES 



By JOE FISHER 



NEWSREEL minute men had visions of a real picture story being handed 
them as a gift on Christmas Eve when fire started in the offices of Ad- 
Vance Trailer on the eighth floor at 845 South Wabash, but there wasn't 
any Santa Glaus. Nevertheless, if it had been a Santa Claus stunt, officers of 
Ad-Vance Trailer would have been off him for life, because some damage was 
done in the short time before automatic sprinklers and the fire boys had the 
flames under control, and Ethel Chez, employe of the company, suffered a 
slightly burned back. She was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment. 
j^iJEN from the Chicago Daily Newsreel Chicago. He was on his way to Los 



office on the same floor of the building 
helped prevent the fire from spreading by 
wielding chemical extinguishers to advant- 

Ad-Vance is operatmg temporarily on the 
sixth floor. It is estimated that two weeks 
will be required to repair the damage done 
by the flames. 

The joyful and merry whirl of the past 
New Year Eve frolics has no disappoint- 
ments for Max Levy, district manager for 
Robertson-Cole company. We heard Max 
had a bundle of prescriptions under his arm 
that kept Chicago's 100 "drug emporiums" 
busy from noon time until 1920 came rush- 
ing in. And the best of it was that Max 
was the first to arrive on the 18th floor of 
the Consumers building bright and early 
Friday morning, January 2.§ 

* * * 

Cresson Smith, district manager of the 
United Artists exchange, and Eddie Gross- 
man, branch manager, received eversharp 
pencils from Gloria Swanson with their 
names engraved on them. 

^ ^ ^ 

The Haymarket theatre is bidding bur- 
lesque farewell. The house is installing a 
Western Electric sound device and will 
open with talking pictures early in January. 
For years the Haymarket has been a big 
drawing theatre. Besides burlesque it put 

on amateur fights every Thursday night. 

^ ^' ^ 

Sam Halper has taken over the Halsted 
and Waverly theatres from Richard Israel. 
Halper also operates the Irving theatre on 
Halsted street. 

* * * 

I. Maynard Schwartz, manager of Educa- 
tional exchange, is out for office these days. 
Schwartz is the motion picture candidate 
for alderman of the fifth ward, and from all 
indications has a good chance of landing 
the job. Everyone in the picture business 
is plugging for the popular manager.f 

i(C >}i ^ 

Attention of Henry Ford: Harold Wise, 
lonesome little booker at the Tififany ex- 
change, has given up all hopes of recover- 
ing his Ford, stolen a month ago. 

Steve Montgomery, salesman of Tififany, 

is arranging a bout between the Great 

Shires and Sidney Stern, Film Row's favorite 

pugilists. The bout if it goes through, will 

be referred by Max Levy of Exclusive Film. 
^ ^ ^ 

Graham McNamee, voice of the radio 
world and now the Talking Reporter for 
the Universal Newsreel, spent Friday in 

§This item appeared on the Chicago page ten years 



on 

Angeles, to broadcast the football game be- 
tween the East and the West. 

^ ^ ^ 

A baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Gilliam on Thursday, December 
26. Just a day late for Christmas but in 
time to celebrate the New Year. He 
weighs 8 pounds. This is the second boy 



Why Women 
Leave Home 

In one of Chicago's neighborhood 
theatres, the manager employs a deaf 
usher. One night, when the theatre 
was playing to a big house, a woman 
patron started a hunt for her husband 
who was m the front part of the the- 
atre. She approached the usher and 
tried to explain that she was search- 
ing for husband. Thinking she was 
looking for a seat the usher replied, 
"There are better ones on the top 
floor." 



ago. 



tFrom the Chicago page five years ago. 



in the family of Tom Gilliam, asistant man- 
ager of the First National office. 

^ iK :{: 

Frank Schafer, wellknown in theatre cir- 
cles hereabouts, postcards L. A. Ullrich, 
Pathe salesman, from Florida, where he is 
spending a seven weeks' vacation. Frank 

says the golfing is fine.f 

* * * 

Greiver Productions is distributing 
Gorno's "Marionettes" in the Indiana and 
Illinois territory. The novelty acts are 
made of wood and operated by a string. 
This week they are playing the Roosevelt 

theatre. The acts run 8 minutes. 

^ ^ ^ 

Clyde Eckhardt did not let the Christ- 
mas spirit get away from him even though 
he was up to the neck with work. The Fox 
manager decorated his office with holly 

wreaths and Christmas ornaments. 

* * * 

An article printed on this page last week 
stated that Dave Ross M G M salesman, was 
married. This has been denied by Ross. He 
is not engaged and says he has no intentions 
of being married. 

Tom North made his second trip to New 
York this month. Looks like something's 

up, but Tom is mum. 

* * * 

Morton Van Pragg, Universal salesman, 
visited his relatives over the holidays at 
Kansas City.f 




Two promotions were announced in the 
Universal office last week. Benny Eisen^ 
berg (left) was named city sales manager 
and Bill Baker ( right) was appointed 
short subject manager. In the center is 
Henry Herbel, manager of the Universal 
exchange. 

Bill Brumberg received a Christmas card 
from James Cruze productions with a strip 
of sound film attached. Printed on the 
card was: "Three voices wish you all the 
joy of the Yuletide." It was signed by 
James Cruze, Nat Cordish and Henry 
Meyer. 

Three song numbers in Eddie Dowling's 
"Blaze 'O Glory" for Sono Art-World Wide 
are being tied up with the NBC chain to 
be broadcast over station KYW in the near 
future. The numbers will be played by 
Wayne King and his orchestra. 

* * * 

Balaban and Katz moved into their new 
offices in the Loop End Building last 
Thursday. There was a big celebration. 

^ ^ ^ 

Roy Alexander, former manager of the 
local Universal exchange, spent a few days 
in town last week. Roy is managing the 
Tivoli theatre in Mishawaka, Ind. 

* * * 

Bert Vought, formerly owner of the 
Palace theatre. Crown Point, Ind., started 
for Florida last week to spend the cold 
months. He intends to return in the spring. 

Dave Rice, distributor of Mickey Mouse 
cartoons in Chicago, was slightly injured 
by an automobile last Friday. His suit was 
a complete wreck. 

^ ^ ^ 

Nat Levine, producer of "King of 
Kongo," a serial, was another of the many 
visitors. Levine journeyed here from New 
York. His serial is being distributed by 
Ben Judell in the Chicago territory. 
^ ^ ^ 

Tom North announced that two Van 
Beuren song sketches are ready for the ex- 
hibitor. They are titled "The Trumpeter" 
and "Mandalay." 

^ ^ ^ 

J. J. Clarke is in the Pathe office renew- 
ing his many friendships. He came here 
as manager from the Milwaukee exchange 
a few weeks ago. 

* * * 

Floyd Traynham, member of Gene Cour's 
sound gang, went to the Columbus Memo- 
rial hospital last week for a hernia oper- 
ation. 

* * * 

Mrs. David Hellman was robbed of her 
fur coat and money last week.f 

* * * 

The Varsity theatre in Valparaiso has 
been leased by G. G. Shauer and Sons, who 
also are operating the Premier theatre in 
the same town. The lease has been handled 
by Albert Goldman, Chicago. 



LOW-COST TINTS 

that match every mood in 

SOUND PICTURES 

The widest range of tints ever offered the 
industry is embraced by Eastman Sono- 
chrome Tinted Positive Films. They can be 
used to match every mood in the story, or 
to reproduce the one lighting or tone that 
predominates throughout the picture .... 
In either case Sonochrome gives beautiful 
color. It gives faithfully reproduced 
sound. And it costs no more than regular 
black-and-white positive. 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distributors 

New York Chicago Hollywood 



A Rare Vote of Confidence 

13 E VIEWS in unprecedented numbers have appeared in trade 
papers, magazines and newspapers, during the Fall and Winter 
months, on Mack Sennett Talking Comedies. You could read 
every line of every one of them and find no dissenting voice raised 
in criticism. Nothing but praise! A rare vote of confidence — prob- 
ably without equal in motion picture history! 

MACK SENNETT 

TALKING COMEDIES 



"THE GOLFERS" 

A "pippin" . . . Entertainment all the way through. 

— Canadian Moving Picture Digest 

Will make you giggle whether or not you know anything about 
the game. — Life 

The large golfing fraternity and any number of others who don't 
know anything about this popular game will simply "eat" this 
picture up. — Motion Picture Neiva 

Supreme entertainment, intensely amusing both to golfers and 
to those who never stepped on a green. 

—Arthur James, Exhibitors Daily Review and Motion Pictures 
Today. 

A delightful outdoor event which scored heavily because it 
never became technical. 

— Harold Heffernan, Detroit News. 

"A HOLLYWOOD STAR" 

Sennett continues on the upgrade. "A Hollywood Star" is un- 
usually funny. — W. Ward Marsh, Cleveland Plain Dealer. 

Exceedingly funny. — Boston Globe. 

A mighty funny comedy. — New York Daily News. 

They don't come often enough like this one. . . . Grab this one. 

— Motion Picture News. 

Worth a prominent spot on any bill. — Film Daily. 

A pip of a satirical Mack Sennett comedy. 

— Los Angeles Examiner. 

Here is a really funny picture. It's Mack Sennett back in his 
splendid form and up to new tricks at one and the same time. 

— Screenland. 



"CLANCY AT THE BAT" 



A corker. 
It can't miss. 



— Motion Picture News. 
— Film Spectator. 



A thoroughly enjoyable baseball comedy. . . . Plenty of laughs 
all along the line, concluding with a comedy finish that is a 
smash. Worth strong billing. — Film Daily. 

The funniest show to reach town as a talking film this week. 
. . . T think Gribbon and Clyde are comics, in their own field, 
of the first rank. —Quinn Martin, New York World. 

"THE NEW HALFBACK" 



Solidly packed with laughs, 
to overlook. 



A picture you cannot afford 
—Zit's 



Good enough to get top billing. — Exhibitors Herald-World. 

Spot this as a "special" on your program, and you'll have no 
kickbacks. It will goal 'em for championship laughs. 

— Film Daily. 

Mack Sennett almost reaches the pinnacle of his career in this. 

— -Associated Publications. 

An even greater laughgetter than "Clancy At the Bat". . . . 
This comedy, played with even the weakest feature, will make 
the program a complete success. — Billboard. 

"UPPERCUT O'BRIEN" 

It has enough for two or three old-fashioned comedies. 

— Zit's. 

One of the funniest prize-ring themes ever screened. 

— Film Daily. 

Gribbon and Clyde are at the moment turning out some of the 
best comedies on the market. Any exhibitor that plays these 
and the other Educational shorts at this time is doing his 
patrons a great favor. • — Billboard. 

A wow comedy. . . . Educational has a knockout of a two-reel 
comedy here. . . . Go the limit and promise a lot. It will lift 
any show right out of the average «slass. 

— Motion Picture News. 



k "THE SPICE OFTHE PROGRAM 



— ^ 



EDUCATIONAL FILM EXCHANGES, Inc., E. w. mammons. President 

Member Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, Inc. — Will H. Hays, President 



Coast to Coast Reports on New Films — Pg, 32 

EXH I B ITO RS 

RALD 





W 







PARAMOmX'S GREATEST YEAR! 




'No. 1 among the $2 talkers." (Variety) "Eas- 
ily the best picture of the year." (Liberty') 



mAURICE CHEVAIilER in 
ERI¥ST ElJBITSCe'S "TheL.ove 
Paradc".with jeanette macdonald, 

Lupino Lane and Lillian Roth. Now in 8th 
S.R.O. §2 week at Criterion, N. Y. The in- 
dustry's biggest hit to date! 



f "THE 



'99 



Paramount presents Greatest of all Singing 
Romances as Perfect All -Technicolor Gem 



DEIVI¥IIS KII¥G in "The Vaga- 
bond King". With JEANETTE MAC- 
DONALD, Warner Oland, O. P. Heggie and 
Lillian Roth. Ludwig Berger Production. 
Coming soon and destined to top all pre- 
vious b. o. records! 



Just the Start of the Giant Prosperity Parade of 
PARAM OUNT'S New Show World of 1930! 



'g^t QQ PUj-v O Entered as second-class matter, August 20, 1917, at the Post Office at Chicago, III., under the act of March S, 1S79. Published larmar^/ II IQTA 
weekly by Quigley Publishing Co., at 407 South Dearborn St., Chicago. Subscription, $3.00 a year. Single copies, 25 cents. Jaiiuaiy ii, iZJ^Xf 



The Sound 
qf Success 



Recording and 
Reproducing 
Equipment 
De Luxe 



Producers and Exhibitors Alike . . . must con- 
sider Sound Qualities above every other detail 
of Production and Exhibition. . . . The Public 
is "SoMwd-JFise" and Tonal Quality is Vital — 
Indispensable to Success. 

POWERS CINEPHONE RECORDERS Photo- 
graph Every Delicate Inflection of the Human 
Voice and All Notes of All Instruments with 
Clear-Toned Fidelity. 

POWERS CINEPHONE THEATRE EQUIP- 
MENTS Reproduce Every Sound Recorded on 
Film or Disc with Crystal-Clear Clarity, Without 
Distortion at High Point Volume. 

POWERS CINEPHONE Instills ''A Dominant 
Personality into the Picture and the Playhouse. 




POWERS CINEPHONE EQUIPMENT CORP. 
' i Powers Building 

723 Seventli Avenue, New York City, N. Y. 



IT'S 1930, BROTHER! 

You canH run your car with 
1929 license plates or your 
theatre with 1929-style pictures! 

^The public's tastes have changed again! Back-stage pictures are out; 
Westerns are in. Look at the smash success of "THE VIRGINIAN"! 
^ Old-time stars are out; new stars like Chevalier, Oakie, Helen Kane 
and others sca!e the b. o. heights. Old-fashioned musicals are passe; 
today ^'THE LOVE PARADE" is king. Former attempts at color talkers 
pale beside the All -Technicolor gem, Dennis King in ^^THE VAGABOND 
KING," with Jeanette MacDonald. ^1 Paramount saw the change coming 



IX'S 1030 and revised production to fit. 31 PARAMOUNT 
^^^^ fresh 1930-style hits here between now and 

August. 11 of them not heretofore offered for 
sale: 'TARAMOUNT ON PARADE/' the new idea in revues with almost 
every big star under the PARAMOUNT banner. "THE TEXAN," with 
Gary Cooper, and "THE BORDER LEGION," with Richard Arlen, head- 
ing a big stampede of outdoor all-talkers. Jack Oakie starring in two 
big shows. "BENSON MURDER CASE,'' with William Powell, topping 
"Canary" and "Greene.'' "RETURN OF FU MANCHU," answering your 
demand. "YOUNG MAN OF MANHATTAN," greatest of Satevepost 
serials and hotter than tomorrow's headlines. "ROADHOUSE NIGHTS," with 
a sensational new comedy star. Helen Kane "boop-a-dooping" as 
"DANGEROUS NAN McGREW." "MEN ARE LIKE THAT," the big 
laugh on the 1930 U. S. male. ^There's only one way to keep pace 
with the public: PLAY PARAMOUNT! 



PARAMOUNT'S 



!\EW SHOW WORLD OF 







Your New Prosperity License 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 




^rEseni eoL by 

CARLLAEMMLE- 




ICTURES 
NOT 

ES 




H£myOUBMEAT 



PICTURES— not promises! Pictures for which UNIVERSAL 
re-arranged its whole schedule . . . Pictures for which UNI- 
VERSAL inaugurated its new selling season . . . Pictures to feed 
you box-office profits when the pickings are scant everywhere 
else. Pictures like — 

LAURA LA PLANTE AND JOHN BOLES IN "LA MAR- 
SEILLAISE" . . . JOHN BOLES IN "MOONLIGHT MAD- 
NESS" AND "THE SONG OF PASSION" . . . MARY 
NOLAN IN "SHANGHAI LADY," "UNDERTOW," "BAR- 
BARY COAST" . . . PETER B. KYNE'S "HELL'S HEROES" 
. . . JOSEPH SCHILDKRAUT IN "NIGHT RIDE" . . . "THE 
SHANNONS OF BROADWAY," starring JAMES AND 
LUCILLE GLEASON . . . "THE COHENS AND»KELLYS 
IN SCOTLAND," starring GEORGE SIDNEY AND 
CHARLIE MURRAY . . . "WHAT MEN WANT" ... The 
ONE and ONLY "BROADWAY" . . . "SHOW BOAT" . . . 
GRAHAM McNAMEE as the TALKING REPORTER in 
UNIVERSAL'S TALKING NEWSREEL . . . And the two 
Big Ones . . . "ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT" 
. . . PAUL WHITEMAN'S "KING OF JAZZ" . . . PIC- 
TURES—NOT PROMISES! 



GREATER UNIVERSALIS NEW SELLING SEASON STARTS NOW! 



Member Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, Inc. — Will H. Hays, President 




pioneers rode Tradition. They held their heads high, these sons of danger; for they 



were the First, the Oldest, the Hardiest. So they plunged fearlessly into perilous 



country and founded an empire . . . Pathe Sound News, whose ringing voice now 



speaks to a nation, rests its fame on twenty years of tradition and faithful service. 



THE Trail of the /ioneer 




Pa the, pioneer of silent news; Pathe, leader of sound news ... a triumph of energy 



and determination! ... So follow the Pathe trail on the road to 1930*s news. 



PAT HE 



SOUND 



EDITED BY TERRY RAMSAYE AND RAY L. HALl 
RECORDED BY THE RCA PHOTOPHONE SYSTEIV 



NEW 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 




THE COCK EYED 
WORLD 

The champ record-wrecker of 
all time. And Raoul Walsh's 
mighty mirthquake is still go- 
ing strong. 



SUNNY 
SIDE UP 

Breaking "The Cock Eyed 
World" records wherever 
shown. Held over fourth week 
at Keith's Memorial, Boston. 




these coming 
productions 



HOT FOR 
PARIS 

Sweet box-office! Beats "The 
Cock Eyed World" record, first 
two days at Fox, Philadelphia. 

MEN WITHOUT 
WOMEN 

Bound to be the most talked of 
drama of 1930. Directed by the 
GoldMedal winner, John Ford. 

SUCH MEN ARE 
DANGEROUS 

Elinor Glyn's sensation- 
packed story with dialog by 
Ernest Vajda. Warner Baxter 
heads the cast. A natural! 

THE GOLDEN 
CALF 

The Liberty Magazine story 
of love, legs and laughter 
produced as a girly, golden 
musicol show. 



LET'S GO 
PLACES 

A singing and dancing whirl 
around Hollywood with love 
and laughs along the way. 
In the bag! 

THE 
SKY HAWK 

A smashing $2 top hit at the 
Gaiety, New York, acclaimed 
the greatest of all air thrillers. 

THE BIG 
PARTY 

A merry musical romance 
produced on a lavish scale 
with a flock of song hits. Big! 

HIGH SOCIETY 
BLUES 

Janet Gaynor and Charles 
Farrell as singing sweethearts 
in a musical romance directed 
by David ("Sunny Side Up") 
Butler. 



Sntirely 
Technicolor 



Irene 
Borcloni 




Copy of Our Reply J 

New York, N. Y., Dejc. 19 

Frank Sardino, 
Empire Theatre, 
Syracuse, N. Y, 

Delighted know Show of Shows in your opin- 
ion most outstanding picture history industry. 
Demand prints this attraction such that even 
with two laboratories working twenty -four 
hours each day it is utterly impossible for us 
to supply present commitments or national 
demand. Appreciate your constructive pro- 
posal play this production three houses Syra- 
cuse together with Strand Theatre Day and 
Date. But regret our inability to take advan- 
tage of it. Regards. 
^ ^ S. E. MORRIS 



Richard 
Barthelntess 



YOII'L,!. ]¥EVI:R KJ\0W THE CAPACITY OF YOUR THEATRE 

UI^TIE irOU Pl,AY "SHOW OF SHOWS" 



•RICHy' DIX HANDS 



PICKED "PATE" PART AS GREATEST 
AND DELIVERS WITH VENGEANCE? 

With the same sound showman's sense that gave ' Street Girl to 
Compson and ''Rita" to Daniels, Radio Pictures laid the selection of all 
dramatic material before Richard Dix . . . "Take your pick!" was the or- 
der . . . And the answer of Richard Dix was "SEVEN KEYS TO BALD- 
PATE." HE PICKED IT TO TOP A CAREER OF UNRIVALLED 
BRILLIANCE ... HE PLAYED IT AS NO ACTOR EVER PLAYED 
A PART BEFORE! 



CRITICS CHEER 
LONG RUN AT 
}<EW YORK STRAND 

rWOT OF FUN. BEST 
IFALLSTAGE PLAYS 
FRANSPORTED TO 

JCREEN." Headlines i 
^ew York American F 



WITH 



ALEXANDER GRAY - BERNICE CLAIRE 
LOUISE FAZENDA - ZASU PITTS 

LUCIEN LITTLEFIELD - LILYAN TASHMAN j 

BERT ROACH MILDRED HARRIS I 

( 

Directed by Clarence Badger 

Adapted from musical comedy by Frank Mandel, Otto Harbach, Vincent Yeumqns and Emil Nyilray | 

"Hits the top rank of musical films." N, Y. World, \ 
"Packs spontaneous humor in every reel." N, Y. GraphicJ 
"Made the big Strand roar with chuckles." N. Y. News,] 
"One of the few naturals of the season." N. Y. AmericanJ 
"Stirs up mirth. Comedy is invariably unfailing." I 

N. Y, Times, ! 
"Best filmed musical comedy to reach Broadway." 

N, Y, Telegraph, \ 

TURNED TOLEDO TOPSY TURVY. i 
HELD FOR A MINIMUM OF TWO AND ; 
A HALF WEEKS. | 
"GREATEST HIT AT STANLEY, PHILA. 
AUDIENCE LAUGHING AS NEVER BE- 
FORE. BREAKING ALL RECORDS," ! 
wires William Goldman. 

HIT-AFTER-HIT-AFTER-HIT FROM i 




"Sally' 



'Paris' 



"Son of the Gods" 



'Song of the Flame' 



"Bride of the Regiment' 



FIRST NATIONAL 



The 
Independent 
Film Trade 
Paper 



E X H I B ITO RS 

H E RALD 
WORLD 



Home 
Office: 
407 So. Dearborn St, 
Chicago 



IN THIS ISSUE 



NEW PICTURES 

T. O. Service This Week Announces an Ex- 
tension OF His Reports on New Pictures — 
Productions from Coast to Coast Pass in 
Revue, Providing Complete Information for 
Exhibitors on I^atest Product of the Studios 
— Eleven Associates Will Assist in Comment- 
ing on Films. 



A RISING POWER 

Will Electrical Research Products, Inc., 
Go It on Its Own? Industry Wonders, Re- 
calling Case of Graybar Organization, Which 
Stepped Out for Itself — 4,212 Theatres in 
World Now Have Been Equipped with West- 
ern Electric Apparatus for Showing Sound 
Pictures. 



COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS 



NEWS 



Woman censor at Evanston, Chicago's classic suburb, bars Bull- 
dog Drummond without even having seen picture — Petitions 
demand her removal. 

New independent group of exhibitors in Chicago plans move to 
affiliate with Allied States — Projectionists' demands in Chicago 
would increase pay 15 per cent. 

William Fox weathers threat of Class A stockholders to contem- 
plate receivership when he issues announcement showing com- 
panies' assets 873,000,000 above all liabilities. 

Lankford introduces bill calling for new federal department of 
welfare to control radio and make motion pictures for civic and 
religious groups. 



FEATURES 



Service on Pictures 32 

The Voice of the Industry (Letters from Readers) 58 

Motion Picture Finance 26 

Los Angeles, by Douglas Hodges 38 

Broadway 18 

Sound Pictures 34 

Pictorial Section 27 

Short Features with Sound 42 

J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 63 



DEPARTMENTS 

The Studio 38 

Short Features 41 

Music and Talent 48 

The Theatre 45 

Classified Advertising 65 

Quick Reference Chart 53 

What the Picture Did for Me 59 

New Pictures 64 

Chicago Personalities, by J. F 66 

ADVERTISEMENTS 

film, SOUND AND EQUIPMENT— Paramount, Powers Cine- 
phone, Eastman Kodak, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Universal, Pathc, 
Fox, Warner Brothers, Radio Pictures, First National, Weber 
Machine Corporation, Beaded Screen Corporation (Vocalite), 
Mellaphone Corporation, Radiotone Picture Corporation, Vitadisc 
Company, Bestone Sound System, Bower Show Print, Bell and 
Howell, Automatic Ticket Register. 

MUSIC AND TALENT— M. Witmark and Sons, Bill Meeder, 
Brooks Costumes, Ransley Slides, Remick Music Corporation. 



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16 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS 

H E RALD 
WORLD 

Martin J. Qui'gley, Publisher & Editor 

Incorporating Exhibitors Herald, founded in 1915; Moving Pic- 
ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and 
The Film Index, founded in 1909 

Published Every Wednesday by 

QuiGLEY Publishing Company 
Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. 
Martin J. Quigley, President 
Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer 

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 
Copyright, 1930, by Quigley Publishing Company 
All editorial and business correspondence 
should be addressed to the Chicago office 

Other publications: Better Theatres, devoted to construction, equipment and 
operation of theatres; published every fourth week in conjunction with Exhibitors 
Herald-World; The Motion Picture Almanac, Pictures and Personalities, pub- 
lished annually; The Chicagoan and Polo, Class publications. 



Vol. 98, No. 2 . January 11, 1930 



Helpful Harrison 

PUBLICATIONS devoted to motion pictures, however 
competently or incompetently they may be directed, 
appear to the outsider as coming from the industry with a 
certain degree of authority and sanction. This presents a 
situation of vital concern to the whole business. Theoreti- 
cally at least an incompetently directed publication con- 
cerned with motion pictures would not exist, or long exist, 
unless it enjoyed some sanction from the intelligent people 
in the industry. 

Unfortunately, as a practical matter this is not the case. 
We have, for instance, the case of Pete Harrison and his 
sheet with its irresponsible, illogical and sniping attitude 
toward everybody and everything in the industry which 
do not fit in with his plainly ignorant ideas of what should 
and what should not be. 

Harrison has been about in the picture business for a 
long time so what he really amounts to is pretty generally 
understood. For his own sake it is to be hoped that he 
will continue about in the picture business because if he 
were to turn to some less tolerant field he might be invited 
to give up the pen in favor of the shovel which would be 
more appropriate to his hand. 

We are noticing the strange phenomenon of the exist- 
ence of Editor Harrison and his publication at this time 
because our attention was directed to a flattering so-called 
review given by this editor to the most vicious motion pic- 
ture subject which has shown up in the industry in a 
long time. 

Let us quote a few of the precious lines in this review: 
"One's emotions are stirred to the very depths by the 
sight of a mother and a brother standing by a daughter 
and sister in her hour of the greatest need a young girl can 
ever have. ... It is the story of a young girl who loved 
her sweetheart so well that she surrendered herself to him. 
. . . There is some propaganda for birth control. . . . But 
the situations are handled so delicately that a most power- 
ful lesson is conveyed to young folk." 

The editor spares us an analysis of his conclusion that 
"a most powerful lesson is conveyed to young folk" and 
does not specify whether the lesson is based on the young 
girl's surrender to the sweetheart she loved so well, to the 
propaganda for birth control, or to both. 



Editor Harrison thrives on creating trouble or the illu- 
sion of trouble in the industry. 

There is likely to be no illusion of trouble about the 
difficulties which will be brought to the door of the indus- 
try by such a picture as this and by such a review as 
Editor Harrison has accorded it. 



The Abramson Touch 

MR. IVAN ABRAMSON has come out of his retirement 
with a sensational suit against various motion picture 
concerns and individuals in which he would like to collect 
a large sum of money as damages for, according to his 
allegation, having been put out of business. 

Mr. Abramson may be quite sincere in his intentions and 
in his convictions about the whole matter. 

However, it appears to us that he has somewhat misin- 
terpreted the situation: He was not put out of the busi- 
ness; the business simply walked away from him, leaving 
him standing in the shadowy past with a set of ideas about 
production which are as much out of date as a horse car 
on Broadway, 

Mr. Abramson is not alone in his position of having been 
left in the discard. He has numerous company throughout 
the land with heavy concentrations in New York and Los 
Angeles. If this whole company would join with Mr. 
Abramson in filing suits for damages against the industry 
the total amount of money asked for would make the 
national debt seem small in comparison. 

This former producer of what was once regarded as 
motion picture entertainment is quite right in his feeling 
that the type of competition now existing in the industry 
leaves the independent producer in a difficult position. 
But the door has not been completely closed to the inde- 
pendent producer, yet any independent producer in order 
to be able to get even his foot in the door must have some- 
thing that the public of today wants. 

If Mr. Abramson had this something he would now be 
producing pictures and not filing suits. 

Mr. Abramson may really feel that the "system" has 
been against him but we should not look for any such com- 
plicated reason to explain his present inactivity in produc- 
tion. At one time the name of Ivan Abramson in the 
motion picture trade stood for a cheap, sensational, sexy 
type of picture for which there is no more demand now 
than there is for hoop skirts. The Abramson touch was 
once a byword in the business. But that day passed and 
with it passed Mr. Abramson as a motion picture producer. 

He is, however, entitled to his day in court. But, unless 
we miss our guess badly, that day will not be even slightly 
profitable to him. 

* * « 

Heroes 

PERSONS who sit back comfortably and safely in their 
theatre chairs belittling the efforts which are made to 
provide daring and realistic scenes in motion pictures, 
should find something in the accounts of the airplane 
accident in California to change their attitude. Persons 
who know nothing of motion picture production are far 
too prone to describe as faking scenes which in many cases 
have beerf made possible only through the fine courage 
of production people. 

The unfortunate accident in California illustrates the 
degree of peril which production people constantly subject 
themselves to in their zealousness to provide better enter- 
tainment. 

The men who lost their lives in this accident carried 
with them into the air on their last flight that same fine 
courage which is the hallmark of the hero the world over. 

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY. 



January II, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



17 



Will Erpi Go Out on Its Own? 
New Giant Has Growing Pains 



Try These Figures 
On Your Statisticator 

Electrical Research Products, Inc., 
boasts 4,000 employes, 2,500 of whom 
are located in the United States. It 
has 300 engineers in the field making 
installations. It has a hundred tech- 
nical inspectors checking up on these 
same installations. It also has three 
sound schools, one for the making of 
installation engineers, one for those 
who have been in the field and aspire 
to become technical inspectors and 
a third, graduate affair, for the tech- 
nical inspectors themselves. Erpi 
also has 70 amplifying channels, 100 
disc machines, 60 61m recorders, 65 
newsreel trucks and 25 location 
wagons. 



It's Just Too Awful Bad 
When You Try to Be N ice 
And Have This Happen! 

It Seems That Wilstach Said Some- 
thing About "Tight As a Tabloid 
Columnist" and Then — 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Frank J. Wilstach, 
who might be described as the buffer-state 
between the Hays organization and the 
press, has got himself involved in a pretty 
controversy. And all because he tried to 
be nice! 

Every New Year Day, as sure as egg- 
nog. Uncle Frank gives out a list of the 
smartest and snappiest similes pulled dur- 
ing the year. All you have to do is say 
something like "I feel like a wet dish-rag" 
and he has his little pencil and notebook 
out, to jot the thing down and save it for 
official pronouncement when the right time 
comes. 

"Tight as a Tabloid Columnist" 

This year — only the other day, though 
it seems like years ago — Dr. Wilstach an- 
nounced 'that one of the brilliant nifties of 
the year was the simile, "Shut up as tight as 
a tabloid columnist at five a. m." Franklin 
Pierce Adams, who conducts the celebrated 
Conning Tower column in the New York 
World over the initials F. P. A., was re- 
membered by Wilstach as the man who 
pulled it. 

And so Wilstach honored F. P. A. by 
including this bon mot, or bon phrase, in 
the list. And was F. P. A. duly pleased? 

Look What Happened 

Listen to this, written in Adams' own 
particular brand of green ink: 

"In accordance with his annual custom, 
Mr. Frank J. Wilstach has issued a few 
pages of 'The Best Similes of 1929.' Among 
them, credited to us, is 'Shut up as tight 
as a tabloid columnist at five a. m.' We 
never said it; we never wrote it; we are in- 
capable of having thought it, as to us it has 
no significance whatever. We never have 
seen a tabloid columnist at five a. m. ; we 
never have seen a tabloid columnist tight; 
Mr. Walter Winchell, the only t. c. we have 
ever seen more than once, does not, as far 
as we know, drink anything stronger than 
coffee. We defy Mr. Wilstach to show the 
verse or paragraph of ours from which the 
silly simile was taken." 



Will Do 40 Millions Business 
To Double Its Growth of 1929 

Total of 4,212 Theatres Equipped with Western Electric 
Sound — And Erpi Does the Okaying 

By PETER VISCHER 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7. — Erpi, that powerful factor in the motion picture 
industry with the forgettable name and the curious nickname — otherwise Elec- 
trical Research Products, Incorporated — is feeling growing pains. And these 
growing pains may have their effect upon the entire industry. 

P>pi, who sounds like a medieval giant, has turned out to be a modern one. 
Entering the film industry less than three years ago, May 21, 1927, Erpi grew 
last year into a $20,000,000 organization. This year Erpi will report a business 
of between $40,000,000 and $50,000,000 for 1929, which is dough in any man's 
money. 



Erpi ought to be a baby, withal a husky 
one. Erpi is only a subsidiary, a subsidiary 
of the vast Western Electric organization. 
Erpi manufactures nothing, but distributes 
and sells (with spectacular success, need it be 
told?) the sound equipment manufactured by 
Western Electric. And Erpi last week issued 
a list of 4,212 theatres equipped with "The 
Voice of Action," to say nothing of fourteen 
producer licensees. 

And Otterson Is a Fox Trustee 

Now, Western Electric itself is a part of the 
huge system of business, industry and com- 
munications built up by the American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company. And this 
great organization, feared and avoided upon 
its entry into the motion picture field, has 
more than once officially and smilingly an- 
nounced that it has no intention of doing a 
picture business. 

As a result, Erpi has grown in importance 
and power. When a decision affecting motion 
picture business is made, the decision is made 
at 250 West 57th street, which is the office 
of Erpi, and not at 195 Broadway, which is 
the office of Western Electric. When an 
official communique is prepared down town, it 
is taken up town for OK. Need I say more 
than that John E. Otterson, the head of Erpi, 
was the particular individual called in to be- 



come one of the three trustees of the vast 
Fox enterprises. 

A year ago, when Western Electric did a 
business of $287,000,000, the total represented 
by Erpi was a good bit less than 10 per cent, 
$20,000,000. Last year, the Western Electric 
total mounted, true, to $400,000,000 or there- 
abouts, but the Erpi contribution was 10 per 
cent or more, as the figures will in time show. 

Obviously, Erpi is feeling growing pains. 
Under the keen and close-mouthed direction 
of Otterson, a business organization of en- 
viable efficiency has: been built up. Four men 
of particular helpfulness surrounded Otter- 
son : Whitf ord Drake, his right-hand man ; 
James J. Lyng, vice president in charge of 
engineering; H. D. Knox, vice president in 
charge of West Coast studios, recently 
brought from abroad; and C. W. Bunn, sales 
manager. 

Should Erpi suddenly, or after mature con- 
sideration, decide to go out on its own (de- 
spite half-hearted denials that any such move 
is contemplated) it would not surprise those 
in the know. Nor would it be unprecedented. 
The Graybar organization, once a Western 
Electric subsidiary, recently went out on its 
own; this outfit sold and distributed toasters, 
waffle-irons, radios manufactured by Western 
Electric, so the analogy is not as far-fetched 
as it might seem. 



New Projectionists' Demands Would 

Mean Wage Increase of 15 Per Cent 

Demands by projectionists which are estimated to represent a wage increase 
of 15 per cent, and exhibitors' proposals which would mean a considerable de- 
crease in the present projection room labor cost, featured the negotiations begun 
last week by Chicago exhibitors and the projectionists' union, following expiration 
of their two-year contract. 

This year the union was forced to negotiate with two general exhibitor groups, 
the newly formed Illinois Independent Exhibitors Association, as well as the Jack 
Miller organization, the Chicago Exhibitors Association. Whatever the terms of 
the new contract, they will be the same for both groups, according to Tom Malloy, 
union head. 

One of the reasons the new exhibitor organization was formed, according to 
Aaron Saperstein, president, is to effect operating arrangements without the chain 
and deluxe theatre influence, said to be present in the older association. 

The union demands, in addition to the present conditions, a six-day week with 
seven days' pay; an additional operator in de luxe theatres; and pay for the half- 
hour required to prepare equipment for the performance. 

These demands were met last week by the Chicago Exhibitors Association with 
a proposal for the calculation of fractional hours in quarter-hours, not half -hours ; 
for the care of batteries to be done on regular time; for one operator only in 
theatres with merely sound-on-film equipment; one operator only to assist an 
engineer called in for inspection ; payment for such assistance only according to 
hours devoted to it; reduction in scale of permit men to $15 under that for card 
men; reduction in scale for small downtown houses. 



18 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 11, 1930 



mm 



Al Selig, on the Run 

ON the Saturday before Christmas, when 
all through the house (over at Tif- 
fany's) not a creature was stirring except 
Al Selig, the message came that Party Girl 
would open at the Gaiety on New Years 
Eve. Well, you could have knocked Al 
over with a trip-hammer. Here it was 
seven minutes after 3 and on Tuesday 
evening the place had to be ready. 

You couldn't do anything Saturday. You 
couldn't do anything Sunday. In fact, you 
couldn't do much on Monday or Tuesday, 
because The Sky Hawk was still holding 
the fort at the Gaiety and William Fox had 
no intention of taking that out until its run 
was ended, less than an hour before Party 
Girl was to come in. 

Well, men, during those odd moments on 
Monday and Tuesday when you and I were 
visiting, ifs shu r'member, Selig was dust- 
ing around. Lobby, lights, painting, pub- 
licity, tickets, sell-out — all arranged in two 
days. At 11:10, when you and I were be- 
ginning to kiss the old year goodby, Selig 
was shooing the last customer out of The 
Sky Hawk and welcoming the first clean- 
ing-woman to Party Girl. At 11:20, when 
you and I were the same, Selig was putting 
the last few tickets on sale in the box 
office. At 11:45, when you and I were 
better than ever, Selig turned out the lights 
and the machines started grinding out 
Party Girl to a capacity house on time to 
the minute. 

I haven't the slightest idea what Selig 
was doing at 12:15 or 4:15, but whatever 
he did, he deserved it. 

^ ^ ^ 

Toy Cannons 

I SEE that Canon Chase is demanding 
another investigation of the motion pic- 
ture industry. This will give Arthur James 
something to write about for weeks. 

* * * 

Senator Brookhart 

WHEN Ivan Abramson brought his suit 
against the Hays organization and a 
flock of film companies for $1,300,000, 
charging monopolization and other crimes, 
he announced that Senator Smith W. 
Brookhart, the renowned enemy of block 
booking, would be his trial counsel. 

The Hays organization, through Charlie 
Pettijohn, promptly announced that it was 
prepared in the matter of the Abramson 
suit and particularly welcomed it as an 
opportunity to clash at arms with the noble 
Senator. 

Some fun, boys. 

BUT ... no sooner did Mr. Abramson 
make his announcement and Counsel Petti- 
john issue his welcome than the wires of 
the press associations carried the word of 
Senator Brookhart that he had no intention 
whatsoever of acting as counsel. 

* * * 

Warners in Front 

THE activities of the Warners in behalf 
of sound is unceasing. The latest an- 
nouncement is to the efifect that the entire 
Warner-Stanley chain will be equipped for 
sound by February 1. 

It is interesting to note that the last two 
theatres to be converted to sound are ready 
for the event, the Savoy and the Family, 
on Market street in Philadelphia. It is also 
significant that the one theatre not to be 
converted to sound, the Princess, is either 
to be closed or placed on the market as 
real estate. 

PETER VISCHER. 



Victims of the Plane Crash 



"[Story on page 39]- 




Kenneth Hawks (shown with his wife, Mary Astor) 



Ben M. Frankel 




Otto Jordan 



Ross Cook 



Tom Harris 





Halleck Rouse 



George Eastman 
[all photos by p. & a.] 



Max Gold 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



19 



Fox's Reorganization Plans 

Favorable to All Interested 

Assets Are $73,000,000 Above 
Liabilities, Stockholders Told 



Fox Maps Its Greatest 
Program for 1930-1931; 
Studios Already Available 

Only Five Pictures Remain to Be 
Made of Schedule Up to 
August 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— With only five pic- 
tures incomplete of the Fox productions for 
exhibition in the next six months, studio 
facilities are now available for the compre- 
hensive plans for the season from August, 
1930, to July, 1931. 

John McCormack has completed his first 
singing and talking picture, said to have cost 
$1,000,000. Raoul Walsh has gone West to 
produce The Oregon Trail. Victor Fleming 
will make Common Clay and Janet Gaynor 
will be in Liliom, directed by Frank Borzagc. 
John Ford will make Jack London's The Sea 
Wolf and David Butler will film Mark 
Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King 
Arthur's Court in sound and dialog. 

Talking rights have been acquired to these 
novels: Basquerie, by Eleanor Mercerin; The 
Mad Song, by Mabel Gagnells ; The Last of 
the _ Duanes, by Zane Grey ; The County 
Chairman, by George Ade ; The Painted Lady, 
by Larry Evans ; The Country Beyond, by 
James Oliver Curwood. Plays to be made 
into talkers include: The Man Who Came 
Back, by J. E. Goodman ; The Yellow Ticket, 
by Michael Morton; The Fatal Wedding, by 
Theodore Kramer, and The Dancers, b)' 
Gerald du Maurier. 

Winfield Sheehan when overseas obtained 
rights to several works, and the first to be 
screened will be The London Revue, with 
Beatrice Lillie, the music by Richard Fall. 

S. N. Behrman on February 1, will join the 
30 writers on the Coast. Twenty-nine direc- 
tors are now at work. Three hundred talk- 
ing and musical artists are on the payroll. 



57,000 Film Theatres in 
World, 4 Billion Capital 
In Industry, Is Estimate 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
GENEVA, _ Jan. 7. — There are fifty-seven 
thousand motion picture theatres in the world, 
with $4,000,000,000 capital invested in the in- 
dustry, according to an estimate and survey 
of the International Labor office. 

American theatres have sufficient capacity 
to house 100,000,000 patrons a week, says the 
Labor office, while 25,000 of the theatres are 
in Germany and 4,000 in England. 

American companies are credited with half 
of the total investment, the British industry 
with $350,000,000. 



New Censor for Boston 
Named by Mayor Curley 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
BOSTON, Jan. 7.— Any hopes that Boston 
exhibitors had held they would be relieved of 
censorship were shattered when Mayor James 
M. Curley appointed John M. Casey to the 
censorship post. 



Eastman Denies Published Report He Would Finance 
Short Term Obligations of William Fox 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Reorganization of the William Fox organizations 
had progressed to such a point as this issue went to press that a definite 
announcement of plans was expected almost momentarily. 

Conferences between William Fox and his fellow trustees and their advisors 
were continuing favorably to all interested in the progress of the company. 

George Eastman, through the Eastman Ko- "The Class A stockholders' committee 
dak Company, denied a published report that is working to obtain additional figures 
he would finance the William Fox short term giving more details. The willingness of 

Mr. Fox for the first time since the com- 
pany's difficulties to make public these 
figures indicates that the committee's activi- 
ties are having the desired efifect. 

"In so far as Class A stockholders are 
concerned, the present situation will be re- 
lieved at the next annual meeting of the 
company when, in the opinion of the 
counsel of this committee, the Class A 
stock will have direct representation by the 
election of five directors, which will remove 
the principal barrier of closed control of 
the corporation. 

"Inasmuch as only $3,600,000 is required 
to continue the payments of the dividends 
of the Class A stock, and that the indicated 
earnings for the next year will be at least 
equal to those of 1929, the refinancing pro- 
gram should not meet with any insur- 
mountable difficulties, especially with the 
now expected cooperation of all interested 
parties." 



Bowes Host to 5,000 Widows and Children 

NEW YORK — Major Edward Bowes, managing 
director of the Capitol theatre, played host to more 
than 5,000 widows and children at a morning program 
at the Capitol, under the auspices of the Board of 
Child Welfare. 



obligations and thus end the trusteeship. 

During the week, Fox weathered a crisis 
adroitly. 

A committee of Class A stockholders 
announced through their counsel, Stanley 
M. Lazarus, that a receivership was in- 
evitable. "If the receivership is not imme- 
diately applied for by the creditors," said 
Lazarus, "such immediate action is con- 
templated by the Class A stockholders for 
their protection." 

The announcement was carried by finan- 
cial news tickers at 2:35 p. m. and in the 
35 minutes remaining- before the close of 
the market, Fox stock dropped to 17, a skid 
of points and a new low. During 1929 
the stock sold as high as $105.62. 

Assets Exceed $73,000,000 

The situation was such that William Fox, 
who makes it a rule never to discuss his 
affairs publicly, issued a statement. He 
stated that the assets of Fox Film over and 
above all liabilities are in excess of $73,000,- 
000, its earnings for 1929 more than $19,000,- 
000, and its estimated earnings for 1930 in 
excess of $17,000,000. Fox's statement 
follows: 

"In connection with statements that have 
been made by counsel for the socalled 
stockholders' committee, I wish to say that 
the assets of Fox Film Corporation over 
and above all liabilities are in excess of 
$73,000,000, and the earnings for the year 
of 1929 are over $13,000,000 with a special 
non-recurring profit of $6,000,000, or a total 
for the year 1929 of over $19,000,000. 

"The estimated earnings to be produced 
in 1930 based upon" figures from the oper- 
ating officials of the company, are in excess 
of $17,000,000. The officials of the company 
are in the process of negotiations which 
when completed, they believe, will enable 
them to fund all of the corooration's short- 
term obligations. From all appearances the 
year 1930 will be the greatest in every re- 
spect in the history of the company." 
Fox Film Recovers on Market 

The Fox statement, his first since the 
announcement of the trusteeship on Dec. 
6, brought Fox Film a recovery from a 
new low of 16^ to 22^. It also brought 
a new statement from Farrar Lazarus, a 
member of the Class A stockholders' com- 
mittee. This statement read as follows: 

"The statement issued by William Fox 
to the efiect that the assets above the lia- 
bilities of the Fox Film Corporation are 
$73,000,000 indicates a book value of $73 a 
share for the Class A and B stocks. 

"This, together with the estimate of 
earnings for 1929 of $19,000,000, showing 
earnings of $19 a share for both classes of 
stock, is reassuring. 



33 Sound Projects 
Open Biggest Year 
Of Fox West Coast 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 7.— With plans in 
hand or work begun on 33 sound houses, 
Harold B. Franklin, president of Fox West 
Coast theatres, predicted 1930 will be the 
largest and most important year in new thea- 
tre expansion that Fox West Coast theatres 
have ever taken. The 33 cities are: 

San Pedro, Huntington Park ; Los Angeles : 
Wilshire & Hamilton, Florence & Compton, 
Beverly & Fairfax; Hollywood: Hollywood 
Blvd. ; Pasadena, Westwood, Burbank, San 
Jose, Sacramento, Oakland, Santa Barbara, 
Whittier, Bakersfield, Berkeley, Stockton, 
all in California; Phoenix, Ariz.; Snokane, 
Wash. ; Billings, Mont. ; La Grand, Oregon ; 
Kansas City, Mo. ; Denver, Col. 

"We made these plans because of the growth 
necessary to accommodate the tremendous in- 
crease in patronage since the talkies were first 
shown," Franklin said. 

"Strange as it may seem our reports show 
the best November and December we have 
ever had, better even than the 1928 boom 
period. 

"Another phase of future possibilities that 
influences our expansion is the imminence of 
three 'talkie' developments ; color, depth and 
the much discussed wide film, not singly but 
combined. When we introduce these features 
we expect another boon to our patronage like 
unto the first showing of talking pictures 
in 1928." 



20 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



The Sound 

=Box= 




Milt Gross, Sculpt 



0-o-o-o-h, Mickey! 

Pass the complaining, please. Over there, 
in the green bottle next to the Chili sauce. 
Right here. Ok. 

Now. See here, Walt Disney! What's all 
this, anyway? Times used to be when I'd 
wake in a cold 
sweat dream- 
ing of how 
Mickey Mouse 
saved the Prin- 
cess by throw- 
ing his head at 
the villain. No 
more though. 
Now I can't 
even sleep for 
worrying 
what's hap- 
pened to the 
creative talent 
behind the pen. 
Remember the fellow who comes on the stage 
and says "Now I'll punch the bag ten 
t'ousand consekative times." He takes about 
half a dozen pokes, stops, and turns around. 
"Well," he says apologetically, "you get the 
idea." 

That's what happened to Mickey. If you've 
seen one Mickey Mousre you've seen too many. 
First, a skeleton quartet comes clacking on 
tomb stones in a swell buck and wing. All 
right, funny. Then three stalks of celery do 
a buck and wing on a blue plate vegetable 
dinner. Still funny. Than three beetles go 
bughouse on a turtle's shell. Now hereabouts 
the thing isn't hilarious anymore. Law of 
diminishing returns; and all that. 

Come, come now, old bean. Let's use it. 

* * * 

The lobby display on Party Girl was some- 
thing for the naked eye to see. 

Profile 
Glendon a l l V I n e. 
Director of Advertising 
and Publicity for Fox. 
Five nine and weighs 
147 with two pounds of 
clothing. not wearing 
two pounds of clothing, 
he weighs the conven- 
tional 145. Bluest eyes 
on Tenth Avenue. 
Thirty-six years old and 
has nice gray hair over 
worrying over his gray 
hair. Married last June 
but still talks with his thumbs in his vest. A 
genuine Kansas City Star man. Later on 
Irihune, press agent for musicals, eight years 
with Paramount, and last two years with Fox. 
Very enthusiastic about future of his organ- 
ization. "We did 40 per cent more business 
this month than last year's corresponding 
month." Carries his data on the backs of 
envelopes. Has three telephones and a water- 
proof filing cabinet. Writes passes with either 
hand. 

^ ^ ^ 

Maurice Chevalier sang at a Paul 
Block party the other night as a favor 
to Adolph Zukor — and wouldn't accept 
a dime for it. P. B. sent a check for 
$1,000 to a Paris hospital. 

* * * 

The Duncan sisters tell me, not for pub- 
lication, that The Hollywood Revue was 
expressly written for them and it's the story 
of their own lives. They too landed in New 
York with four dollars between them. 

NORMAN KRASNA 




Glen Allvine 



Sound Making Slow But Sure Progress 
Overseas^ Says Joe Brandt 

Britain to Install Many of Its Own Sound Equipments, Declares Columbians 
President — Situation Confused in France and Germany 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7. — Limited distribution and comparatively smaller 
population are making the general adoption of talking pictures a 
slower process in foreign countries than in the United States, but the 
public is enthusiastic and final settlement of the interchangeability problem 
is helping to clear the atmosphere, says Joe Brandt, president of Columbia, 
who has the experiences of three trips abroad in 1929 to support his findings. 

FOLLOWING is the situation in the 
various countries as seen by Brandt and 
as based on his observations in the past 



year: 

GREAT BRITAIN 

"Due to some technical problem, Brit- 
ish Acoustics was not prepared to compete 
with the American made machines. As a 
result the American machines made consid- 
erable inroads before the British machines 
could be marketed. The situation today is 
that there is a predominance of American 
made machines in the theatres. I look for 
the installation of many British made ma- 
chines in Great Britain. 

"None of the mechanical companies now 
object to the use of American made film 
on British made machines, provided that 
the tone quality is as good as that of the 
Americans. 

Phenomenal Grosses 

"The British public have taken to talk- 
ing pictures as keenly as the American, and 
exhibitors appreciate that never in the his- 
tory of the business have they taken in 
such phenomenal grosses. 

"British International, Maxwell's organ- 
ization, has equipped its studios with RCA 
equipment. British Dominions, Herbert 
Wilcox company, is using Western Elec- 
tric. British Gaumont has been success- 
fully recording on British Acoustics. 

FRANCE 

"The situation in France is a bit more 
complicated. The most progressive organ- 
ization for the development of reproduc- 
tion and recording of sound is the estab- 
lishment of Jacques Haik. Haik had in- 
tended to market a talking picture device 
but concluded arrangements with a very 
large electrical company over there to han- 
dle the manufacturing and selling of ma- 
chines in France. 

"Pathe Natan were equipping their studio. 
The producers of France contemplate that 
they will, as soon as they can get proper 
studio installations, produce as many 
French talking pictures within a period of 
18 months as they did during a year's 
period of silents. 

"Submarine ran at the Cameo for four 
months and The Jazz Singer broke a rec- 
ord by staying six months at the Aubert 
Palace. 

GERMANY 

"The situation in Germany is rather 
chaotic due to the suits pending and in- 
junctions granted against American devices. 
The combmation of the Tobis and the 
Klang interests have retarded the installa- 
tion of American machines, but Warner 
seems to have been particularly successful 
in the exhibiting of The Jazz Singer. The 
German independent producers have all 
come to the conclusion that it will take a 
very considerable time, possibly over a 
year, before the Germans can properly 
equip their studios. 

"There was a tendency in Germany to 
restrict production to silent pictures in an 
effort to curb the desire of the public for 
talking pictures, but the invasion of some 
of the synchronized pictures has developed 



a desire on the part of German producers 
to meet the demand. 

AUSTRIA AND ITALY 

"Austria is in a very peculiar position, 
because geographically Austria cannot 
afford to make talking pictures. Its market 
is very restricted. Installations have been 
very slow and many lawsuits have been 
started to restrain those exhibitors who 
wanted to install American machines. I 
believe there are one or two installations 
in the bigger theatres but they are suffer- 
ing from the lack of product because of 
the German interest. 

"In Italy there has been a more pro- 
gressive state of mind among exhibitors. 
In the principal cities there have been a 
great many installations. A few of the 
musical pictures have got by with titles 
and American songs. 

OTHER COUNTRIES 

"The other countries, such as Hungary 
and the Balkans, are apparently going very 
slow on installations, as they realize tliat 
they cannot produce in their own country 
pictures in which their native tongue is 
used. 

"Russia seems to be going ahead on the 
basis of a definite program to manufacture 
talking pictures. There the producing and 
exhibiting of pictures is entirely financed 
by the government. 

_ "From my talk with several representa- 
tives of circuits in the Far East, it seems 
as if those countries, and particularly India, 
Australia and Africa, are going ahead in a 
big way. Japan also is showing American 
talking pictures." 



1930 Construction 
To Top That of 1929, 
Hoover Reports Say 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 7.— President Hoover 
told callers that 1930 promises to be a far 
better construction year than 1929, according 
to figures held by the Department of 
Commerce. 

Reports from 29 states indicate projects in- 
volving $1,550,000,000, which, combined with 
the $1,050,000,000 of the railroads and the 
$2,100,000,000 of the public utilities insures a 
program of at least $5,000,000,000 when com- 
plete reports are all made. 



/. B, Dagger Elected to 
Head Dallas Film Board 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
DALLAS, Jan. 7. — J. B. Dugger, manager 
of the local Paramount exchange was 
elected head of the Dallas Film Board to 
serve the unexpired term of P. K. Johnston, 
which extends to next September. Johns- 
ton, who until recently was the manager of 
the Fox Dallas exchange, resigned his posi- 
tion with the Fox organization to go with 
Publix. 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



Award Goes to Small Town House 
Having Acoustical Expert's Okay 

Editor's Recommendation Wins 
Plaque for St. Charles Arcada 



YOU ARE CORDJALLY INVITED TO BE A GUEST AT THE 

CIVITAN CLUB LUNCHEON 

FRIDAY. JANUARY 3RD. 1:00 P. M. 
TUTWILER HOTEL 
AT WHICH TIME THE 

EXHIBITORS Herald World 

AWARD OF MERIT 

TO THE 

RiALTO Theatre 

FOR SOUND PICTURE REPRODUCTION 
WILL BE PRESENTED TO 

R. M. KENNEDY. MANAGER 



Invitation issued by Rialto, Birmingham 



Results Should Be 



Definite 



I think your idea of an honor award 
for exhibitors who maintain a high 
quality of sound reproduction is not 
only splendid from an idea standpoint, 
but I beHeve it will be rewarded with 
definite results. We spend a great 
deal of time and money in the studio 
to achieve results in our sound record' 
ing, but this is all wasted unless sound 
reproduction in the theatres is main- 
tained at the same standard. A plan 
such as this which will tend to make 
the exhibitors actually conscious of 
quality can only result in higher 
profits for everyone in the motion pic- 
ture industry. 

IRVmO G. THALBERG. 
Vice President, Metro-Goldwyri' 

Mayer Studio. 



In This Corner, Petti john; 
In This— But Where Did 
Senator Brookhart Go? 

Is It Possible Promoter Ahramson 
Announced His Fighter Before 
Signing His Stable? 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— It looked, for a few 
brief moments last week, as though the man 
had been found to promote the greatest Battle 
of the Century: Ivan Abramson. He an- 
nounced he had Senator Smith W. (Block 
Booking) Brookhart all signed on the dotted 
line, practically in training. Charlie Pettijohn 
promptly came back with word that his sreat 
little piece of fighting machinery, Hays Office, 
had been waiting for the chance for years. 

"Senator Brookhart," said Abramson, with 
the easy gesture of a man who had the papers 
in his pocket, "will be trial counsel in my suit 
against the Hays organization and others for 
$1,300,000." 

Pettijohn rubbed his hands, dreamily. He 
was wondering whether it had to be gloves, 
or_ if it couldn't be done with bare knuckles, 
shillalahs, knives, or pineapples at ten paces. 

The Herald-World sent scouts at once to 
arrange a site for the battle, when Senator 
Brookhart pulled a Tunney and in perfect 
English told representatives of the press asso- 
ciations that he had not the slightest intention 
of fighting under Ivan Abramson's promotion. 



Mayor Thacher of Albany, N, Y., Presents Symbol of 
Better Sound Reproduction to Buckley 

By JAY M. SHRECK 

There may be pride in ownership, but there is twofold pride in award. 

Theatres, large and small, outstanding in their quality of sound reproduction 
have been presented with the Herald-World Plaque, which signifies that the 
exhibitor and his staff have devoted time and effort to reproduction with a view 
of offering the theatres' clientele, and new patrons, the best in motion picture 
entertainment. 

A recent award, recommended by the local newspaper editor, has just been 
made to the Arcada theatre, St, Charles, 111., a 500-seat theatre in a town of 4,099. 

It is gratifying to learn that this house, prior to the award, was found to have 
excellent acoustical conditions by no less an authority than Dr. Paul E. Sabine of 
the Riverside Laboratories. Dr. Sabine is nationally known, as was his father. 

Recommendation for presentation of the Award of Merit to the Arcada, of 
which W. L. Pracht is manager, was made by P. M. Paschal, editor of the St. 
Charles Chronicle, 

In announcing the Award, the Chronicle, in a top story, said: 

"In making the Award emphasis was placed on two prime requisites: Good 
acoustical conditions in the theatre, and good reproducing equipment. Dr. Sabine, 
a leading authority in acoustics, made a thorough test at the Arcada auditorium 
and found conditions excellent. Numerous tests were made by the Operadio 
Manufacturing Company and United Reproducing Engineers and invariably the 
verdict was 'acoustics excellent.' 

"The reproducing equipment, the De Forest Phonofilm and Phonodisc, was 
found to be of the highest quality, the installation having been under the personal 
supervision of Dr. De Forest. Especially commended were the three sets of 
speakers with which the Arcada is equipped whereby the projectionist can at any 
time switch from one to another, getting maximum efficiency from the various 
recordings. 

"The plaque, which is indeed a work of art, is reproduced in another column, 
and is now on display at the box office window." 

Acknowledging receipt and presentation of the Plaque, Mr. Pracht writes: 

"Please excuse my tardiness in acknowledging the finest Christmas gift received 
this year, the Merit Award .... so please accept my sincere thanks and apprecia- 
tion for this truly wonderful gift." 

On the letterheads of the Arcada there will be printed a small reproduction 
of the Plaque. 

In Albany, N. Y., the mayor presided at the presentation of the Plaques to two 
theatres. The story of these presentations follows : 

Talk about your Christmas presents, or, what is better yet, let C. H. Buckley, 
owner of the Leland and Harmanus-Bleecker theatres in Albany, N. Y., do the 
talking. For Mr. Buckley admits that he never received a Christmas present that 




quite equalled the one that caine his 
way a couple of weeks ago. 

Maybe it was a bit premature, arriv- 
ing a day or so before Old Santa himself 
put in his appearance, but it was such a 
joyful surprise that "Chris" Buckley, his 
face wreathed in smiles, made his way 
forthwith to the office of Mayor John 
Boyd Thacher in the city hall, and right 
then and there proceeded to tell him 
about it, knowing that it was an event in 
which the mayor and everyone in the 
city of 140,000 inhabitants would be 
interested. 

And maybe Mayor Thacher wasn't 
pleased when he heard that Mr. Buckley 
had received not one but two of the 
awards made by the Exhibitors Her- 
ALD-WoRLD for the high quality of the 
reproduction of sound pictures in the. 
two houses. 

Mayor Thacher is always on the look- 
out for things that improve his home 
city and naturally he wants his theatres 



to be numbered among the best in the 
country. And so when Mr. Buckley re- 
ceived the two awards, he, too, did a bit 
of smiling and then proceeded to con- 
gratulate Mr. Buckley with a camera- 
man right on the spot. 

It was a big event, and now Mr. 
Buckley has placed the two bronze 
plaques right on the front of the respec- 
tive theatres where they can be seen by 
everyone as he lays down the price of 
his admission, and which, as Mr. Buck- 
ley says, assures the patron of the very 
best of entertainment and the highest 
quality of sound. 

To date 200 theatres in cities, neigh- 
borhood communities of cities and small 
towns have received, or have been rec- 
ommended to receive, the Herald- 
World Plaque. These theatres range in 
seating capacity from 250 to 6,000. 

Next week we will review the com- 
ments of editors on the question of 
sound reproduction. 



January II, 1930 

Hays, in "See and Hear,'* 
Traces Industry Growth 
From Early Experiments 

It's All Done in 63 Pages and the 
Entire History Is 
Retraced 

Just around the corner is coming "a motion 
picture flashed on the screen as large as the 
ordinary stage, the figures moving in perspec- 
tive, speaking naturally, all in the vivid colors 
of life," writes Will H. Hays in his new 
volume, "See and Hear," carrying the sub- 
title, "A brief history of motion pictures and 
the development of sound." 

Sound, its origin and growth, comprises 
almost one-half of the book, the first half 
tracing the development of the motion pic- 
ture from its first embryonic beginnings long 
before Thomas A. Edison began his experi- 
ments in 1887. These beginnings, often told 
in the journalism of the industry, are treated 
interestingly and picturesquely in Hays' vol- 
ume, with occasional quotations from Terry 
Ramsaye's "A Million and One Nights." 
Throughout, the volume is dotted with pic- 
tures, from the interior of a nickelodeon to 
reproductions of sound film strips. 

First Order for Film 

In the first chapter, on "The Genesis of 
the Motion Picture," there is reference to 
Edison's first order for film from George 
Eastman — and "the motion picture had come 
into being" . 

"An Industry's Early Days," the second 
chapter, pictures a series of events that 
played a big part in development: the show- 
ing of Armat's projector, called the Vitascope 
when Edison purchased it, in 1896, with April 
23 as "the real birthday of the motion picture 
as a form. of public entertainment"; the finale 
with those in the front rows "jumping from 
their seats to avoid being deluged by the 
waves" in the picture of Manhattan Beach"; 
the beginnings of Adolph Zukor, Marcus 
Loew and William Fox; Carl Laemmle's 
White Front theatre in Chicago with "a bright 
messenger boy by the name of Sam Katz 
to play the piano"; Jesse L. Lasky and Cecil 
B. DeMille renting a barn in Hollywood for 
a studio ; the first serial ; the first newsreel ; 
the opening of the Strand in 1914. 

Under "Organization of an Industry," Hays 
describes the formation of the M P P D A and 
its purposes, the public relations committee, 
gives statistics on employment, activities in 
the field of religious and surgical pictures. 

Sound in 1862 

Sound pictures. Hays points out, had their 
suggestions in 1862 and 1892 and in Edison's 
Kinetoscope in 1894, and Laemmle experi- 
mented with it in the Synchroscope, while 
Edison in 1913 launched another, the Camera- 
phone or Kinetophone. 

The modern talking picture, with tre- 
mendous and dazzling development since 
1926, had been a subject of experiment for 
five years previous, an experiment with the 
greatest problem lying in commercial prac- 
ticability, or, as Hays puts it, how to "pro- 
duce satisfactory qualities of sound in ade- 
quate volume." Then comes the familiar 
history of the Warner Brothers contract with 
Western Electric in 1926, the premiere of 
Vitaphone August 6 of that year, the tragic 
death of Sam Warner; the coming of Fox 
into the talking picture field. In a chapter 
on the recording of sound pictures. Hays tells 
of how the "success of the Jazz Singer became 
the signal for all the producing companies 
to enter the sound field." He describes the 
kinds of recording and then goes on into the 
final chapter, on the future industry, with 
every new picture marking an advance in 
production. 

A history of the motion picture in 63 pages, 
and that in itself is a real accomplishment. to 
say nothing of the attractiveness with which 
it is presented. 



Bill for Government Production of 

Films Given to Congress by Lankford 

(From Washington Correspondent of Herald-World) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 7. — A bill providing for a department of general welfare 
to have full control of radio and also to produce Elms for the Government and 
provide £lms for schools, churches, lodges and other organizations, was introduced 
in Congress yesterday by Representative Lankford of Georgia, author of the un- 
successful bill to introduce Sunday Blue Law into the District of Columbia. 

With the exception of the Brookhart block booking bill, this is the Srst adverse 
£lm legislation to be introduced in the present Congress, and represents the first 
move of the reformers. The Brookhart bill was reintroduced to back up its 
author's assertion that he would continue to fight for the legislation, and so far no 
steps have been taken to secure consideration of it. 



January II, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 




Flames tried to complete what the march 
of film production had started when a 
fire recently caused $100,000 damage to 
the building which had housed the old 
Selig studio in Chicago. Two candy com- 
panies and a rug concern now use the 
building. (P. and A. Photo.) 



Warners Appoint 
Rapee as General 
Musical Director 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Erno Rapee, for 
many years associated with S. L. Rothafel, 
and conductor of the symphony orchestras 
at the Capitol and Roxv theatres in New 
York, has signed a contract with Warner 
Brothers to become general musical di- 
rector of their studio, it has been announced 
by J. L. Warner, vice president in charge 
of production. 

Rapee, who is noted for his compositions 
"Diane," "Charmaine" and "Angela Mia," 
will have charge of all musical activities 
connected with the program of Vitaphone 
specials made at the Warner studio during 
the coming months. 



Irving D, Rossheim, 
Former F N President, 
Joins Brokerage Firm 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Irving D. Ross- 
heim, former president of First National 
Pictures, Inc. and the Stanley Company of 
America, has been named a general partner 
in the banking and brokerage firm of New- 
burger, Henderson and Loeb of New York 
and Philadelphia. 

Starting with the Stanley company as 
assistant counsel, he became, successively, 
comptroller, assistant treasurer and treasurer. 
He then served as president of First Na- 
tional Pictures, Inc., and after that as 
president of the Stanley company. At 
present he is active on the board of di- 
rectors of Warner Brothers. 



Theatre Owner Ends Life 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
AKRON, Jan. 7.— Poor health and worry, 
believed to have been caused by a bombing 
and fire at his theatre, caused Park J. 
Palmer, exhibitor, to end his life by shoot- 
ing himself in the head with a pistol. 



Bars Picture She Hasn't Seen 
As Climax to Censorial Mania 

And Now Petitions Are Demanding Forced Exodus, for Mayor's 

Censor Appointee — She Wanted Family Type Film 

So She Rejected Bulldog Drummond 

Censors move in ridiculous ways, their blunders to perform. But out in 
Evanston, Chicago suburb where anything but the intellig/entsia is a rare 
exception and where logic is a regular subject of study for the Maturing Mind, 
there exists a type of censorship that defies any of the three R's — Rhyme, 
Reason and Ratiocination. Two times that peculiar censorial bent has "broke" 
theatres. 



The only beam of mental sunlight that 
has been able to force its way through 
the fog is a movement in the form of a 
petition demanding the removal of the ap- 
pointed misinterpreter of public opinion. 

Bars Film She Hasn't Seen 

Fours years of iron-handed censorship, 
with only an occasional hiatus in which an 
exhibitor arising in the morning could be 
certain that by show time he would not 
have had to substitute another picture, 
brought a climax of climaxes when a pro- 
duction was barred because, as the censor 
explained, she wanted to "insure a family 
type picture for the New Year's Holiday"! 
And she admitted she had not even seen the 
production! 

Mrs. Carleton Randolph, appointee of 
Mayor Charles H. Bartlett on recommenda- 
tion of the staid Woman's club, has been 
flinging rejection slips hither and yon with 
dictatorial abandon. Two motion picture 
houses in that city of 75,000 have gone to 
the wall because of her dislike of "crime" 
films or "night life" pictures, and now she 
has locked horns with the Balaban and 
Katz organization, which maintains the 
Varsity theatre. 

Rejects Three to Five a Week 

Since Publix took over the Varsity a year 
ago, Mrs. Randolph has passed many con- 
troversial pictures, chiefly because she was 
convinced partial censorship was a difficult 
matter with Vitaphone and sound track 
pictures. Prior to that period, she had re- 
jected from three to five pictures a week, 
viewing them in the morning and forcing 
the manager to take a trip to Chicago, 
obtain another and usually inferior film, 
and hold a preview for her approval — all 
before the afternoon opening time. 

The latest trouble arose over the show- 
ing of Bulldog Drummond, starring Ronald 
Colman; a picture that was admittedly of 
high class and censor-proof variety. But 
the day before its advertised appearance, 
Mrs. Randolph sent A. C. Archbald, the 
manager, the much-feared rejection slip. 
Asked why, she startled the manager, the 
police department and the usually benign 
public with this statement: 

"Aly purpose in rejecting Bulldog Drum- 



mond was to insure a faimly type picture 
for the New Year's holiday. I did not see 
Bulldog Drummond and as there had been 
some question of the suitability of the two 
preceding films. The Cockeyed World and 
Untamed, I though it advisable to ask that 
a substitution be made." 

Demand Her Resignation 

Thus Evanston had the spectacle of a pic- 
ture being rejected when it had not been 
seen by the censor, admittedly because she 
realized a week later that there had been 
passages to which she objected in the 
Cockeyed World and Untamed. The city 
is aroused to the point where demands for 
Mrs. Randolph's resignation flooded the 
mayor's office for an entire day; but her 
Woman's club connection and that organ- 
ization's political influence has seemed to 
assure her "staying put." 

An example of censorship in Evanston, 
supposedly a city of above-the-average in- 
telligence, occurred when Honky Tonk, 
starring Sophie Tucker, was shown. When 
the time came for the public to hear the 
song, "Red Hot Mama," the censor cut out 
the sound and let the film go on, with 
Sophie lipping wordless phrases. Hoots 
and hisses greeted this sample of "protect- 
ing the public." 

Bars Sunday Shows 

The United Artists' corporation, on the 
rejection of Bulldog Drummond, offered to 
back up the Varsity theatre if the censor 
took reprisals for its making public her 
"censorship without seeing" policy. After 
the smoke of battle died down, she said the 
film could show in Evanston, but on some 
other day. Of course she was not con- 
cerned with the effect of advance booking 
arrangements on that gesture of generosity. 

"Movies tend to glorify crime," she told 
a gathering of clubwomen some time ago. 
"It is my duty to prevent the children from 
seeing crooks made into heroes. If the 
public wants that tvpe of picture, they'll 
have to go across the line into Chicago." 

And patrons are going to Chicago for 
many of their films. There are no Sunday 
pictures in Evanston; a condition long at- 
tributed to Mrs. Randolph's activity among 
the women voters of the city. 



Prison Term Is Promised for Hoodlum 

Who Yelled ^^Fire" in Crowded Theatre 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

OTTAWA, Jan. 7. — Shouting a false alarm of "fire" in the balcony of the thea- 
tre during a crowded matinee performance, a patron caused a rush at the Francais 
theatre, several hundred patrons, including many children, racing through the 
exit. No one was injured, thanks to the quick action of employes, but the mis- 
creant eluded pursuers. The description given to the police was that he was 35 
years of age. Manager Joseph Paquin immediately offered a reward of $100 for 
the arrest of the offender, but without result. 

Chief of Police Ross promised a penitentiary term for the offender. There 
were 1,500 persons in the theatre at the time and, fortunately, his cry of "fire" 
was not heard on the orchestra ffoor because of the sound picture presentation. 
After restoring order, all patrons returned to their seats to witness the show which 
had not been stopped. 



24 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 11, 1930 



2,000 Signers in Four Months 



And Here Are the Pictures, Including Six Roadshows and Twenty Features, That 
Tiffany Is Promising in Return for the Trust Shown the Company in Hanging Up 
Its Record of 2,000 Franchise Holders Signed Since Chicago Meeting with Allied 
Last August — Hanson Predicts Greater Additions of Exhibitors in Next Two Months 
Than First Two of Campaign Produced. 



Paper Profits, from a magazine story of the same 
name. 

Cyclone Hickey, the story of a pugilist's rise and 
fall, by A. P. Younger. 

liasca, from the poem of the same name. 

Mareea-Maria, from the novel of the same name 
by Sophie Kerr. 

Cheat the Boys, featuring Alice Montague. Story 
by A. P. Younger. 

The Torrent, by Langdon McCormick, author of 
"The Storm." 

SHORT FEATURES 

Color Symphonies. Single reel subjects in sound, 
done in technicolor. 

The Voice of Hollywood. One-reel regular release, 
showing stars of Hollywood speaking and having 
fun. Produced by Louis Lewyn. 



(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7. — The 2,000 franchise holders who have signed up 
under the Tiffany banner since last August, setting a real distribution 
record, will find their confidence well placed and richly merited in the 
light of the company's program calling for six roadshows and twenty features 
in addition to many short features, just announced by Grant L. Cook, executive 
vice-president. 

IT'S a real sales mark that Tiffany has hung 
up since that meeting only a bit more than 
four months ago at the Stevens hotel in Chi- 
cago when Tiffany broached its franchise plan 
through Cook and Oscar R. Hanson, general 
sales manager, in conjunction with Allied 
States. Then followed some busy days for 
Hanson, for in company with Al Steffes and 
Col. H. A. Cole of Allied he traveled through 
the Middlewest and Northwest, and then on 
to the Coast, explaining the five-year con- 
tract plan. 

Sees Double Total in Two Months 
In two months there had been 1,000 signers. 
The number had grown to 1,500 in another 
month, and New Year Day saw the total at 
2,000. All of which reflects the logic of Han- 
son's prediction that the next two months will 
find a greater number of franchise holders 
signed than in the two first months of the 
campaign. 

And here is what Tiffany offers these ex- 
hibitors in return for their faith in the com- 
pany's productions for this year, while addi- 
tional releases are to be announced later: 
ROAD SHOWS 

Jonrpcy's End. All-talking screen version of R. 
C. SherrifT's stage play, directed by James Whale, 
the cast headed by Colin Clive, who went to Holly- 
wood from the Prince of Wales theatre, London, to 
play the part of Stanhope. No women in the caet. 
This will be released on Broadway within a short 
time. 

Party Girl, with Douglas Fairbanks. Jr., and star 
cast. Now being shown at the Gaiety theatre. New 
York. All-talking. 

Resurrection. Musical and talkinc version of Tol- 
stoi's masterpiece, with William Collier, Jr., heading 
the cast. 

Mamba. All-talking and technicolor story of white 
people in the African jungles, with Jean Hersholt, 
Eleanor Boardman, Ralph Forbes. Cost of picture 
will exceed $500,000. 

The Lost Zeppelin. All-talking, with Conway 
Tearle. Virginia Valli. Ricardo Cortez. Now show- 
ing at the Park. Boston, where it hae broken all 
house records. A Zeppelin sails for the South Pole 
and is wrecked. Romantic story of an "eternal tri- 
angle." More than a year in the making. 

Second All-Talking Technicolor Production, with 
locale in the South Sea Islands. 

REGULAR RELEASES 

Mae Murray in Peacock Alley. All-talking, with 
singing and dancing sequence in color. George Bar- 
raud plays opposite star. 

Troopers Three. Story of the U. S. Cavalry, with 
Rex Lease, Dorothy Gulliver, Slim Summerville in 
cast. 

Painted Faces, featuring Joe E. Brown as a circus 
clown. All-talking. 

Snnny Days, a musical college story of youth, love 
and laughter. 

The Medicine Man. All-talking, singing and 
dancing. From the New York stage play of the 
same name by Eflliott Lester. 

Leo Carrillo in Mister Antonio, with Virginia 
Valli. All-talking. Carrillo's first talkng picture. 

Love Waltz, a Viennese romance with music, fea- 
turing Mae Murray. 

High Treason. A dramatic production looking into 
the future. 

Love, Life and Laughter. A drama of love. 
Luxury Girl, dramatic picturization of an uptodate 
theme. 

Left-Over Ladies, by Ursula Parrott, author of 
Ex-Wife. 

Satin Straps, from Maysie Greig's story. 
Senor Manana, from the novel by Stuart Page 
Graham. Featuring Leo Carrillo. 

Leo Carrillo in My Brudder Sylvest. 



Technical Bareau 
Of AMPP Shifted 
Over to Academy 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Technical activities 
affecting the production branch of the motion 
picture industry will be centralized through 
the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences, it has been announced. The tech- 
nical bureau, which for the past two years has 
been maintained by the Association of Motion 
Picture Producers, has been transferred to 
the Academy. 

The facilities of the Academy will be con- 
tinued and expanded as a clearing house for 
technical data and as the medium of coopera- 
tive research of non-competitive problems 
among the studios. 



Good Reception Marks 
Opening MGM Broadcast 
From Montana Film Set 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7. — Excellent reception 
was reported for the first of the new MGM 
countrywide radio broadcasts last night over 
the Columbia chain of 43 stations. Presented 
were Joan Crawford and Doug Fairbanks, Jr. 
Listeners were privileged to tune in on the set 
of Montana, Miss Crawford's new talking 
film. She spoke, while Cliff Edwards, ukulele 
player, and Benny Rubin, comedian, provided 
a monolog and musical specialty. A California 
band gave some lively numbers. The Biltmorc 
Trio also entertained. 

The MGM programs, from KHJ. Los An- 
geles, which will be given each Monday eve- 
ning from 7 to 7:30 (Eastern Time), are 
sponsored by the Purity Bread Company and 
the Carter Manufacturing Company, and will 
be extensively advertised. WABC receives the 
program in New York. 



Warner Brothers Will 
Release 20 Specials in 
First 6 Months of 1930 

List Consists of Operettas, Dramas, 
Color Films and Out- 
door Stories 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Twenty audible pic- 
tures are scheduled to be released on Warner 
Brothers program the first six months in 
1930. The announcement was made by Sam 

E. Morris, vice president of the company. 
Among the pictures are, operettas, dramas, 
outdoor stories and several all-color produc- 
tions. The twenty pictures are: 

Second Choice, starring Dolores Costello, supported 
by Chester Morris, Jack Mulhall and Edna Murphy. 

Wide Open, based on Edward Bateman Morris' 
novel, The Narrow Street, with Edward Everett 
Horton, Patsy Ruth Miller and Louise Fazenda. 

She Couldn't Say No, from Benjamin M. Kaye's 
play, featuring Winnie Lightner, Chester Morris, 
Sally Eilers and TuUy Marshall. 

Song of the West, with Vivienne Segal and John 
Boles. An all-technicolor production of Rainbow by 
Laurence Stallings and Oscar Hammerstein 2nd, with 
music by Vincent Youmans. 

The Green Goddess, starring George Arliss in the 
play by William Archer. H. B. Warner, Ralph 
Forbes and Alice Joyce are also in the cast. 

Under a Texas Moon, an all-color version of The 
Two Gun Man by Stewart Edward White. Frank 
Fay, Armida, Raquel Torres, Noah Beery and 
Myrna Loy have the leading roles. 

John Barrsrmore in The Man from Blankley's, by 

F. Anstey, supported by Loretta Young, Dale Fuller, 
Albert Gran and Emily Fitzroy. 

Al Jolson in Mammy, the story and songs of 
which are by Irving Berlin. Cast includes Lots 
Moran, Lowell Sherman and Louise Dresser. 

Those Who Dance, with Monte Blue, Eddie Phil- 
lips and others. Story by George Kibbe Turner. 

Golden Dawn, with Walter Woolf and Vivienne 
Segal. An all-technicolor production of the operetta 
by Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein 2nd. 

Hold Everything, with Winnie Lightner, Joe E. 
Brown, Sally O'Neil and Georges Carpentier, an all- 
technicolor musical comedy. 

Isle of Escape, with Monte Blue, Betty Compson 
and Myrna Loy. The story is by Jack McLaren. 

A Woman's Game, with Pauline Frederick. 

Sweet Kitty Bellairs, based on the David Belasco 
play. Marian Nixon has the lead. 

Fame, an all-star cast in the story by Audrey and 
Waveney Carten. 

The Agony Column, by Earl Derr Biggers, with 
Grant Withers and Loretta Young. 

Dumbells in Ermine, with Beryl Mercer, Charlotte 
Merriam, Mary Foy and others. 

Rin Tin Tin in three all talking outdoor specials: 
On the Border, by Lilly Hayward; Rough Waters, 
by James A. Starr, and The Ivory Trail, by Lilly 
Hayward. 



Stagehands* Strike 
Settlement Expected 
To Affect Film B,0,s 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
CINCINNATI, Jan. 7.— The stagehands' 
strike, which prevented the three legitimate 
houses here from opening at beginning of 
regular season in September, has finally 
been settled, although the exact terms of 
settlement have not been made public. The 
houses are planning to open immediately 
for a 12-week season. This is expected to 
materially affect box-office receipts at the 
movie houses, which have been enjoying 
increased business diverted to them by 
reason of the enforced shutdown of the 
legitimate theatres. 



Bowes Member of Honorary Committee 

NEW YORK — Major Edward Bowes, managing di- 
rector of the Capitol theatre, has been made a mem- 
ber of the Honorary Committee of the 2nd Annual 
New York Aviation Show, which will be held at the 
Grand Central Palace from February 7-15, 1930. 



Brenon, Three-Time Gold 
Medal Winner, Signed by 
Radio Pictures to Direct 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Herbert Brenon, 
three-time gold medal winner for the picture 
of the year, has signed a year's contract with 
Radio Pictures, it has been announced by 
Joseph I. Schnitzer, president. 

Brenon will move his entire staff to Holly- 
wood, where he will work in close coopera- 
tion with William Le Baron at the RKO 
studios. 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



25 



Ohio Censors Decide 
This Way; Then Turn 
Around and Do That 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

CINCINNATI, Jan. 7.— Toledo seems to 
be the target for Ohio censor board. The 
State theatre plastered the town with 24- 
sheets advertising Hot for Paris (Fox), 
when censors ruled thumbs down on the 
picture. Vita-Temple showed a short pic- 
ture. Some Pumpkins, for three days when 
the film czars notified the management that 
there was nothing doing, and the picture 
was withdrawn. The Pantheon showed 
Wedding Rings (First National), after 
having obtained permission for showing it 
untouched. Then the celluloid potentates 
at Columbus changed their minds and re- 
moved the picture. 



Series of 10 Meetings 
Planned by Engineers 
For Development Study 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— A 10-meeting pro- 
gram has been planned by the Pacific Coast 
Section of the Society of Motion Picture 
Engineers for the coming year, for the pur- 
pose of studying the latest developments in 
the industry. The subject of the meetings, 
and the number on each subject are as 
follows: color, 3; wide film, 2; laboratory 
procedure, 3; stereoscopic depth, 1; tele- 
vision, 1. 

Authorities on these various subjects are 
being obtained as speakers, and it is 
planned to have two speakers read at each 
meeting, with a general discussion follow- 
ing. The membership of the Pacific Coast 
Section now numbers about 75. 



Warners Lay Plans for 
Regional Meetings to Be 
Held in All Key Cities 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— A series of reeional 
meetings, to be conducted by C. C. Ezell, gen- 
eral sales manager of Warner Brothers and 
Paul Swift, general sales manager of the Vita- 
phone Corporation, will be held in the key 
cities, according to announcement by Sam E. 
Morris, vice-president of Warner Brothers. 

The series of meetings will start in about 
ten days. Branch managers and salesmen will 
attend these conferences. 



Portland House Closed 
For Week When Unknowns 
Destroy Film Equipment 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
PORTLAND, ORE., Jan. 7.— Unknown 
vandals broke into Royal theatre yesterday 
and destroyed projection machines and 
talking picture equipment. The screens of 
the theatre were also slashed. It was an- 
nounced that the house would be closed for 
a week for repairs. The Royal has been 
operating as a non-union house. 



Lincoln and Washington 
Shorts Will Be Released 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK. Jan. 7.— James A. Fitz- 
patrick will release the first two of his Amer- 
ican holiday short subjects, Abraham Lincoln 
and George Washington, around February 
12 and 22, respectively, to coincide with the 
anniversaries of their births. In place of 
actors Fitzpatrick will portray events and 
people by clay modelings, made by Virginia 
May, prominent American sculptress. 



New Exhibitor Group Will Ask 
Allied to Consider Affiliation 

Officials of Chicago Independent Organization Announce Intention 

Of Inviting Steffes to Conference — Association Arising from 

Dissatisfaction in Ranks of Miller Body Claims 100 Members 

Allied States will be invited to take into its organization an incorporated 
association of 100 or more independent Chicago theatres, at a meeting planned 
for next week, to which will be asked a representative of Allied, expected to 
be Al Steflfes, President Abram F. Myers' chief of staff. Announcement of this 
intention was made last week by Aaron Saperstein, president of the new 
Illinois Independent Exhibitors Association, formed two weeks ago by Chicago 
independent theatre owners as a result of a feeling among some members of 
the Chicago Exhibitors Association that an organization devoid of large chains 
and deluxe theatre owners could better serve the interests of the small inde- 
pendent exhibitor. 

Asked whether his organization would look favorably upon a move by the 
new Chicago group to join with Allied States, Myers said in a message from 
Washington to the Herald-World on Monday, that he had not been ap- 
proached on any affiliation. 



The new group has state-wide ambitions, 
as its name indicates. Organization work is 
now being confined to Chicago, but it is the 
announced intention to extend it to all sec- 
tions of Illinois. A state association now 
exists in name, with Jack Miller, president of 
the Chicago Exhibitors Association, at its 
head, but it has not functioned for years. 
The Southwestern part of the state is organ- 
ized under the M P T O of Eastern Missouri 
and Southern Illinois. 

Judge Named Chief Official 

The principal executive business of the new 
independent group will be conducted by a 
commissioner, to which office Emanuel Eller, 
former supervisor judge, and politician, has 
been appointed. He is the son of City Collector 
Morris Eller, who received considerable pub- 
licity a year or so ago following the murder 
of Michael Granady, a negro working for an 
opposing political faction. Commissioner 
Eller's salary is $10,000 a year. 

Besides the commissioner, there is a board 
of trustees, which will handle finances; a 
board of directors, and the usual officials. 
The latter, in addition to President Saperstein, 
are Samuel Halper, secretary (owner of one 
theatre) ; Sid Selig, treasurer (one theatre) ; 
and Fred Gilford (three theatres). 

The board of directors is composed of 
Harry Lasker of Jacob Lasker & Sons, opera- 
tors of five theatres ; Joe Pastor, who operates 
four houses ; Jack Rose, executive of the 
James Coston booking organization, who was 
named to represent theatres booked, but not 
operated, by Coston; Edward Brunnell and 
Sam Abrams, each of whom runs one theatre ; 
and Gilford. 

On the board of trustees are Nat Wolf, who 
operates four theatres; Saul Best, one thea- 
tre; and Andrew Cuzar, two theatres. Presi- 
dent Saperstein has two houses and books 
for six others. 

Allied Interest Denied 

That Allied States had instigated a left- 
wing movement in the ranks of the Miller 
organization persisted as a rumor, but this 
was vigorously denied. 

"We just felt that we independent ex- 
hibitors could do better by ourselves," said 
Saperstein. "There are a lot of chain houses 
in the Exhibitors Association, and what have 
we got to do with them? Our troubles are 
difTerent than theirs. 

"Why couldn't the Exhibitors Association 
handle our affairs, too? Don't ask me. They 
just didn't, that's all. Anyway, what have we 
got to do with those big chain houses? And 
they run the Association. 

"We will invite Allied States in with us. 



We'll have a meeting in about a week. But 
Allied States wasn't behind this. There were 
just some of us who were dissatisfied with 
things the way they were and now we're going 
by ourselves." 

It is known that Allied States would have 
been welcomed in the Miller organization 
when the former was beginning its activities. 
The Chicago Exhibitors Association, however, 
has chosen to remain independent. 

Membership Confusing 

All of those listed as members of the new 
association have at some time belonged to the 
Miller organization, but it is stated about half 
of them have not been considered bona fide 
members during the past year or two because 
of failure to contribute to the support of the 
organization financially. Others have signi- 
fied their intention of resigning from the 
older body. 

The resulting confusion as to just who were 
members made it impossible to negotiate defi- 
nitely last week with the operators' union for 
a new contract to take the place of that just 
expired. President Miller immediately sent a 
telegram to each listed member of the estab- 
lished association, asking if he was represent- 
ing that member in the union negotiations. 
On Tuesday, when a second meeting with the 
union was scheduled, repHes representing 150 
theatres confirmed their continued member- 
ship in the Miller organization, which has a 
listed membership of about 300 houses, 54 of 
which belong to chains. 

Fund of $1,875 Raised 

Those named as officers and directors of 
the new association, all until now members of 
the older body, formed the original committee 
which called the first meeting, at which $1,100 
was raised by selling memberships at $25 per 
theatre. This total subsequently was increased 
to $1,875, representing 75 paid-in members. 
Officials, however, declare that over 100 inde- 
pendent theatres are represented on the mem- 
bership list. 

At the meeting the suggestion that a move 
be made to join Allied States brought some 
opposition on the ground that the $6,000 mem- 
bership fee was too high for the organization 
to stand at this time. The motion was voted 
down for this reason. Later, however, came 
the announcement of officials that Allied 
States would be invited in for a conference 
at once. 

The names of those definitely listed as 
members of the new organization appear on 
the Chicago Personalities page. 



26 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1950 



At the New York 
Theatres 



MOTION PICTURE FINANCE 

Modest Recovery Features Market 

By LAURENCE STERN 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7. — Quiet and modest recovery has been the chief 
feature of the motion picture stocks during the last week, a week in 
which the influence of the New Year's holiday restricted speculative 
activity. For the present the entire stock market is awaiting clarification of 
the business outlook, and while the prospects of most film companies are by 
no means doubtful or obscure their shares have been held back by the general 
lack of confidence and continue to sell on an abnormally high yield basis. 



IN THESE, as in the rest of the market, 
narrow day-to-day trading operations are 
dominant, but a steady flow of stock bought 
for investment is being taken out of Wall 
Street, and the mere passage of time works to 
the advantage of the bull side. 

It is perhaps significant of the improved 
technical position of the market that the iso- 
lated troubles of Fox Film apparently have 
ceased to have an unsettling effect on other 
amusements. After dropping to a fresh low, 
Fox ended the week without net change. The 
company's situation remains deadlocked, for 
Mr. Fox apparently has not yet been willing 
to go as far toward relinquishing control as 
his co-trustees desire. The outcome of the 
struggle between him and the largest creditors 
of his companies remains in doubt, although 
both sides profess a desire to come to an 
understanding without court action. Wall 
Street expects little result from the collective 
action of Class A stockholders, whose pro- 
gram remains vague. 

While Paramount, Warner Brothers and 
Loew's, Inc., shares advanced more than a 
point each during the week, the best current 
performance is being given by Radio-Keith- 
Orpheum, which seems to be meeting _ with 
informed buying, as reflected in a gain of 
2^4 points. Under the Radio management this 
company has definitely turned the corner. 
Net earnings for the third quarter amounted 
to more than $1,000,000. Profits for the year 
should exceed $2,000,000. 

Lehar to Compose Score 
For Gloria Swanson Film 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Frank Lehar, Com- 
poser of "The Merry Widow," has contracted 
to compose the score of Gloria Swanson's 



next talking and singing film, an all-color 
operetta. Queen Kelly. Joseph P. Kennedy, 
who produces the Swanson pictures for re- 
lease through United Artists, says that Lehar 
is already at work on the score of his first 
film operetta, in Berlin. Lehar is not ex- 
pected to come to America but will send his 
score here by installments. 

B & K Attendance 
Tops Million Each 
Week Daring 1929 

According to a report given out by Balaban 
and Katz over a million people attended B & K 
theatres each week during 1929. The talking 
picture is given credit for this figure by John 
Balaban, who predicts that 1930 will see a 
return to favor of the western "thriller," as 
evidenced by the popularity of The Virginian. 

He also added that this year will see con- 
tinued improvements in the mechanism with 
which talking pictures are reproduced in the 
theatres. 

Report That Killam Quit 
Famous-Canadian Spiked 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

MONTREAL, Jan. 7.— i here has been 
no announcement that I. W. Killam, big 
Montreal financier, has resigned as a di- 
rector of Famous Players Canadian Corp., 
as indicated by a New York trade publica- 
tion. What gave birth to the report prob- 
ably was his sale of a block of F P stock 
to Fischer Bros, of Detroit. 



NEW FILMS 

PAR.A.MOUNT— The Laughing Lady, Paramount 
talker, with Ruth Chatterton, Clive Brook, Dan 
Healy and Dorothy Hall, directed by Victor Schert- 
zinger. Opened January 3. 

ROXY — Hot for Paris, Fox talker with Victor Mc- 
Laglen, Fifi Dorsay and El Brendel, directed by 
Raoul Walsh. Opened January 3. 

STRAND — No. No, Nanette, First National talker 
from the stage musical comedy, with Bernice Claire 
and Alexander Gray. Opened January 3. 

CAMEO — The Man from the Restaurant, Amkino 
silent. Opened January 4. 

HIPPODROME— The Racketeer, Pathe talker, with 
Robert Armstrong and Carol Lombard. Opened Jan- 
uary 4. 

SSTH STREET— Throw of the Dice, silent Hindu 
spectacle with a native cast. Opened January 4. 

LITTLE CARNEGIE— The Farmer's Wife, silent 
screen version of Eden Philpott's play, with Jame- 
son Thomas and Lillian Hall-Davis. Opened Janu- 
ary 4. 

FILM GUILD— The Golem, Ufa silent production, 
and Women of the World, with Poli Negri. Opened 
January 4. 

HELD OVER AND REVIVED 

CENTRAI^Disraeli, Warner talker. Opened Oc- 
tober 2. 

SELWYN — Condemned, United Artists talker. 

Opened November 3. 
CRITERION— The Love Parade, Paramount talker. 

Opened November 19. 
RIALTO— The Virginian, Paramount talker. Opened 

December 20. 

ASTOR — Devil May Care, M G M talker. Opened 
December 22. 

WINTER GARDEN— Sally, First National talker. 

Opened December 23. 
COLONY — Hell's Heroes, Universal talker. Opened 

December 27. 

EARL CARROLI^Seven Keys to Baldpate, Radio 

talker. Opened December 27. 
GEORGE M. COHAN— Blaze O' Glory, Sono-Art 

World Wide talker. Opened December 30. 
RIVOLI — The Mighty, Paramount talker. Opened 

December 30. 

GAIETY-^Party Girl, Tiffany talker. Opened De- 
cember 31. 

CAPITOL— Hollywood Revue, M G M talker. First 
time p.p. 

GLOBE — Rio Rita, Radio talker. First time p.p. 

Universal Pays Up for 
$2,500,000 6% Notes 
Without New Financing 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Universal Pictures 
Company, Inc., issued the following state- 
ment last Saturday: 

The outstanding six per cent notes of 
Universal Pictures Company, Inc., issued 
two and a half years ago in the original 
amount of $2,500,000 and which matured 
January 1, 1930, have been paid at matur- 
ity by the company by depositing with the 
National City Bank as trustee under the 
indenture covering said notes, the necessary 
funds to pay the same. 

"The funds for the payment were sup- 
plied by the company without any further 
public financing." 



SECURITIES PRICE RANGE 



Week Ending January 4 



NEW YORK STOCK MARKET 

Sales High 

American Seating 3,100 19 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender 7,700 20% 

Consolidated Film pfd 3,100 17% 

Do. pfd 2,900 19% 

Eastman Kodak 3,900 182 

Fox Film "A" 627,600 24% 

Keith Albee Orpheum 100 20% 

Do. pfd 500 79V, 

Loew's, Inc _ 14,800 45% 

Do. pfd. w. w 600 87 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, pfd 400 24 

Paramount 45,900 ZlVi 

Pathe Exchange 17,700 3% 

Do. "A" 3,400 6 

Radio Corporation 515,100 45% 

Do. pfd. "A" .=;00 54S/t 

Do. pfd. "B" 2,300 72% 

Radio Keith Orpheum 86,600 21 



Low 
17 

19% 
151/2 
18 
17214 
16% 
20% 
75 
41 

85Vs 
231/2 
47% 
2 

4S/t 
40% 
53% 
72 
17% 



Close 
19 

19% 

i6y2 

19 
178% 
22 

20% 
791/2 



87 

24 

50% 
2% 
51/3 

43% 

54% 

72 

20% 



Sales High 

Shubert Theatres 6,000 10 

Universal Pic. 1st pfd 140 36 

Warner Brothers 120,700 41% 

Do. pfd 2,100 37 

CHICAGO STOCK MARKET 

Balaban & Katz 500 70 

Marks Brothers cvt. p. f 2.250 10% 

Morgan Litho 6,350 12i^ 

NEW YORK CURB 

Columbia Pictures 700 25% 

Con. Theat 100 2 

Educational Pictures 100 25 

Film Insp. Mch 100 % 

Fox Theatres "A" 66,100 6% 

General Theatre Equipment 6,100 27% 

Loew's rts _ 1,100 14 

Do. war 300 3% 

Sentry Safety 7,300 6% 

Trans-Lux 800 4% 



Low 

8 
30 

38y2 
341/a 

60 

9 



25 
2 
11 

% 
2Vs 
25 

12% 
3% 
5% 
3% 



Close 
8% 
34 
40% 
36% 

70 

9 

i2y2 

25% 

2 
11 

% 
4% 
27 

13% 
3% 

3% 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



27 



Film News 
in Pictures 



PICTORIAL SECTION 



Stories Told 
by the Camera 





Playwright's son becomes 
play-actor. Owen Davis, 
Jr., who has an important 
role in Universal's AH 
Quiet on the Western 
Front. 



Back home from the Philippines. Barney Sarecky (extreme left), who has 
been editor of the Graphic Magazine in Manila, shown at the R K O studio. 
Sarecky has returned to write scenarios for R K O. He is shown with Lila 
Lee, Director Russell Mack and Conrad Nagel, between scenes of the forth- 
coming R K O production, The Second Wife. 



Here's Lila Lee emulating 
a coy Nipponese in ofl- 
moments at Warner 
Brothers' studios, where 
she has been playing in 
featured roles. 




In the Port of New York. Raoul Wabh, Fox director, and his 
family on the deck of the Leviathan as it docks, bringing them from 
Europe Walsh returned from a vacation trip abroad to attend the 
opening of his latest production, Hot for Paris, at the Roxy theatre 
in New York last week. 



Married. William Hawks, non-professional, with his film star bride, 
Bessie Love, M G M player, after marriage in Los Angeles on Dec. 
27, a jovous occasion preceding by less than two weeks the tragic 
death of the groom's brother, Kenneth Hawks, in a mid-air crash 
of airplanes during the filming of scenes for a picture. 



28 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 11, 1930 




The maternal in a woman's love. Norma 
Shearer in a scene from her latest M G M 
starring vehicle, Their Own Desire, with 
Robert Montgomery. It is an all-talker di- 
rected by E. Mason Hopper. 





Congratulations. Tony Williams, manager of the Stanley, 
Jersey City; Nick Lucas, a star of Warner Brothers' Show of 
Shows; Benny Ross, M. C. at the Stanley; and Major Willis 
Lazar, district manager for Warner-Stanley, in the lobby of 
the Stanley, where Lucas made a personal appearance. 







A modem pyramid. The girls who share the fame which they have jointly 
won as the Markert Dancers, upon their arrival in Universal City to work in 
Universal's King of Jazz, starring Paul Whiteman and being diected by John 
Murray Anderson. The fellow thus rewarded for his part in their collective 

fame is Russell Markert. 



The Spirit of Freedom. Laura La Plante in character for 
her new Universal starring vehicle, La Marseillaise, all- 
talking epic of the French revolution being directed by 
Paul Fejos. Five songs have been written by the noted 
composer, Charles Wakefield Cadman. 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



For the fourth consecutive 
year, Exhibitors Herald- 
World* carried more paid 
advertising during 1929 
than any other motion pic- 
ture trade paper* 



*Exhibitors Herald-World has the 
largest arculation in the motion 
picture field. It is the industry's 
only Audit Bureau of Circula- 
tions paper. 



30 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 11, 1930 



Western Electric Wirings Outside of U.S. 



ALASKA 

luneau. Coliseum 2S-FD 

Ketchikan, Coliseum 2S-FD 

ARGENTINA 

Avelaneda, General Roco 3S-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Astral 2SX-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, El Condor 3S-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Electric l-'alace 2SX-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Florida 3S-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Grand Splendid 2DX-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Hindu..._ 2SX-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, National Palace 3S-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Once 3S-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Palace IS-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Porteno IS-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Renacimiento 2SX-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Select LavaUe 2SX-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Suipacha 2SX-FD-NS 

Buenos Aires, Villa Crespo 3S-FD-NS 

Cordoba. General Paz 2SX-FD-NS 

La Plata, Paris 3S-FD-NS 

Mar del Plata, Splendid 3S-FD-NS 

Kosario, Palace 2S-FD-NS 

AUSTRALIA 

Adelaide, Grand 2S-FD-NS 

Adelaide, Regent IS-FD-NS 

Adelaide. Wondergraph 2SX-FD-NS 

Adelaide. PaviUon 2SX-FD-NS 

Adelaide, West's Olympia IS-FD-NS 

Adelaide, Tork 2SX-FD-NS 

Albury, Regent...- IS-FD-NS 

Annandale, Annandale 2SX-FI)-NS 

Arniidal, Capitol 2S-FD-NS 

Ascotvale, Ascot 2SX-FD-NS 

Ashfield, Union De Luxe IS-FD 

Auburn. Queens 2SX-FD-NS 

Ayr, Belta 2SX-FD-NS 

Ballarat, Regent IS-FD-NS 

Bankstown, Capitol 2S-FD 

Bankstown. Majestic 2SX-FD-NS 

Bathurst. City 2S-FD-NS 

Belmore, Paragon 2SX-FD-NS 

Brighton. Brighton 2SX-FD-NS 

Brisbane, Lower Tivoli 2SX-FD-NS 

Brisbane, Lyceum 2SX-FD-NS 

Brisbane, Majestic 2S-FD 

Brisbane, Regent IS-FD-NS 

Brisbane, Savoy IS-FD-NS 

Brisbane, Upper Tivoli 2SX-FD-NS 

Brisbane, Valley 2SX-FD-NS 

Brisbane, Wintergarden IS-PD-NS 

Brunswick, Western. 2SX-FD 

Bum. Royal 2SX-FD-NS 

Bundaberg. Wintergarden 2SX-FD-NS 

Burnly. Bumly 2SX-FD-NS 

Burwood. Cinema IS-FD-NS 

Cairns, Gaiety 2SF 

Carins, Palace 2SX-FD-NS 

Carins. Tropical IS-FD-NS 

Coogee. Boomerang 2SX-FD-NS 

Corrmal. Strand _ 2S-FD-NS 

Crows Nest. Crows Nes.t 2SX-FD-NS 

Drummoyne. Kismet IS-FD-NS 

Dulwich Hill. Britannia 2SX-FD-NS 

East Brunswick. Lygon 2SX-FD-NS 

East MaiUand. Palace _ 2SX-FD-NS 

Eastwood. Duke of York 2SX-PD-NS 

Enfield, Cinema 2SX-FD-NS 

Fitzroy, Merri IS-FD-NS 

Fitzroy, Regent _ IS-FD-N.S 

Footscray. Barkly _ 2SX-FD-NS 

Freemantle, Princess _...2SX-FD-NS 

Geelong. Geelong 2SX-PD-NS 

Geelong, Regent...„ 2SX-FD-NS 

Glenelg. Strand 2S-FD-NS 

Gladesville, Palace DeLuxe ?SX-FD-NS 

Granville. Granville 2SX-FD-NS 

Haberfield, Haberfleld ■.2SX-FD-NS 

Hampton, Hampton 2SX-FD-NS 

Hamilton, Prince Regent 2R-FD 

Hobart. Strand _ 2SX-FD-NS 

Hobart. His Majestys 2SX-FD-NS 

Hobart. Prince of Wales 2S-FD 

Homsby. Hornsby 2SX-FD-NS 

Hurlstone. Hurlstone Park 2SX-FD 

Hurstville. Queens IS-FD-NS 

Ingham, DeLuxe 2S-Fn-NS 

Ipswich. Wintergarden IS-FD 

Katoomba. Empire 2S-FD-NS 

Kogarah. Victory 2SX-FD-NS 

Lakemba. Magnet 2.SX-FD-NS 

Launceston. Majestic JSX-FD-NS 

Launceston. Princeton '. 2SX-Fn-NS 

Lithgow. Royal 2.SX-"f"D-NS 

Lithgow. Trades Hall 2S-FD-NS 

Leichardt, Marlborough 1 S-FD-NS 

Leiohardt, Strand .lS-FD-]Srs 

Lidcombe, Arcadia 2SX-FD-NS 

MacKay. Royal 2S-FD-NS 

Manly. Rialto 2SX-FD-NS 

Maryborough, Bungalow. 2SX-FD-NS 

Mascot, Ascot 2S-FD-NS 

Mascot. Roseberry 2S-FD-NS 

Merredin. Cummins 2S-FD-NP1 

Melbourne, .\thenaeum 2SX-FD-NS 

Melbourne, Auditorium IS-FD-NS 

Melbourne. Britannia 2S-FD-NS 

Melbourne. Capitol IS-iTJ-NS 

Melbourne. Cinema IS-FD-NS 

Melbourne. De Luxe IS-FD-NS 

Melbourne. Majestic 2."^ir-F'n-NS 

Melbourne, Melba 2S-t='D-NS 

Melbourne, Kinema IS-FD-NS 

Melbourne, New Mentone 2SX-FD-NS 

Melbourne, Palais Pictures....! IS-FD-NS 

Melbourne, Plaza 1S-tT)-NS 

Molhoume, Princess 2SX-FD-NR 

Melbourne, Regent IS-FD-NS 

Melbourne, State i S-FD-NS 

Melbourne, Victory IS-FD-NS 

Melbourne. Waratah IS-wD-NS 

Moonee Ponds, Moonee Ponds 2SV-FD-NS 

Mordialloo, Paramount 3S-^-NS 

Newcastle, Lyric 2ST-TO-NS 

Newcastle, Royal 2'5X-FD-ats 

Newcastle, Stran'' 2SX-"pd-NS 

Newcastle. Victoria 2S"^-FD-NS 

Newton. Hub 3S-FD-NS 



KEY TO SYMBOLS 

D — Disc only. 
F — Film only. 
FD— Film-Disc. 

NS — Non - Synchronous attach- 
ment. 



North Carlton. Adelphia IS-FD-NS 

Northcote, Northcote IS-FD-NS 

North Sydney, Orplieum 2SX-PD 

Paddington, Five Ways 2SX-FD-NS 

Parramatta, Cinema IS-FD-NS 

Perth, Ambassadors IS-FD-NS 

Perth, Grand. 2SX-FD-NS 

Perth, Prince of Wales IS-FD-NS 

Perth, Regent IS-FD-NS 

Petersham, M.ajestic IS-FD-NS 

Port Melbourne, Eclipse IS-FD-NS 

Prahran, Empress 2SX-FD-NS 

Redfern, Lawson IS-FD-NS 

Rockdale, Acme 2SX-FD-NS 

Rockliampton. Wintergarden IS-FD 

St. Peters. St. Peters 2SX-FD-NS 

South Northcote, Westgarth 2SX-FD-NS 

South Yan-a, Regent IS-FD-NS 

Stanmore, Stanmore 2SX-FD-NS 

StraUifleld, Cinema 2SX-FD-NS 

Sydney, Arcadia 2SX-FD 

Sydney, Broadway 2S-FD-NS 

Sydney, Capitol ID-FD-NS 

Sydney. Chatswood IS-FD-NS 

Sydney, Clovelly IS-FD-NS 

Sydney, Doncaster 2SX-FD-NS 

Sydney, Empress 2S-FD-NS 

Sydney, Enmore IS-FD-NS 

Sydney, Haymarket 2SX-FD-NS 

Sydney, King's Cross IS-FD 

Sydney, Lyceum 2DX-FD-NS 

Sydney, LjtIc 2SX-FD-NS 

Sydney, Mosman 2SX-FD-NS 

Sydney, Metro Review 3S-FD 

Sydney, North Sydney _ IS-FD-NS 

Sydney, Olympia IS-FD-NS 

Sydney, Oxford 2SX-FD-NS 

Sydney, Prince Edward 2DX-FD-NS 

Sydney, Randwick 2SX-FD-NS 

Sydney, Regent ID-FD-NS 

Sydney, Royal 2SX-FD-NS 

S.vdney, St. James 2SX-FD-NS 

Sydney. Six Ways IS-FD-NS 

Sydney. State IS-FD-NS 

Sydney. Union Marriokville IS-FD-NS 

Tamworth. Capitol 2SX-FD-NS 

Thirroul. Kings 2.SX-FD-NS 

Thornbury, Regent IS-FD-NS 

Toowoomba, Empire IS-FD-NS 

Townsville. Olympia 2SX-FD-NS 

Townsville. Wintergarden 2SX-FD 

Wagga. Strand 2SX-FD-NS 

Wagga. Wonderland 2SX-FD-NS 

West Maitland. Princess Pictures 2S-FD-NS 

Wonthaggi. Wonthaggi 2SX-PD-NS 

WoUongong, Crown IS-FD-NS 

AUSTRIA 

Vienna, Apollo Theatre _ 2S-FD-NS 

Vienna, Lastpiel Theatre 2S-FD-NS 

Vienna, Schweden Kino 3S-FD 

BELGIUM 

Brussels. Agora IS-FD-NS 

Brussels. Cameo 2S-FD-NS 

Brussels, Casino LyriQue 2SX-FD-NS 

Brussels, Coliseum _ 2SX-FD-NS 

Brussels. Trianon Aubert Palace 3S-FD-NS 

Charleroi, Eldorado 2SX-FD-NS 

BRAZIL 

Avelaneda, General Roca 3S-FD-NS 

Rio de Janeiro. Colombo 2SX-FD-NS 

Rio de Janeiro. Capitolio 2SX-FD 

Rio de Janeiro, Gloria 2SX-FD-NS 

Rio de Janeiro, Imperial 2SX-FD-NS 

Rio de Janeiro, Odeon IS-FD-NS 

Rio de Janeiro, Palaccio 2SX-FD-NS 

Rio de .Janeiro. Sao Jose 2SX-FD-NS 

Sao Paulo. Capitolio IS-FD-NS 

Sao Paulo, Cine-Paramount 2DX-FD-NS 

Sao Paulo, Odeon 2SX-FD-NS 

Sao Paulo, Republica IS-FD-NS 

Sao Paulo, Rosario 2S-FD-NS 

Sao Paulo, Sala Vermelha IS-FD-NS 

Sao Paulo. Salazul IS-FD-NS 

BRITISH ISLES 
ENGLAND 

Accrington, Hippodrome 2S-FD-NS 

Aldershot, Manor Park Pay 2S-FD-NS 

Andover. Palace 2S-FD 

Ardwlck, Ardwick Empire IS-FD-NS 

Ashington. Miner's 2SX-FD-NS 

Ashton/Lyne, Majestic 2SX-FD 

Bath, Beau Nash 2SX-FD-NS 

Bathgate, Pavillion 2SX-FD-NS 

Bedminster, Hippodrome IS-FD-NS 

Benwell, Adelaide 3S-FD-NS 

Birkenhead, Empire 2S-FD-NS 

Birmingham. Futurist 2SX-FD-NS 

Birminsham. New Imperial 2S-FD 



ENGLAND— Cont'd 

Birmingham. New Palladium 2S-FD 

Birmingham, Regal Theatre IS-FD-NS 

Birmingham, Robin Hood 2SX-FD 

Birmingham, Scala 2S-FD-NS 

Birmingham, West End IS-FD 

Blackpool, Hippodrome 2SX-FD-NS 

Blackpool, Winter Gardens IS-FD-NS 

Bletchley, King George 3S-FD-NS 

Blyth, Theatre Royal _ 2SX-FD-NS 

Bognor Regis, Picturedrome 3S-FD-NS 

Bognor Regis, Pier PaviUon 2S-FD-NS 

Bolton, Palladium. 2SX-FD-NS 

Bolton, Olympia IS-FD-NS 

Bournemouth, Regent...- IS-FD 

Bournemouth. Westover .....2SX-FD-NS 

Bradford, Empire 2SX-FD 

Bradford, St. Georges IS-FD 

Bradford. Savoy 2SX-FD-NS 

Bradford. Theatre Royal 2SX-FD 

Brigend. The Cinema 3S-FD 

Brighton. Palladium 2SX-FD-NS 

Brighton, Regent IS-FD 

Bristol. Hippodrome IS-FD-NS 

Bristol. Kings 2SX-FD-NS 

Bristol. Regent IS-FD 

Bristol. Triangle 2X-FD-NS 

Burnley, Savoy 2S-FD-NS 

Burslem, CoUseum 2SX-FD 

Cambridge, Central 2S-ET> 

Chatham, Empire IS-FD-NS 

Oieadle, Electra 3S-FD-NS 

Chelmsford, Regent 2SX-FD-NS 

Chesterfield. Victoria 2SX-FD-NS 

Cheetham Hill. Shakespeare 2SX-FD-NS 

Chichester. Picturedrome 3S-FD-NS 

Chiswick. Empire IS-FD-NS 

Colchester. Headgate Ele 3S-FD-NS 

Consett, Empire Palace 2SX-FD-NS 

Coventry. Alexandra 2S-FD-NS 

Coventry. Scala 2SX-FD-NS 

Colwyn Bay, Arcadia 2S-FD 

Con.'ett. Plaza 2SX-FD-NS 

Crewe. Queens Cinema 3S-FD-NS 

Croydon, Davis Theatre _...1S-FD 

Croydon, Hippodrome 2SX-FD-NS 

Croydon, Kc. Hse - 2SX-FD-NS 

Croydon, Scala 2S-FD-NS 

Darlington, Coiu-t Kin 2SX-FD 

Darlington, Empire 2S-FD-NS 

Derby, Empire 2SX-FD-NS 

Dudley, Regent 2SX-FD 

Ealing, Broadway 2SX-FD 

Edmonton, Empire 2SX-FD 

Farncombe, King George 3S-FD-^"' 

Fleet. King George 3S-FD-NS 

Gateshead. Coatsworth 2SX-FD-NS 

Gloucester. Picturedrome 3S-FD-NS 

Gloucester. Picturedrome 3S-FD-NS 

Gloucester. Theatre de Luxe 2SX-FD-NS 

Goole. Cinema Palace 3S-FD 

Gosport. Criterion 3S-FD-NS 

Grimsby, Savoy 2SX-FD 

Grimsby, Tivoli 2S-FD-NS 

Guildford. Pic. Playhse 2S-FD-NS 

Halifax, Picture House 2SX-FD 

Hanley, Regent IS-FD 

Hants. King George 3S-FD-NS 

Harrogate, Central 2S-FD-NS 

Harrogate, Scala 2SX-FD 

Harroy. CoUseum 3S-FD-NS 

Heywood. Picturedrome 3S-FD 

Hounslow, Alcazar _ 2SX-FD-N'5 

Houghton-le-Spring. Empire 3S-FD-NS 

Huddersfleld, Grand 2S-FD-NS 

Huddersfleld. Princess 2S-FD-NS 

Hull. Cariton Cinema - 2SX-FD-NS 

Hull. Cecil 2SX-FD 

Hull. Monica Cinema _ 3S-FD-NS 

Hull. National 2S-FD-NS 

Hull. Savoy ;SX-FD-N=; 

Hford. Super IS-FD 

Ipswich, Central 2S-FD-NS 

Ipswich, Picture House 2S-FD-NS 

Irvine, Picturedrome 3S-FD-NS 

Kings Lynn, Majestic 2SX-FD-NS 

Kings Lynn. St. James 3S-FD-NS 

Kingston. EUte 2SX-FD-NS 

Lancaster. Palace ;SX-FD-NR 

Lancaster. Palladium 3S-FD-NS 

Leeds. Crown - 2S-FD 

Leeds, Lounge 2S-FD 

Leeds, Regent 2S-FD 

Leeds, Rialto 2SX-FD-NS 

I^eds, Scala JS-FD 

Leicester, Palace 2SX-FD-NS 

Leicester. Picture House 2SX-FD 

Lincoln. Grand 3S-FD-NS 

Liverpool, Casino 2SX-FD 

Liverpool. Clubmoor P/H 2S-FD-NS 

Liverpool. Futurist _ 2S-FD-NS 

Liverpool, New Premier 2S-FD-NS 

Liverpool. Olympia IS-FD-NS 

Liverpool, Rialto _ 2SX-FD 

London. Acton. Globe _ 

London. Balham, Pavilion cT^ 2 

London, Balham, Picture House 2SX-FD 

London. Bear Street. Cameo 2S-FD 

London. Bethnal Green. Forresters 2S-FD 

London. Bethnal Green. Smart's P/P 3S-FD 

London. Brixton. Astoria IS-FD-NS 

London, Camden Town. Brittania 2S-FD-NS 

London, Cani'g Town. Grand Cinema 2SX-FD 

London. Charing X Rd.. Astoria 

London. Clapham. Majestic 2SX-FD 

London. Coventry St., RiaUo 2S-Fri-NS 

London, Cricklewood, Queens IS-FD 

London, Crystal Pal, Rialto 2SX-FD-NS 

London, Dalston. Amhurst Hall 3S-FD-NS 

London, Dalston, Picture House IS-FD 

London, EiUng. Walpole.--. 2SX-FD-NS 

London. East Ham. Premier IS-FD 

London. Edgware Rd.. Blue Hall 2SX-FD-NS 

London. Enfield. Rialto 2SX-FD 

rx>ndon. Euston Road. Euston. Cinema 2S-FD-NS 

London. Finsbuvy Prk.. Rink IS-FD 

London. Forest Hill. Capitol 2SX-FD 

London. Golders Green. Lido IS-FD-NS 

Lou'ion. TTacknev. Empire IS-FD-NS 

London. Hackney. Pavilion _ IS-FD-NS 

London. Hackney. South Cin 2S-FD-NS 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



31 



ENGLAND— Contd 

London, Ham'ersmlth. Commodore IS-FD-NS 

London, Harrow Kd.. I'lince of Wales 2S-FD 

London, Haymarket. Carlton. 2SX-FD-NS 

London, Haymarket, Capitol - 2SX-PD 

London. Highgate. Electric Palace 3S-FD-NS 

London, HoUoway. Marlborough 2SX-FD 

London, Islington, Angel 2SX-FD 

London, Islington, Lido 2SX-FD-NS 

London, Islington, Victoria 3S-FD-NS 

London, Kensal Klse, Palace 3S-FD 

London, Kensington. Kinema IS-FD-NS 

London, Kilburn, Grange IS-FD 

London. Kingsland, Empire 2S-FD 

London. Kingsway. StoU IS-FD-NS 

London, Laven'r HiU, Pavilion Cinema 2SX-PD 

London. Leicester Sq.. Alhambra IS-FD-NS 

London. Leicester Sq., New Empire IS-FD-NS 

London, Lewisham. Prince of Wales 2SX-FD 

London. Leyton, Kings Hall 2S-FD-NS 

London. Leyton. Savoy 2SX-Fn-NR 

London. Levtonstone. Rialto 2SX-FD 

London. Maida Vale. Picture House 2S-FD 

London, Malton, Exchange Pict. Hall 3S-FD-NS 

London. Manor Par. Coronation 2SX-FD-NS 

London. Marble Arch. Pavilion 2SX-FD 

London. Marble Arch. Regal IS-FD-NS 

London. Margate. Hippodrome 2S-FD-NS 

London. Mile End Ed., La Boheme 3S-FD-NS 

London. New Cross, Kinema IS-FD 

London. Newcastle. Adelaide 3S-FD-NS 

London, Oxford St., Cinema House 2S-FD 

London. Peckham. Tower IS-FD 

London. Piccadilly, Piccadilly 2SX-FD-NS 

London. Piccad'v Cir., London Pavilion 2SX-FD-NS 

London, Piccadilly Cir.. Plaza 2SX-FD-NS 

London. Poplar. Pavilion 2SX-FD 

London, Regent St., New Gallery...- 2SX-FD 

London. Richmond. Royalty 2SX-FD-NS 

London, Saltcoats. La Scala 3S-FD-NS 

London. Sheerness, Hippodrome 2S-FD-NS 

London, Sheffield, Scala Cinema 2S-FD-NS 

London, Sklpton. Plaza 3S-FD 

Ix)ndon, St. Martins Ln., Coliseum IS-FD-NS 

London, Shep'rds Bush, Empire 2SX-FD-NS 

London, Shep'rds Bush, Pavilion IS-FD 

London, Stamfd Hill, Regent IS-FD 

London, Stoke N'gton. Apollo...- 2SX-FD-NS 

London. Strand. Tivoli IS-FD 

London, Stratford. Broadway IS-FD 

London. Sydenham, Rink IS-FD 

Ixjndon, Tooting. Pavilion 2S-FD-NS 

London, To'er Bdg. Rd.. Cinema IS-FD-NS 

London. TottrCrt. Rd.. Majestic 2S-FD-NS 

London. Upton Park. Carlton IS-FD-NS 

London, Victoria. Biograph 3S-FD-NS 

London, 'Wandsworth, Clock Tower 3S-FD 

London. Willesden. Empire 2SX-FD 

Luton, Palace - 2SX-FD 

Macclesfield, Majestic - 2S-rD-NS 

Maidenhead. Rialto 2SX-FD-NS 

Maidenhead. Plaza 3S-FD 

Manchester, Claremont Supr 2SX-TD-NS 

Manchester, Empire IS-FD-NS 

Manchester, Hippodrome IS-FD-NS 

Manchester, La Scala 2S-FD-NS 

Manchester. New Oxford - 2SX-FD-NS! 

Manchester, Palladium 2SX-FD-NS 

Manchester. Piccadilly IS-FD-NS 

Manchester. Premier 2SX-FD-NS 

Manchester. Qneens 2S-FD-NS 

Manchester, Royal IS-FD-NS 

Manchester, Hippodrome 2S-FD-NS 

Mexborough, Empire 2S-FD-NS 

Morecambe. New Plaza 2S-FD-NS 

Mumbles. Cinema 3S-FD 

Newcastle. Queens 2SX-rD 

Newcastle. Stoll's 2SX-FD-NS 

Northampton. Exchange IS-FD 

North Shields. Princess Theatre 2SX-FD-NR 

Norwich. Haj-market 2SX-FD-NS 

Norwich. Regent 2SX-T!'D-N'5 

Nottingham. Berridge Ed 2SX-FD-NS 

Nottingham. Hippodrome 2SX-FD 

Nuneaton. Scala 3S-FD-NS 

Oldham, Grosvenor .— 2SX-Fn-NS 

Oldham. Palladium IS-FD-NS 

Oswaldtwistle. Palladium 2S-FD-NS 

Palmers Green. Palmadlum IS-FD 

Poole. Regent 2S-FD-NS 

Portsmouth. Majestic 2SX-FD-NS 

Portsmouth. Plaza - 2SV-FD-NS 

Portsmouth, Regent IS-FD-NS 

Portsmouth, Victoria Hall - 2SX-FD-NS 

Preston. New Victoria IS-FD 

Ramsgate, Palace 2SX-FD-NS 

Readina. Pavilion 2SX-FD 

Reading, Vaudeville 2SX-FD-NS 

Eedhill, Pavilion _ 2S-FD-NS 

St. Annes. Empire 2SX-FD-NS 

Salford. Palace - 2SX-FD-NS 

Scaraborough. Futurist IS-FD 

Sheffield. Albert Hall 2SX-FD 

Sheffield. Central 2SX-FD-NS 

Sheffield. Regent IS-FD 

Shrewsbury. Empire 2S-FD 

South Shields, Pavilion 3S-FD-NS 

South Shields, Scala 2SX-FD 

Southampton, Gaiety 2S-FT)-NS 

Southampton. Picture House 2SX-FD-NS 

Southend Essex. Strand 2SX-FD 

Southend Sea. Rlvoli 2SX-FD-NS 

Southport, Scala - 2SX-FD-NR 

Southsea. Gaiety 2SX-FD-NS 

Stockport. Alexandra 2SX-FD-NS 

Stoclrport. Palladium 2SX-FD-NS 

Stockton. Cinema - 2SX-FD 

Stockton-on-Ts. Globe 2SX-FD-NS 

Sunderland. Havelock 2SX-FD 

Sutton. County IS-FD 

Surbiton. Coronation 3S-FD-NS 

Tenhv. Avenue Parilion 3S-FD-NS 

Tonbridge, New Cinema 3S-TrD-NS 

Torquay. Electric 3S-FD-NS 

Torquay. Empire 3S-FD-NS 

Transmere. Coliseum - 3S-FD-NS 

Twickenham. Kinema 2SX-FD-NS 

Victoria. Biograph 3S-FD-NS 

Wakefield. Playhouse ~ 2S-FD 

Walsall. Picture House _ - IS-FD 

Walthamstow. Carlton - 2SX-FD 

Weaste. Picture House _ 3S-FD-NS 

Wembley. Majestic IS-FD-NS 

West Bromwich. Imperial „..2S-FD-NS 

West Hartlepool. Picture House _ IS-FD 

West Stanley. King George 3S-FD-NS 

Weybridge. Albert Hall - 2S-FD-NS 

Weymouth. Regent 2SX-FD 

Whitehaven. Empire 3S-FD-NR 

Wigan. Empire 2S-FD-NR 

WimTiledon. Elite 2SX-FD 

Windsor. Playhouse 2S'^-FD-NR 

Woking. Plaza 2S-FD-NS 



ENGLAND— Cont'd 

Wolverhampton. Agricult. Hall 2SX-FD 

Wolverhampton. (Jueens 2S-FD 

Wood Green. Empire IS-FD-NS 

Workington. Ocford 2S-FD-NS 

Yarmouth, Regent 2SX-FD-NS 

York, St. Georges 2SX-FD-NS 

IRELAND 

Belfast, Classic IS-FD 

Belfast, Picture House 2S-FD-NS 

Cork, Pavilion 2S-FD-NS 

Clonmel, Magners 3S-FD-NS 

Dublin, Carlton 3S-FD-NS 

Dublin, Capitol IS-FD-NS 

Dublin, De Luxe 2S-FD-NS 

Dublin, Grafton 3S-FD-NS 

Dublin. Metropole 2S-FD-NS 

Limerick, Coliseum 3S-FD-NS 

Londonderry. Midland 3S-FD-NS 

Rathmines, Stella 2S-FD-NS 

Tralee, Picturedrome 3S-FD-NS 

SCOTLAND 

Aberdeen. La Scala 3S-FD-NS 

Aberdeen. Picture House 2S-FD 

Ayr, Picture House - 2SX-FD 

Bellshill. Alhambra 2SX-FD-NS 

Clydebank. Empire 2S-FD 

Dundee, Palace 2SX-FD-NS 

Dundee, Plaza - 2SX-FD-NS 

Dunfermline, Palace 2SX-FD-NS 

Edinburgh, Lyceum 2SX-FD-NS 

Edinburgh, New Palace 2S-FD 

Edinburgh. Picture House...- 2SX-FD 

Edinburgh, Playhouse IS-FD-NS 

Edinburgh, Ritz IS-FD-NS 

Edinburgh, SaUsbury : 2S-FD-NS 

Falkirk, Salon 3S-FD-NS 

Glasgow, Arcadia 2SX-FD 

Glasgow, Cambridge 2S-FD 

Glasgow, Coliseum IS-FD-NS 

Glasgow, La Scala 2SX-FD-NS 

Glasgow, Picture House ■ 2SX-FD 

Glasgow, Playhouse IS-FD-NS 

Glasgow, Waverly 2SX-FD-NS 

Govan, Lyceum 2SX-FD-NS 

Ibrox, Capitol IS-FD 

Kilmarnock, George 2SX-FD 

Kilmarnock, Kinks 2SX-FD-NS 

Kirkcaldy, Opera House 2SX-FD-NS 

Leith, Alhambra 2SX-PD-NS 

Leith. Capitol IS-FD 

Paisley. La Scala IS-FD-NS 

Patrick. Rosevale 2SX-FD 

Butherglen, Cinema 3S-FD-NS 

WALES 

Aberdare, Kosy Kinema 3S-FD-NS 

Cardiff. Capitol IS-FD-NS 

Cardiff. Park Hall IS-FD 

Cardiff, Queens 2SX-FD 

Llanelly, Palace Cinema 3S-FD-NS 

Merthyr Tydfil, Castle 2SX-FD 

Neath, Empire 2S-FD-NS 

Newport. Olympia 2SX-FD-NS 

Newport, Tredegar Hall 2SX-FD-NS 

Swansea, Albert Hall 2SX-Ti'D-NS 

Tonypandy, Empire 2S-FD-NS 

CANADA 

Arvlda. Palace 3S-FD-NS 

Banff, Banff Springs Hotel 2n2A-REP 

Belleville, Belle , 

Brantford. Temple 2SX-FD-NS 

Brock-viUe, Capitol 

Calgary, Capitol 

Calgary. Palace 

Chatham. Capitol 

Chicoutimi. Capitol ,2 tI 

Cochrane, Empire SS'^t^ 

Cornwall, Capitol 

Cranbrook, Star oS"™"™ 

Drumheller. Napier 

Edmonton. Capitol ^^"-^2'^.^ 

Edmonton. Empress si'l^rJ 

Edmonton. Gem tJ^'Sto 

Edmonton. Monarch 5? -S^ 

Edmonton. Princess ™ 

Edmonton. Rialto — ^^'^2"?5 

Edmundston. Star ,S"i,S 

E^tevan. Orpheum Wii ^'irn 

Fort William, Orpheum ;;J2"S^"SS 

Guelph, Capitol ^SX-FD-NS 

Halifax, Casino a;; 

Halifax, Community 5§ „5"i;„ 

Halifax. Orpheus 

Hamilton. Capitol : 1§'E5"S„ 

Hamilton. Strand xJJ"ES"^S 

Hamilton, Tivoli ^^o^-Si^'xS 

Kingston, Capitol 2l"E5"Si 

Kitchener, Capitol 

Lachlne, Empress oo'iJrl 

Lachine, Royal Alexandra oc'r'T^ 

Leamington, Capitol oi;";?S"'lTcl 

Mhbrldge. Capitol ^<?I"S2"S2 

I^ndon, Capitol Hx FD NR 

London. Loew's oo m 

Moncton. Capitol Wo'^S'^S 

Mnncton. Imperial qo -S^ 

Montreal. Alexandria -.i;;'™'!,^ 

Montreal. Corona 

Montreal. Capitol .— ii"S2"So 

Montreal. Century oo'to NS 

Montreal. Francais ?g'Si^ 

Montreal. T^ew's oo'i.^ 

Montreal. Midway ;;;"t;^"^tc 

Montreal. Palace oS'^'iic 

Montreal. Regent io-S'-Sii atq 

Montreal. Rivoli 

Montreal. Seville 11'?^ NS 

Montreal. Strand II'SS NS 

Montreal. Orpheum 

Montreal. Paplneau 

Moose .Taw. Canitol So i^^'iiS 

New Glasgow. Roseland „o tJt^'tSc 

New Westminster. Columbia „o E,l;"iiS 

Niagara Falls. Queen. 

North Bay. Capitol ^^^■'^c'Sc 

North Bay. Royal ■••.^■'S-nn 

Oshawa, Regent qq'fd'ns 

Ottawa, Avalon - ^S-FD-NS 

Ottawa, Centre ■ s'|:^ JJj 

J^ff^t;&L.::::::=:;:;:;;:::::::::;::::::::::;::::::^ 

Owen Sound, Classic 

Peterborough. Capitol so rm'wt! 

Peterhorough. Regent iS^-l'u-x^o 



CANADA— Cont'd 

Port Arthur. Colonial 2S-FD-NS 

Prince Albert. Orplieum .3S-FD 

I'rince Rupert. Capitol _ 2S-FD-NS 

Quebec, Auditorium 2SX-FD-NS 

Quebec, Canadian 2S-FD-NS 

Quebec, Cartier 3S-FD 

Quebec, Imperial 2S-FD-NS 

Rcglna, Capitol 2S-FD-NS 

Itegina, Metropolitan 3S-FD-NS 

St. Catherines, Capitol 2S-PD-NS 

St. Catherines. King George 2S-FD-NS 

St. .Tohns Imperial 2S-FD-NS 

St. .Tohns, Strand 3S-FD-NS 

St. Johns, NFLD, Nickel 3S-FD 

St. Johns, Opera House 3S-FD 

Sarnia, Imperial 2S-FD-NS 

Saskatoon, Capitol 2SX-PD-NS 

Sault Ste. Marie. Algoma 2SX-PD-NS 

Sault Ste. Marie. Stevens Orpheum IS-FD-NS 

Smith Falls. Capitol 3S-PD-NS 

Shawiningan. Auditorium 3S-FD 

Sherbrooke. Granada 2SX-FD-NS 

Rherbrooke. Premier 3S-FD-NS 

Sudbury, Grand 2S-FD-NS 

Sydney, Capitol 2S-PD-NS 

Sydney, Strand 3S-F1) 

Three Rivers, Imperial 3R-FD 

Three Rivers, Capitol 3S-FD-NS 

Timmins, Goldfields 3S-FD-NR 

Toronto, Alhambra 2SX-NS 

Toronto, Beach 2SX-NS 

Toronto. Beaver 2S-FD-NS 

Toronto. Bloor 2S-FD-NR 

Toronto, Blue Bell 3S-FD 

Toronto, Capitol 2S-FD-NS 

Toronto, Carlton SS-FD-NS 

Toronto, Christie 3S-FD-NR 

Toronto. College Playhouse 3S-FD 

Toronto. College 2SX-NR 

Toronto. College Playhouse 3S-FD 

Toronto. Eastwood , 3S-FD-NS 

Toronto. Eclipse 3S-FD 

Toronto. Gerrard 3S-FD-NS 

Toronto. Grover 2S-FD-NS 

Toronto, Kingswood 3S-PD 

Toronto, La Plaza 3S-FD-NS 

Toronto, Loew's IS-FD-NS 

Toronto, Madison 3S-PD-NR 

Toronto, Oakwood 2SX-FD-NR 

Toronto, Park 3S-FD 

Toronto, Palace 2SX-FD-NR 

Toronto, Pantages IS-FD-NS 

Toronto. Parkdale 2S"s'-FD-NS 

Toronto. Prince of Wales 3S-FD-NR 

Toronto. Revue 3S-FI) 

Toronto, Runnymeade 2SX-FD-NS 

Toronto. St. Clair 2S-FD-NS 

Toronto. Tech 3S-FD-NR 

Toronto. Tivoli 2S'«'-'i'D-NS 

Toronto. Uptown IS-FD-NR 

Toronto, York .^S-wti-n^ 

Trenton, Trent 3S-i^ti,x-c; 

Truro. Strand 3S-FD 

Vancouver. Broadway 2.R-FD-NR 

Vancouver. Capitol IS-FD-NS 

Vancouver, Dominion 2S-FD-NS 

Vancouver, Rex 2S-FD 

Vancouver. Strand IS-FD-NS 

Verdun. Palace 3S-FD-NR 

Verdun. Park 2S-FD-NS 

Victoria. Dominion 2S-FD-NS 

Winnipeg, Gaiety 3S-FD-NS 

WalkerviUe. Walkerville 2S-FD-NS 

WeUand. Capitol 2SX-NS 

Windsor. Capitol 2RX-FD-NS 

Windsor. Palace 2SX-FD-NS 

Winnipeg. Capitol IS-FD-NS 

Winnipeg. Lyceum : ; 2S-FD-NS 

Winnipeg. Metropolitan 2SX-ii'D-NR 

Winnipeg. Osborne — .3S-FD-NS 

Winnipeg. Regent 2S-FD-NS 

Winnipeg, Palace 3S-FD 

Winnipeg. Plaza 3S-F^ 

Winnipeg. Rose 3S-'P'n 

Winnipeg. Tivoli 3.R-FD-NS 

Woodstock. Capitol 2S-F'^-^"~ 

Woodstock. Capitol 3S-FD 

CHINA 

Shanghai, Capitol 2R-FD-NS 

Shanghai, Carlton 'S-FD-NR 

Shanghai, Grand 2SX-FD-NR 

Hong Kong, Queens 2SX-FD-NS 

COLOMBIA 

Armenia, Municipal 2SX-FD-NS 

Call, Colombia IS-FD-NR 

Call, Municipal 2SX-FD-^'S 

Tulua, Sarmiento 2NX 

COSTA RICA 

San Jose, Raventos IS-FD-NS 

CUBA 

Cameguey, Principal 2SX-FD-NS 

Habana, Encanto 2SX-FD-NS 

Habana, Fausto 2SX-FD-NS 

Habana, Marti 2SX-FD-NS 

Habana, Riviera 2S-PD-NS 

Santiago de Cuba, Cuba 2S-FD-NS 

CZECHO SLOVAKIA 

Prague, Bio Adria 2S-FD-NS 

Prague, Capitol Bio 2SX-FD-NS 

Prague, Lucerno 2SX-FD-NS 

Prague. Kotva Bio 2S-FD-NS 

DENMARK 

Aarhus, Regina 3S-FD-NS 

Copenhagen, Aladdin 3S-FD-NS 

Copenhagen, Coloseum 2S-FD-NS 

Copenhagen. Grand 3S-FD 

Copenhagen. Kino Palaeet 2S-FD-NS 

Copenhagen. Palads IS-FD-NS 

Copenhagen. Roxy 2S-FD-NS 

Odense. Kinoteatret 3S-FD-NS 

FINLAND 

Helslngfors, Capitol 2S-FD-NS 

FRANCE 

Lyon, Royal Aubert 2S-PD-NS 

Marseilles, Capitol IS-FD-NS 

Nice, Paris Palace - 2SX-FD-NS 

Paris, Artistic 2SX-FD 

Paris, Aubert Palace 2S-FD-NS 

Paris. Cameo 2S-FD-NS 



32 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



SERVICE ON PICTURES 



^3eLIEVE it or not, I made a New Year's 
resolution on which I'll make a small wager 
that I'll abide by it through 1930 — providing, of 
course and if, my exhibitor readers don't take 
the matter in their own hands and find me a 
good job sweeping streets. In that case all bets 
are off — absolutely. 

I resolved this New Year's day to share this 
department with my associates. First, because 
my associates know pictures; second, because 
it will serve to amplify the department; and 
third, because my hair has grown grey from 
trying to view all of the pictures during the last 
decade. 

And without further preliminaries we'll get 
down to the business of presenting the opinions 
of my associates with a report on — 

THE MIGHTY 

COOD FOR BANCROFT! Produced and dis. 
tributed by Paramount^ Story, Robert N. Lee, 
Treatment, Nellie Revell, Adaptation and dia- 
log, Grover Jones and William Slavens Mc- 
Nutl. Director, John Cromtcell. Editor, Otto 
Levering, Photography, J, Roy Hunt, Cast: 
George Bancroft, Esther Ralston, Warner Oland, 
Raymond Halton, Dorothy Revier, Morgan 
Farley, O. P, Heggie. Length, 6,802 feet. Re. 
leased, November 16, 1929, 

In The Mighty, Paramount had the set-up for 
a great picture; a smashing star, a story with 
real possibUities, dialog writers who know their 
stuff, bright direction, a good cast, all gathered 
under a grand title. I might say that I would 
have ventured this opinion even if I hadn't seen 
them stand five deep at the Rivoli in New 
York, with a line outside. 

However, The Mighty didn't turn out to be 
anything more than just a good program pic- 
ture. The temptation to do too much ran the 
story into preposterous and overdone situations, 
to no good purpose. 

The story is that of a gangster who gets 
caught in the draft during the recent unpleas- 
antness, much against his will. He goes to the 
trenches and becomes a great hero, in contrast 
to finer characters, because "war is a thing for 
gunmen." He comes home a major, and, be- 
cause of his record, is invited to become the 
police commissioner of a gang-ridden town. He 
cleans up in dramatic style, incidentally wiping 
out his own particular pre-war gang. 

This is the simple and telling story, good for 
Bancroft. But it gets embellished with a love 
story, in which Bancroft is prostrated, in the 
clumsy fashion of the he-man, at the feet of 
the sister of the frightened young esthete who 
was his lieutenant in France. To build this 
up, the first half hour of the picture is given 
over to war stuff and news reels, some of which 
is a bit thick. And the end is conventionally 
sentimental. 

The picture is interesting and smartly done, 
for all its faults.— P. V. 

NO, NO, NANETTE 

A COVNTRY GIRL, NANETTE. Produced and 
distributed by First National. Directed by 
Clarence Badger from the musical comedy. 
Adapted by Frank Mandel, Otto Harbach, Vin- 
cent Youmans and Emil Nyitray. With Ber- 
nice Claire, Alexander Gray, Lucien Littlefield, 
Louise Fazenda, Lilyan Tashman, Bert Roach, 
Zasu Pitts, Mildred Harris, Henry Stockbridge 
and Jocelyn Lee, Length, 9,108 feet. Release 
date, February 23, 1930, 

]NJo, NO, NANETTE, brought into the 
Strand on Broadway by First National at a 



By T. O. Service 



Hero of the Week 




THE OILY BIRD 

CHARLES BICKFORD—One of Our 
Best Leerers and Eye-Gougers, Con- 
gratulated for an Outstanding Perfor- 
mance in Univer sal's Hell's Heroes 



spectacular premiere, has the greatest finale yet 
shown upon the screen. Filling the full stage 
with legions of dancers and acrobats, stylish, 
swift, brilliantly colored, the finale outdoes a 
series of lavish production numbers and sends 
them out into the street cheered with satisfac- 
tion. 

With such a finish No, No, Nanette cannot 
help but be a smashing success. Certainly it 
will knock them dead if they've never seen a 
real musical comedy in New York. 

Up to the arrival of the finale, I must say 
I was discouraged. My mind was wandering 
from the picture and I was wondering why the 
musical comedy type of picture has lagged so 
far behind every other kind of screen entertain- 
ment. It came to me that the screen musicals 
are not only miles behind every other type of 
picture, but years behind such stage successes 
as Sweet Adeline, Sons o' Guns, Fifty Million 
Frenchmen Can't Be Wrong, now packing them 
in along Broadway. 

No New York producer of musical comedies 
would dare present a show so slow, so dull, so 
obvious, so formal, so distinctly unfunny (with 
the single exception of ZaSu Pitts) as is the 
first part of No, No, Nanette. The thing drags 
tediously, without comedy of situation or com- 
edy of line. Incidentally, practically nothing is 
left of the original show and the famous Tea 
for Two is played only once, hurriedly gotten 
out of the way at the very opening of the 
picture. 

While I'm at it, I might as well admit that 
I am against any picture which brings in phoney 



piano players, dreamy young men with soulful 
eyes who pretend to be tearing off a tune while 
do-dahing their hands over the keys, as though 
some one had put grease on them and made 
them slippery. — P. V. 

THE VIRGINIAN 

ONE FOR THE BOOK, Produced and dis- 
tributed by Paramount. Story by Owen Wister, 
Screen adaptation by Howard Estabrook, Di- 
rected by Victor Fleming, Cast includes Gary 
Cooper^ Mary Brian, Richard Arlen and Walter 
Huston, Released December 14, 1929, 

The VIRGINIAN is undoubtedly the ace 
Western thriller of the sound regime so far. 
Taken from Owen Wister's celebrated novel of 
the same name it offers a tremendous asset 
merely by being associated with a work that 
literary authorities rate as a contemporary 
classic. Better, it is a film worthy of its back- 
ground and close enough to Wister's script not 
to antagonize the author's admirers. 

Gary Cooper, Mary Brian, Richard Arlen and 
Walter Huston are surely as attractive names, 
collectively, as is flaunted on any theatre mar- 
quee about. The Rialto in New York, where 
the picture was placed for a run, had something 
to be proud about. 

To Cooler go the major acting laurels in the 
title role. The modest restraint of Wister's 
original character has been recaptured to the 
last blush and it is a tribute to Cooper that 
he had the far-seeing intelligence to derive most 
from his role by permitting the story to weave 
him into a fascinating character rather than to 
emote heavy hysterics over genuine enough 
heroics. 

Even the incident of hanging his best friend 
has been left untouched, another tribute from 
Paramount to the intelligence of its audiences. 
The entire picture has been planned tand ex- 
ecuted with so deft a strain of suppressed ex- 
citement,! so natural and unforced, that your 
audiences leave with the feeling of having wit- 
nessed the story from the active side of the 
screen. 

There is no doubt that this picture, unani- 
mously praised by the critics, will prove one of 
the more successful film accomplishments dur- 
ing the new year. — N. K. 

HELL'S HEROES 

BICKFORD TO KOHLER TO HATTON. Pro- 
duced and distributed by Universal Peter B, 
Kyne's story. Three Godfathers, Adaptation, 
continuity and dialog by Tom Reed, Directed 
by William Wyler, Photographed by George 
Robinson, Length, 6,289 feet. Released 
January 5, 1930, 

A 

-LA.N encouraging argument against the possi- 
bility of keeping a good picture down is offered 
in the strange case of Universal's Hell's Heroes, 
running two weeks at the Colony in New York. 
The original story is Peter B. Kyne's Three 
Godfathers, from which was made two different 
silent versions starring Harry Carey a few year.' 
ago. 

Here, presumably, was an exhausted themt 
worthy of fond memories and storage, and ye) 
Universal thought it good enough to merit the 
addition of sound and a third revival. And an 
exceedingly good move it turned out to be. 

Charles Bickford has Carey's old role of the 
cruel, unbelievably brutal Western bad man 
who turns softie, and his partners in crime are 
the ox-like Fred Kohler and generous, puny 
Raymond Hatton. 



January li, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



33 



The story centers around three flint-hearted 
bandits who voluntarily give up their lives to 
save a week-old baby they had accepted from 
a dying mother. First Hatton, fatally shot in a 
bank robbery, takes his life so as not to hinder 
the flight of the remaining three and then 
Kohler disappears in the desert leaving less 
mouths for the limited supply of water, and 
also leaving Bickford, the one member of the 
original trio who was in favor of abandoning 
the child, to save it. 

For fully a third of the picture Bickford 
struggles through the maddening desert with 
the baby in his arms. His greasy, crafty, lov- 
able swashbuckling of the saloon scenes changes 
to the frenzied tottering of a man dying of 
thirst, as moving a performance as has been 
offered in a long while. 

The photography is appropriate, the scenes 
are authentic, and some peculiar blending dis- 
solves are worthy of especial mention. An 
excellent story excellently done. — N. K. 

HOT FOR PARIS 

BARD BOILED McLACCEM Produced and 
distributed by William Fox. Story and direc- 
tion, Raoul Walsk, Adaptation and dialog, 
Wiltiam K. Wells. Music and lyrics, Walter 
Donaldson and Edgar Leslie. Photography, 
Charles Van Enger, Footage 6,570. Released, 
December 22. Cast: Victor McLaglen, Fifi 
Dorsay, El Brendel, Polly Moran, Lenox Pawie, 
August Tollaire, George Fawcett, Charles Judels, 
Eddie Dillon, Rosita Marstini, Agostino Bor- 
gato, Yola D'Avril, Anita Murray and Dave 
Valles. 

If you've seen Victor McLaglen once you've 
seen him always: which is another way of say- 
ing that if you enjoy a good laugh once you'll 
enjoy it again. And you'll have plenty of op- 
portunity to enjoy it in Hot for Paris with 
McLaglen, Fifi Dorsay and El Brendel, the last 
mentioned being the familiar Axel of the Cock 
Eyed World. He's Axel this time, too, and no 
brighter than he was before. 

McLaglen, as you know, gives a pretty broad 
performance. This time he and the Swede, 
buddies on shipboard, are ashore on leave and 
make no pretense of what they're after. The 
only difference is that for once the big he-man 
marries the girl, or threatens to as the picture 
closes. Lots of girls in this one, cabaret scenes 
and whatnot with a streak of additional com- 
edy running through it in the persons of two 
gentlemen who're after our hero to give him 
a million samolians for being lucky enough to 
win the Grand Prix. As it happens, he thinks 
they're "dicks" trying to get him for certain 
breakages committed the last time he was in 
that port. 

The girl in the picture, Miss Dorsay, would 
be more attractive if the projectionists at the 
Roxy wouldn't magnify her voice out of all 
proportion. It's strident enough as it is. How- 
ever, in the opinion of the audience she did 
have what are known as "dese, dem and dose." 
McLaglen seemed to think so, too. Another 
thing which may give you a slant on audience 
reaction is that the film got better box office 
results in Philadelphia than the Cock-Eyed 
World.— D. F. 

PARTY GIRL 

WHAT KIND OF A PARTY IS THIS? Pro- 
duced and distributed by Tiffany. Directed by 
Victor Halperin. Adaptation by Monte Katter- 
john. Dialog by George Draney, Victor Hal- 
perin and Monte Katterjohn. Musical composi- 
tions by Harry Stoddard and Marcy Klauber. 
With Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Jeanette Loff, 
Judith Barrie, Marie Prevost, John St. Polis 
and Hal Price. 

OR a number of purely box office reasons 
Party Girl should be considered a worthy pro- 
gram picture. It has a basically clever story; 
a wealthy man's fight against the custom of 
supplying girls and parties to out of town buy- 
ers; it has the fairly alluring names of Douglas 
Fairbanks, Jr., and Jeanette Loff in its cast; it 
is more than lavishly set; and its musical score 
contains a drawing card in Oh, How I Adore 
You. 

Further than that would be unreasonable to 
say. The picture has been hacked a bit by the 



censorial shears and shows it. Ebccerpts from 
the forbidden parts of the film have been en- 
larged for lobby displays, an ingenious, if tem- 
porary, method of outwitting the keepers of the 
public morals. 

The part sequences are undoubtedly the more 
attractive portions of the picture together with 
Miss Loff's singing and one beautiful drunk 
pantomime by Fairbanks junior. Miss Loff, at 
the Gaiety at least, worked under the disadvan- 
tage of screechy sound reproduction, a situation 
which evoked snickers at non-snickerable 
moments. — N. K. 

THE LAUGHING LADY 

SWELL t Produced and distributed by Para- 
mount. Story, Alfred Sutro, Direction, Victor 
Schertzinger. Adaptation and dialog, Bartlett 
Cormack and Arthur Richman. Photography, 
George Folsey. Footage 7,105. Released, De- 
cember 28. Cast: Ruth Chatterton, Clive 
Brook, Dan Healy, Nat Pendleton, Raymond 
Walburn, Dorothy Hall, Hedda Harrigan, Lil- 
lian B. Tonge, Marguerite St. John, Herbert 
Druce, Alice Hegeman, Joe King, Helen Hawley 
and Betty Bartley. 

J N the Laughing Lady, recently filmed at the 
Paramount Long Island studio and now being 
shown at the New York Paramount, Ruth Chat- 
terton and Clive Brook step smoothly into an 
easy amusing drama of near infidelity and its 
effect on society and big business. New York 
audiences must be getting much more sophis- 
ticated or much more ingenuous for there was 
considerable laughter and even applause at the 
end of the picture — this, mind you, at the morn- 
ing show, before the audience had had a chance 
even to partially fortify itself with a luncheon. 

That's my idea of a real test for an amusing 
picture — whether people wiU laugh or not on 
an empty stomach. 

Sets in The Laughing Lady are splendiferous, 
and the lady herself, more often than not, is 
gorgeously caparisoned. Of the sets, again — I 
must get about more or,, perhaps, it's that I 
don't get invited to the right places. But never, 
outside of pictures, have I seen such imposing 
ballrooms and offices. Clive Brook's place of 
business (he's a screen lawyer) is snootier than 
Roxy's. 

Victor Schertzinger directed The Laughing 
Lady shortly after Rouben Mamoulian finished 
Applause and it's obvious from his camera 
work that he followed the methods of his pre- 
decessor to good advantage. In other words, 
I'm quite enthusiastic about his work as well 
as that of his principals. — D. F. 

NEWSREEL PROGRAM 

T 

-l HE one objection offered to the Newsreel 
theatre idea has cropped out already. It isn't 
a very important defect but it's noticeable. 
What is going to be done when a week falls 
short of sufficient events worth their reproduc- 
tion on the screen? 

Last week was evidently one, and what Fox- 
Hearst did was to use more features and human 
interest fillers. This isn't exactly in the spirit 
of the new medium that was supposed to 
threaten the future of the press but it does very 
nicely as entertainment. 

The various items have been selected with 
an intelligent understanding of what the audi- 
ence likes to hear and most, while strictly fea- 
tures, contain some relation to present news 
events. A talk by Arthur Hopkins, flanked by 
Brock Pemberton and Gilbert Miller, on the 
evils of the ticket specidator and his relation 
to the gasping legitimate theatre, is the best of 
these. 

There are only three or four strictly news 
recordings, and the rest are episodes that are 
either timely or interesting through content. 
Some of the features are the drawing of the 
winners of the Cuban national lottery; a talk 
on the advantages of owning a new Ford model, 
a swell ad; the perenninal physical contest 
winner, this time of Holyoke college; a dog 
show; an alligator farm; Lake Placid's winter 
sports opening; an assurance by Bob Shawkey 
that the Yankees would win the pennant; and 



a group of college coaches speaking on health, 
one of whom keeps repeating "It don't . . ." — 
N. K. 

And now from Hollywood — 

MAID TO ORDER 

FIRST CLASS! Produced by Jesse Weil. 
Story, Doris Denbo and A. L, Parsons. Songs, 
George Beauchamp and Fred Thompson. Direc- 
tor, Elmer Clifton. Cast; Julian Eltinge, Betty 
Boyd, Jane Reid, Jack Richardson, Georgie 
Stone, Al Hill and Charles Giblyn, 

Julian eltinge, vaudeville's imperson- 
ator, makes his talking screen debut in Maid 
to Order. Jesse Weil produced the film inde- 
pendently and it ranks as first class entertain- 
ment. Elmer Clifton directed. 

It is crook comedy drama. Song and dance 
numbers in the night club furnish a musical 
background. Eltinge plays a secret service man 
guised as a French demimondaine in an Ameri- 
can night club. As a dainty lady, wearing beau- 
tiful costumes, he swings a mean right hook. 
Gun battles, diamond smuggling and fist fights 
carry the action to a finale where the crooks 
are uncovered. 

Eltinge marries the girl and everything ends 
as it should. Betty Boyd as the female menace 
does well. Jane Reid plays the feminine lead. 
Others in the cast include Jack Richardson, 
Georgie Stone, Al Hill and Charles Giblyn. The 
story is by Doris Denbo and A. L. Parsons. 

Eltinge sings several song numbers written by 
George Beauchamp and Fred Thompson. The 
camera work and RCA Photophone recording 
is well done. The credit subtitles are presented 
in an unusual and clever manner. — T. J. H. 

And I think you'll agree that my associates 
have done an excellent job. And now, mod- 
estly, I present a few of my own observations. 

SO LONG LETTY 

Charlotte greenwood's first pic- 
ture, so far as I know, is So Long Letty. It 
should not be her last. She has a vigorous 
style of comedy, something between wisecrack- 
ing and slapsticking, that comes across with a 
bang. I expect to see her gain in the cinema 
an even greater prominence and a wider vogue 
than has been hers these many years on the 
stage. 

The plot of So Long Letty ought to be famil- 
iar to all of you, although it doesn't matter. 
It's a comic thing, wherein young married peo- 
ple exchange wives and husbands to deceive 
the wealthy uncle into making proper financial 
settlement upon his nephew. But the handling 
of the thing makes it seem much brighter, 
fresher and gayer than the synopsis sounds. 
And Claude Gillingwater, Bert Roach, Grant 
Withers and others who assist Miss Greenwood 
add immensely to the merriment. 

There are songs in it, of course, and they fall 
naturally into the action of the thing. There 
is a musical score also running along while 
the speeches are being spoken and the didoes 
are being didoed. It's all very animated, swift, 
and occasionally snappy in the more moderate 
meaning of that adjective. It's a good picture. 

CHRISTINA 

Janet GAYNOR goes Dutch in Christina 
and I have the idea that she can go Scandina- 
vian, Hindu, French, Japanese, British or what 
have you with equal facility and poise. The 
story is of Holland, infrequently utilized as a 
locale, and she has the valuable assistance of 
the senior Schildkraut in her performance of 
the quaint little drama performed. There is, 
also, the young fellow who looks like Charles 
Farrell and whose name I never can remember. 
And other people. 

The picture is silent for a good part of the 
way, possibly three-quarters or more, and then 
they begin talking. The transition is negotiated 
more smoothly than usual and, if seen from the 
beginning, the production does not suffer. I 
had the misfortune to see it otherwise, but 
that's my hard luck. 



54 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 11, 1930 



SOUND PICTURES 



THE BLUEBOOK SCHOOL 

By F. H. RICHARDSON 

KLUEBOOK SCHOOL QUESTION NO. 36.-If an electrical condenser be too 
heavily charged, what happens? What is meant by a "puncture" in an electrical 
condenser? Explain in just what manner condensers of considerable capacity 
may be and are made to occupy small space. 

ANSWER TO BLUEBOOK SCHOOL QUESTION NO. 32 



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m 



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— — 'ma * - ^^ 'tBn»— — 



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TeciiiiedL iab&S 

j-ec^i/JeaL 
SmaoUiJ:). G. aJter heJItg 



THE QUESTION: Upon what does 
an electncal condenser depend for its ac- 
tion f Just what purpose does the con- 
denser serve? Name one purpose served 
by the condenser. What does the elec- 
trical condenser represent? 

CORRECT answers have come in from 
G. L. Roe, R. L. DuBoise, J. L. Hicks, 
Harland Fox, G. W. Wooten, Frank 
L. Dennis, Bernard A. Omlor, William Doe, 
W. R. Gw3'nn, Gayle Gurbaugh, Thomas Lis- 
tron, Karl Friedrich, A. D. Henley, F. An- 
drews, T. R. Matthews, Patrick Canty, T. R. 
Abernathy, J. Furman, H. M. Johnson, L. 
Ryder, Bert T. Andrews, M. R. Harrison, 
"Baldy" Thomas, G. Bryan, B. L. Hanley, 
Tyron Deffers, Frank Easterleigh, William T. 
Samuels and Ray Van Vaughenburg. 

Before continuing on question No. 32, I 
want to say that late correct answers on 
question No. 31 have come in from Frank 
Dudiak, T. L. Dodson, G. W. Wooten, R. S. 
Singer, J. T. Baldy, Philip Robinson, Thomas 
R. Davis, Bernard A. Omlor, Harlan B. Fox 
and Roland Terry. Now for question No. 32. 

And now I'm stuck. W. R. Gwynn has 
sent in by far the most complete answer, 
illustrated by several drawings. But it is 
pages long, and I don't know whether or not 
we can bluff enough space out of the manag- 
ing editor's grasp for its printing, but any- 
how we'll try, and when this comes through 
we'll know how well we've succeeded. We'll 
be good natured, though, and permit him to 
run it in two installments if he can't spare 
space for it all in one issue. Here is the 
answer, with the notation that I cannot vouch 
for its correctness at all points, nor have I 
had it checked over by the engineers. I'm 
not saying it is incorrect at any point, mind 
you. Our readers are invited to report any 
point with which they may disagree. An- 
swers Gwynn : 

"The following important characteristics of 




condensers should be recalled in answering 
Question No. 32: 

(1) "That no current of any kind will flow 
through a condenser if it be in good con- 
dition, in the sense that current will flow 
along a wire. The condenser actually 
stops the flow of current. 

(2) "That direct current cannot flow through 
or pass around a condenser. 

(3) "That an alternating or pulsating current 
will apparently flow through a condenser, 
though it does not actually flow through 
it. The plates discharge in first one di- 
rection, then in the opposite direction, as 
the current reverses in polarity, discharg- 
ing completely as the current reaches its 
maximum value on the quarter cycle. 

(4) "That inductive reactance or inductance 
in an alternating current circuit causes 



the current to lag the voltage, and that a 
condenser (capacity reactance) in the cir- 
cuit causes the current to lead the volt- 
age. By the right amount of each they 
may be made to coincide, each reaching 
its maximum value at the same instant. 
"An electric condenser depends for its ac- 
tion upon a charge of electricity from a bat- 
tery, lighting circuit, or even from a static 
charge — any kind of electrical charge, but 
just what the resultant action may be de- 
pends on the nature of the current; or 
whether it be pulsating direct, alternating, or 
a high frequency alternating current, termed 
an oscillating current; on the frequency of 
the current or the frequency of its interrup- 
tions, if it be direct current; on the capacity 
of the condenser itself and on whether it be 
connected in a series of parallel circuit. In 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



35 



addition to these considerations, its action 
further depends on the characteristics of the 
circuit in which it is employed, especially 
whether in a circuit in which an inductive re- 
actance is used in series with the condenser. 

"A condenser is frequently referred to as 
'an electrical shock absorber.' This definition 
is somewhat true when it is used in a filter 
circuit, but in other circuits it is used to cre- 
ate a shock (not the kind received from a 
hot wire) and the reverse is true. For in- 
stance, when it is connected across the vibra- 
tor on a spark coil. In this case, a sudden 
drop in voltage is desired in the primary 
circuit of the coil to produce a high voltage 
in its secondary, but reactance of the primary 
winding, acting here as a 'shock absorber' 
(inductances possess electrical inertia and re- 
sist any change in the flow of current), re- 
sists any change in the current, and the con- 
denser is inserted in series with the primary 
winding to cause the current to lead the volt- 
age and break down this resistance of the 
primary. It is seen by this that it is not 
always employed as a shock absorber. When 
used with an inductance in series, it may be 
said to have electrical elasticity — like a rub- 
ber band or a screen door spring, figuratively 
speaking. It takes time for a condenser to 
charge, hence its so-called elasticity. 

"Just what purpose does a condenser 
serve? As employed in various places in an 
audio-frequency amplifier and in speed con- 
trol apparatus, it serves these purposes : 

(1) "As an electro-static coupler between 
the anode ot a photoelectric cell or the plate 
of an amplifier tube to the grid of the next 
succeeding amplifier tube. This, itself, re- 
quires some little explanation, hut it will 
probably suffice here to say that the direct 
current impressed on either the plate of the 
tube or the anode of the cell, whichever the 
case may be, is not suitable for transfer to 
the grid of the next tube. These positive 
plate currents are of a constant potential and 
only their varying components are used on 
the grid of the next tube. Insertion of the 



condenser between the plate and the follow- 
ing grid blocks the flow of direct current, but 
permits the passage of the varying compo- 
nent, which originated in the photoelectric 
cell as the light falling on the cathode va- 
ried, or in the pickup, which produces a vary- 
ing current. See Figure 1. 

(2) "Condensers are also used in a 'filter' 
to iron out the ripples which remain in the 
current after the rectifier tubes have acted on 
it. The voltage impressed on the plates of 
the rectifier tubes is not instantaneously posi- 



tive, but rises from zero to its maximum pos- 
itive voltage and gradually drops to zero 
again through each half of the cycle. Each 
plate is alternately positive with reference to 
the center tap of the power transformer in a 
full-wave two-tube rectifier. In a full-wave 
rectifier, the current is continuous, but due 
to the rise and fall of the impressed voltage, 
retains a 60-cycle ripple, which it inherited 
from the 60-cycle current feeding the recti- 
fier tubes. See Figure 2. 

[To be continued in next issue] 




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36 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II. 1930 



"Educational Hollywood Needed 
For Sound Demand: J. W. Hammond 

What's wrong with this reportorial statement (outside of the fact that Sir 
Oliver Lodge is very much alive) : "Sir Oliver Lodge, who died several years 
ago, spoke to the audience on 'Action of Forces in Space,' and conducted several 
interesting experiments during his address." Nothing wrong at all. Sir Oliver 
will be quite capable of doing that, in fact this identical lecture already has 
been recorded in a talking picture, and has been given several times in America 
while Sir Oliver is going about his daily affairs in England. 

John Winthrop Hammond of General Elec- 
tric Company points to the significance of the 
foregoing in emphasizing the tremendous role 
which talking pictures will pay in education. 

"The moving picture has long been able to 
preserve men's actions as silent performers," 
he said. "And the pallophotophone film has 
made records of men's voices with wonderful 



. * ' < f ftp 




fidelity of tone. The talking screen success- 
fully unites both methods in a presentation 
which is a living episide from the career of 
the person himself — the nearest science will 
ever come to projecting an individual's per- 
sonality through space and time, and so near 
to the actual ideal that the individual, to all 
practical purposes, is really present to every 
major sense but that of touch. 

Its Meaning to Posterity 

"What this will mean for posterity can be 
rather vividly realized by contemplating what 
it would mean to the present generation — to 
each of us — if such an invention could have 
existed and could have been made use of dur- 
ing the long centuries of the past. No intelli- 
gent person now alive would fail to feel a 
thrill, perhaps a succession of thrills, if he 
were to hear and see Alexander the Great 
on 'How I Conquered the World' ; or Julius 
Caesar on 'Intimacies of Roman Politics' ; or 
Socrates in his conversations with Plato on 



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improving the soul; or Shakespeare on 'How 
I Became^ a Playwright — Without Mention of 
Francis Bacon' ; or old Doctor Johnson in a 
series of dialogs with Boswell in his plebeian, 
much-sought lodgings off Fleet street. 

"To scientists and educators who have grad- 
ually became aware of the practical extent to 
which the talking screen can be adapted in 
projecting the living personalities of people 
through their speech and actions, a recent 
demonstration appeared finally convincing. 
An audience of 300 educational leaders at the 
Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh 
a few weeks ago saw to what education is 
undoubtedly coming when four eminent scien- 
tists appeared before them, talked to them 
and conducted investigations and demonstra- 
tions — through the medium of the talking mo- 
tion picture. These talking pictures were made 
by General Electric engineers, with photo- 
phone equipment of the Radio Corporation of 
America, in the laboratories of the scientists, 
who conducted their original laboratory ex- 
periments to illustrate their lectures. 

"Educational Hollywood" 

"Obviously, however, some definite agency 
will be needed whose business it will be to 
obtain the pictures and maintain a library of 
the films. An educational Holl3rwood will 
have to be established, from which the innu- 
merable company of distinguished men and 
women of the past will come forth upon de- 
mand to reenact the deeds and restate the 
thoughts, that made them famous while alive. 
And the talking screen will be the priceless 
medium reaching back into the years that 
have gone to present to new generations the 
living forms and living voices of the leaders 
of other times. 

"In the original home of the poet Browning 
in London — now preserved as a literary land- 
mark — a concealed phonograph permits visi- 



"Boy, 
. ain't /. 
t<>72 you 
the early 
bird 
catchti 

the 
worm}" 




"Sho', 
hoy, 
what 

about it. 
Who 

icatUs a 



aitywayt 



THE TWO 
BLACK CROWS 

MORAN6>MACK 

'Why Bring That Up?' 

Radio's' sJde-Splltting comics. Talking! Aclingl In 
a gor|;eous selling uf girls and mu£ic. 



.EXTRA ApOEO. 



Paramount Comedy Song 

"After the BaU Wm Over" 



Or^y 3 bay* — 
Mbn., Tu0a.. W«d. 




Starts T^uridiy 
RUTH CHATTERTON 

Talking m 

"Madame X** 



A novel ad, this! R. M. Kennedy of the 
Rialto theatre at Birmingham used this 
attention-arresting layout to advertise 
Paramount' s Why Bring That Up?, star- 
ring the two Black Crows, Moran and 
Mack. 

tors tb hear one of his best known poems 
recited in the poet's own voice. By means 
of the other reproducing medium a complete 
motion picture record of the recent Edison 
electric-light celebration at Dearborn, Mich., 
will always be at the disposal of generations 
to come. But the supreme heritage, in the 
way of an historical record, will be achieved 
— is already being achieved — when voice and 
picture are united in reproducing through 
both senses important occasions and portray- 
ing prominent personages of an age that has 
gone before. 

"In such a manner a graphic story of human 
life can be passed down through the long 
years ahead. 



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January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



37 



Sound Will Make Even Greater 
Progress in ^30^ Declares Ross 

Four reasons why sound will make even greater progress in 1930 than the 
astounding advancement achieved in the past two years, are that there will be 
improvement in picture production, in sound recording, in reproducing equip- 
ment, and in servicing, says C. J. Ross, executive vice-president of RCA 
Photophone. 



"Since sound and sight were synchronized 
on the screen, over $500,000,000, it is said, 
has been invested in new equipment, in the 
scrapping of old equipment, in new artistic 
materials, in plays and music and in de- 
velopment of a new technique of produc- 
tion," Ross said. But the results have been 
commensurate with the importance of the 
new art and the impressive capital invest- 
ment necessary to put it into practical ap- 
plication. More than 10,000,000 people, we 
are told, have been added to the weekly 
motion picture audience of the United 
States by this single development. The 
talking picture has become the bell wether 
of the industry. 

"The principal factors, I believe, which 
will make for the greater success of sound 
in motion picture theatres during 1930 
might be summarized as follows: 

Better Picture Production 

"Producers during the past year have 
learned how best to utilize the new dimen- 
sion which sound has brought to the mo- 
tion picture art. Directors have discovered 
new possibilities in electrical entertain- 
ment. Established motion picture stars, 
instead of finding themselves on the way 
out, have learned how to become audible 
on the picture screen, ine sound picture 
has attracted the best artists of the operatic, 
the legitimate and the vaudeville stage. 



"Great as has been the success of Rio 
Rita, Street Girl, and other productions 
recorded by the RCA Photophone system, 
even greater successes will be scored, I be- 
lieve, with new productions in 1930. 

"Not only in the United States has R C A 
Photophone scored with its sound picture 
recording system, but leading producers in 
England, France and Italy have adopted the 
system of sound recording developed for 
RCA Photophone. The addition during 
the past year of the facilities in the 
acoustical and recording fields developed by 
Victor greatly widens the scope. 

Better Reproducing Equipment 

"The industry has learned that not every- 
thing which reproduces sound is good 
sound equipment. 

"Exhibitors are now looking to the or- 
ganization behind the product. The repro- 
duction of sound records, whether from film 
or disc has required extensive research and 
development in such field as radio, dynam- 
ics, _ acoustics, optics and chemistry. The 
achievements of the radio and electrical in- 
dustries of the United States are behind all 
RCA Photophone reproducing equipment. 

"The record established by R C A Photo- 
phone in leading theatres throughout the 
United States is supplemented by the 
success of this system abroad. In addition 



to the United States, RCA Photophone 
installations are now successfully operating 
in 22 countries. Outstanding theatres in 
the United Kingdom, Argentine, Australia, 
Brazil, China, Cuba, Egypt, France, Bel- 
gium, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Java, 
Mexico, Philippines Singapore, Spain, 
Switzerland, Turkey, Japan, and Russia are 
now equipped with RCA reproducing 
installations. 

"With the introduction of the Type "G" 
model, RCA Photophone has gone far to 
meet the problems of the smaller exhibitor 
vvfith regard to sound equipment. 

Better Servicing 

"For 1930, RCA Photophone is establish- 
ing a coast-to-coast system of 32 service 
and spare parts stations under the super- 
vision of a staflf of more than 200 trained 
engineers. As an adjunct to the new sys- 
tem, RCA Photophone will expand the 
training facilities at its sound motion pic- 
ture equipment school in New York, where 
technically trained men are being initiated 
into the installation and services of R C A 
Photophone reproducing equipments, pre- 
paratory to their taking posts in the service 
system. 

"RCA Photophone is concentrating in 
New York and substantially enlarging its, 
engineering staff. It is now entering on a 
wider program of research and develop- 
ment in the talking motion picture art. 

"Through its association with Victor's 
developments in the field of sound record- 
ing, RCA Photophone in 1930 will make 
available non-synchronous records to mo- 
tion picture exhibitors, and particularly a 
series prepared especially for overture and 
exit purposes. 

"On the Coast, in Hollywood, RCA Pho- 
tophone, Inc., is taking additional quarters 
to establish a projection theatre where ex- 
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38 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 




THE STUDIO 



Begin Year with Many Films 
In Production; Fox Busiest 

Tiffany Announces Program — Neill Will Direct Tango for Cruze — 

Butler Begins Society Blues — Women Among Candidates for 

Griffith-Lincoln Role — ^John Langan to Direct Arlen 

By DOUGLAS HODGES 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7. — Production returned to normal here this week as 
many of the large studios began production on the first of the 1930 pictures. 
Fox headed the list. A search of records in the matter of production for the 
past 12 years reveals no volume of product to compare with the present sched- 
ule of Fox films. M G M is second in production. 

According to Phil Goldstone, of Tiffany, more than any other, approximated the real 

there are 26 special features to be produced Lincoln in height, temperament and physical 

by that organization. The cost will total appearance. 

$10,000,000. Among the first to begin are ri t ^„ *^ n:^^^* 

Cyclone Hickey and Paper Profits. Both John Langan to Direct 

stories are originals by A. P. Younger. John Langan will co-direct, with Otto 

The group will be filmed in technicolor and Brower, Light o£ the Western Stars for Para- 
Younger will supervise. Of the classical mount. Richard Arlen is starred. He has 
stories to be produced, Lasca and Resurrec- been with that company for seven months and 
tion will be first. Moran of the Lady Letty was recently signed on a new contract. He 
is also due for early production. Lasca is was formerly a New York stage director, 
from the poem by Frank Desprez. Resurrec- 
tion is by Leo Tolstoy. Frank Norris is the 
author of Moran of the Lady Letty. 

Neill to Direct 

R. William Neill will dirrct The Soul of the 
Tango for James Cruze, Inc. It will be the 
first of the Cruze films to be made at the 
Educational studios. The unit moved there 
this week. Production will begin shortly. The 
story is by Arturo S. Mom. English and 
Spanish versions will be made. Nagene Searle 
and Ralph Bell collaborated on the treatment 
and dialog. 

Butler Begins at Fox 

David Butler began production this 
week on Those High Society Blues at Fox. 
Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell are in 
the leading roles. Lucien Littlefield has 
been signed for the featured character 
part. Besides Butler there are eight other 
films in production. Eight are slated to 
start by the middle of January. 

Companies in production January 1 in- 
clude the John McCormack film I Hear 
You Calling Me, On the Level, Such Men 
Are Dangerous, One Mad Kiss. Temple 
Tower, The Golden Calf, The Big Party 
and The Girl Who Wasn't Wanted. Those 
to begin are Yonder Grow the Daisies, 
Louis Beretti, The Cisco Kid, If I Was 
Alone With You, A Very Practical Joke, 
The Fatal Wedding and Common Clay. 

Griffith^ s Lincoln 

There are 45 men and two women who 
bear striking resemblances to Abraham Lin- 
coln. These figures were gained from scores 
of applications received by D. W. Griffith 
while casting for the title role. One of the 
women is Lucille La Verne, stage actress, and 
the other is Sophia A. Hume of Los Angeles. 

Out of 148 applicants received, Griffith 
brought the list down to 45 on the basis of 
exact resemblance. Walter Huston was 
finally selected t® play the part because he, 



News Notes 



Sheets Gallagher in Crash; 
De Haven, Jr, and Girl Sue 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7. — Richard 
"Skeets" Gallagher has been named defend- 
ant in a damage suit for $35,850 as the 
result of an asserted auto crash between his 
and one driven by Carter De Haven, 



car 



Jr. De Haven asks $10,000 for alleged in- 
juries. His girl companion, Sadie Camp- 
bell, is asking $25,650. 



R K O Signs Four Actors 

(Special to the Herald-Wcrld) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Radio Pictures 
has signed four character actors as part 
of the cast for Strictly Business, it has 
been announced by William Le Baron, vice 
president in charge of production. The 
names of the new members are: Charles 
Brinley, James Donlon, Barney Furey and 
Bill Patton. 



Lydia Yeamans Titus Dies 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7.— Lydia Yea- 
mans Titus, comedienne and character 
actress, died here last week of natural 
causes. 



Littlefield Has 
Role in Butler Film 

(Stccial to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7. — Lucien 
Littlefield completed his assignment 
in the Edward Small Rim in time to 
accept the character role in Those 
High Society Blues for Fox. David 
Butler is directing. 



(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, JAN. 7. 

BESSIE LOVE and her husband, William 
Hawks, have left for their honeymoon. 
They declined to say where they were 
going. 

JOAN MARSH, 15 year old actress, has 

signed a new contract with Universal. 
RICHARD DIX is reported engaged to 
Maxine Glass, 21 year old co-ed resident of 
Long Beach. Miss Glass displayed a dia- 
mond but denied her engagement to Dix. 
PAUL SCHOFIELD, writer, and Mildred 
Van Dorn, actress, have filed notice of 
intention to wed. They plan to be married 
within several weeks. 

JAMES GLEASON has signed for a role in 
Tiffany's Cyclone Hickey. The cast 
includes Johnny Walker, Marion Shilling 
and Paul Hurst. Production will begin 
shortly. 

COLLEEN MOORE, and her husband, 

JOHN McCORMICK, have left for a 
short stay at the William Randolph Hearst 
ranch at San Simeon, California. 
MARY NOLAN has renewed her contract 

with Universal. She will begin What 
Men Want within several weeks as her first 
film on the new contract. 
JOSEPH SCHILDKRAUT will make The 

Czar of Broadway as his next for 
Universal. The story is by Gene Towne. 
No director has been assigned. 
R. WILLIAM NEILL will direct The Soul 

of the Tango for James Cruze, Inc. Pro- 
duction will start soon at Educational stu- 
dios. The story is by Arturo S. Mom. No 
cast has been announced. 
GEORGE O'BRIEN appears in the current 

issue No. 13 of Screen Snapshots for 
Columbia. Fred Kelsey acts as master of 
ceremonies. Ralph Staub directed. Kelsey 
introduces, besides O'Brien, Stan Laurel, 
Janet Gaynor, Charles Farrell, Buddy Rog- 
ers, Betty Compson, Frank Fay, Doug 
Fairbanks, Jr., Leo Diegel, Victor McLag- 
len, Ben Lyon and Bebe Daniels. 
RICHARD SCHAYER has signed a long 

term contract with M G M. Shayer is 
responsible for the scenario of Trader 
Horn, On the Set and The Song Writer. 
He is now at work on an original story and 
dialog for John Gilbert's next film. 
WILLIAM SEITER has left for Mexico 

City for a short vacation. His wife, Laura 
La Plante, will join him upon the comple- 
tion of her film at Universal. 



Elect Riddle, Garver, Head 
In Recent Hi-Hatters Meet 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7.— Mel Riddle 
and Oliver B. Garver were elected chief 
Hi-Hatters in the recent election here. 
Harry Hammond Beal is director. Hal 
Baetz was elected treasurer and R. M. 
Finch is secretary. The Hi-Hatters is an 
organization of associated theatrical press 
representatives of Los Angeles. 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



39 



Fox Tragedy Has 
Ironical Twist 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7.— An actor 
of the Such Men Are Dangerous 
troup reports an ironical turn follow- 
ing the crash of the two planes which 
killed eight Fox employes Thursday. 
He casually sauntered to the call 
board on the Fox lot the day after 
the tragedy. On the board was a 
call sheet listing the Hawks company 
for work as per schedule. While he 
read the names of the company, ves- 
sels with grappling hooks were 
combing the sea's bed for their 
bodies. 



Film Industry's Worst 
Tragedy Kills Hawks, 
Director, and 9 Others 

Studio People Grief Stricken When 
Planes Crash on Second Day 
Of New Year 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 7.— The film in- 
dustry's worst tragedy occurred on the sec- 
ond day of the new year when two airplanes 
carrying eight Fox employes collided. All who 
figured in the accident, 10 in all, were killed. 
Five of the bodies have been recovered. 

The pall of death hung over the motion 
picture colony for three days following the 
tragedy. Studios were hushed. The Fox 
studios bore the greatest signs of grief. Its 
people had little to say. They showed re- 
luctance to speak of the topic that was en- 
gaging employes throughout all the other lots. 

Most prominent among the victims^ was 
Kenneth Haws, who had followed a brilliant 
career in studio work. He was in charge of 
the company that was shooting Such Men Are 
Dangerous scenes in the air over Santa 
Monica's ocean front. 

The list of dead follows : 

KENNETH HAWKS, 31, director, husband of Mary 
Astor. 

MAX GOLD, 29, assistant director. 
CAPT. ROSS COOK, 32, pilot. 
HALLOCK ROUSE, 33, pilot. 
GEORGE EASTMAN, 29, cameraman. 
CONRAD WELLS, 32, cameraman. 
BEN FRANKEX, 26, assistant cameraman. 
OITO JORDAN, 26, assistant cameraman. 
TOM HARRIS, property man. 
HENRY JOHANTVES, 24, grip man. 

Miss Astor, who was appearing in an 
Edward Everett Horton stage play downtown, 
was informed of her husband's misfortune 
immediately at the close of the play. She is 
taking the tragedy stoically. 

The collision occurred when the planes 
bearing the technical staff and camera equip- 
ment were 3,000 feet over the ocean. A 
third plane piloted by Capt. Roscoe Turner 
bore a double for Warner Baxter who was 
to do a parachute jump into the sea while 
the cameras cranked. 

L. W. O'Connell, regular cameraman of 
the Hawks company, had refus:ed to make the 
flight. Another who declined to make the trip 
in the face of an insistent invitation was 
Howard Hawks, brother of the director. 

The picture had been practically com- 
pleted. The parachute jump was one of the 
final shots. The story was taken from the 
idea surrounding Albert Lowenthal's mysteri- 
ous death when he dropped from an airship 
several months ago on the English Channel. 

The bodies of Kenneth Hawks, Tom Harris, 
property man, and Conrad Wells, cameraman, 
were among those recovered. 



Aimee McPherson to 

Play Star Role in Film 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7.— Aimee Semplc 
McPherson will appear in the starring role of 
a talking picture based on her famous kid- 
napping. Cromwell Ormsby, her former 
attorney who recently sued her for $300,000 
damages will probably withdraw the suit and 
he is named as one of her partners in the 
film venture. No release has been obtained 
for the picture but that is not a question that 
appears to be important in this particular 
film venture. 

Lone Bandit Gets $80 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7. — The Balboa 
theatre here was held up this week and 
robbed of $80. The cashier of the theatre 
said the lone bandit limped as he escaped. 



Fairbanks and Pickford 
To Make Television Film 
To Be Shown This Month 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Douglas Fairbanks 
and Mary Pickford will make a special mo- 
tion picture for Television, to be transmitted 
at a public demonstration some time this 
month at San Francisco by the Farnsworth 
Television system from Television Labora- 
tories, Inc. 

Television Laboratories have granted to the 
Kemper Radio Corporation, Ltd., the first 
license to manufacture and sell Television sets 
under the patent rights of their company. 
No More Family Pictures 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7.— Douglas Fair- 
banks and Mary Pickford have returned from 
a four months tour abroad and announced they 
will appear in no more family pictures. Each 
will henceforth star in his own productions. 



E 




hotography 

^Uxcellent . 



"Photography excellent . . . ". 
Thus ends the movie review. 
We are mindful of the direc- 
tor and his cameramen whose 
skill accounts for good acting, 
good direction, good compo- 
sition and good lighting. And 
of the operator in his booth 
we take account. Unstinted 
credit must go to them. But 
Bell & Howell takes particular 
pride in the "photography ex- 
cellent" stamp placed upon the 
tens of hundreds of featured 
movies made by Bell & Howell 
Standard Cameras since 1907. 
How has Bell & Howell main- 
tained its technical leadership 
thus for the past 2 3 years.'' The 
answer lies in this company's 
willingness to forego immedi- 



ate gain to the gradual upbuild- 
ing of the industry; in its eter- 
nally vigilant staff of engineers 
and technicians; in its generous 
appropriations for research 
into the theory and practical 
mechanics of cinematography. 

The culmination of all these 
things is the new Bell & Howell 
Engineering Development 
Building, a costly but finely 
equipped plant devoted to the 
solution of the present and fu- 
ture technical problems of the 
industry. It is already paying 
dividends to producers, dis- 
tributors and theater-owners, 
large and small; the investment 
it represents is in everyway jus- 
tified. We invite you to submit 
your particular problems, too. 




BELL & HOWELL 
, COMPANY 



99 



DEPT. M, 1851 LARCHMONT AVE.. CHICAGO, ILL. NEW YORK, 11 W. 42nd ST. HOLLYWOOD, 
5324 SANTA MONICA BLVD. LONDON (B. & H. CO., LTD.) 320 REGENT ST. i ESTABLISHED 1907 



40 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



Chevalier's Chicle Chewing too 
Speedy for Producing Schedule 

Japanese and Spanish Shorts Are Fihned by Ray Cozine — ^Young 
Man of Manhattan Will Follow Big Pond at Paramount 
Long Island Studio — Vitaphone Is Busy 
By DOUGLAS FOX 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7. — Hot news from the Paramount plant in Astoria: 
The American Chicle Company, in that vicinity, is Wrigley's only competitor 
— all the people in these United States and throughout the world who don't 
work the polish off their molars on Wrigley's do so on American Chicle. 
Think of it! 



"Think of it— just think of it !" That's what 
Maurice Chevalier is saying to himself as he 
works at a mixing machine in a sequence 
which I have been assured is typically Amer- 
ican. He repeats himself as, finding favor in 
the story of a Frenchman in an American 
gum factory, he is moved up to a flavoring 
machine. Workmen cluster around, against 
all rules, and the deadly monotony of work 
in a gum plant is broken as the French star, 
for a day or two, manufactures gum for all 
sorts and conditions of people. 

Jaws waggle up and down around him. His 
own mouth begins to move like a camel's. 
He's becoming a part of the American scene. 
Sinclair Lewis should have gone , to work in 
the chicle factory. 

Filming both language versions of the story. 
Chevalier is also slated to masticate in French. 
"This, doubtless, will be even more of a novelty 
to the chicle workers in Astoria. 

The Big Pond, the picture whereof we've 
been speaking, threatens to get ahead of its 
production schedule. Chevalier, they say, 
chews too fast. Hobart Henley, director, can 
hardly keep up with him and Claudette Colbert, 
lovely leading lady, is miles behind. Not that 
there is any desire on my part to throw as- 
paragus or gum on Mile. Colbert. Her jaws 
just aren't made for the job. They're far 
too shapely. 

Ray Cozine last week turned out a couple 
of foreign language shorts : The Golden 
Kimono, entirely in Japanese, and Rondalla 
Usandizaga, entirely in Spanish. 

As soon as The Big Pond is finished the 
Paramount production force will get to work 
on Young Man of Manhattan from the novel 
by Katherine Brush, and Dangerous Nan 
McGrew, poop-boop-a-doop picture, which will 
probably be camera-miked simultaneously. 

Mai St. Clair, replacing Alfred Green who 
is convalescing from an operation, will direct 
the Helen Kane film. St. Clair is on his 
way East. 

Roadhouse Nights has been selected as the 
final title for the original Ben Hecht story 
recently filmed at the Paramount studio under 
the working monnicker of The River Inn. As 
you may remember, this Hobart Henley talking 
picture features Helen Morgan, Charles 
Ruggles, Fred Kohler, and the comedy trio of 
Clayton, Jackson and Durante who make their 
screen debut in this picture. 

John Noble intends to get back in production 
at the American Sound Recording Corpora- 
tion within a week. He'll make some more 
of the Schoolday Frolics series and, possibly, 
a prizefight feature. 

Weiss Brothers (Artclass Pictures) are wait- 
ing for someone to lease their Deforest Phono- 
film studio on East 48th street. Powers Cine- 
phone have cut out production at their plant 
in Astoria. Pathe, after finishing two comedies 
at the Gramercy plant, is undecided about 
future production here. Famous Sound Studios 
(the old Edison plant) are not functioning as 
such. Great progress is being made on the 
Colorcraft Building on Long Island. Fox 
studios on Tenth avenue and M G M's big place 
uptown are idle. 

The Vitaphone plant, of course, is as busy 
as ever. Varieties completed there this week 
are: Broadway's Like That, musical playlet 



with Ruth Etting; Ruth Breton, a violinist, 
and Rodolfo Hoyos, baritone, in more or less 
of a concert number; Ben Bernie and his 
orchestra with Frances McCoy (beauty win- 
ner — the real McCoy) ; Jane Dillon and her 
Boy Friend — or an evening with a male im- 
personator ! 

Stanley E. Rauh, musical comedy writer, 
has been signed to do originals and special 
material for the Varieties. 

Hays Rates Pictures 
For Children Highly, 
In Reply to Editorial 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
DES MOINES, Jan. 7.— Will Hays, in a 
reply to an editorial which stated that edu- 
cational pictures are of low rank and find 
favor with only 2 per cent of the children, 
says that an impartial analysis, gathered from 
several different points, shows that approxi- 
mately 60 per cent of the pictures shown 
have been recommended for children by vari- 
ous disinterested groups. Lists of pictures 
sent out by them indicated many as recom- 
mended for children. 

He continues by saying that one of the pri- 
mary responsibilities on the part of the indus- 
try is to furnish suitable entertainment for 
children, and, according to these aforemen- 
tioned groups, this responsibility is being dis- 
charged increasingly. For instance, in a sur- 
vey made by the International Federation of 
Catholic Alumnae in 1928, 254 pictures were 
found suitable for children. 

Darmour Signs Feature 

Players for Comedies 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7.— Dell Hender- 
son, Arthur Housman and Irving Bacon 
are the latest feature players to sign for 
Darmour comedies. They have prominent 
roles in the H. C. Witwer story, The Dear 
Slayer. Those in the cast are Alberta 
Vaughn, Al Cooke and Lewis Sargent. 
Phil Whitman is directing. 

Paramount to Produce 

The Spoilers in Dialog 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Paramount has 
acquired the talking picture rights for Rex 
Beach's famous story. The Spoilers. It 
will be produced as an all-talking picture 
with George Bancroft as the star. The 
story was written 24 years ago. It was 
dramatized by Rex Beach and James Mac- 
Arthur in 1907. 



Artist for Chinese Theatre 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7. — Keye Luke, 
Chinese artist, has been engaged by Harold 
B. Franklin for advertising art work at the 
Chinese theatre in Hollywood. His paint- 
ings have been exhibited in the salons of 
London and Vienna. 



"Friends" Hard 
On Dinner Places 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7.—Roscoe 
A r buckle is named in a civil suit Bled 
Saturday for $320. It is brought by 
a poultry £rm for chickens said to 
have been served and bought by 
Arbuckle for his cafe. Arbuckle told 
friends this week that one factor in 
the cafe's failure was the accounts 
due him by friends who patronized 
him and signed their checks. Many 
Hollywood restaurants including the 
famous Henrys are said to have 
thousands of dollars on their books 
due from actors and directors who 
have failed to pay. Arbuckle is now 
employed by Mack Sennett. 



It's No Pink-Tea Work, 
This Talking Film Making, 
Declare the Sisters Gish 

Can't Make Many and Keep Health, 

Says Lillian — Dorothy Doesn't 

Like Her British Talker 

NEW YORK, January 7. 
Lillian Gish speaking : 

"Max Reinhardt is made for talking pictures 
— he understands sound, silence and light bet- 
ter than anyone in the theatre. He can build 
a scene up from nothing to a crescendo of 
tensely quivering drama." 

"Only a Place to Work" 

Miss Gish recently spent a year abroad 
studying with Reinhardt. She claims that her 
experience with him has been of great help 
to her in making The Swan, Ferenc Mol- 
nar's play, just completed for United Artists. 

"Hollywood is only a place to work, to ride 
in an automobile and to see talking pictures. 

"Talking picture work is unbelievably un- 
healthy. Sound proof stages are usually air 
tight, too, and terribly hot. Everyone gets 
colds. There are seven and eight takes on 
every scene. You can't make many pictures 
and keep your health. . . , 

Great School for Drama 

"The talkies are, however, a great school 
for the drama. If you want to be on the 
legitimate stage, work in the talkies first. 
You'll learn more there than you ever can 
elsewhere. . . . 

"Beryl Mercer in Three Live Ghosts, gives 
the best feminme performance that I've seen 
or heard on the screen. You get all the lovely 
shades of her voice, her inflection. Other 
women sound as if they talk in a monotone. 

"I think it's rather terrible to hear my own 
voice. I never realized it sounded quite like 
that. It's uncanny. . . . 

"Alexander Moissi is studying English. A 
great actor already, he will be greater in the 
new medium. 

"Miss Garbo is the best motion picture ac- 
tress in America. Garbo always seems rather 
important to me — and rather unhappy, too. 
Perhaps that's why she's important." 
Dorothy Gish speaking: * * * 

"I made a talker in England. And it's awful, 
gosh-awful. It's one of those serious things 
and it's a scream, too. When I saw it I 
laughed so hard they had to kick me out of 
the projection room." 

The Misses Gish will take a trip to Europe 
before they make any more pictures. 



Jowitt, Scenarist, Weds 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 7.— Anthony Jowitt, 
scenario writer, married Doris Anderson, also 
a writer of scenarios. 



January 11, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



41 



THE SHORT FEATURE 



Newspictures 



KINOGRAMS NO. 5567.-6,338 shake hands with 
President Hoover on New Year's Day — Crack Ital- 
ian cavalry performs for the king — -Winter sports 
now at midseason speed at Lake Placid Club, N. Y. 
— Primo Camera, 6 feet 8 inches, boxer, arrives in 
United States. 

PARAMOUNT NEWS NO. 44.— Lindy and wife 
start mid-winter flight to give nation's skyways an 
expert's once-over — Britain's second dirigible takes to 
air — Office in White House burns — Chicago's Field 

^ Museum cleans house. 

HEARST METROTONE NEWS NO. 229.— Hearst 
News photographs King Abdullah, ruler of Trans- 
jordania — Coast Guard wars on rum runners — 
Young boxing hopefuls train for the ring — Metro- 
tone News visits Moroccan market— Famous artist 
finds modern misses surpass old-fashioned maids. 

MGM INTERNATIONAL NEWS NO. 42.— West 
humbles East as Stanford beats Army in football 
battle — Mummers again parade amid vivid pageantry 
in Philadelphia — James Walker is installed as mayor 
of New York for second time — Stirring race opens 
new $2,000,000 race track at Agua Caliente, Mexico. 

UNIVERSAL NEWSPAPER NEWSREEL NO. 1.— 
Saloons wide open everywhere, says Borah — Medi- 
eval splendor at Royal Magyar wedding — Daredevil 
flyers open ice boat race season at Lake Winnipeg, 
Canada — Guard against riots in Philippine jail— 
Universal reel gives highlights of 1929. 



Sennett Starts His Final Nine 

With Hagen and Diegel at Golf 

Twenty-one of the two-reel talking comedies on Mack Sennett's contract with 
Educational for the current production season have been completed or placed 
in work, and with the home stretch in sight, Sennett has plans underway to do 
an even bigger job in making the fun pictures in 1930. 



Columbia Chooses 
Distributor for 
Brazil Territory 

A distribution deal has been consum- 
mated between Columbia Pictures and 
Industrias Reunitas F. Matarazzo for the 
handling of the "Prosperity Group" and a 
diversified selection of short subjects m 
Brazil. 

The volume of business resulting from 
the 1929 distribution of Columbia releases, 
which was handled by the same company, 
was excellent, and it is responsible for the 
new deal which has just been made. 

It is reported by the Industrias Reunitas 
that the picture Submarine was one of the 
most popular pictures shown in Brazil dur- 
ing the past year. 



Regal to Release 
Van Beuren Sound 
Subjects in Canada 

A deal was closed by Amedee J. Van 
Beuren, president of the Van Beuren Cor- 
poration, and the Regal Film Ltd. of 
Canada whereby the latter will handle the 
distribution of all Van Beuren sound sub- 
jects in the Dominion of Canada. Pathe is 
now releasing the Grantland Rice Sport- 
lights, Aesop Fables, Song Sketches and 
Talking Topics of The Day in the United 
States. 

L. Ernest Cuimet, representative of Van 
Beuren, will tour all provinces waging a 
sales campaign that was outlined by Jesse 
J. Goldberg, general sales manager of the 
Van Beuren Corporation. 



Take for example his plans to use Walter 
Hagen and Leo Diegel in a new play on golf 
as one of his group of sports comedies. 
Charlie Guest, Pacific Coast pro, was in the 
first, The Golfers. 

Baseball and Fight Ring 

Then came one with Wade Boteler, Coast 
baseball star, in Clancy at the Bat. Charles 
Sullivan and Sid Torres, Coast lightweights, 
were in Uppercut O'Brien, latest completed 
sport comedy. So now the stage is set for the 
champions of the links, Hagen and Diegel. 

Sennett has gone back to the use of current 
topics as the basis for. his comedies, a policy 
which stood him in such good stead in the 
early days. Andy Clyde has had a comedy 
role in all four sports comedies. 

Nine Still to be Made 

Besides these, Sennett has made A Holly- 
wood Star travesty on talkers, and a comedy 
entitled Scotch. 

In the cutting room now is Sugar Plum 
Papa, with a cast including Daphne Pollard, 
Clyde, Harry Gribbon, Marjorie Beebe and 
Bert Swor. 

Nine two-reel comedies remain to be pro- 
duced by Sennett on his Educational contract. 



189 out of 193 Patrons 
Call Dangerous Female 
Better Than ^'Good'^ Film 

Of 193 patron comments on the Christie 
talking comedy, Dangerous Females, when it 
played at the United Artists theatre in Los 
Angeles, 189 were better than "good" reports, 
only two rated it as "fair," and only two stated 
they did not like it. 

The United Artists theatre compiles daily 
reports and comments from patrons, col- 



Even Wheezer Goes 
Spanish and French 

They're teaching Our Gang to 
speak Spanish and French now, and 
even Wheezer, the four-year-old. 
who's just getting past the "guess 
again" stage in his oral progress, is 
audibly translating the "wheeze" 
part of his name into "oui's." Our 
Gang, by the way, is completing its 
second talking picture with a Span- 
ish version, the American title being 
When the Wind Blows, and James 
Horne directing. Jackie Cooper is 
director. 

Harry Langdon is starring in The 
Shrimp, directed by Charles Rogers. 



lected by the ushers and staff on the vari- 
ous items of the show as well as the long 
feature. 

Eighteen rated Dangerous Females as the 
"funniest" comedy they ever had seen, and 
eighteen called it the "best" they had wit- 
nessed. Marie Dressier and Polly Moran are 
featured. 



1929 Roll of Honor 
Includes Newsreel 
Theatre as Drama 

In its issue for January 8, the Nation 
magazine gives its roll of honor for 1929, 
and places the Newsreel theatre under the 
classification of Drama. 

The Nation states: "We offer below the 
names of certain Americans who, in public 
service, the arts, sciences or other fields, 
have distinguished themselves during the 
past year. This is not an inclusive group, 
but as it stands it forms a group of men 
and women who have done, honor to the 
United States as a whole or to their par- 
ticular part of it." 

The list includes: Eva La Gallienne, 
Elmer Rice, Preston Sturges and the News- 
reel theatre, the latter for the establish- 
ment of a unique institution where one may 
enjoy the talking newspaper. 



337 Children Take 
Part in Program 
At Holiday Party 

The annual holiday party given by Aunt 
Dolly for the youthful members of the 
Chronicle Club, San Francisco, was given 
at the Fox theatre. Although the doors 
were not scheduled to open until 9 a. m. 
youngsters began to gather as early as 7:30 
and a special detail of police was summoned 
to keep traffic moving on upper Market 
street. When 5,000 had been admitted it 
became necessary to close the doors. 

A 50-foot Christmas tree, glittering with 
lights and ornaments, was presented by 
A. M. Bowles, division manager of Fox 
Theatres, Inc., and a Santa Claus delivered 
presents. The program, outside the music 
by Walt Roesner's organization and the 
screen attractions, were provided by youth- 
ful talent. There was a boys club band, 
besides a ballet and budding artists from 
various schools, a total of 337 children ap- 
pearing on the stage. 



42 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



COLUMBIA 

Victor Gems 

(One Reel) 

AT A TALKIE STUDIO, Budd; Doyle, directed by BagU 

Smith. Beleased Aug. 14. 1929. 
PARLOR PEST, Boyce Combe, directed by Basil Smltli. Be- 

leued Aug. 28. 1929. 
HARMONY CLUB, Oeoflrey O'Hara, directed by Baall Smltb. 

Beleased Sept. 11. 1929. ^, ^ ^ 

LISTEN, LADY, Grace LaBue. Hale Hamilton, directed by 

Basil Smith. Beleased Sept. 25, 1929. . ^ ^ 

ON THE BOULEVARD, Sweet and McNaughtOD, directed to 

Basil Smith. Released Oct. 9. 1929. „ „ „^ „ 
BOY WANTED, Joe Phillips, directed by BasU Smith. Be- 
leased Oct. 23. 1929. . „ „ 
DAY OF A MAN OF AFFAIRS, A, Maurice HoUand, 

directed by BasU Smith. Released Nov. 6, 1929. 



Silly Symphonies 

(One Reel) 



SKELETON DANCE. Released Aug. 29. 1929. 
EL TERRIBLE TORREADOR. Released Sept. 26, 1929. 
SPRINGTIME. 
HELL'S BELLS. 

Krazy Kat Kartoons 

(One Reel) 

RATSKIN. Beleased Aug. 15. 1929. 
CANNED MUSIC. Released Sept. 12. 1929. 
PORT WHINES. 

SOLE MATES. » » * 

EDUCATIONAL 

Mack Sennett Talking Comedies 

BRIDE'S RELATIONS. THE (136S). Jo'"W' , 2>^!'; 
Thelma HiU, Andy Clyde. Johnny Burke and Xhelma HiU 
spend honeymoon with hick relations. 1728 ft. Beleased 

WmRLsf'A^^ND' GIRLS (1364). Hany Grlbbon and Andy 
Clyde. Harry and Andy get mixed up in a hometa neit 
of flappers. 1790 ft. Released Feb. 24, 1929. 

BROADWAY BLUES (1362). Johnny Burke and Thelma 
HlU — a couple of ham actors who bring home the bacon. 
1874 ft. Released March 10, 1^9. ^ j j. 

BEES' BUZZ, THE (1366). Harry Gribbon and Andy 
Clyde. Harry and Andy get mixed up in a hornet's nest 
while attempting to thwart the marriage of Andys daughter. 
1908 ft. Released April T, 1929. m,.,™. 

BIG PALOOKA, THE (1366). Qnbbon, Clyde and Thelma 
HiU In a modem ahotgum wedding. 1370 ft. Eeleaaed 
May 12 1929. ^ „ 

JAZZ mAMAS (788). Virginia Lee Corbin and Vernon 
Dent. First »U-color, all-talking comedy. In absence of 
crime, international detecUves frame robbery. 2 reels. 
(Disc only). Beleased June 30, 1929. j 

• IRL CRAZY (1367). Andy Clyde, Vemon Dent and Alma 
Bennett. The follies of youth committed by a lexagenarian. 
and what a run for his money Alma gave him. 1862 ft. 

BARbFr^S^DAUGHtIr, THE (1368). Thelma HiU in the 
title role, and Andy Clyde aa her father. Keeping track 
of her romances keeps Andy busier than hia tonsorlal 
parlor. 1844 ft. Released July 21. 1929. 

CONSTABULE. THE (1369). An arresting comedy with 
Harry Gribbon. the constable, wrongly aocusmg Andy Clyde 
and Thehna HiU'« fiance of a robbery. 2006 ft Released 

LUiilKHE/lD^^fHE (1370). Harry Gribbon. Andy Clyde 
and Thelma HiU cooking % stew In a restaurant. Hairy 
wanta to marry nielma. but «he has other plans. She 
"frames" Harry In a manner that cures him of her for 
Ufe. 1849 ft Released Sept. 1, 1?29. . ^ , 

■OLFERS, THE (1371). Harry Gnbbon. Andy Clyde and 
Thelma Hill. Comedy as a matter of course. They aU 
"play at" pasture pool, but CharUe Guest, welllmown 
California pro, shows them how it should be done. 1874 
ft. Released Sept. 22. 1929. ^^^^ , ^ 

HOLLYWOOD STAR, THE (1372). Harry Gribbon, Andy 
Clyde and Marjorie Beebe. Satire on the old cowboy 
meller and the talking picture in which everything that 
could go wrong, does go wrong. 1780 ft. Released Oct. 
13 1929 

CLANCY AT THE BAT (1373). Hany Gribbon and Andy 
Clyde. Rolling the ball of fun on the diamond. As a 
batter, Harry proves to be sUghtly batty. 1954 ft. For 
release Nov. 3, 1929. _ . ^ , ^ 

NEW HALF-BACK, THE (1374). Harry Gribbon and Andy 
Clyde . FootbaU taken not too seriously. 2 reels. For 
rrleasp Nov. 24. 1929. 

UPPERCUT O'BRIEN (137S). Harry Gribbon, Andy Clyde. 
Marjorie Beebe. The two boys are opposite light pro- 
moters. 1601 feet. Release December 15. Ifl29. 

SCOTCH : Clyde. McPhall. Bevan. Thelby. Released Janu- 
ary 19, 1930. Two reels. 

Coronet Talking Comedies 

Starring Edward Everett Horton 

ELIGIBLE MR. BANGS, THE (446). The amusing pursuit 
and capture of Edward Everett Horton by Florence El- 
dridge. 189B ft. Released Jan. 13. 1929. 

ASK DAD (447). Edward Everett Horton and Ruth 
Benlck. Two men In love with a maid. Who wonf Ask 
Dad. 1872 ft. Released Feb. 17. 1929. 

GOOD MEDICINE (451). Edward Everett Horton as a 
patlent-less doctor who gets a position in a hospital 
through Olive TeU. Enid Bennett plays the part of the 
wife. 1.868 feet. Released December 8, 1929. 

RIGHT BED, THE (448). Edward Everett Horton found 
a blonde. But his wife (Betty Boyd) was a brunette. 
1523 ft. Released April 14. 1929. 

TRUSTING WIVES (449). Mlxlngr love sonnets vrith marsh- 
mallow cake . Edward Everett Horton and Natalie Moor- 
bead In a battle of wits. 1699 ft. Released June 23. 1929. 

PRINCE GABBY (450). A silk-bat burglar who came to 
steal but stayed to conquer. 1615 ft. Released Sept. 15, 
1929.' 

Jack White Talking Comedies 

HOT AND HOW: Harold Goodwin. Phyllis Oane. Re- 
leased in January. 1930. Two reels. 

ZIPl BOOM! BANGl (1663). Raymond McKee takes his 
famUy to the circus and has a wild time. Conlln and 
Glass In the supporting cast. 1805 ft. Released March 
17 1<)2S 

MADHOUSE. THE (1668). Eddie Lambert and Monty 
Collins. Everything, including the kitchen sink, militates 
against a peaceful Sunday morning. 1643 feet. Released 
December 1. 1029. 

COLD SHIVERS (1864). Ghosts that are all In the spirit 
of fun. Al Thompson "plays dead" and plants ghosts in 
the house to test heroism of relations. Raymond McKee 
and T.ucUle Hutton win. 1741 ft. Released May 19. 1920. 

LOVERS' DELIGHT (1665). Johnny Arthur and Pauline 
Garon are a pair of the one-year-old lovebirds whose 
nelehhors ar(< "eats." 1523 ft. Released .Time 30. 1929. 

LOOK OUT BELOW (1668). Raymond McKee Is nsed tjf 
Thelma Todd to make her husband Jealous and it develops 
Into a whoopee psrtv on skyscraper girders. 1614 ft. 
Released Aug. 18, 1929. 



Short 
Features 
With Sound 



HUNTING THE HUNTER UBbij. BaymunU MoKee and 
Harold Gouawin. Xneir wives aidn'i mind their nunung 

wild animals, out tiiey drew the line at wild women. 
1506 ft. Released October 20. 1929. 

Lloyd Hamilton Talking Comedies 

HIS BIG MINUTE (1005). Lloyd Hamilton, a lad from 
the country, comes to Bloody Gulch and gets In wrong 
with a couple of bad men. 1805 ft. Beleased May 6. 
1929. 

DON'T BE NERVOUS (1006). Lloyd Hamilton, who Is afraid 
of his own shadow, is mistaken for a gangster. Even the 
gangster's moll makes the mistake and makes violent love 
to him. 1718 ft. Released July 7, 1929. 

GRASS SKIRTS (1010). Ruth Hiatt marries Lloyd, an In- 
valid, in the thought that his death wiU make her eligible 
for the JoUy Widow's club. Lloyd, however, gets weU. 
1667 feet. Released December 22. 

HIS BABY DAZE (1007). Hamilton Is nursemaid to little 
Billy, who turns out to be circus midget, bent on a 
nefarious mission. 1751 ft. Released Aug. 18, 1929. 

PEACEFUL ALLEY (1008). Lloyd Hamilton tries to reform 
little Douglas Scott who has "taking ways." 1835 ft. 
Released Sept 29 1929 

TOOT SWEET (1009). Lloyd likes Lena and she plays him 
for all he's got and then leaves him flat for her apache. 
1802 ft. Released Nov. 10. 1S29. 

Lupine Lane Comedies 

SHIP MATES (2613). Luplno Lane is a goofy gob. and his 

feUow-sailors make the most of his sappiness. 1670 ft. 

Released AprU 21, 1929. 
BUYING A GUN (2612). Fun in a gun shop with the 

brothers Luplno (Wallace and Lupino Lane.) 1531 ft. 

Released JuJ^ 14. 1929. 
FIRE PROOF (2614). Luplno Lane starts an opposition fire 

house and his little four-year-old playmate tries to boost 

his business by starting fires. 1598 ft. Beleased Sept. 

8 1929 

purely' CIRCUMSTANTIAL (2615). Lane is a newlywed 

against whose happiness circumstances seem vo conspire. 
2 reels. Released Nov. 17, 1929. 

Mermaid Talking Comedies 

CRAZY NUT, THE (1436). Franklin Pangbom imagined be 
had every Imaginable lUness. When the doctor told him 
he would die, he promptly proceeded to get weU. John T. 
Murray and Vivien Oakland in the cast. 1480 ft. R«- 

l6&S6d .T lin A 2 1929 

ROMANCE De' LUXE (1439). Monty CoUins and Nancy 
Dover. Love and danger generously mixed. ThriUs of the 
high and dizzy type. 1335 feet. Released December 29. 
1929. 

TICKLISH BUSINESS (1437). Monty Collins and Vemon 
Dent are a couple of Tin Pan AUey guys, and women and 
songs are their major troubles. 1843 ft. Released Aug. 
25 1929 

TALKIES.' THE (1438). A funny Idea of how a talking 
picture Is made. Monty Collins and Vemon Dent are the 
goofy "sound experts." 1522 ft. Released Oct. 27. 1929. 

Tuxedo Talking Comedies 

SOCIAL SINNERS (1880). A bug exterminator mingles In 
high sodety. Raymond McKee. Cissy Fitzgerald, Marlon 
Byron. 1710 ft. Released Sept. 1. 1929. 

DON'T GET EXCITED (1881). Lloyd Ingraham sails for 
Hawaii to get away from an annoying guitar-strumming 
neighbor, only to And him occupying the adjoining cabin 
on the boat. Harold Goodwin. Addle McPhail and EsteUe 
Bradley. 1444 ft. Released Nov. 10, 1929. 

DREAMING IT IN: Raymond McKee. Philip Smalley. Be- 
leased January 26. 1930. Two reels. 

FITZ PATRICK 

PEOPLE BORN IN SEPTEMBER: Horoscope, obtainable on 
disc and film. For release August 26. One reel. 

BARCELONA TO VALENCIA: Traveltalk. on disc only. 
For release August 26. One reel. 

LABOR DAY: HoUday short. Obtainable on film only. 
For release August 26. 

PEOPLE BORN IN OCTOBER: On film and disc For re- 
lease September 14. One reel. 

VALENCIA TO GRANADA: Traveltalk. On film and disc. 
For release September 21. One reel. 

COLUMBUS DAY: HoUday short. On dlio only. Om reel. 
For release September 21. 

PEOPLE BORN IN NOVEMBER: Horoscope. On film and 
disc. For release October 3. One reel. 

GRANADA TO TOLEDO: Traveltalk. On film and disc. 
For release October 15. One reel. 

ARMISTICE DAY: HoUday short. On disc only. For re- 
lease October 15. One reel. 

THANKSGIVING DAY: HoUday short. On disc only. For 
release October 15. One reel. 

PEOPLE BORN IN DECEMBER: Horoscope. On film and 
disc. For relea.se October 2. One reel. 

CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR: HoUday short. Disc only. 
For release November 9. One reel. 

IN OLD MADRID: Traveltalk. Film and disc. For release 
November 15. One reel. 

PEOPLE BORN IN JANUARY: Horoscope. Film and disc 
For release Deo. 1. One reel. 

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 

M G M Colortone Revue 

CLIMBING GOLDEN STAIRS (R-1). Released Aug. 3. 
1929. 

MEXICANA (R-2). Released Aug. 31. 192S. 
DOLL SHOP. THE (Tt-3). Released Sept. 28. 1929. 
GENERAL. THE (R-4). Released Oct. 26, 1929. 
SHOOTING GALLERY, THE (R-5). Released Nov. 23, 1929. 
GEMS OF M G M (R-5). Dec. 21. 1929. 

Charley Chase Hal Roach Comedies 

STEPPING OUT (1847): Going out without wife to have 

a good time. Release November 2. 
LEAPING LOVE (1847): Chariie faUs In love with both 

mother and daughter but. marries cigarette girl. Release 

June 22. 



THE BIG SQUAWK (1710): in which bashful Charley wins 

tus girl. Release May 26. 
SNAPPY SNEEZER (1729): Chariie has hay fever In this 

one. Release July 20, 1929. 
CRAZY FIGHT (1702): Charlie in a role as a dancer, 

Itelease September 7, 1929. 
REAL McCOY, THE: Charley Chase, Thelma Todd, Edgar 

Kennedy. (Charley being chased by a cop for speedinf. 

Directed by Warren Doane. 

Laurel and Hardy Hal Roach 
Comedies 

UNACCUSTOMED AS WE ARE (1940): (Jetting in dutch 
with the wife and neighbors. Release May 4. 

BERTH MARKS (1807): The life of two feUows sleeping 
in an upper berth in a speeding train. Release June 1. 

THEY GO BOOM (1864): Hardy playing doctor in helping 
Laurel with bis terrific cold. In which the bed goee 
boom. Release September 21. 

ANGORA LOVE (1884): Trying to hide a goat from tbe 
hardboiled landlord. Release December 14, 1929. 

MEN 0' WAR (1822): Two saUors go rowing into other 
people's boats. Release June 29. 1929. 

NIGHT OWLS: Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. The two 
boys volunteer to rob a house so a poUce officer can gain 
fame by the arrest. Directed by James Parrott. 

PERFECT DAY (184B): Laurel and Hardy going picnick- 
ing in an old flivver that causes a delay that never ends. 
Release August 10, 1929. 

BACON GRABBERS (1862): Two detectives sent to bring 
back an unpaid radio that is owned by a bardboUed In- 
dlviduaL Release October 19. 

Harry Langdon Hal Roach Comedies 

SKY BOY (1881): Harry landing on an ice-berg with hM 

rival boy friend. Release October B. 
HOTTER THAN HOT (1765): Harry and a beautUul blonde 

locked In a building that's on fire. 
FIGHTING PARSON, THE: Harry Langdon, Nancy Dover, 

Thelma Todd, Eddie Duim. Harry as a traveUng minstrel. 

Directed by Fred GiUol. 
SKIRT SHY (C-223). Released Nov. 30, 1929. 

Our Gang Hal Roach Comedies 

SATURDAY'S LESSON (1577): The Gang refuses to work 

untU a devil scares them into working. Release July 9. 
LAZY DAYS (1870): The Gang helps Farina earn fifty 

bucks. Release August 15. 
RAILROAD IN' (1736): The Gang goes riding in a tralo 

with a crazy driver. Release June 15. 
SMALL TALK (2330): The Gang in an orphan borne. 

Wheezer is adopted and the Gang go to visit him tt 

bis elaborate home. Release May 18. 
BOXING GLOVES (1603): The Gang runs a prize fight in 

which Joe Cobb and Chubby are the pugilists. Beleue 

September 9. 

BOUNCING BABIES (1908): Wheezer getting rid of hli 
baby brother, who gets aU the attention in his home. 
Belease October 12. 

Metro Movietone Acts 

DOLL SHOP, THE: Gus Edwards, Vincent Bryan, Louis 
Alter. Jo Trent. Dave SneU, Lionel Belmore, Buster Dees, 
CI Kahn and M G M Ensemble. Directed by Sammy Lea. 

QEORGE LYONS (79). Numbers: a. "Beloved"; b. "Ah, 
Sweet Mystery of Life"; c "Don't Be Like That"; d. 
"St. Louis. Blues"; e. "Rainbow 'Round My Shoulder." 
646 feet. For release August 3. 1929. 

CECIL LEAN AND CLEO MAYFIELD (80): Number: "Hli 
Lucky Day." 1,736 feet. For release August 10, 1929. 

GEORGIE PRICE (81): Numbers: a. "The One That I 
Love Loves Me"; b. "I'm Marching Home to Tou." 714 
feet B'or release August 17. 1929. 

PHIL SPITALNY and Hit Pennsylvania Orcliestra (82). 
Numbers: a. "Medley of Musical Comedy Hits"; b. "Fare- 
weU Blues." 71 feet. For release August 24, 1929. 

VAN AND SCHENCK (83). Numbers: a. "That's How Yea 
Can TeU They're Irish"; b. "Rainbow 'Bound My Shoul- 
der"; c. "Ramona"; d. "The Dixie Troubadours." 838 
feet. For release August 31. 1929. 

GEORGE DEWEY WASHINGTON (84): Numbers: a. "Joat 
Be a Builder of Dreams"; b. "Down Among the Sugar 
Cane." 632 feet. For release September 7. 1929. 

TITTA RUFFO (86) in "Credo" from "OtheUo." 625 feet. 
For release September 14. 1929. 

METRO MOVIETONE REVUE— "Bits of Broadway" (86). 
For release September 21. 1929. 

MADAME MARIA KURENKO (87). Numbers: s. "The 
Jewel Song," from Faust, b. "II Bacio"; o. "Tlie Last 
Rose of Summer." 840 feet. For release September 28, 
1929 

KELLER SISTERS AND LYNCH (88). Numbers: a. "Hew 

D'Ta Do"; b. "Ka Krazy for Tou"; o. "If I Had Tou." 

727 feet. For release October 5, 1929. 
YVETTE RUGEL (89). Numbers: a. "Paradise Lost": b. 

"Marie"; o. "The Parting." 713 feet. For release October 

12. IflZS 

SONG WRITERS REVUE, THE: Gus Edwards, Dave Dreyer, 
Fred A. Ahlert. Boy Turk, Roy Helndorf. Nacio Herb 
Brown. Arthur Freed, Roy Egan. Fred Fisher and Jack 
Benny. Directed by Sammy Lee. 

BILTMORE TRIO (90). Number: "Jail Birds." 860 feet. 
For release October 19. 1929. 

CLYDE DOERR (91). Saxophone act. Numbers: a. "Saxo- 
phone March"; b. "Suimy South"; o. "TechnlcaUtiei" ; 
d. "Bye, Bye, Sweetheart." 796 feet. For release Octo- 
ber 26 1929 

TOM WARING (92). Numbers: a. "Glad Rag Doll"; b. 
"Just & Garden"; c. "I'm Marching Home to Tou." 665 
feet. For release November 2, 1929. 

TITTA RUFFO (93): Number: "L'Africaine." 620 feet. 
For release November 9, 1929. 

EARL AND BELL (94): Numbers: a. "La Spagnola"; b. 
"Kiss Me Again"; c. "Blue Hawaii"; d. "Just a Mel- 
ody." 700 feet. For release November 16, 1929. 

DUCI DE KEREKJARTO (95): Numbers: a. "Serenade"; b. 
"Witches' Dance." 622 feet. For release November 23. 
1929 

IRVING AARONSON'S COMMANDERS (96). Numbers: a. 
"She's NolMdy's Sweetheart Now"; b. "The SaUor's Sweet- 
heart"; 0. "I'U Get By." 696 feet. For release Novem- 
ber 30, 1929. 

JIMMY HUSSEY (97). Number: "Uneasy Street." 841 feet 

For release December 7. 1929. 
ROY EVANS (assisted by Al Belasco) (98). In comedy 

sketch. Exclusive Columbia artist. 796 feet. For release 

December 14. 1929. 
THE REVELLERS (99). Numbers: a. "I'm Looking Over 

a Four Leaf Clover"; b. "Rose of Waikiki"; o. "Breezing 

Along With the Breeze." 607 feet. For release December 

21 1929 

MADAME MARIA KURENKO (100). Numbers: a. "Shadow 

"Song" from "Dinorrah": b. "Song of India." 714 feet 

For release December 2, 1929. 
WALTER C. KELLY (101), In "The Virginia Judge." 808 

feet. For release January 4, 1930. 
VAN AND SCHENCK (102). Numbers: a. "Everything's 

Going to Be AU Right"; b. "Aain't Got Nothln' Now"; 

0. "St. Louis Blues." 799 feet. For release January 11. 

1930. 

CLYDE DOERR (103). Saxophone act. Numbers: a. "Wed- 
ding of the Painted DoU"; b. "If I Had Ton"; o. 
"Original Music." 672 feet. For release January 18. 1930. 

BILTMORE TRIO (104) in "CoUege Romeos." 853 feet. 
Por release January 26. 1930. 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



43 



PARAMOUNT 

Christie Talking Plays 

THE MELANCHOLY DAME. All cuiored caot from OoUtui 
Bor Cotuxi nory. staged In colored cabaret. lUOU feel. 
R«lea£ed Feb. 2. 1929. 

A BIRD IN THE HAND. LoU WUson, Jason RobardB. Boy 
D'Atox and Dot Farley, farcical sketcb between kiuband 
and wife orer lo?e and money. 1833 feet. Beleated Feb. 
16. 1»2». 

POST MORTEMS. Raymond Qrlffltli, Tom Kennedy, Uabel 
Forrsst, corned; playlet witb gentleman burglar alttlng In a 
bridge game with conple be came to lob. 3017 feet. Be- 
leated Mar. X, lUt9. 

UUSIC HATH HARMS. All colored oaft In OcUvus Boy Cohen 
■tory about saxophone player who eouldn't play tlie sax 
and had a double. 1892 feet. Released Mar. IS, 1929. 

MEET THE MISSUS. James and LuoUle Gleason In Kenyon 
Nicholson play, about vaudeville husband and wife, former 
coming home a little Inebriated with a blonde. 1808 feet. 
Released Mar. 30. 1929. 

JED'S VACATION. Charley Qrapewln, Anna Chance, in their 
own Taudenlle sketdi about adopting a baby. Introduction 
on musical comedy stage. 1909 feet. Released Apr. 13, 
1929 

THE FRAMING OF THE SHREW. All oolored cast In 
Octanii Roy Cohen atoiy of the negro who went on a 
hunger itrUce to get better treatment from his laundress wife. 
1863 feet. Released Apr. 27, 1929. 

WHEN CAESAR RAN A NEWSPAPER. Raymond Hatton, 
Sam Hardy In Waldemar Young's travesty of Caesar as 
an editor, Maro Antony as a press agent (or Cleopatra. 
1821 feet. Released May 11, 1929. 

HOT LEMONADE. Louise Fateada. Jolinny Arthur and 
Walter Hlers, In a triangular comedy on board a steamer 
bound for Honolulu. 1S50 feet. Released May 25. 1920. 

OFT IN THE SILLY NIGHT. All colored cast In Ootavus 
Boy Cohen story about the chauffeur wlio sneaks out with 
his employer's car and daughter. 1787 feet. Released 
June 8, 1929. 

DEAR VIVIEN. Raymond Hatton and Sam Hardy in a 
clever comedy sldt about a business man who wrote letters, 
with which a blaclmiaillng blonde is holding him up. 
1891 feet. Released June 22, 1929. 

HER HUSBAND'S WOMEN. Lois Wilson. Harrljon Ford, 
Nina Romano and Wanda Hawley in farcical sketch about 
a clever wife who fixes up the jams into which her artist 
husband gets hlmaelf with women. 1733 feet. Released 
July 6, 19S9. 

A HINT TO BRIDES. Johnny Arthur and Ruth Taylor, in 
Kenyon Nicholson's playlet about a bridal couple who get 
chummy with the burglars and give away the wedding 
pnseiits they doo't want. 1S92 feet. Released July 20, 
1M8. 

THE SLEEPING PORCH. Raymond Grifflth, Barbara 
Leonard and John Litel in sketch about a hujband who Is 
sleeping out in the enow to cure a cold and his scheme 
witb a convict to get him out of it. 16S0 feet. Released 
Sept. 7, 1929. 

LADIES' CHOICE. Charley Orapewin and Anna Chance In 
sketch about a wife who learned to drive a car in fifteen 
minutes with ninaway auto in dizzy chase. 1727 feet. 
Released Sept. 14, 1929. 

THE LADY FARE. All oolOTed cast and cabaret and chorus 
in revue type of entertainment built around an Octavus 
Roy Cohen story. 1843 feet. Released Sept. 28, 1929. 

FARO NELL, or In Old Callfomy. Louise Fazenda, Jack 
Luden and Frank, Bice In a travesty revival of an old 
western melodrama. Laid on the desert and In an old 
fashioned movie western saloon. 1819 feet. Released Oct. 
5. 1120. 

ADAM'S EVE. Johnny Arthur, Frances Lee, In a comedy 
sketcb starting with a bridegroom's pre-marriage celebration 
and ending In a mixup in the apartment of two chorus 
ladles. 1618 feet. Released Oct. 12, 1929. 

HE DID HIS BEST. Taylor Holmes, Carmel Myert and 
Kethryn McGulre, In faroe comedy playlet of Holmes enter- 
taining a friend's vrlfe for the evening, ending in a comedy 
sword duel. 1616 feet. Released Oct. 19, 1929. 

THE FATAL FORCEPS. Ford Sterling, Bert Roach and 
Will King, in comedy of a dentist on trial for nearly 
murdering a saxophone player whose music had driven 
liim crazy. 1664 feet. Released Nov. 2, 1929. 

THE DANCING GOB. Buster and John West, In com- 
bination of West's stage dancing and comedy taking place 
at a naval training station where the actors are mistaken 
for sailors. 1823 feet. Released Nov. 9, 1929. 

DANGEROUS FEMALES. Marie Dressln and Polly Moran 
in a comedy ot two old spinsters about to entertain either 
the evangelist or a dangerous criminal, with Dressier getting 
a little Intoxicated with the visitor. 1873 feet. Released 
Nov. 16, 1929. 

BfiOWN GRAVY. All oolored oast In Ootavus Boy Cohen 
story atiout a fake medium swindling the gullible patrons, 
novel feature if inclusion of Georgia Jubilee Singers in 
spirituals. 1627 feet. Released Nov. 23, 192S. 

HE LOVED THE LADIES. Taylor Holmes, Helene Millard 
and Albert Contl, in faroe comedy sketch of a near elope- 
ment of a wife and how Holmes, the husband, cleverly 
handles the situation. 1764 feet. Released Nov. 30, 1929. 

WEAK BUT WILLING. Will King. Billy Bevan and Dot 
Varley in a comedy In a cabaret, with the Hebrew comedian 
in a role of a husband being given a birthday party and 
not being able to get any food. 1627 feet. Released Dec. 
14 1929 

MARCHING TO GEORGIE. Buster and John West and 
Frances Lee in a comedy starting on a battleship, witb 
Buster as saUor and John as c(»nic captain, and ending 
In a mixup in a girl's boarding school. 1850 feet. Be- 
leased Dec 21 1929 

THAT RED HEADED HUSSY. Charley Grapewln and Anna 
Chance as a couple of old time vaudevilllans in a martial 
sketch staging a fake quarrel in front of their fighting 
daughter and ((m-in-law. 1521 feet. Released Deo. 28, 
1929. 

FOR LOVE OR MONEY. Lois WUson, Bert Boach and 
Ernest Wood, In a comedy at the race track, with horse 
race atmosidieTe and Bert Roach proving hlj friend's wife's 
love. 1827 feet. Released Jan. 4, 1930. 

SO THIS IS PARIS GREEN, Louise Fazenda, Bert Boach 
and George Stone, in a burlesque of the Parisian Apache 
theme, laid in the cabarets and Latin quaitCT of Paris. 
Released Jan. 18, 1930. 

• • • 

PATHE 

George LeMaire Comedies 

AT THE DENTIST'S (0501) George LeMaire and Louis 
Simon. Scene: Dentist's office. Louis Simon, suffering 
from a toothache goes to George LeMaire for treatment. 
For release March 24, 1929. 2 reels. 

DANCING AROUND: (0502) George LeMaire and Joe Phil- 
lips. Scenes: Exterior and cabaret. George LeMaire and 
Joe Phillips take girls out for big time. Ivan Brunnell's 
Montrealers play "My Album of Dreams" and Vivlenne 
Johnson sings "Marie." For release AprU 21, 1029. 3 
reels. 

GO EASY, DOCTOR: (0503) George LeMaire, Louis Simon. 

(5eorge LeMaire as the bone-breaker — Louis Simon as the 

nut — and how! For release July 14. 1929. 
THE PLUMBERS ARE COMING (0504) George LeMaire, 

Louis Simon. LeMaire and Simon, two burglars, trying to 

nrt like pInmhArs. Fnr rplpase August 18, 192fl. 2 tppIs. 
GENTLEMEN OF THE EVENING (0505). George T^Malri-. 

Lew Heam. Evalyn Knapp. George LeMaire as the hoa«e 



detective. Lew Hearn as a delegate in Association of In- 
ventors of America convention and Evalyu Knapp as the 
girl In the case. For release Oct 20, 1929. 3 reels. 

BARBER'S COLLEGE (USUU). George LeMaire, Lew Heam, 
Sam Raynor, Gladys Hart. Lew Heam as "Good Time 
Charlie," graduate of a barbers' college, creates bavoo In 
a barber shop. For release Dec. 15, 1929. 2 reels. 

TIGHT SQUEEZE, A (0S07). George LeMaire, Jimmy Conlin, 
Evalyn Knapp. The adventures of a pair of impecunious 
young men who borrow dress suits to call upon their best 
girls. For release Feb. 9, 1930. 2 reels. 

Manhattan Comedies 

HER NEW CHAUFFEUR: (0511) Louis Simon, Veree Teas- 
dale, AverUl Harris. Veree Teasdale thinks Louis Simon 
is her new chauffeur, whUe he thinks Veree is his bride- 
to-be. For release May 19, 1929. 2 reels. 

WHAT A DAY: (0512) Louis Simon, Kay MaUory. What 
a picnic he had when he started to take his family on a 
picnic. For release June 16, 1929. 2 reels. 

HARD BOILED HAMPTON: (0513) Harry Holman. Evalyn 
Knapp. Doris McMabon, Alice Bunn, Andy Joclilm. Hol- 
man is a hard boiled lawyer with a fast line. For r«- 
lease July 28. 1929. 2 reels. 

BIG TIME CHARLIE: (0514) Lew Hearn, Dick Lancaster, 
Evalyn Knapp. A hick comes to New York to make 
whoopee on New Year's Eve. Eddie Elkins Orchestra plays 
in night club sequence. For release October 6, 1929. 2 

LOVE,' HONOR AND OH. BABY: (0616) Herbert Yost, 
Franltlyn Ardell, Evalyn Knapp, Kay MaUory. A very 
modern version of "the worm that turned" theme. For 
release December 16, 1929. 2 reels. 

Checker Comedies 

THE SALESMAN: (0531) Frank T. Davis. Helyn Ebys-Rock. 
Frank T. Davis sells a car to Helyn Eby-Bock. For re- 
lease July 21, 1929. 2 reels. 

TURKEY FOR TWO: (0532) Frank T. Davis, William 
Frawley, Noel Francis. Two escaped convicts with a fond- 
ness for turkey come to a Westchester inn at Thanks- 
giving. Jack LeMaire's Golden Rooster Orchestra features 
"I'll Say She's Pretty." For release August 25, 1929. 2 

SMOOTH GUY, THE (0533). Frank T. Davis and Evalyn 
Knapp. A bean salesman with a grand spiel tries bis 
line on a small town girl. For release Oct. 27, 1929. 

ALL STUCK UP: (0534) Harry McNaughton, Olyn Landlck. 
Charles Howard. Evalyn Knapp. Lester Dorr, Joe B. Stan- 
ley. How paper hangers go on strike and guests at 
newlyweds' housewarmlng try to finish the lob with mirthful 
results. For release December 22, 1929. 2 reels. 

Melody Comedies 

SYNCOPATED TRIAL: (0671) Morgan Morly, Lew Sey- 
more. A musical mock trial. Eddie Blkina Orchestra and 
Ed. Prinz Dancers feature. For release September 8, 1929. 

AFTER THE SHOW (0672). Jack Pepper, Morgan Moriev, 
Paul Garner, Jack Wolf. Numbers: "Can't Find a Girl," 
"A-Hunting We Will Go," "Here We Are," "Jig-A-Boo- 
Jig." "Ain't That Too Bad." "Mississippi Mud." For 
release Nov. 10. 1929. 2 reels. 

NIGHT IN A DORMITORY, A (0573). Ginger Bogers, Buih 
Hamilton, Thelma White, Morgan Morley, Eddie Elklos 
and Orchestra. Miniature musical comedy. Numbers: "Stay 
With It," "Song of the Volga," "I Love a Man in ■ 
Uniform," "Where the Sweet Forget-Me-Nots Bemember," 
"Why Can't Tou Love That Way," "Dormitory Number." 
For release Jan. S, 1929. 2 reels. 

Variety Comedies 

BEACH BABIES: Charles Kemper, Evalyn Knapp, Naomi 
Casey. Charles Kemper tries to shine in the eyes of 
Evalyn Knapp while Naomi Casey makes him appear ridicu- 
lous. For release August 4, 1929. 2 reels. 

HAUNTED: (0552) Bob MiUikln. Evalyn Knapp, Charles 
Kemper. Mystery comedy embodying all the thrills of 
"The Cat and the Canary," "The Gorilla," "The Bat," 
and others. For release September 1, 1929. 2 reels. 

END OF THE WORLD: (0553) Alexander Carr. Lorin Raker. 
Marcia Manning. A wealthy Hebrew, believing the world 
is about to end. gives his son thousands and his consent 
to the latter's marriage to an Irish maid. For release 
September 29. 1929. 2 reels. 

HIS OPERATION (0544). Charles Kemper, Sally Noble. 
He must have quiet, but what a racket they raise. For 
release Nov. 24. 1929. 2 reels. 

WEDNESDAY AT THE RITZ (0655). Charles Kemper. 
Evalyn Knapp. The almost-married young man and some 
girl and they meet "Wednesday at the Ritz." For release 
Jan. 19 1930 2 reels 

DOING PHIL A FAVOR (0656). Mackenzie Ward and Val 
Lester. A British society man Is jealous of bis wife and 
uses his friend Phil to test her fidelity. For release March 
16, 1930. 2 reels. 

HIS BIRTHDAY SUIT: (0557) Dr. Cart Herman, Steve 
Mills, BiUy M. Green, Cliff Bragdon. What happens at a 
vaudeville show when two little tx)ys attempt to aid the 
Great Hokey in his mystery act. For release May 4. 1830. 
2 reels. 

Folly Comedies 

HER HIRED HUSBAND: Released January 12, 1930. Two 

reels. 

FANCY THAT: (0541) William Frawley, Earle Dewey. What 
a party would look like if two hobos suddenly became 
millionaires. Frawley sings "Dearest One." For release 
September 22, 1929. 2 reels. 

SO THIS IS MARRIAGE (0542). Guy Voyer. Norma Pallat. 
Earle Dewey. Miniature musical comedy of marriage and 
its problems. Theme song: "After You Say 'I Love You.' ' 
For release Nov. 17, 1929. 2 reels. 

Golden Rooster Comedies 

GARDEN OF EATIN': (0561) James Gleason. LucUIe Web- 
ster Gleason. The story of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmle's beanery 
that tried to become ritzy — and what happened when! 
Orchestra plays "Pouring Down Rain." For release Aug- 
ust 11, 1929. 2 reels. 

FAIRWAYS AND FOUL (0562). James and LuclUe Webster 
Gleason. A tale of golfers and their ways as well as the 
breaks of the game. A dash to Intrigue is added for 
laughing purposes. For release Oct. 13. 1929. 2 reels. 

RUBEVILLE (0563). Harry B. Watson. Reg. Merville, Jert 
Delaney. Josephine Fontaine. Miniature musical comedv. 
Numbers: "Sally," "Maggie." "Sweet Long Ago," "Rag- 
ging the Scale." "She May Have Seen Better Days." "Swe»t 
Sixteen," "Wabash," "Bedella." "Yaka Hoola Hicky 
Doola." "Over the Waves." For release Dec. 8. 1929. 
2 1*6 sis 

FIFTY MILES FROM BROADWAY (9564). Harry B. Wat- 
son, Reg MervUle, Olga Woods. Miniature musical com- 
edy. Numbers: "How Is Everything Back Tome," "Trail 
to Yesterday," "Carolina Moon," "Oh, Tillle," "School- 
days," 'Summer Time," "Rosle, You Are My Posie," 
"Stars and Stripes," "Walt TiU the Sun Shines Nellie." 
"Give My Regards to Broadway." For release May 11, 
1930. 2 reels. 

RUBEVILLE NIGHT CLUB (0666). Harry B. Watson. Reg 
Merville. Josephine Fontaine, Olga Woods. Miniature 
musical comedv. Numbers: "I'm Just a Vagabond Lover," 
"It's Alwavs Fair Weather," "Sunrise to Sunset." "Mag- 
gie." "Harmonists." "Nola," "Doln' the Raccoon." "Under 



ilio Double l!)agle," ■Turliey in the Straw." "Mockloi 
Bird." if'ur release Feb. 2, 1921). 2 reeii>. 
CKUSbY'S OOKNEKS (Ufibai. Keg Mervuiu. belli, ittina. 
Joaupliiue FouLaine, Ueurge Pailen. Miniuiure uiu&n-ai 
comedieu. Numbers: "Down On the Farm," "I'li Do Au> 
thing For You," "Every Day Away From You," "Wtiai > 
Day, ' ' l Am i Got Nothing For Nobody But Xou," '•Bwe-il 
16," "Uero We Are," ■ Ragging the Bcale," "Good Night. 
Ladles," 'Merrily We Roll Along," "Jingle Bells," "AulO 
lAng Syne." For release March 23, 1930. 2 reels. 

Buck & Bubbles Comedies 

BLACK NARCISSUS: (0621 Buck & Bubbles. WUdcat It 

enmeshed in the wiles of a siren while trying to rescue 
his pal Denny from matrimony with another dusky 
charmer. Southern songs featured. For release September 
15, 1929. 2 reels. 

IN AND OUT (0622). Buck and Bubbles. Buck and Bub 
bles as Wildcat and Deimy do some funny stepping "Id 
and out" of Jail. For release Nov. 3, 1929. 3 reels. 

FOWL PLAY (0623). Buck and Bubbles. The boys hate 
to deliver an ostrich. On the way they become entangled 
with a yaUer-sklnned vamp. What happens is picntf. 
Numbers: "Swanee River," "Oh, You Beautiful Doll," 
"When I Got You Alone Tonight," "Give Me a Little Kjsh 
Will You Hun," "Coal Black Mammy of Mine," "Chlcknn 
Reel." For release Dec. 29, 1929. 2 reels. 

HIGH TONED (0624). Buck and Bubbles. When his dusk> 
rival not only grabs his Job of butler, but also his lady 
friend. Wildcat brings in Demmy and Lilly the goat to 
start something. Numbers: 'My Old Kentucky Home,' 
"Home, Sweet Home," "12th Street Bag," "Clarlns- 
Mannalade," "Lonely Me." For release Feb. 23, 1930. 

DARKTO'WN FOLLIES (0625). Buck and Bubbles. Broke 
and hungry. Wildcat and Demmy show their samples ef 
song, dance and joke and stumble onto the rehearsal of 
a Darktown Follies and get the job. Numbers: "St. 
Louis Blues," "I'm Krazy For You," "Bachmanlnoll'i 
Prelude," "Mean To Me." "Some Rainy Day." For re- 
lease April 13. 1930. 2 reels. 

HONEST CROOKS (0526). Buck and Bubbles. A mysterious 
black bag, buried In a haystack by a couple of crooks, '.s 
found by the boys, full of money. When they try to 
return it, things happen — and howl Numbers: '"Turkey la 
the Straw," "Old Black Joe." For release May 18, 193». 
2 reels. 

• • • 

RKO 

Record Breakers 
(Alberta Vaughn- Al Cooke; 

(All-Talking — Two Reels) 

AS YOU MIKE IT (0602). Released Sept 8, 1929. 
MEET THE QUINCE (0603). Released Sept 22. 1920. 
LOVE'S LABOR FOUND (0604). Released Nov. 10, 1929. 
THEY SHALL NOT PASS OUT (0606). Released Nov. 34. 
1929 

EVENTUALLY BUT NOT NOW (0606). Released Deo. » 
1929. 

CAPTAIN OF HIS ROLL, THE (0607). Released Deo. 21. 
1929. 

Mickey McGuire 

(All-Talking — Two Reels) 

MICKEY'S MIDNITE FOLLIES (0701). Released Aug. It. 
1929 

MICKEY'S SURPRISE (0702). Released Sept 15, 1920. 
MICKEY'S MIX UP (0703). Released Oct 13. 1929. 
MICKEY'S BIG MOMENT (0704). Released Nov. 10, 193S. 
MICKEY'S STRATEGY (0706). Released Dec. 8, 1928. 

RCA Shorts 

(All-Talking — Two Reels) 

BURGLAR, THE (0801). Released Aug. 11, 1928. 
ST. LOUIS BLUES (0802). Released Sept 8, 1928. 
TWO GUN GINSBURG (0803). Released Oct 13, 1829. 
HUNT THE TIGER (0804). Released Nov. 10. 1928. 

RCA Novelties 

(All— Talking—One Reel) 

HEADWORK (0901). Released Sept 15, 1929. 
GODFREY LUDLOW & NBC ORCHESTRA (0902). Re- 
leased Nov. 10, 1929. 

RCA Marc Connelly 

( AllTalking—Two Reels) 

TRAVELER. THE (0907). Released Aug. 18. 1929. 
UNCLE, THE (0909). Released Oct 13, 1929. 
SUITOR. THE (0910). Released Dec. 8. 1929. 



UPOVERSAL 

Snappy Cartoon Comedies 

(Oswald the Rabbit) 
(Synchronized Only — One Reel) 

WEARY WILLIES. Released Aug. 6. 1928. 
SAUCY SAUSAGES. Released Aug. 18. 1929. 
RACE RIOT. Released Sept 2, 1929. 
OILS WELL. Released Sept 16. 1929. 
PERMANENT WAVE. Released Sept 30. 1929. 
COLE TURKEY. Released Oct 14. 1929. 
PUSSY WILLIE. Released Oct. 28, 1929. 
AMATEUR NITE. Released Nov. 11. 1929. 
SNOW USE. Released Nov. 25. 1929. 
NUTTY NOTES. Released Dec. 9, 1929. 

Collegians 
(All Star) 

(Talking — Two Reels) 

ON THE SIDELINES. Released Aug. 6, 1929. 
USE YOUR FEET. Released Aug. 19, 1929. 
SPLASH MATES. Released Sept. 2. 1929. 
GRADUATION DAZE. Released Sept 16. 192] 

• Special 

(Talking) 

SWEETHEARTS: Rooney Family, two reels. Released S»vt 

2 1929 

LOVE TREE. THE: Rooney Family, two reels. Released 

Sept. 16: 1929. 

ACTOR, THE: Benny Rubin, one reel. Released Sept. 19 

1929 

INCOME TACT: Benny Rubin, one reel. Released Sept. <fl. 

1929. 

ROYAL PAIR, THE: Rooney Family, two reels. Releaswi 
Sept. 30. 1929. 

DELICATESSEN KID, THE: Benny Rubin, two reels. R- 

leased Oct. 14. 1929. 
LOVE BIRDS: Rooney Family, two reels. Released Oot. 

14. 1929. 

POP AND SON: Benny Rubin, one reeL Released Oct. M, 
1929. 



44 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



MARKING TIME: BooDey Family, mo reels. Beleased Oci 
28 1929 

BROKEN STATUES: Benny Bubln, one reel. Released Not 
11 1929 

THR'eE diamonds. THE: Booney Family, two reels. Bt> 

leaflod Nov 11 1929, 
PILGRIM PAPAS: Benny Bubln, one reel. Beleased Not 

25 1929. 

HOfSY TOTSY: Benny Bubln, one reel. Beleased Deo. >. 

im 

Universal Comedies 

(Talking — Two Reels) 

BABY TALKS: Sunny Jim. Beleased Sept. 11, 1929. 
WATCH YOUR FRIENDS: All star. Beleased Oct. 9, 191li. 
NO BOY WANTED: Sunny Jim. Beleased Nov. 6. 1929. 
SUNDAY MORNING: AU Star. Beleased Dec. 4, 1929. 



Sporting Youth 
(All Star) 

(Talking — Two Reels) 



LADY OF LIONS. Beleased Nov. 25, 1929. 
HI JACK AND THE GAME. Beleased Dec. 9, 1929. 



Serials 



ACE OF SCOTLAND YARD, THE (Taltlng and SUent^ 

two reels). Craufurd Kent. 
No. I. FATAL CIRCLET, THE. Beleased Sept. 30. 1920. 
No. 2. CRY IN THE NIGHT, THE. Beleased Oct. 7, 192il 
No. 3. DUNGEON OF DOOM, THE. Beleased Oct. 14. 1929 
No. 4. DEPTHS OF THE LIMEHOUSE. Beleased Oct 21. 
1929 

No. 5. MENACE OF THE MUMMY. B«leased Oct. 2» 
1929 

No. 6. DEAD OR ALIVE. Beleased Nov. 4, 1929. 
No. 7. SHADOWS OF FEAR. Beleased Nov. 11. 1929. 
No. S. BAITED TRAP, THE. Beleased Nov. 18, 1929. 
No. 9. BATTLE OF WITS. A. Beleased Nov. 2S, 1929. 
No 10. FINAL JUDGMENT, THE. Beleased Dec. 2. igzii 
TARZAN THE TIGER (Synchronized and Silent). Frani 

MerrUl. Consists of 15 episodes released from Dec. 9 

1929 to March 17. 1930. 
JADE BOX, THE (Synchronized and SUent). Consists ol 

10 episodes, released from March 24, 1930, to May 28 

1930. 



VITAPHONE 



Vitaphone Varieties 

Star and Description 

ABBOTT, A I (2703) In "SmaU Xovm Bambles"; songs and 

oluracterizatlons, 
ADAIR, JANET (2629) in "Here Comes the Bridesmaid." 

told In narrative song. 
ADMIRALS, THE (477). A Naval Quartette harmonizing 

popular songs vrtth ukelele accompaniment. 
ALDA, FRANCES (451) grand opera star singing "The Star 

Spangled Banner," accompanied by Vitaphone Symphonj 

Orchestra. 

ALPERT, PAULINE (418) In "What Price Piano f" offering 

originai piano arrangements. 
ALPERT, PAULINE (419). A piano medley of popular songs. 
AHATO, PASQUALE (419). A piano medley of popular songs. 

"Neapolitan Bomance." Lillian Mines at the piano. Sings 

"Tonno Sariente" and "Toreador Song" from "Carmen." 
ARDATH, FRED & CO. (720) \n "The Comer Store," * 

ilapstick comedy with four songs. Directed by Bryan Foy. 
ARDATH, FRED & CO. (2255) In "Men Among Men." 

comedy of a man alibing an intoxicated friend to his wife. 
'ARISTOCRATS. FOUR (3G6). Vitaphone popular vocal and 

Instrumental group in a series of songs. 
ARISTOCRATS, FOUR (544). Vocal and Instrumental group 

In a new song offering. 
ARISTOCRATS, FOUR (545): Vltaphone's instrumental and 

Toeal group in three songs. 
ARISTOCRATS, FOUR (546): Popular Vitaphone singers and 

Instrumentalists in new songs. 
ARISTOCRATS. FOUR (547): Five songs by Vltaphone's 

Tocal and instrumental group. 
ARNAUT BROS. (S71): "The Famous I/Ovlng Birds" U 

singing and whistlinu: numtjers. 
BAILEY AND BARNUM (2556) In "The Globe Trotters," 

singing three popular songs. 
BAILEY AND BARNUM (2557) In "Without a Band." a 

comedy singing and talking act. 
BAILEY AND BARNUM (2558) In "The Two White Ele- 
phants." In "high yaller" make-up they sing popuisi 

Jazz songs. 

BAIRNSFATHER, BRUCE ((393). The creator of Old BIT 

tells of his origin and sketches him as the orchestra plays 
BAKER, PHIL (724) in "A Bad Boy from a Good Family.' 

^Tes four songs with accordion. A comedy number. 
BAKER. PHIL (725) in "In Spain," a hUarlous farce with 

the Shiiberts comedian as star. 
BARCLAY. JOHN (436). Musical comedy and concert star 

operatlo airs and an Impersonation of Challapln. 
BARCLAY, JOHN (437) In "Famous Character Impersona- 

tloBB." Sings three songs. 
BARD, BEN (2910) In "The Champion Golfer," an original 

eomedy sketch. 

BARRIOS. JEAN (2700) In "Feminine Types." This fe- 
male Impersonator sings three songs with his impersonations. 

BARTRAM & SAXTON (2144). "The Two Kentucky boys 
of Jarz" In three song numbers, with guitar and orchestra 
Mcompanlment. 

BAUER, HAROLD (278). International pianist playing 

Chopin's "Polonaise In A Flat." 
BAXLEY, JACK (27 68) In "Neighbors," a comedy sketch 

wiai songs. 

BELL & COATES (2697). "The California Songbirds" la 
popular songs. 

BENNETT TWINS (476). 'Uttle Bare Knee Syncopators" 
of stage and vaudeville In a song and dance recital. 

BENNY, JACK (2597). Comedian in "Bright Moments," his 
noted monologue. 

BIFF & BANG (574), "Fisticuff Funsters" In s burlesqtw 
boxing match. 

BILLEE, LITTLE (2869). Versatile midget star In "The 
Flaming Touth": original songs and fast tap dancing. 

BORN & LAWRENCE (2885) In "The Country Gentleman,' 
a comedv skit with songs. 

BORN & LAWRENCE (294ft) In "PlgsMn^Troubles." a com- 
edy of campus and the gridiron, with songs. 

BORN & LAWRENCE (2920) in "The Side Show" In which 
these musical comedy comedians recite, dance, sing and 
swap Jokes. 

BORN & LAWRENCE (2640) In "The Aristocrat?" In which 
tbey employ their pantomime stunt In accompaniment to 
fheir songs. 

BOSWORTH, HERBERT (2233) In "A Man of Peace." A 
Qidet man of the mountains becomes suddenly embroiled 
In a feud. 

BOWERS. BRUCE (2870) In "Artlstlo Mimicry" In which 

ho does a variety of Imitations. 
BRADY, FLORENCE (2699) In "A Cycle of Songs." 
BRADY, FLORENCE (2734). Stage and valrety star In 

"rharacter Studies" In songs. 
BRADY. STEWART (2745). "The Song Bird." boy soprano 

IB three songs. 



BRIAN. DONALD (2733). Musical comedy star in a quar- 
tet of bonus. 

BRITT, HORACE (614). Benowned 'cellist playing Masse- 
net's "Elegy" and Popper's "Serenade." 

BROCKWELL, GLADYS (2235) in "Hollywood Bound." a 
satire on male beauty contests, with a cast of tlve. 

BROOKS & ROSS (2232). Vaudeville headliners in "Two 
Boys and a Piano." 

BROWNE, FRANK & KAY LAVELLE (2589) in "Don't 
Handle the Goods," xylophone singing and patter act. 

BROWN, JOE E. (2590) in "Don't Be Jealous." Famous 
stage comedian as dancing teacher to a pretty wife with a 
Jealous husband. 

BROWN & WHITAKER (2285) In "A Laugh of Two." 
Vaudeville headliners in gags and jokes. 

BROWN &. WHITAKER (2328) in "In the Park," a 
liumorous sidt with music. 

BROWNING, JOE (496). Popular comedian In a talking and 
singing number. 

BROX SISTERS, THREE (2570) in "Glorifying the Ameri- 
can Girl." Popular uio of stage and variety in a trio 
of songs. 

BROX SISTERS, THREE (2571) in "Down South," In 

wliich they sing tliree liaunting southern melodies. 
BUDDIES, FOUR (609). "Harmony Songsters" in four 
numbers. 

BURNS & KISSEN (2679). Popular comedians in comedy 

Greek makeup, singing funny songs. 
BYRON, ARTHUR & CO. (2704) in "A Family Affair." 

a eomedy of mixed identities. The star is supported by 

Kate. Eileen and Kathryn Byron. 
CARLE, RICHARD (2179) in -Stranded." playlet of a 

stranded opera producer, with two songs. 
CARLE, RICHARD (2239). With May McAvoy in "Sunny 

Caliiomia," story of a wife who induces her husband 

to Quit cold New York for glorious Calitomla. 
CARLE. RICHARD (2251). Stage star in a comedy sketch, 

"The Worrier." A man who does the worrying for othe'fl 

at so much per worry. Ends with a song. 
CARR, NAT (2309). Popular comedian, in a monologue of 

laughable Incidents. 
CARRILLO, LEO (507) in a clever monologue, "At the Ball 

Game." _ 
CARILLO, LEO (2369) in a dialect monologue, "The 

Foreigner." 

CARRILLO, LEO (2552). Noted stage star in a recitation 
of the most dramatic poem of the world war, "The Hell 
Gate of Soissons." 

CASE, ANNA (294). Opera star, accompanied by Metro- 
politan Grand Opera Chorus singing "Cachaca" and 
"Anheio." 

CEBALLOS, LARRY REVUE (2562) in which Vitaphone 
Girls and Al Herman, sing and dance. 

CEBALLOS, LARRY (2627). "Boof Garden Eevue." Beau- 
ttlui girls and an adagio team in songs and dance. 

CEBALLOS, LARRY (2661). "Undersea Bevue." Noted Va- 
riety stars and chorus in spectacular revue. 

CEBALLOS, LARRY (2693). "Crystal Cave Bevue," with 
songs. 

CHANDLER, ANNA (2739) in "Popular Songs." 

CHASE, CHAZ (2696). "The unique comedian." who eats 

everything — Are, paper, violins, flowers, shirts, etc. 
CHIEF CUPOLICAN (2598). "The Indian baritone," the 

only Indian who has sung in grand opera, in three classic 

songs. _ 
CLEMONS, JIMMY (2242). Vaudeville star. In "Dream 

Cafe," songs and dances. 
COD EE &. ORTH (2709) in "Zwei und Vlerstigste Strasse," 

in German, with three songs. 
CODEE &. ORTH (2798) in "Stranded in Paris," comedy 

skit. 

COHEN, SAMMY (2800) In "What Price BuriesQue"; Imi- 
tations. 

COLEMAN. CLAUDIA (2244) in "Putting It Over," comedy 

impersonations. 

COLLEGIATE FOUR, THE (2249) in "Campus Capers"; the 

coUege spirit in songs. _ _ ^ 

COLONIAL GIRLS, THE THREE (2121) in "The Beauty 
of Old Time Music" ; harp, flute, 'cello and coloratura 
soprano. _ .. ^ 

CONLEY, HARRY J. (2273) In "The Bookworm." comedy 
playlet which was the hit of "LeMaire's Affairs." 

CONLIN & GLASS (2577) in "Sharps and Flats." in 
amusing antics and songs. 

CONNOLLY & WENRICH (2583). Musical comedy star and 
famous composer in a numl)er of Wenrich's songs. 

CONRAD, EDDIE (491). Broadway comedian In a com- 
edy sketch. , , . 

CONRAD, EDDIE (563) assisted by Marion Eddy, in four 
songs. J , 

COOK. CLYDE (2284) In "Lucky in Love : comedy of a 
husband who extracts J200 from his wife for a poker gams. 

COOPER & STEPT (2169). Song hit writers, in several of 
their popular songs . „ „ „ 

CORCORAN, RED (2769) in "I'm Afraid That's All." Four 
hanio numbers. ^, , ^ 

COSCIA &. VERDI (2272) in a burlesque of operatic airs 
and the artistic temperament. 

COSLOW, SAM (2659) in "The Broadway Minstrel, pre- 
senting four of his most popular compositions. 

COWAN. LYNN (2245). Vaudeville headliner. in three of 
his original songs. 

COWAN. LYNN (2258). The "Community Singer," In five 
popular songs. 

COWAN, LYNN (2547). Leads audiences in choral singing 

— four numbers. 
COWAN. LYNN (2680) In a new collection of old songs. 
COYLE & WEIR (2253). Songs and dances by clever team 

nf votmgsters. 

CRANE. HAL (2133) in "The Lash." a dramatic playlet of 
The Tombs, written by Crane, a big hit In vaudeville. 

CRAVEN. AURIOLE (2118). The dancing vioUnlst and 
singer. In three numbers. 

CROONADERS. THE (2685) In "Crooning Along." Four 
bovs In five lilting songs. 

CROONADERS, THE (2736) In "Melodious Moments"; four 
anngs. . . 

CROWELL A. PARVIS (2140). VaudevlUe's talented chil- 
dren. In songs and dances. 

CRUMIT, FRANK & JULIA SANDERSON (733) In "Words 
nf Love," giving three of Crumlt's own songs. 

CRUMIT, FRANK (727). Famous songster and composer, 
singing several nf his own compositions. 

CRUSE BROTHERS (2120). The "Missouri Sheiks" In "Old 
Time Melodies In an Old Time Way," with violin, guitar 
and banjo. 

CRUSE BROTHERS (2126) In popular melodies and ditties. 

CUGAT, X. & CO (264) In "By the Camp Fire." Caruso's 
violin accompanist, his musicians and dancers In five 
beautiful numbers. 

CUMMINGS. DON (2126). The "drawing room roper" In a 
lariat exhibition, accompanied by Vitaphone orchestra. 

CUNNINGHAM & BENNETT (736). Popular singing com- 
posers, in three vocal numbers and an impersonation. 

D'ANGLO, LOUIS (509) assisting Giovanni Mariinelll In the 
duet from Act IV of the opera. "La Julre." 

DEIRO, GUIDO (296S) famous plano-acoordionist In two de- 
lightful selections. _ 

DE LA PLAZA & JUANITA (2702) In "Siesta Time." 
Famous tango artist and his company In thrilling dances 
and some songs. 

DELF, HARRY (2542). Broadway comedian. In songs and 
comedy monologue. 

DELF. HARRY (2551) In "Soup" which displays his re- 
markable mimicry of a whole family eating soup. 

DELF. HARRY (2563-64) in "Giving In," supported Iw 



Hedda Hopper, directed by Murray Both. An engaging 
playlet. 

DE LUCA, GIUSEPPE & BANIAMINO GIGLI (518) In se- 

iecuons from Act II of the opera "La Gioconda." 
DEMAREST, WILLIAM (229U) in "Papa's Vacation," a 

riuutous comedy playlet by Hugh Herbert and Murray Both. 

Directed by Bryan Foy. 
DEMAREST, WILLIAM (2143) in "When the Wife's Away," 

comedy playlet directed by Bryan Foy; with three songs. 
DEMAREST, WILLIAM (2138) in "The Night Court." 

(Jomedy playlet directed by Bryan Foy. 
DICKINSON, HOMER (2ljU9): Musical comedy star, m 

three songs. 

DIPLOMATS. THE (565): "High-hat syncopators of Jaza" 
in lour selections. 

OlSKAY, JOSEPH (2122): "Famous Hungarian tenor, con- 
cert and radio artist. In two songs. 

DONER, KITTY (2668) In "A Bit of Scotch." Male Im- 
personations and six songs. 

DONER, KITTY (2669): Famous male Impersonator, and 
two assistants in four songs. 

DONER, TED (2298): Dancing comedian and his Sunklw 
Beauties, in a singing variety. 

DONOHUE, RED & U-NO (734) in "A Traffic Muddle." 
Famous clown and his mule in a comedy skit. 

DOVES. THE TWO (2146) in "Dark Days," comedy dialog 
and original songs. 

DOVES, THE TWO (2178) in "Flying High." Blackface 
comedy of two aviators stranded at the North Pole. 

DOVES, THE TWO (2257) in a comedy of two negroes In 
a haunted house. 

DOWNING, HARRY & DAN (2127) in "High Up and Low 
Down." Songs, laughs and female impersonations. 

DOYLE, BUDDY (442) in three songs in blackface. 

DREYER. DAVE (2889) in "Tin Pan Alley." Popular com- 
poser in popular compositions of his own. 

DUFFY & GLEASON (775) in "Fresh from HoUywood." A 
eomedy skit with songs. 

DUNCAN. HERRING & ZEH (2115): Popular CaUfomta 
singers in solos, a duet and some trios. 

ELMAN, MISCHA (275): Celebrated vioUulst, playlni 
Dvorak's "Humoresque" and Gossec's "Gavotte." 

FASHION PLATES OF HARMONY (2283): A quartet of 
distinctive concert voices in famous and original composi- 
tions. 

FERRIS, AUDREY (2238) In "Tho Question of Today." A 

dramatic playlet. 
FIELDS, SALLY (2147): Comedy entertainer In "The 

"Hostess." A laughing sketch with songs. 
FIELDS & JOHNSON (2588): Vaudeville headliners In a 

comedy skit, "Terry and Jerry." 
FLEESON & BAXTER (435) In "Song Pictures." A reylew 

of popular melodies with Miss Baxter at the piano. 
HOWARD, JOSEPH E. (2596): Composer of musical com- 
edies in a recital of his own songs. 
HOWARD, WILLIE &. EUGENE (349): Musical comedy 

stars in a comedy sketch titled "Between the Acts of tho 

Opera." 

HOWARD, WILLIE & EUGENE (643): Stage stars in a 

comedy sketch. "Pals." 
HOWARD. WILLIE & EUGENE (672) In a comedy sketca 
with songs. 

HUGHES & PAM (2837) in "The Fall Guy," a sketch m 
which Bay Hughes sings and does his comedy falls. 

HURLEY, PUTNAM & SNELL (2180): Popular song trio 
in Jazz and comedy songs. 

FLIPPEN. JAY C. (2581): Musical comedy and vaudeville 
star, in a fast comedy skit, "The Ham What Am." 

FLONZALEY QUARTETTE (466): World's foremost stringed 
instrument ensemble, now disbanded, playing Mendelssohn'! 
"Canzonetta" and Pochon's "Irish Ileel." 

FLONZALEY QUARTETTE (467): Famous stringed ensem- 
ble, playing Borodin's "Nocturne" and Mozart's "Minuet." 

FLORENTINE CHOIR (2281): Italy's greatest ensemble of 
choral voices singing "Adoramus te Christe" and the 
"Toreador Song" from the opera, "Carmen." 

FLORENTINE CHOIR (2282): Oldest choral organization 
in the world — more than 800 years — singing "Nlnna, 
Naima" and "Santa Lucia Luntana." 

FOLSOM, BOBBY (2839): Musical comedy actress In "A 
Modern Prlscilla." contrasting the Pturltan Priscllla and 
the same girl today. 

FOX. ROY (2819): The whispering cometist. In three se- 
lections and two band numbers. 

FOY, EDDIE & BESSIE LOVE (2575-76) In a clever playlet 
of back-stage life. "The Swell Head." starring the son of 
the famous stage clown and the screen leading woman. 

FOY FAMILY. THE (2579) in "Foys of Joys." A satire on 
talking motion pictures with Eddie Foy's family. Directed 
bv Bryan Foy. 

FOY FAMILY, THE (2580) in "Chips of the Old Block." 

Presents the children of the famous comedian. Eddie Foy, 

In songs and dances and a monologue by Eddie Foy. Jr. 
FRANKLIN. IRENE (2705): Famous American comedienne, 

supported by .Terry Jarnigan in three of his songs. 
FREDA & PALACE (2271) In "Bartch-a-KaUoop," theh 

nationally famous vaudevlUe act. Comic antics and songs. 
FREEMAN SISTERS (625): "Sunshine Spreaders from 

Eoxy's Gang" in popular selections with piano and ukulele. 
FRIGANZA, TRIXIE (2791): Stage and variety star, in 

"My Bag o' Trix." vrtth two songs. 
GABY, FRANK (2188): Popular ventriloquist In "The 

Tout," a skit of comedy moments at the race track. 
GALE BROTHERS (610): Juvenile comedians, in fast 

dancing and songs. 
GIBSON. HOOT. TRIO (2132): The Hawaiian Serenade! 

engaged by Hoot Gibson, screen star, to play at his ranch 

on ukuleles and steel guitars. 
GIGLI. GORDON. TALLEY & DE LUCA (415) In Ou 

Quartet from "Bigoletto." 
GIGLI, BENIAMINO (414): Famous Metropolitan Opera 

tenor In scenes from Act II of Mascagnl's opera, "Caval- 

leria Rustlcana." 
GIGLI. BENIAMINO (498): Celebrated tenor In four sonn 

In English. French. Spanish and Italian. 
GIGLI. BENIAMINO (517) In selections from Aot 11 of 

Ponchielll's opera. "La Gioconda." 
GIGLI. BENIAMINO AND GISUEPPE DE LUCA (518) !■ 

a scene from Act I of Bizet's opera. "The Pearl FUhers," 

accompanied bv the Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra. 
GIGLI. BENIAMINO, & MARION TALLEY (499) In th« 

duet. "Verranno a to sull'aura." 
GILBERT. MASTER (2260): Sensation child artist from 

vaudeville in an unu.sual routine of songs and dances. 
GILLETTE. BOBBY (2838): Famous banjolst from the va- 
riety stage, assisted by Doris Walker, radio and stage 

artist, in four selections. 
GIVOT. GEORGE. PEARL LEONARD AND NINA HINDS 

(2107) : "The College Boy" and "The Melody Girls" In 

popular songs. Directed by Bryan Foy. 
GOLDIE, JACK (704) In "The Ace of Spades." A fast 

singing and chatter act with the variety headliner la 

GORDON. GIGLI, TALLEY & DE LUCA (416) in the Quar- 
tette from "Bigoletto." 

GORDON, JEANNE (474): Assisting Giovanni Martlnelll IB 
a scene from Act II of Bizet's opera. "Carmen." 

GOTTLER. ARCHIE (2670): Famous song writer In • 
medley of the songs which have made him celebrated. 

GOULD, VENITA (562): Famous impersonator of stars, m 
Impersonations of four stars In some of their songs. 

GREEN.. HAZEL & CO. (2112) in musical selecUons di- 
rected bv Miss Green who also sings. 

GREEN. JANE & CO. (2746) In "Singing the Blues." Tlio 
Brnadwav star in three numbers. Directed by Bryan Foy. 

GREEN, JANE (2750): "The melody glri" In three song*. 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



45 




THE THEATRE 



Build Film Setting Into Theatre Front 
And Public Will Want to See It 



DID you ever think of your theatre 
front as a mannikin? In other 
words, have you noted the close rela- 
tionship possible between the theatre 
front and the picture itself? Of course 

you have: 

More and more the managements have 
realized the value of providing a setting for 
program by dressing up the theatre in a 
tasteful and appropriate costume. Just as a 
jewelry store, for example, does not content 
itself with filling its windows only with cards 
telling what the public may buy inside, but 
shows the product itself in the front display 
cases, so the theatre front takes on added 
significance when, in addition to the printed 
matter naming the program numbers, it also 
symbolizes the featured picture, a replica of 
a scene or setting being actually built into the 
front and lo^jby. 

Two Attractive Theatre Fronts 

Examples of the value of this increasingly 
important part in exploitation are abundant 
in the methods used by Harry Wren, man- 
ager of the Alhambra at Milwaukee, and 
illustrated in the cuts on this page. 



For one thing, Manager Wren realized that 
Milwaukee folk like stories about sophisticatedi 
youth and women, with lots of comedy mixed 
in, and so when he had booked Paramount's 
Hard to Get he set about letting the public 
know what kind of picture he was showing by 
dressing the theatre in a futuristic style. So, 
too, when he was to show Universal's The 
Shannons of Broadway, he togged up the the- 
atre front to represent a hotel. 

There were other tieups, of course, and 
window dislays were used to advantage. 

Heralds Used in Tieup 

A tieup was effected with the National 
Family Stores whereby 5,000 heralds with a 
special gift offer to their patrons were dis- 
tributed. Each of these heralds brought into 
the store and signed by the manager was 
honored as an admission to the theatre. The 
Family stores paid the theatre ten cents on 
each coupon brought into the theatre. This 
was in effect from December 16 to 24 and 
went over big, during what is ordinarily 
known as a tough week 

Still another stunt was pulled in connection 
with the Western Union in arranging for 
window displays in all the downtown offices. 



This was made with a still showing Dorothy 
Mackaill receiving a telegram. The still was 
mounted on a compo board. Copy was "Even 
the talkies use Western Union. Dorothy 
Mackaill receives a telegram in her latest all 
talking picture, Hard to Get, now at the 
Alhambra." 

Special Lighting Display 

The box office during this show was 
decorated with very futuristic designs and a 
special lighting display. Side frames 60 by 40 
were painted with pictures of Mackaill and 
Oakie predominating. Suspended over the box 
office was a large cutout of Hard to Get. 
This was covered with silver tinfoil and 
lighted from below with concealed Xray 
lamps. 

A tieup also was made with a local credit 
store in which credit was depicted as being 
"hard to get" except at the local store. This 
was a hookup it was realized that any credit 
store would be glad to go in on, because of 
its instant appeal. Newspaper advertising on 
the picture was average with all reviews very 
good. A sound trailc was run one week in 
advance of the picture. 




The appearance of theatre front and outer lobby plays an impor- 
tant role in attracting the prospective patron. All managers have 
seen individuals who apparently do their picture-shopping accord- 
ing to the attractiveness of the theatre's dress. Here is how the 
Alhambra at Milwaukee was togged in futuristic design for Para- 
mount's Hard to Get. 



When Universal's picture. The Shannons of Broadway, was booked 
into the Alhambra at Milwaukee, Manager Harry Wren decided to 
give atmosphere to the theatre front by decorating it to simulate 
the setting of the picture itself, with the following over the cashier's^ 
office: "Hotel Sutton. The Shannons, Props." The words "Rooms" 
and "Board" appeared on the sides. 



4b 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 11, 1930 




The Fox theatres at Springfield, III., managed by John B. Giachetto, are decidedly alii'e to exploitation possibilities. For First National's 
The Painted Angel the usherets were togged in costumes synchronizing with the film. Note, too, how the lobby and foyer were decorated 
with cutouts. Writing to The Theatre, Giachetto says that "the stunt received very favorable comments from all the patrons and the news- 
papers gave it marvelous readers ivhich were sure box-office values." Giachetto manages the Lincoln, Tivoli and Vaudette. 



Born on Christmas, 
She Invites Orphans 
To Benefit Showing 

Helen Ann Martin, a Christmas Day ar- 
rival at the home of Chester A. Martin, 
manager of the Orpheum theatre in Cin- 
cinnati, is Cincinnati's youngest "publicity 
agent." Although only two weeks old, she 
has invited 100 orphans from various local 
institutions to be guests at a showing of 
Sunny Side Up. 





Thanksgiving 
Greetings 



What's that?— A typographical error? 
— Not at all! Christmas Is here; but 
fODsider this thought 3 moment. Ev- 
ery day should be Thanksgiving Day 
foil the inhabitants of all the small 
towns and villages in the land. Why? 
Because one of the newer inventions 
of man has wiped out the disadvan- 
tages of isolation. Entertainment of 
the highest caliber, such as has been 
available to only the city dweller at 
prices prohibitive to most, has been 
brought Within the reach of anyone, 
anywhere, who hag the price of ad- 
mission to his motion picture theatre. 
When you see "The Doll Shop" at 
the Braumart tomorrow, remember 
this ad. When you thrill at its song, 
its dance, its color, its lavish spread 
of talent, just consider how much the 
talking picture lias widened the boun- 
daries of your own enjoyment. 

THE BRAUMART MANAGEMENT 



'Twas the night before Christmas, and 
then this ad appeared in the Iron Moun- 
tain News. It must have been a real sur- 
prise to the inhabitants of that Michigan 
town, and that was exactly what the 
Braumart Theatre Company intended. 



Illustrated Card Placed 

In Beauty Shops; Records 
And Shadow Box Used 

Distribution of window cards is a stunt 
as old as motion pictures themselves, but 
Bert Hanson, of the publicity department 
of the California theatre, San Francisco, 
working under the direction of manager 
Nat Holt, gave this idea a new twist when 
Paris came to this house. A special illus- 
trated card was brought out and placed in 
beauty shops, where advertising cards of 
any kind rarely are seen. The plan worked 
like a charm and women made up an un- 
usually large proportion of the audience. 

The show was advertised as a $4.40 stage 
show on the screen and a huge shadow box 
over the theatre entrance illustrated the 
fact that it was filled with beautiful girls. 
Paris records were played in the lobby and 
there was a booth there for their sale. 



Children of Poor 
Enjoy Holiday Film 
At Puhlix Theatres 

Christmas parties for newsboys and de- 
serving children have become annual events 
with Publix Theatres, San Francisco, and 
several interesting events of this kind were 
held at the Granada theatre the last week 
in the year. The newsboys of the Chronicle 
were entertained on one occasion, when 
Don George presented a special organ solo 
in their honor, Frank Siegrist and the 
Granada Syncopators played several num- 
bers and Eddie Magill, the "crooning king 
of the megaphone," sang especially for the 
boys. 



Runs Steam Pipes 
Around Marquise; 
Shows Picture 'Hot^ 

Among numerous exploitation stunts in- 
corporated in connection with Hot for 
Paris, Manager Floyd Maxwell of the Fox 
Broadway at Portland, Ore., put in some 
real "hot licks," running one of his steam 
pipes entirely around the big marquise and 
cutting 365 vents from which the steam 
escaped with a warning hiss. 



Free Buffet Lunch 
Is Tied to Midnight 
Opening of Picture 

.A free bufifet lunch for all patrons of the 
midnight premiere at the Cataract theatre 
in Niagara Falls was one of the fast-work- 
ing stunts of the management to put over 
Hollywood Revue. The hookup was with 
the Louis Restaurant. 

Postal Telegraph cooperated in sending 
out telegrams to 350 families, via uniformed 
messenger boy. At least one family on 
each street was visited. 

The Fanchon and Marco unit which 
played the Cataract the week previous had 
a series of dance steps for the finale to the 
tune of "Low Down Rhythm," a song from 
the film. The master of ceremonies an- 
nounced the coming picture and the over- 
ture also consisted of a medley from Holly- 
wood Revue. 




This tastefully-planned window told pa- 
trons of the Alhambra at Milwaukee what 
is in store for them in the way of picture 
treats in the New Year. 



January II, 1930 



EX 



HIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



47 



Record, Song, Auto 
Tieups Ready Aid to 
Fa the Downey Film 

Ha\ ing an ace in the hole is a great first 
aid for confidence in any game, but having 
three aces under cover makes the play a 
lark. National hookups are playing a more 
and more important part in the readymade 
campaigns afforded the exhibitors by the 
companies, with these hookups readily ap- 
plied to succeeding pictures. Pathe showed 
how this works out with its Morton 
Downey picture, Lucky in Love, at the 
Colony in New York. 

Previous tieups with Victor records, with 
the Green & Stept sheet music dealers and 
with the Essex auto were brought into 
service for Lucky in Love and each played 
a specific role for Sidney C. Davidson of 
the Colony, aided by Richard Block, the- 
atre exploiter, and Rutgers Neilson and 
G. R. O'Neill, Pathe's director of advertis- 
ing and publicity. 

How the various exploitation mediums 
were wheeled into action is shown as 
follows: 

Radio: A systematic broadcasting pro- 
gram was put over daily with the cooper- 
ation of Mack Stark of Green & Stept, 
whereby "Love is a Dreamer" was plugged 
over the leading New York stations. The 
highlight was Morton Downey's singing 
from the Club Richman, where he is the 
headliner, over WEAF and a hookup. 
Among the leading broadcasters of the 
week were Byron Holliday on the Liftman 
Hour, WABC and hookup; Ben Alley on 
the_ Howard Fashion Plate Hour, WABC; 
Smith Bellew on the Whyte Restaurant 
period, WJZ; the Kinney Shoe Country 
Club Orchestra, WOR and Paul Tremain's 
orchestra, Yoeng's Restaurant, WABC: 

Victor Record: Twenty-five stores sell- 
ing records in the vicinity of the theatre 
displayed the Pathe-Victor poster with 
special Colony date announcements. Many 
of these stores played the record over their 
street loudspeaker. 

Sheet Music: All three Downey songs, 
"Love is a Dreamer," "When They Sing 
the Wearin' of the Green" and "For the 
Like o' You and Me," were featured in 
the racks and windows of nearby music 
stores. 

Essex Auto Photos: A special photo 
showing Downey seated at the wheel of the 
Essex Challenger and carrying the Colony 
notice was displayed at 160 Hudson-Essex 
dealers throughout New York, Westchester 
County and Northern New Jersey. 

General Windows: Miniature cutouts 
from colored 22x28's and black and white 
stills with Colony snipes were placed in 
drug stores, novelty, men's furnishing and 
other store windows. 

Marquise: The giant sign over the mar- 
quise was given to Downey's name, with 
the title of the attraction below with the 
border changeable block letter sign billing 
the star as "Broadway's Great Tenor In 
Romantic Musical Drama." 

Lobby: Oil paintings of scenes from the 
picture made an attractive lobby display. 
In addition to the side panel pictures, a six- 
picture special display was placed over the 
entrance. "Love is a Dreamer" was played 
over a loudspeaker above the box-office. 

Heralds: Davidson used the Pathe herald 
of the picture as his house program for the 
week by printing the show schedule on the 
back cover. In addition to the theatre dis- 
tribution a large mailing list was covered. 

Newspapers: The advance ads featured 
the fact that the picture would have its 
premiere in New York at the Colony, while 
those during the week sold Downey and the 
attraction fifty-fifty. 



Lucky in Love — and Exploiting 




Miniature cutout in drugstore for Pathe film. 




Power in the Colony lights. 




Playing up the Morton Downey songs in music store. 



4li 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 11, 1930 



MUSIC AND TALENT 

School to Train Masters of Ceremonies 



Bob Murphy to 
Start School of 
Foot light Poise 

Proposed Plan Will FulfiU Great 

Demand for Masters of 

Ceremonies 
By DON SAMSON 

Hollywood's newest educational in- 
stitution will make the desired fre- 
quent changes in M. C.s possible. 

If the plans, of Bob Murphy, well 
known vaudeville headliner becomes an 
actuality, there will be in Hollywood in 
the very near future an entirely new 
form of educational institution, which 
will be a school entirely devoted to the 
training of masters of ceremonies for 
motion picture theatres. 

For several years a comedian and master 
of ceremonies over leading vaudeville cir- 
cuits, Bob Murphy, realizes the possibilities 
of his new idea and is heart and soul be- 
hind it. 

After finishing a tour in Los Angeles, 
he went to Hollywood where he has leased 
a large house on Hollywood boulevard, 
which he plans remodeling into an academy 
of footlight poise and wise-cracks. A school 
where if carried out as he plans will turn 
out men of a high caliber who will be 
fitted to go directly into theatres. 

According to Mr. Murphy, the supply of 
masters of ceremonies in film theatres is 
considerably less than the demand. One of 
the most redeeming features of his new 
school is to enable the desired frequent 
changes of masters of ceremonies in motion 
picture theatres. 

Mr. Murphy has been in conference with 
several authorities in the industry, consider- 
ing the possibilities and benefits of his 
newly devised plan and has been encour- 
aged in every possible way. With the sin- 
cere support of the exhibitors there is no 
question or doubt that this school will be 
a big step toward bigger and better stage 
presentations. 

Besides the school itself turning out bet- 
ter stage show material it will in time lead 
to the founding of more such schools, each 
putting the qualifications of masters of 
ceremonies on a much higher scale. 

There could be no better man at the 
head of an institution of this kind than 
Mr. Murphy, who besides years of experi- 
ence in vaudeville as both singer and master 
of cerernonies has several original songs to 
his credit as a lyrist and composer. 

We wish Mr. Murphy all the success in 
the world in his new venture and wish to 
compliment him for being a pioneer. 



Bob Murphy 




Otto Kahn Is Subject of 
Fannie Brice's Song 
"Be Yourself" 

Otto Kahn is the subject of a song that Fannie 
Brice sings in - "Be ' Yourself !" her first United 
Artists Picture. The song is entitled "Is Something 
tl* ■> Matter -with Otto Kahn?" The lyrics are by 
Billy Rose and Ballard Macdonald. the music is by 
Jesse Greer, and JWr^ Kahn already has heard Miss 
Brice sing the song. It is with his permission that 
it is rendered for talking films. 

Pathe Composers Scored 
Four Song Hits 

Out of the maze of music and lyrics being turned 
out daily in Hollywood for talking pictures, Pathe 
composers have scored four of the outstanding hits 
of the past year and have a half dozen more that 
will be hummed throughout the country with the re- 
lease of the pictures in which they are sung. 

"Little by Little," the these song of The Sopho- 
more, starring Eddie Quillan, is one of the ten 
best sellers on the musical market and the .second 
biggest hit of DeSylva, Brown & Henderson. It 
was written by Walter O'Keefe and Bobby Dolan. 

"If I Had My Way" and "I'm That Way About 
Baby," from William Boyd's picture. The Plying 
Fool, are both close to the top in popularity. They 
were written by George Green and George Wagg- 
ner. Tnese same writers are responsible for "Love 
Found Me When I Found You," sung in Oh, 
Yeah I with Robert Armstrong and James Gleason. 

Two other numbers by O'Keefe and Dolan, des- 
tined to sweep the company with the release of 
Red Hot Rhythm, featuring Alan Hale, are "At 
Last I'm in Love" and "Out of the Past," sung 
by Kathryn Crawford, who was featured in Hit the 
Deck. 



Hob bins Sales 
Meeting Points 
To Biggest Year 

Sales of Talkie Songs and Stand- 
dard Music Are Dis- 
cussed 

First copies of songs from M G M 
picture "Devil May Care" are pub- 
lished at close of the convention. 

The Robbins Music Corporation 
held a convention assembled at the 
Hotel Victoria, in New York, from 
December 9th to the twenty-fourth. 

The sessions were marked with a spirit 
seldom equalled in business conclaves, with 
daily talks by prominent Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer officials and Robbins executives. 
Among those who addressed the convention 
were David Bernstein, vice-president and 
general manager of M G M, Felix Feist and 
Howard Deitz, respectively sales manager 
and general advertisinp- and publicity di- 
rector for that mammoth photoplay enter- 
prise, and others. 

Numerous subjects pretending to promo- 
tion, distribution and sales of talkie songs 
and standard music were discussed. Just 
prior to the convention's close, the presses 
contributed the first copies of the songs 
from the sensational Ramon Navaro mu- 
sical romance, "Devil May Care." 

Among those present at the convention 
were Chick Castle, Chicago; Al Skinner, 
Detroit; Jack Bregman, general manager 
of the firm; Sig Bosley, Los Angeles; Phil 
Wilcox, middle west promotion manager; 
Newton Kelly, San Francisco; Ben Gold- 
burg, Boston manager; Chick Wilson, At- 
lanta; Billy Chandler, professional man- 
ager; Carl Zoehrns, Philadelphia; Staphen 
Levitz, production manager; George Lott- 
man, director of publicity and advertising; 
J. J. Robbins; Bernard Prager, sales man- 
ager; Charles McLaughlin, Denver; Harry 
Hoch, band and orchestra manager; Carl 
Winge, Seattle; and Frank Kelton, eastern 
promotion manager. 

The convention came to a successful 
close with the distribution of most generous 
bonuses. 

Frankie Judnick at the 
Brooklyn Paramount 

Frankie Judnick, protege of Paul Ash, and for- 
merly with Ash for a long- time at the McVickers 
and Oriental theatres, Chicago, is now entertaining 
the crowds who are waiting to see the show at the 
Paramount theatre, Brooklyn, N. Y. Frankie, is a 
versatile showman and an accomplished accordionist, 
and his pleasing personality and fine playing go a 
long way in keeping the waiting patrons contented. 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



49 



BITS ABOUT 'EM 

By 

Don Samson 

Chicago Music and Talent 




Hello Everj'body. — I hear that Jean Anthony, who 

has been recently appointed featured organist at the 
Belpavk theatre is being more than well received 
these days. His special program for the holidays 
caused no little comment. 

» « * 

Gloria Swanson's picture the Trespasser opens 
simultaneously at the Tivoli, Uptown and Paradise 
theatres this week. This picture has as its theme 
6ong that popular Berlin number, "Love Me." 

• * • 

Bob Schafer, who is Chicago manager for Sher- 
man Clay Music Publishers returned from New York 
this week where he has been for the past couple 
of weeks on business. Mr. Schafer who was in 
the music business in New York for several years 
was naturally no stranger and was well greeted by 
his friends there. During his stay due to his fine 
voice he was busy broadcasting some of his many 
song hits. He is all pepped up and ready to start 
the new year with a bang, although he seems quite 
alone without his wife and child who are remaining 
in New York a little longer. 

• » * 

I received a letter from Al Strafford of the S & M 
Music Publishers the other day with a copy of Al's 
newest waltz ballard "Some Body's Lonesome." Have 
you heard it? If you have, you can't help but agree 
■with me when I say it will be a sure hit. 

* • « 

Stuart Barrie, who gained such a following as 
organist at the Mastbaum theatre. Philadelphia, is 
now acting as guest organist at the Warner Beacon 
theatre, 72nd St., New York City. Leonard Mc- 
Clain, who acted as organist following the opening 
of Warner-Equity's Holme theatre. Philadelphia, is 
now at the Commodore theatre. West Philadelphia. 

• * * 

Joseph Moncure, the popular young poet who in- 
troduced a new rhythm in "The Set Up" and "The 
Wild Party," has been signed by Howard Hughes, 
motion picture director to a three year contract. 
Mr. March you know wrote the dialog for the all- 
talking version of "Hell's Angels." 

* * « 

I hear that Sid Lorrine, who is Chicago manager 
for Ager, Yellen & Bornstein Music Publishers, is 
at home with the flu. Hope it is not serious, Sid. 

* « « 

Sunny Side Up opens at the McVickers theatre 
this week, which has as its theme song the song hit 
by the same name. There are also "Talking Pic- 
ture of You" and others which are DeSylva, Brown 
& Henderson song hits. Joey Stool who is Chicago 
manager of the DeSylva, Brown & Henderson Corp. 
is planning a good will trip in the near future. 

* • * 

Dan Kusso's Beach View Garden celebrity night is 
getting to be quite an event these days. Each night 
seems to be more than well represented by popular 
personalitis. Drop in and find out for yourself. 

• • * 

Vina Delmar who has to her credit such books as 
"Bad Girl" and "Kept" was a recent visitor to the 
city on her way to the coast where she is to pre- 
pare an original story for Warner Brothers. Miss 
Delmar was accompanied by her husband. 

» « « 

The Santly Bros. Music Publishers prove an ex- 
ception in the fact that in spite of not having any 
picture songs, are still going strong with their many 
song favorites. "My Fate Is in Your Hands" and 
"Beside an Open Fire" are becoming as popular as, 
oh, well, just turn on the radio. Maybe it's Jimmy 
Carrins method of promoting them. Take your bow, 
Jimmy. But anyway I hear that all of the music 
firms personnel received a nice bonus for Xmas. 
« * « 

Phil Howard is said to be, by those who know 
him as one of the few men who manage a music 
counter, who really know anything about the busi- 
ness. Mr. Howard is at present manager of the 
music counter at McCrorys on State St. He has been 
in the music business for the past ten years and his 
opinion is valued by all those who know him. . . . 
See you next week. 



Stephen Boisclair's New 
Organ Solo Idea Is Hit 

Theatre owners who employ organists will be! 
interested in the pronounced success which is at- 
tending Stephen E. Boisclair's appearance at the 
console of the Mark Ritz theatre in Albany. N. Y. 
Mr. Boisclair has thousands of admirers who have 
listened in to his progi-ams as they are broadcast 
each week from the theatre over WGY. Before com- 
ing to Albany, Mr. Boisclair was featured at sev- 
eral of the theatres in Los Angeles and other West 
Coast cities. 

And here is the way he is doing it. In fact he is 
receiving so many encores these days that the the- 
atre management has begun to worry as to how 
to keep the program within the two hour schedule. 
In the first place, Mr. Boisclair is not only an 
excellent organist, but he has an excellent voice. 

A slide appears to the effect that one can cure 
his blues by singing. Another elide calls attention 
to the song and asks the single men in the audi- 
ence to take up the first verse, the married men 
the second verse, the applause to decide the winner. 

Mr. Boisclair first sings the verse and then calls 
upon the single men, who bellow forth lustily. And 
then the second verse appears on the screen and 
the married men get busy. 

Last week Mr. Boisclair all but turned the house 
into a riot when he first asked those who didn't like 
their wives to sing the first verse, and then asked 
the wives who didn't like their husbands to sing 
the second verse. A half hundred or more men 
yelled the words at the top of their voice and an 
equal number or more women, not to be outdone, 
screeched the second verse in close competition. The 
whole idea is going over so well that the theatre 
is packed nightly no matter what picture is shown. 



Duncan Dancers Guests of 
Yasha Bunchuk 

Thirteen of the Duncan dancers, who have just 
completed a successful season in New York, at- 
tended a matinee at the Capital theatre as the 
guests of Yasha Bunchuk, conductor of the Capital 
Grand Orchestra, to witness "The Hollywood Re- 
vue." The group included Irma Duncan, the head 
of the organization, which was founded by the late 
Isadora Duncan. The girls are planning to sail 
for Europe in the near future. 



Appropriate Stage Show 
With "Hot for Paris" 

To provide an appropriate stage show entertain- 
ment to supplement Hot for Paris which comes to 
the Roxy theatre this week, S. L. Rothafel has ar- 
ranged a program in the light vein and atmosphere 
that characterizes the picture. 

The headlight of the program will be "Bon Soir 
Paree" a scene disclosing the famous cafes on the 
interesting boulevards of Paris.' The reproduction 
of color and atmosphere will bring into use the 
splendid lighting facilities the stage show can produce. 

A group of divertissements constitute the rest of 
the entertainment. "Friese Antique," a novel form 
of dance presentation in the classic manner with 
Patricia Bowman, premiere danseuse, Leonide Mas- 
sine and the ballet. 



Alexander Keese Returns 
To Pit for Palace Band 

The Dallas public Is not fickle. It may take 
new favorites to its heart, but it remembers the old 
idols, it was proven Friday when Alexander Keese 
returned to the Palace theatre pit as orchestra con- 
ductor after an absence of two years. And the 
ovation he received after conducting "The Toy 
Shop" was as thunderous as those he received two 
years ago, plus added enthusiasm for his return. 
Keese is a favorite among the leaders the Palace 
has had and he is firmly entrenched in the hearts of 
the patrons. 

Another musical debut was that of Johnny Win- 
ters, who succeeds Billy Muth at the organ. Win- 
ters is a nice-looking blond young fellow and al- 
though his presentation Friday was nothing to cheer, 
his playing is enjoyable. He'll probably be a win- 
ner among those who like illustrated songs and such. 



RE NICK 

MUSIC rhuv. 



Extending You 

NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS 

And 

NEW YEAR'S SONGS 



A Melody That Will Linger — 

UNDER A TEXAS MOON 

from 

Warner Brothers newest 
production 
UNDER A TEXAS MOON 



A Whirl-wind of Rhythm — 

LOOSE ANKLES 

from 

The First National Picture 
Loose Ankles 



Maurice Chevalier's Hit 

NOBODY'S USING 
IT NOW 

from 

The Paramount Production 
THE LOVE PARADE 



The Present Song Sensation 

IF I CANT HAVE YOU 

from 

The First National Release 
FOOT-LIGHTS AND FOOLS 



OUR NEW YEARS 
POPULAR CATALOG 



WITH YOU WHERE 
YOU ARE 



GYPSY DREAM ROSE 



ABSENCE MAKES THZ 
HEART GROW FONDER 

(For Somebody Else) 



ORGANISTS — Write for special 
organ material — slide novelties, 
etc., to 

Cliff Hess 

Special Service Dept. 



50 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



PRESENTATIONS 

AND 

Material for Orgamsts 



SPECIAL LARGE SETS 

SINCIN' IN THE 
PICTURES 
1930 - VERSION - 1930 

Featuring 

PAINTING THE CLOUDS 
WITH SUNSHINE 

TIPTOE THRU THE TULIPS 
GO TO BED 
WOULDN'T IT BE 
WONDERFUL 



SINGING IN THE 
BATHTUB 

A Song Slide Playlet 
of that rip-roaring, smashing comedy 
hit from Warner Bros, triumphant Talk- 
ing picture production 

SHOW OF SHOWS 



A MUSICAL AER- 
O-LOCUE 

Featuring 

AMI BLUE? 



SMALL SETS 



WOULDN'T IT BE 
WONDERFUL 

TIPTOE THROUGH THE 
TULIPS 

PAINTING THE CLOUDS 
WITH SUNSHINE 

SINGING IN THE 
BATHTUB 

LADYLUCK 

GO TO BED 

MY SONG OF THE NILE 

AM I BLUE? 



VITAPHONE RECORDS 

SHOW OF SHOWS medley 
GOLD DIGGERS medley 
MY SONG OF THE NILE 
ON WITH THE SHOW 

CHORUS SETS ON ALL SONGS 



Write for Special Bulletin 

Jimmy Clark 

Special Service Manager 
321 West 44th Street, New York 

"VITAPHONE" REC'D TRADEMARK 

M. WITMARK 
& SONS 

1560 Broadway, New York 



STAGE SHOWS 



Philadelphia Fox 

Week Ending December 20 

Fanchon and Marco's "Contrasts" is the stage 
show at the Fox this week, with Mel Klee and his 
caustic wit and many colored coats and hats acting 
as master of ceremonies. The orchestra under the 
leadership of Wm. A. Kruth is roundly applauded 
for its beautiful rendition of ChristmaB carols and 
two large brilliantly-lighted trees at each side of 
the stage add to the holiday spirit. 

The ballet in scanty attire takes possession of the 
stage as the curtain is raised and goes through a 
series of acrobatic stunts centering around a long 
hand rail extending the entire length of the stage. 
These exercises set to music form an interesting 
episode of the bill. 

Alexander Callam, baritone, sings "Play, Gypsies. 
Play," in splendid form, his tones round and virile 
and his interpretation of the song dramatic. 

Another "Contrast" is provided when the "Sun- 
kist Beauties," six blondes and six brunettes, the 
former in white and the latter in red costumes with 
large picture hats, give a beautiful aesthetic dance. 
The blondes and brunettes are separated into two 
groups and go through various interesting formations. 

Serge and Robert Temoff, two lithe young Russian 
dancers, in close-fitting red and white silk suits, make 
one's head fairly spin with their whirlwind dancing 
and jumping. The audience gives them a good hand. 

Nan Blackstone sings a blues song, "I'm the 
Laziest Girl in Town," to her own accompaniment 
on a miniature piano. The song is coarse and the 
applause only perfunctory. 

The real hit of the program is a group of Old 
Timers, stars of forty years ago, their ages ranging 
from 62 to 81 years, personally introduced by McI 
Klee, who dance is as lively a manner as the young- 
sters one-third of their age who follow them on the 
bill. They dance simultaneously, then each gives an 
exhibition of his or her specialty of bygone days. 
The agility of these old timers is surprising and 
Harry Swirl, sixty-four, performs acrobatic feats 
that would be impossible to many of the youthful 
dancers of today. Their stunts include soft shoe 
and tap dancing, Irish jigs and acrobatic dancing 
and one white haired man of eighty-one accom- 
panied them on the violin. The audience gave them 
an ovation and many felt that Fanchon and Marco 
had scored a real hit by giving them a place on the 
bill at this season of the year. In line with the 
"Contrast" idea, a group of Fox Movietone Follies 
Girls gave a version of modern dancing in striking 
contrast to the steps of the old timers. 



San Antonio Majestic 

Week Ending January 2 

On the boards of the Greater Majestic theatre for 
the current week is one of the best vaudeville pro- 
grams to be offered in a long time. This vaudfilm 
house now has a new policy of starting their new 
bill on Friday instead of Saturday each week. 

Miss Kitty Doner, America's foremost male im- 
personator headlined this week's big time program 
attraction. She fulfills the saying "America's best 
dressed man is a woman." Dance and song impres- 
sions made up Miss Doner's routine, which went over 
nicely and pleased. 

The Tom Davis Trio, three motorists of sterling 
ability made a big hit with the patrons and drew 
a very good hand, which was well deserved. 

Val Harris and Gertrude Shari presented their 
comedy and dance act entitled "The Western Wild- 
cat." This number won some applause, and they 
earned it, too. Permaine & Shelly entertained with 
their "Pulley-Pulley." 

An extra added feature on the program was 
Marget Margot and her revue, Hugh Osborn and the 
10-people miniature dance completed this deluxe 
vodvil presentation. 

On the screen was The Romance of the Rio 
Grande, the William Fox all-speaky outdoor drama, 
starring Mary Duncan and Warner Baxter ; other 
talky subjects included Aesop's Sound Fables, Movie- 
tone Newsreel, and a serial of the jungles, along 
with short film novelties. 

New York Paramount 

Week Ending December 26 

"White Caps," featuring Paul Ash is produced by 
Lewis W McDermott, and is his first unit to play 
in the east. This unit is a typical musical comedy 
show and really carries the theme and story through- 
out as so many others have attempted but failed to 
do. This cleverly produced unit opens to a "shore" 
scene in which ships appear in the background, and 
the orchestra in the pit. Nine "sailors" offer a song 



and dance called "In the Navy." The dancing gobs 
do the dancing and the Varsity Four, called here, the 
Singing Ensigns are the quartette. Paul Ash and 
Bill Hutchins, as officers enter with the Fred Evans 
Ensemble and the Singing Ensigns sing "My Sweeter 
Than Sweet" to Pauline Gaskins, a charming and 
beautiful girl. Miss Gaskins then follows with a 
graceful and pleasing high-kicking routine as she 
leads the ensemble. Meanwhile Harriet Hutchins has 
been eating brandy cherries and becomes slightly 
inebriated, following Bill's singing to her, she and 
he do a very well done eccentric routine. Miss 
Hutchins is a clever comedienne and has the house 
in a continual uproar at her funny antics. Paul Ash 
and Bobby Pincus, the Hot-Cha-Cha Boy gag and 
finally Bobby does an eccentric dance that nearly 
stops the show. Scene then changes to aboard 
battleship, on which Ash's band plays for the "dance 
of the season." Harriet Hutchins, dressed as one 
of the gobs, comes in for many laughs with her 
antics and finally is sent ashore by Commander Ash 
as the company dance to the band music. Miss 
Hutchins again appears, this time dressed in the 
height of fashion and she and Pauline Gaskins lead 
the ensemble and the dancing gobs in a novel and 
well done routine. Ash then makes his first intro- 
duction of the evening, in introducing Monroe and 
Grant, two boys who enter on a dilapidated truck 
which explodes and forms a tranboline on which they 
offer tumbling and other acrobatic feats to a good 

St. Louis Ambassador 

Week Ending December 26 

Ed Lowry called his stage revue "Jazz Clock Store." 
It provided the vehicle for two St. Louis high school 
graduates to make their professional stage debut. 
The girls were Sarah Belle Birger and Evelyn Birgcr 
and known as the Tiffany Twins. They are eccen- 
tric dancers and made such a hit they have been 
booked by the Public Circuit for a forty-five week 
engagement. 

Others who went across in grand style on the 
stage were Bard and Avon, Bob La Salle, the 
comedian, JJm Rentsch and the Fred Evans Ensemble, 
reception. The finale consists of the usual beautiful 
musical settings, with the ship lighted, the ensemble 
singing and guns firing. 



Oklahoma City Orpheum 

Week Ending January 3 

On the stage. Count Omi Vici and his all girl 
revue in a specially prepared program of riotous 
dances, snappy songs and peppy music, with Maude, 
Hilton & Aimy. It is a good entertainment even 
without comparison. The unit contains a jazz band 
of 13 lucky pieces, a chorus which does some nice 
dances and a very capable pair of commediennea 
who really do amuse. 

On the screen the feature picture. The Missis- 
sippi Gambler, pleased the large crowds and the 
added features, Aesop's Fables, Orpheum Movietone 
News, were good. 

The Orpheum Orchestra Instruments were in ex- 
cellent good tune and furnished delightful music 
for the vaudeville acts and with few extras thrown 
in between acts. 

Milwaukee Wisconsin 

Week Ending January 3 

This week's offering of Fanchon & Marco is the 
"Drapes Idea," which is very cleverly presented and 
which pleases many people. It is also the first show- 
ing in this city of E. Max Bradfield as master of 
ceremonies. He replaces Frankie Jenks who hies him- 
self to California just recently. The stage has draped 
curtains of yellow with a purple drop as a back- 
ground. It is different from other presentations re- 
cently in this respect and goes over good with the 
crowd. 

Sixteen St. Louis beauties draped in yellow satin 
with satin reaching from ceiling to their hats, too, 
come out and do a snappy dance. Dorothy Kelly is 
in black draped gown and she sings. The girls re- 
move the satin and half the girls in black blouses 
drape the other girls in yards of goods. It's a 
clever idea and gets many "ahs" from the ladies in 
the audience. 

Jerome Mann, a talented fellow, then comes forth 
and does some good impersonations of our friends 
Al Jolson, Ted Lewis and Pat Rooney. This im- 
personation stuff is quite the rage of course and 
it's being overdone in many cases, but Jerome puts 
it over in a way that leaves a fresh taste in your 
mouth. 

Again the St. Louis beauties come forth, this time 
in long, old fashioned gowns with lights changing 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



51 



colors. There is the rhythm and charm of the 90's 
in the dance and makes you forget this speedy cen- 
tury where you've sot to go like hell to stand still. 
The audience gives the girls a big hand. This senti- 
mental, slow stuff makes a good mixer occasionally. 

Frank Melina and Co., including two men and a girl, 
then put on a few jokes and dances which are well 
executed. The dances are individual and clever and 
the dancers get many encores from the audience. 

The finale shows a back drop raising and a sunset 
behind with the girls dancing. It's quite a pictur- 
esque effect, but the sunset idea has been overdone 
here of late. It seems as though a sunset ending 
is provided about every two weeks. The presentation 
all the way through is fair. 



Brooklyn Paramount 

Week Ending January 9 

Harry Richmond together with the Publix "Now 
and Then" unit is the featured attraction at this 
house this week. Richmond, billed as "Broadway's 
Playboy," is a good announcer, a fine singer, makes 
a pleasing appearance on the stage and many may 
think he is a good showman. Some of the audience 
around this reviewer thought otherwise, when they 
whispered that they thought it unethical for him to 
make wise cracks against Vallee and Paul Ash, 
who are great favorites, especially at this house. It 
was very sweet of Richmond to mention Miss Clara 
Bow's greetings to the audience, but it was not 
necessary to continually play on Miss Bow's popu- 
larity to derive a hand for himself. 

This otherwise fine show opens to a band number 
called, "This Is My Lucky Day" which Richmond 
sings as he opens the show. After this number 
Richmond made his aforementioned speech and 
greetings from Miss Bow. At the mention of Miss 
Bow's name, the audience proclaimed her with a 
round of applause. After these preliminaries, the 
regular unit got under way. 

The Ward Sisters, two dainty misses, nicely sing 
and lead the Gambarelli Ensemble in a well done 
routine about "The Naughty Marionette." A novel 
routine is next done by the Ward Sisters and the 
ensemble in which they make the dolls (which they 
have been singing of) seemingly dance a routine. 
They were very well received. Kendall Capps, next 
appears and offers a difficult and very well done 
acrobatic tap dance which he does, seemingly with 
the least exertion, to a very fine hand. A band 
number, "Why" follows and is well sung by Miss 
June MeCloy in a deep and harmonious voice. A 
fan number follows in which the ballet do a well 
routined toe dance as girls in beatiful costumes and 
carrying gorgeous fans representing various foreign 
countries enter stage. For the closing of this, Miss 
June McCloy, representing Russia is posed in an 
elaborate setting as Sammy Krevoff offers a twirling 
and Russian dance that nearly stops the show. 

After mentioning California about a dozen times 
Richmond finally sings, "At the End of the Road." 
He has a very fine voice, full of pathos and feeling 
and really can bring out the best of him in his 
singing of a number. He received a very fine re- 
ception for this song, and encored with a specially 
written song called, "Ga-Ga" and dedicated to Miss 
Bow. A number of this kind would naturally evoke 
a great round of applause no matter who sang it but 
it nearly brought down the house when Richmond 
sang it. Richmond then introduced Charles 
Withers £ind Co., and their standard vaudeville act, 
"The Old Op'ry House" which closed the bill. Mr. 
Withers has been playing this same act for the past 
15 years in vaudeville houses throughout the coun- 
try but it did even better than usual here in a 
presentation house. 



Jersey City Stanley 

Week Ending January 2 

The stage show at this house this week offered 50 
minutes of entertainment, snappily and beautifully 
done. This unit is an innovation, in-as-much as it 
features "The Ingenues," a 25 piece girl band, who 
make a beautiful appearance and are accomplished 
musicians and versitile artists. The only male on 
the bill is Benny Ross, permanent master of cere- 
monies at this house, and the most popular young 
man in this town. 

This fine presentation opens to a black street drop 
in front of which Ross makes a New Year speech, 
amid a tumultuous reception. Ross then went on to 
introduce the famous "Ingenue" band who first ap- 
pear as banjoists and then finish this bit with a 
pleasing chorus of "Swanee River" which they play 
on harmonicas. The band then follows with some 
hot jazz tunes which they play very well, then a 
saxophone solo by 12 of the girls and a difficult 
high-kicking routine by one of the girls as she is 
skipping rope. 

Ross next introduces Miss Jean Boydell, one of 
the most clever comediennes in presentation, who 
nearly stops the show with her comedy songs and 



eccentric dancing steps while singing. The entire 
time she is on the stage, the audience are in an 
uproar and at the finish she is given a very fine 
reception. A xylophone solo by one of the girls 
(the drummeress) and an accordion solo by 8 of the 
girls follows. The girls are given a very fine re- 
ception for their solos of "The St. Louis Blues," 
which each do a bit of. They have a novel closing 
specialty, the singing of "Congratulations." Ross' 
then tells a few gags and then offers his own 
speciality, the singing of "Congratulations." Ross' 
fine singing is what has made him so popular with 
this audience. It is a usual occurrence for him to 
stop the show with his singing, and this is no ex- 
ception, so he is forced to encore with another 
chorus. 

Jean Boydell follows Ross with a very well done 
and comical burlesque dance on "The Dance of the 
Wooden Soldiers," which earns her a very fine re- 
ception from the audience. "Sousa's March" played 
by the Ingenues, as girls form a shield, close this 
fine show. 

San Antonio Texas 

Week Ending January 2 

On the stage of the Texas theatre for the current 
week is the New York produced Publix show unit, 
"Let's Go," which graced the New Year's attraction 
at this theatre. 

In the east were: Lewis and Dody, The Five 
Bracks, Al and Gussie Blum and the Dave Gould 
Girls. 

The stageshow opens with the ballet doing a dance 
to the tune of "You Were Meant for Me" and as 
they made their exit in the form of a railroad train 
which was well Imitated, they received an abundance 
of applause. 

Al and Gussy Blam did a mighty clever dance 
novelty which pleased the entire audience. This 
couple came back for the second time and gave their 
famous rag doll dance, then came Lewis and Doty, 
the Hello, Hello, Hello Boys, who sang several roof 
garden songs and finished up with a ventriloquist 
act that went over very nice. 

"Vic" and His Band Boys then played a medley 
entitled "American Blues," then the entire cast 
assembled for the finale which was a short flash of 
the Five Bracks, a quintet of tumblers which closed 
the presentation with the -ballet arranged in forma- 
tion above and behind the orchestra. 

Vic Insirilo and his Melody Boys put the stage 
show over in a big way, while Ernest Hauscr and 
the Texas Grand Symphony Orchestra rendered the 
beautiful overture that pleased the patrons. L. Earl 
Abel, the versatile organist at the mighty voiced 
Texan, Robert Morton, featured his organ ideas along 
with song slides. 

The Marriage Playground is coming next week. 



Kansas City Mainstreet 

Week Ending January 4 

Marinoff's dogs are a highlight on any program 
and they received enthusiastic receptions at the 
Mainstreet all last week. The act has genuine en- 
tertainment for the kids and grown-ups alike. The 
dogs put on a one-act play that is original and 
funny. 

Falls, Reading and Boyce do an acrobatic dancing 
act that was received favorably. Joseph Ragan is a 
tenor who can really sing. His Irish numbers got 
over very well. 

Slim Temblin does a blackface act which slides 
over very nicely. Dillon and Parker have a singinfl 
and dancing skit that pleases the majority. 



BILL 

MEEDER 

AT THE 

ORGAN 



RKO 

THEATRE 
RICHMOND HILL N. Y. 



Hollywood 
Tunes 



HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 11.— Many a song 
has been sung in many a motion picture 
since the screen went vocal but it remained 
for Paramount to introduce a piano sym- 
phony into a film. A gay little fox trot 
called "Sinfonette" is played by Phillips 
Holmes in Pointed Heels. Newell Chase 
is the composer. 

* * * 

Harold Roberts and his University of 
Southern California Band will be heard in 
Young Eagles. Paramount is filming the 
picture with Buddy Rogers in the leading 
role. The band numbers 30 musicians. 
Many of the songs popular during the war 
will be heard. 

^ ^ 

Walter Donaldson and Edgar Leslie are 
co-melody makers of "If You Want to See 
Gay Paree" and "Sweet Nothings of Love." 
Fifi Dorsay sings them in Hot for Paris. 

Buddy Rogers has made his new year 
resolutions. He says, "now that I have 
mastered the trombone, piano, trap drums, 
cornet, guitar, xylophone, organ and kazoo 
horn, I resolve to master during 1930, the 
bass viol, zither and ocarina." 

* * * 

Cliff Friend and James Monaco are pro- 
viding the music for The Golden Calf. 
Harold Atteridge is author of the dialog 
and lyrics on this Fox film. Earl Lindsay 
is directing the dance ensembles. Jack 
Mulhall and Sue Carol are featured. 

A real gypsy orchestra furnishes much 
of the incidental music for Lillian Gish's 
The Swan. A native gypsy instrument 
called a cymbolom is featured. It is a cross 
between a clavier and a stringed version of 
the xylophone. Now that everyone^ under- 
stands what a cymbolom is we will con- 
tinue. 

* * * 

Many famous names compose the list of 
song writers at First National. Leo Forb- 
stein is musical director. The music mak- 
ers, in teams, are as follows: Oscar Ham- 
merstein and Sigmund Romberg, Otto 
Harbach and Jerome Kern, Eddie Ward 
and Al Bryan, Harry Akst and Grant 
Clarke, Con Conrad, Sidney Mitchell and 
Arch Gottler, Al Dubin and Joe Burke, 
M. K. Jerome and Harold Berg, Michael 
Cleary, Ned Washington and Herb Magid- 
son. 

A number of these boys will move over 
to Warner Brothers soon. The studio has 
been quiet for the past few weeks but pro- 
duction on the 1930 program is now under 
way. MADAME OCTAVE. 

World-Traveled War Vet 
Tenor at Roxy 

One of the most colorful personalities in the mu- 
sical field will make his debut on the program 
accompanying Hot for Paris at the Roxy theatre 
this week. He is David DroUet, tenor. Born on 
the island of Tahiti of Italian-French parentage, his 
adventurous career has carried him to every impor- 
tant city of the globe. His musical education wa« 
procured in the musical centres of Europe and_ he 
has appeared with the leading musical organizations 
on the Continent. The interlude of the World War 
called a halt to his career, when he served under 
the French colors, receiving six medals for bravery 
on different occasions. After the war he resumed 
his operatic career. 



UNIFORMS COSTUMES l°^S^Tr,o,. BROOKS "VS: 



52 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



SIDSAYS 

afiotit 

SONGS 




BEST SELLERS 

Week Ending January 4th 

No. I _ 

Tip Toe Thru the Tulips— (M. Wit- 
mark & Sons). 

No. 2 

Painting the Clouds — (M. Witmark & 
Sons). 

No._ 2 

Singing in the Rain — (Rohbins Music 
Corp.) 

No. 4 

If I Had a Talking Picture — (De 
Syiva, Brown & Henderson). 

Aren't We All — (De Sylva, Brown & 
Henderson). 

Love Your Spell — (Irving Berlin.) 
Chant of the Jungle — (Rohbins Music 
Corp.) 

H'lo Baby — (George & Arthur Pian- 
tadosi). 

No. 6 

All That I'm Asking Is Sympathy — 
(Joe Morris). 
Love Me — (Leo Feist). 
My Sweeter Than Sweet — (Harms). 
No. 7 

I May Be Wrong — (Ager, Yellen & 
Bernstein). 

Through — (Donaldson, Douglas & 
Gumble.) 

My Fate Is in Your Hands— (Santly 
Bros.) 

Congratulations — (Green & Slept). 

That Wonderful Something — (Rob- 
bins Music Corp.) 

Singing in the Bathtub — (M. Wit- 
mark & Sons). 

No. 8 

Funny Dear, What Love Can Do — 
(Leo Feist). 

Satisfied — (Leo Feist). 

Piccolo Pete — (Jenkins). 

How Am I to Knowf — (Rohbins Mu- 
sic Corp.) 

Little by Little — (De Sylva, Brown & 
Henderson). 

Sunny Side Up — (De Sylva, Brown & 
Henderson). 

Rio Rita — (Leo Feist). 

Turn on the Heat — (De Sylva, Brown 
& Henderson). 

Little Kiss Each Morning — (Harms). 

"WHAT DO I CARE?"— (Shapiro, Bernstein & 

Co.) — A fox trot ballad that should make a good 
dance number and looks commercial. By Raymond 
Klages, Jesse Greer and Harry CaroU. 

"SINGIN' RIVER"— (Villa Moret, Inc.)— A cheer 
up Spiritual song. The lyric writer has made a 
specialty of this type of song and can sure write 
them. The melody is also O. K. Lyric by Joe 
Trent, music by Neil Moret. 

"I'M FOLLOWING YOU"— (Irving Berlin, Inc.) 
— The theme song of the new Duncan Sisters' pic- 
ture It's a Great Life. From reports this looks 
like a good picture and this being an excellent 
number should sell real big. By Dave Dreyer and 
Ballard MacDonald. 

"WHERE YOU ARE"— (Remick Music Corp.)- 
A very pretty number, both as to lyrics and melody. 
The melody writer is the young man who won sec- 
ond prize in the Victor contest with his "Song of 
the Bayou." Lyrics by Mort Dixon, music by Rube 
Bloom. 

"I LOVE YOU, BELIEVE ME, I LOVE YOU"— 
(Harms, Inc.) — One of the songs in the first Rudy 
Vallee picture, entitled. The Vagabond. Lover 
This picture opens here this week and we shall see 
if Rudy does to the femmes here what he does in 
the East. Words by Rubey Cowan, music by Phil 
Boutelje. 



ORGAN SOLOS 



Basil Cristol (Chicago, Tower) presents a pleas- 
ing solo this week which consists of a number of 
popular songs which are all summed up into the 
title of "To Sing's the Thing." Mrlss Cristol plays 
each number with the audience accompanying her 
with singing the words on the screen. It eeems 
that this theatre does unusually well with com- 
munity singing. Her first offering was "H'lo 
Baby," followed by Lonely Troubadour," each of 
which were well received. The next was a novelty. 
The words of several popular songs were put to- 
gether to form a story and when eung to the tune 
of "Tip Toe" it offered many a laugh. She closes 
her solo with, "If I Had a Talking Picture of 
You," which received a hearty applause. 



Jean Anthony (Chicago, Belpark) offered a very 
pleasing and entertaining organ solo for the Xmas 
holidays, which was well received throughout the 
week. Eight people were used to assist Jean, six 
of which were back stage, who offered vocal accom- 
paniment to his numbers. His first offering was 
that popular Xmas favorite, "Holy Night," which 
was beautifully done and received a fine response 
from the audience. Next Santa enters with Miss 
Belpark (Eunice Willaly), who offers a very snappy 
dance to Jean's number, "Oh, Baby, Look What 
You Done to Me." This entire part of the pro- 
gram was unexpected and received a great ap- 
plause. They were forced to do an encore, so of- 
fered another chorus, which was greeted with equal 
applause. 

Con Maffle's (Omaha Paramount) debut at the 
Paramount coincided with the holidays, which was 
unfortunate in falling at a time when attendance 
is somewhat slim, but fortunate in coming when 
theatregoers were in a holiday mood. MaflSe's music 
as a result, received enthusiastic welcome from the 
audiences. MaiHe put on "your favorite radio en- 
tertainer," going down the line imitating Rudy Vallee, 
Amos and Andy and all the other lights. He closed 
his program with "The Day Is Done." 

The midnight show of the New Year's Eve also 
fell in Maffie's opening week. He helped make 
whoopee in leading the boisterous midnight crowd 
in songs. 

Bob West (Brooklyn Paramount) offered an 
original organ community stunt which he called, 
"New Year's Greetings." Rising organ, disclosed 
West seated at a beautifully decorated instrument, 
turning toward the audience and orally wishing 
them all greetings of the season, etc., followed by a 
specially prepared slide version with special lyrics 
also stating his greetings. West then announced 
that he would like the audience to sing all the "hit" 
numbers of the past year. This audience certainly 
do comply to everything West tells them, and to 
prove it, they loudly sang, "I've Gotta Feeling I'm 
Falling," "Honey," "Vagabond Lover," "Am I 
Blue," "Singin' in the Rain," "Tiptoe Through the 
Tulips," "Pagan Love Song" and many others. The 
receptions accorded this young fellow prove his popu- 
larity and also prove that a clever organist and 
showman is really necessary for the good of a the- 
atre. 

Music and Talent 

LETTERS 

In this open forum those interested in pres- 
entation may discuss important matters bear- 
ing upon this phase of theatre entertainment. 
Only signed letters will be published. 

MUSIC AND TALENT— To the Editor: Last 
week a letter came to me telling of an agent in 
the East selling a trailer on "Somebody's Lonesome 
for Somebody's Love." I wish you would ask the 
theatre managers to write and tell us if they are 
approached by this man and to get his name and 
address, as we have not given any trailer concern 
permission to use our song. If any manager will 
do this it will help us greatly. I am inclosing my 
Xmas gift to you, a copy of my song, and hope 
you like it. A merry Xmas to you, the crew and 
the trade. Sincerely, Al Stafford, S. & M. Music 
Publishers. 




9tatc. 5918 



'lOS 

54W.a3ndolph St 
Ajcjoo Getting RUMORS 




Hello Everybody — -Here is one for the book. . . . 
Mr. Elmer McDonald, "The Old Timer" of station 
KMOX, knows 2,000 popular songs that have ap- 
peared within the past twenty years and can sing 
any of them on a second's notice. He has never 
been stumped except rarely when someone requests 
a hymn which he probably should have known but 
didn't. His experience comes from many years in 
vaudeville and moving picture houses before his con- 
nection with the radio station, I should say radio 
"stations," for he has sung over no less than 276 
radio stations throughout the United States. Mr. 
McDonald did not intend to become a singer when 
he was a youth. His ambition was to become a 
professional baseball pitcher. It seems that he was 
able to pitch his voice better than he could a base- 
ball, so he turned to music. "Mc" receives up to 
500 fan letters each week, many or rather the ma- 
jority of them requesting ballads, the favorite and 
biggest three being "That Wonderful Mother of 
Mine," "My Wild Irish Rose" and "Ah! Sweet 
Mystery of Life." Old time songs make up his 
Sunday programs but during the week he sings the 
current popular songs which are melodious as well 
as popular. Mr. McDonald says that at this time 
the public favorites are "Am I Blue," "Song of the 
Nile," "Tiptoe Through the Tulips," and "Painting 
the Clouds With Sunshine." 

* * * 

Sherman, Lewis and Armstrong, one of the latest 
of the well known song writers to open their own 
music publishing firm are boasting of a very fine 
catalog, among their best numbers are, "My Heart 
Belongs to the Girl I Love," "Take Your Hands Out 
of Your Pockets," "Once Again Before We Part," 
"I Wish I Had a Sweetheart," "Violet," and "You 
Showed Me the Way." 

t-fi * 

Will Rockwell of Harms, wants it known that 
"Bigger and Better than Ever" and "Bottoms Up," 
both in the score of George White's Scandals elicit 
numerous requests from dance patrons in the vari- 
ous cafes. 

* * * 

The new M G M production. Devil May Care fea- 
turing Ramon Novarro, has as its score, three num- 
bers published by the Robbins Music Corp., and 
which Novarro sings beautifully. The numbers are, 
"Shepherd's Serenade," "Charming" and "If He 
Cared." Another M G M picture, which features 
Charles Kaley, former master of ceremonies at the 
Granada theatre, Chicago, is soon to open on Broad- 
way. Kaley sings a number of songs in this produc- 
tion, but really features, "Should I ?" (a Robbins 
song) which shows great possibilities. 

« • « 

Walter Winchell, well known columnist, in one of 
his column's mentions that he "never knew till now, 
that all Victor Herbert's contracts to conduct or- 
chestras specified that Herbert be furnished with a 
cold bottle of Champagne before entering the pit." 
Maybe the champagne accounts for the inspiration 
that makes Herbert ballads the bubbling melodies 
that they are. Prohibition can't take that away 
from them and they still have their "kick" as is 
proved by their popularity on the radio, on the stage 
and on the screen. 

^ # Hi 

Eddie Wolpin, the energetic young fellow who 
handles the bands and orchestras for George and 
Arthur Piantadosi, Inc., informs us that "H'lo 
Baby" is proving a great favorite with the bands 
who spread their sunshine via the air-line. One 
famous New York band leader, says it is the most 
requested number in his repertoire. "Win" Brook- 
house says Eddie must be right by the way the or- 
ders have been coming in on "H'lo Baby." 

* * * " 
Miss Ida Warshaur, New York manager (or should 

I say managress) informs me that the featured song, 
"I'm in Love With You," from The Great Gabbo, 
is showing up very big, and looks like a "hit" for 
sure. 

a: * » 

Mable Wayne has just completed another number 
that has great potentialities of becoming a hit. The 
number is published by Leo Feist and is called, "Do 
Ya' Love Me." 



January II, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



53 




QUICK REFERENCE PICTURE CHART 



Amkino 

** ELITA (D): Eggert-Solnzewa. (L) 2.900f. (R) Mar. 

'AFGHANISTAN (D) : Special cast. (L) G.OOOf. (R) Sept. 
jio. 1929. 

•A^RSENAL (D) S. Srashenko. (L) 7.250. (R) Nov. 2. 

•FLAMES ON THE VOLGA, or Bulat Bafvr: Anna Wozjlk. 

Yaroslavstev. (L) 7000f. (R) Mar. 30. 1929. 
•FOREST PEOPLE (D) : Special cast. (L) 5.800. (R) 

Sept. 5. 1929. 

•GENERAL LINE (D) : Special cast. Forthcoming release. 
•GIRL WITH THE BANDBOX (D) : Anna Stenn. (L) 

6.000. (R) Sept., 1929. 
•HER WAY OF LOVE (D) : Special cast. (R) 6.008. 
•IN OLD SIBERIA (D) : A. Zhllinsky. V. Taskin. (L) 6500f. 

(B) July 20. 

•KATORGA (D): A. Zhilinsky, V. TasMn, V. Popov. (R) 

June 1, (L) 7500f. 
•KRASSIN: Special cast. (L) 700af. (R) Feb. 19, 1929. 
•LASH OF THE CZAR. THE: Kachalov, Mejerhold, Stenn. 

(L) 6800f. (R) Feb. 9. 1929. 
•MAN FROM THE RESTAURANT, THE: M. Tchekhov, 

Vera Malinovsliaya. (R) .lanuaiT 4. 1930. 
•MAN WITH THE CAMERA (D) : Special cast. (R) Sep- 
tember. (L) 6.000. 

•MOSCOW TODAY (D) : Special cast. (B) April 11. (L) 
5000f. 

•NEW BABYLON (D) : Sophia Magarill, Sergei Geraslmow, 
Peter Sobolewski, Elena Kusmina. (R) June 29. (L) 
SOOOf. 

•PRISONERS OF THE SEA: O. Knipper, Tschechowa, N. 

Kutusow. (R) Apr. 13, 1929. 
•SCANDAL (D): L. FUkovskaya. (L) 7,200. (R) Oct. 

26 1929 

•SEEDS OF FREEDOM (D) : L. M. Leonidoff. (L) 6,800. 

(R) Sept. 7. 1929. 
•SPARTAKIADE (D) : Special cast. (L) 5,000. (R) July 

6 1929 

•TWO DAYS: F. E. Samytschltowsky. (L) 6500f. (R) Feb. 
1 1929. 

•VILLAGE OF SIN (D) B. Cessarskaya. (L) 6,500. (B) 
May 18, 1929. 

Artclass 

•UNMASKED (D-AT) : Robert Warwick, Sam Ash, MUton 
Krims, Lyons Wickland, Susan Corroy, WiUiam Corbett, 
Charles Slattery, Kate Roemer, Waldo Edwards, Roy Byron, 
Clyde Dillson. Helen Mitchell, Marie Burke. (L) Talk- 
ing. 5449f. (B) Dec. 15, 1929. 

Audible Pictures 

•IN OLD CALIFORNIA (D AT): Henry B. Walthall. Helen 

Ferguson, George Duryea, Ray Hallor, Orral Humphrey, 

Larry Steers, Richard Carlyle, Harry Allen, Lew Stem, 

Paul Ellis, Charlotta Monte, Gertrude Chorre. (NP) 
Dec. 14. (L) 5,400f. 



Key to Symbols 



The following appear immediately after th« 
title to Indicate the nature of the prodnotion ; 



Chesterfield 



•BELOW THE DEADLINE (D-Underworld) : Barbara Worth. 
Frank Leigh, J. P. McGowan, Walter Merrill. Arthur 
Rankin, Virginia Sale, "Tiny" Ward, Lou Gory, Fred 
Walton, Bill Patton, Charles Hickman, Mike Donlin. (I,) 
5500f. (R) May 1, 1929. (NP) May 25. 

•CAMPUS KNIGHTS (CD): Raymond McKee. Shirley Palm- 
er, Marie Quillen. Jean Laverty. (R) June 15. 1929. 
HOUSE OF SECRETS (D-AT): Marcia Manning, Joseph 
Striker, Elmer Grandin, Herbert Warren, Francis M. Cerdi, 
Richard Stevenson, Harry H. Southard, Edward Ringham, 
(L) einOf. Sound only. 

•PEACOCK FAN, THE: Lucien Preval, Dorothy Devan. 
Tom O'Brien, Rosemary Theby, Carlton King. Gladden 
James, David Findlay. James Wilcox, Fred Malatesta, Alice 
True, Spencer Bell, John Fowler. (L) 5300f, (R) Mar. 
15, 1929. (NP) Mar. 23, 1929. 



Columbia 



•ACQUITTED (D-AT): Lloyd Hughes, Margaret Livingston, 
Sam Hardy, Charles West, George Rigas, Charles Wilson, 
Otto Hoffman. (B) Oct. 26, 1929. (L) Sound 5,781. 

•BACHELOR GIRL, THE (D-TME) : William CoUler, Jr., 
JacQueline Logan, Edward Hearn, Thelma Todd. (R) May 
3, 1929. (NP) June 22. (L) Talking, 59G7f; sUent, 6248f. 

•BROADWAY SCANDALS (D-AT): Sally O'Neil, Jack Egan, 
Carmel Myers, Tom O'Brien. J. Barney Sherry. John 
Hyams, Charles Wilson, Doris Dawson. Gordon Elliott, 
(NP) Nov. 30. (R) Nov. 10, 1929. (L) Sound 6,395. 

•COLLEGE COQUETTE (CD-AT) : Ruth Taylor, John Hot- 
land, William Collier, Jr., Jobyna Ralston, Edward Plel. 
Jr. (L) Talking. 6149f; silent, 5566f. Recording on film 
and disc. (R) Aug. 5. 1929. (NP) Nov. 2. 

•DONOVAN AFFAIR. THE (D-AT): Jack Holt, Agnes Ayers, 
Dorothy Revler. William Collier. Jr., John Roche, Fred 
Kelsey, Hank Mann. Wheeler Oakman, Virginia Brown 
Falre, Alphonse Ethier, Edward Hearn, .Ethel Wales, John 
Wallace. (L) Talking, 7140f; sUent, 7189f. (R) Apt. 11. 
19J9. (NP) May 18. 

•FALL OF EVE, THE (CD-AT): Patsy Ruth MiUer, Ford 
Sterling, Jed Prouty, Gertrude Astor. Arthur Rankin, Betty 
Farrington, Fred Kelsey. (L) Sound. 6245f. Silent 5799f. 
(R) .June, 1929. (Nl^) July 20. 

•FATHER AND SON (D-TME): Jack Holt, Dorothy Devier, 
Helen Chadwiok. MIckev McBan. Wheeler Oalnnan. (L) 
Talking, 6705f: sUent, 6310f. (R) Apr. 22. 1929. (NP) 
May 18. 1929. 

•FLIGHT (D-AT): Jack Holt, Ralph Graves, Lila Lee, Alan 
Roscoe, Harold Goodwin, Jimmy de la Cruze. (NP) 
October 19. (TOS) Nov. 2. (R) Nov. 1. 1929. (L) 
Sound 10,670. 

•FLYING MARINE, THE (D-TME): Ben Lyon. Shirley 
Mason, Jason Robards. (NP) June 29. (R) June 5, 1929. 
(L) Talking, 5951f; silent. 5736f. 

•HURRICANE (D-AT): Hobart Bosworth, Johnny Mack 
Brown, Lelia Hyams, Allan Roscoe, Tom O'Brien, Leila 
Mclntyre, Joe Bordeaux and Eddie Chandler. (NP) Sept. 
21. (R) Sept. 30. 1929. (L) Sound 5735. Silent 5842. 

•LIGHT FINGERS (D-AT): Ian Keith, Dorothy Rdvier, Car- 
roll Nve. Ralph Theodore. Tom Rickets. (L) Talking. 57n0f. 
(R) .July 29, 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (L) Silent 5578r. 
Sound 5700f. 



C— Comedy 
D— Drama 

CD Comedy-Drama 

Mel^Melodrama 
My^— Mystery 
W — Western 



AT — All-talking 
TME^Talking, musical 
score and effects 

MC Musical Comedy 

O — Operetta 
ME^— Musical Score, Ef- 
fects 

EXAMPLE: C-AT, all-talking comedy. (MC 
and O indicate the entire nature of the pro- 
duction, both as to sound and dramatic ap- 
peal.) 

The following appear after the cast : 
L— Length 

NP^Description in New Pictures 
named. 

TOS Comment by T. O. Service 

named 

R— Release on date named. 

NOTE : An asterisk preceding the title indi- 
cates either that there is a silent version or that 
the picture was produced only in silent foirm. 



of issue 



in issue 



♦MURDER ON THE ROOF (D AT) : Dorothy Revler, David 

NeweU and others. 
•SONG OF LOVE (D-AT): BeUe Walker, Ralph Graves, 

David Durand, Eunice Quedens, Arthur Houseman, Charto 

Wilson. (R) Nov. 25, 1929. (L) Sound 7,720. 
•TRIAL MARRIAGE (D-TME): Norman Kerry, Sally Filers, 

Jason Robards, Thelma Todd. Charles Clary, Naomi CJhlld- 

ers, Rosemary Theby, Gertrude Short. (L) Tallting, 6639J; 

silent. 6506f. (R) Mar. 10, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. 

(TOS) Apr. 20, 1929. 



Excellent 



•CLEANUP, THE: Delaney and Blake. (L) 5660f. (B) 
Jan. 25, 1929. 

•DREAM MELODY: Riche and Thelby. (L) 5050f. (R) 

Ja.n 20 1929 
•DAVID VALLORY: 1929 reVase. 
•FANNY HAWTHORNE: 1929 release. 

•LIFES CROSSROADS: Hulette and Hamilton. (L) 5355f. 
♦HEARTS AND MODELS: 1929 release. (B) Oct. 20, 1928. 
♦MASQUERADE MARRIAGE: 1929 release. 
♦MELLOWING MONEY: 1929 release. 

•ONE SPLENDID HOUR: Viola Dana. George Peridot, Allen 
Simpson, Lewis Sargent, Jack Richardson. Lucy Beaumont, 
Florence Cooper, Ernie Adams, Hugh Saxon, Charles Hich- 
man. (L) (il29f. (R) May 1. 1929. 

♦ORCHID WOMAN. THE: 1929 release. 

♦PENNY PRINCESS: 1929 release. 

♦ROSES OF PICARDY: (B) Apr. 15. 1929. 

♦WRECKERS, THE: 1929 release 



First Division 



♦LINDA (D-ME): Warner Baxter, Helen Foster. Noah 
Beery, MitcheU Lewis. (L) 6775f. 

First National 

•BROADWAY BABIES (M-TME) : Alice White, Charles De- 
laney, Fred Kohler, Tom Dugan, BodU Eosing, Sally 
Eilers, Marion Byron, Joselyn Lee, Louis Natheaux, Maurice 
Black. (L) 8067f. (R) June 30, 1929. (NP) June 22. 

•CAREERS (D-TME): Billie Dove, Antonio Moreno, Thelma 
Todd, Noah Beery, Holmes Herbert, Carmel Myers, Eobert 
Frazer, Sojln. (L) 8435f. (B) June 2, 1929. (NP) June 
22. (TOS) June 29. 

•CARELESS AGE, THE (CD-TME) : Douglas Fairbanks. Jr., 
Loretta Young, Carmel Myers, Holmes Herbert, Kenneth 
Thomson, George Baxter, Wilfred Noy, Doris Lloyd, Ilka 
Chase, Raymond Lawrence. (NP) Aug. 17. (L) Sound, 
6308f. (B) Sept. 16, 1929. 

•CHEYENNE (W) : Ken Maynard, Gladys McConnell, James 
Bradbury, Jr., Tarzan, WUliam Franey, Charles Whlttaker. 
(B) Feb. 3. (L) 5944f. 

♦CHILDREN OF THE RITZ (CD-MB) : Dorothy MackaiU. 
Jack Mulhall, James Ford, Eddie Burns, Ijee Moran. 
Kathryn McGuire, Evelyn Hall, Doris Dawson, Aggie Her- 
ring. Frank Crane. (R) Mar. 3. (L) Sound. eSSfif. 
Silent. 6287f. (TOS) Mar. 2. 

♦DARK STREETS (D-AT): Jack Mulhall, Lila Lee. Aggie 
Herring, Earl Pingree, Will Walling. E. H. Calvert. Maurice 
Black. (NP) Aug. 10. (L) Round. 54161; silent, 55141. 
(R) Aug. 11. 1929. 

•DIVINE LADY, THE (D-TME): Corinne Griffith, Victor 
Varconl, H. B. Warner, Ian Keith, Marie Dressier, Doro- 
thy Cummings. William Conkin, Montague Love, Julia 
Swayne Gordon. Michael Vavitch. (L) 9035f. (R) Mar. 
31. 1929. (NP) Apr. 6, 1929. (TOS) May 11. 1929. 

♦DRAG (D-AT): Eichard Barthelmess, Lucien Littlefleld. 
Katherlne Ward, Alice Day, Tom Dusan, Lila Lee, Mar- 
garet Fielding. (L) 7642f. (R) July 21, 1929. (NP) 
July 13. (TOS) August 10. 

♦FAST LIFE (D-AT): Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Loretta Young, 
Chester Morris. William Holden, Frank Sheridan. Ray 
Hallon, .Tohn SainpoUs. (L) Talking, 7541f. (R) Sept. 2», 
1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (TOS) Oct. 5. 

♦FLIRTING WIDOW. THE (D-AT): Dorothy Mackaill, 
Basil Eathbone. William Austin, Leila Hyams, Claude 
Gillingwater, Emily Fitzroy, Anthony Bushell, Flora 
Bramley. 

♦FOOTLIGHTS AND FOOLS (D AT) : CoUeen Moore, Fred- 
eric March, Eavraond Hackett. (TOS) January 4, 1930. 

•FORWARD PASS (D-AT): Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Ix>retta 
Young, Gulnn WiUiams, Peanuts Byron, Phyllis Crane, 
Bert Rome. Lane Chandler, Allen Tjane. Floyd Shackle- 
ford. (NP) Nov. 9. (R) Nov. 10, 1929. (L) Sound, 
7.246. 

•GIRL FROM WOOLWORTHS (D-AT): Alice White. Charles 
Delaney. Wheeler Oakman, Ben Hall, Rita Flynn. Gladdon 



James, Bert Moorehouse, Patricia Caron. William Orla- 
mond, Milla Davenport. (NP) .Nov. 3. (R) Oct. 27, 1929. 
(L) Sound, 6,171. 

•GIRL IN THE GLASS CAGE, THE (D-TME): Loretta 
Young, Carroll Nye, Matthew Betz, Lucien Littlefleld, Ralpb 
Lewis, George Stone, Julia Swayne Gordon, Majel Coleman, 
Charles Sellon, Robert Haines. (R) June 22, 1929. (NP) 
June 15. (L) Talking, 7159f; silent, 6705r. 

•GREAT DIVIDE (MD-AT) : Dorothy Mackaill. Ian KeltH, 
Lucien Littlefleld, Ben Hendricks, Myrna Loy, Frank Taa<, 
Creighton Hale. George Fawcett, Jean Laverty, Claude 
Gillingwater, Roy Stewart, James Ford, Jean Lorraine and 
Gordon EUiott. (NP) Sept. 21. (TOS) Not. 16. 

•HARD TO GET (CD-AT): Dorothy Mackaill, Jimmle Fin- 
layson, Louise Fazenda, Jack Oakie. Edmund Burni, 
Clarissa Selwynne, Charles Delaney. (NP) Aug. 10. (TOS) 
Sept. 28. (L) Sound. 7324f; silent. 5981f. 

♦HER PRIVATE LIFE (D AT) : BilUe Dove, Walter Pldgeon. 
Holmes Herbert, Montagu Love, Roland Young, Thelma 
Todd, Mary Forbes. Brandon Hurst and Zasu Pitts. (NP) 
Sept. 21. (E) Aug. 25, 1929. (L) Sound, 6,488. 

♦HOT STUFF (CD-TME): Alice White, Louise Fazenda, 
William Bakewell, Doris Dawson, Ben HaU, Charles Sel- 
lon. Buddy Messinger, Andy Devlne. Larry Banthim. (L) 
6774f. (R) May 5, 1929. (NP) Mar. 22. 1929. 

♦HOUSE OF HORROR (MyC-ME) : Louise Fazenda. Chester 
Conklln. James Ford. Thelma Todd, William V. Mong, 
Emile Chautard. William Orlamond. Dale Fuller, Tenan 
Holtz. (L) 5919f. (R) Apr. 28. 1929. (NP) Apr. II. 
1929. 

♦LILIES OF THE FIELD (D-AT): Corinne Griffith, John 
Loder, Freeman Wood, Patsy Paige, Eve Sothern, Rita Le- 
Roy, Jean Bary, Betty Boyd, May Boley, Virginia Bruce. 
Directed by Alexander Korda. (NP) Jan. 4, 1930. 

♦LITTLE JOHNNY JONES (D-AT): Eddie Brazzel, Alice 
Day, Edna Murphy. Robert Edeson. Wheeler Oakman. Don- 
ald Eeed. (NP) November 9. (E) Nov. 17, 1929. (L) 
6.621. 

•LOVE AND THE DEVIL (D-TME): MUton Sills, Maria 
Corda, Ben Bard, Nellie Bly Baker, Amber Norman. (L) 
64Slf. (R) Mar. 24. 1929. (NP) June 29. 

♦LOVE RACKET, THE (D-AT): Dorothy Mackaill, Sidney 
Blackmer. Edmund Burns, Myrtle Stedman, Alice Day, 
Edith Yorke, Martha Mattox, Edward Davis, Webster 
Campbell. Clarence Burton. Tom Mahoney and Jack Curtis. 
Length. 6,118. (NP) Nov. 30. (R) Dec. 8. 1929. 

•MAN AND THE MOMENT, THE (D-TME): Billie Dove, 
Rod LaEocaue, Gwen Lee. Robert Schable, Charles Sellon, 
George Bunny. (L) Talking. 7086f: silent. 6539f. (R) JuD's 
23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. (TOS) August 3. 

♦MQST IMMORAL LADY, A (D-AT): Leatrice Joy. Walter 
Pldgeon. Sidney Blackmer, Montague Love. Josephine 
Dunn. Robert Edeson. Donald Reed. Florence Oakley. Wil- 
son Benge. (NP) September 28. (R) Sept. 22. 1929. (L) 
Sound. 7.145. 

♦PAINTED ANGEL (D-AT): Billie Dove. Edmund Lowe. 
George MacFarlane, J. Farrell MacDnnald. Cis=y Fitzgerald, 
Nellie Blv Baker. Will Stanton. Norma Selby. Douglas 
Gerrard. Shen Camp. Peter Hiegins. Red Stanley. (NP; 
Nov. 30. (B) Dec. 1, 1929. (L) 6.470. 

♦PARIS (D-AT): Irene Bordoni, Jack Bunhanan. Louise 
Closser Hale, Jason Eobards. Margaret Fielding Zasu 
Pitts. (NP) October 10. (E) Nov. 24. (L) 9,007. 

♦PRISONERS (D-TME): Corinne Griffith. James Ford. Bela 
T.ugosi, Ian Keith, Julatme Johnston. Ann Schaeffer. Baron 
Hesse. Otto Matieson, Harry Northrup. (L) 78fl0f. (E) 
May 19. 1929. (NP) July 20. 

SALLY (MC) : Marilyn Miller. Alexander Gray, Joe E. 
Brown. T. Eoy Barnes. Pert Kelton, Ford Sterling. Maude 
Turner Gordon. Nora Lane, E. J. Eadcliffe, Jack Duffy. 
(L) Sound 9.277. (NP) December 28. 

♦SATURDAY'S CHILDREN (D-TME): Corinne Griffith. 
Grant Withers, Albert Conti, Alma Tell. Lucien Littlefleld, 
Charles Lane, Ann Schaeffer. Marcia Harris. (L) 795nf. 
(R) Apr. 14. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) May 25. 

♦SCARLET SEAS (D-TME): Richard Barthelmess, Betty 
Compson, Loretta Young, James Bradbury, Sr.. Jack Cur- 
tis, Knute Erick.'Jon. (L) 6237f. (R) Dec. 9. 1928. (NP) 
Dec. 1. 1928. (TOS) Feb. 2. 1929. 

♦SONG OF THE FLAME (D-AT): Alice Gentle, Alexander 
Grav and others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

♦SHOW GIRL IN HOLLYWOOD (D-AT): Alice VThite, .Tack 
MulhaU. Ford Sterling. Blaache Sweet, John Miljan, Vir- 
ginia Sale, Spec O'Donnell, Lee Shumway, Herman Bing. 
Forthcoming 1930 release. 

♦SMILING IRISH EYES (D-AT): Colleen Moore, James 
Hall, Claude Gillingwater, Eobert Homans, Aggie Herring, 
Betty Francisco, Julanntf Johnston, Eobert O'Connor. .John 
Beck, Edward EarL Tom O'Brien. Oscar Apfel. Fred Kel- 
.sey. Otto Lederer. (L) 8550f. (R) July 31. 1929. (TOS) 
."^eot. 7. (NP) July 27. 

•SQUALL. THE (D-AT): Myrna Loy, Alice Joyce, Richard 
Tucker. Carroll Nye, Loretta Young. (L) 9629f. (E) 
May 26. 1929. (TOS) .Tune 29. 

•SWEETHEARTS AND WIVES: (C-AT): Billie Dove. Ken- 
neth Thompson. Basil Eathnone, Kay Francis, Montagu 
Love. Philip Strange. Gino Corrado, Elinor Vandivere. 

♦SYNTHETIC SIN (D-ME): Colleen Moore, Antonio Moreno. 
Kathrvn McGuire, Edythe Chapman, Montague Love, Ger- 
trude Astor, Gertrude Howard, Ben Hendricks, Jr.. Ray- 
mond Tucker. (L) 6852f. (R) Jan. G. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 2. 1929. 

♦TWIN BEDS (C-TME): Jack Mulhall, Patsy Ruth Miller, 
Armond Kaliz, Gertrude Astor. Knute Eriokson, Edythe 
Chapman, Jocelvn Lee, Nita Martan, ZaSu Pitts, Eddie 
Gribbon, Ben Hendricks, Jr., Carl Levinues, Alice Lake, 
Bert Roach. (B) July 14, 1929. (NP) July 30. (L) 
TalMng. 72G6f. 

♦TWO WEEKS OFF (CD-ME) : Dorothy Mackaill, Jack 
Mulhall, Gertrude Astor, Jimmy Finlayson, Kate Price, Jed 
Proutv. Eddie Gribbon. Dixie Gay, Gertrude Messinger. 
(L) 8"017f. (R) May 12, 1929. (NP) May 11, 1929. (TOS) 
June 8. 

♦WEARY RIVER (Mel-TME) : Richard Barthelmess, Betty 
Compson, George Stone, William Holden, Louis Natheaux, 
Raymond Turner, Robert O'Connor. (L) 797Gf. (R) Feb. 
10. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) May 18. 

•WEDDING RINGS (D-AT): Lois Wilson, H. B. Warner, 
Olive Borden, Kathleen Williams. Aileen Manning. James 
Ford, Hallam Coolev. (NP) Dec. 14. (R) Dec. 29. 

•YOUNG NOWHERES (D-AT): Richard Barthelmess, 
Marian Nixon. Bert Roach. Anders Randolf. Raymond Tur- 
ner, .Toselyn Lee. (NP) October 9. (TOS) Nov. 23. (R) 
Oct. 20. (L) Sound 6,021. 



54 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 11, 1950 



Fox 

•BEHIND THAT CURTAIN (MT-AT) : Warner Baxter, Lois 
Morao, Gilbert Emery. Claude King, Philip Strange, Boris 
Karloff, Jamiel Hassen, Peter Gawthome. John Rogers. 
Montague Shaw, Finch Smiles. Mercedes De Valasco, E. L. 
Parli. (L) S300f. (R) June 30. 1929. (TOS) Aug. 31. 
(NP) July 6. 

•BIG TIME (D-AT): Lee Tracy, Mae Clarke. Daphlne Pol- 
lard, Josephine Dunn, and Stepin Fetchit. Directed by 
Kenneth Hawlis. (NP) Oct. 5. (L) 7.480. (R) Sept. 29. 

•BLACK MAGIC (D-ME) : Josephine Dunn. Earle Foie, 
John Holland, Henry B. Walthall, Dorothy Jordon, Fritz 
Feld, Sheldon Lewis, Ivan Lindow. Blue Washington. (L) 
5835f. Silent. 5855f. (R) June 2, 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 

•BLACK WATCH, THE (D-AT): Victor McLaglen. Myma 
Loy, David Torrence, David Percy. Joseph Disltay, Joyzelle, 
David Rollins, Lumsden Hare. Roy D'Arcy, Mitchell Lewis. 
Cyril Chadwick, Francis Ford. Walter Long, Frederick 
Sullivan, Richard Travers, Pat Somerset, Claude King. 
(L) 8487f. (R) May 26, 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) 
July 6. 

•CAPTAIN LASH (D-ME): Victor McLaglen, Claire Windsor. 
Arthur Stone, Albert Conti, Clyde Cook. Jean Laverty, 
Frank Hagney, Boris Charsky, Jane Winton. (L) 5453f. 
(R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) Feb. 16. 

•CHASING THROUGH EUROPE (D-TME) : Sue Carol. Nick 
Stuart, Gustav von Seyffertitz, Gavin Gordon, E. Alyn 
Wiirren. (L) Silent, 5622f; sound, 5581f. (R) June 9, 
1929. (NP) Aug. 10. 

•CHRISTINA (D-AT): Janet Gaynor, Charles Morton, Ru- 
dolph Schildkraut, Lucy Dorraine, Harry Cording. (L) 
G955f. (R) Mar. 30, 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 

•CITY GIRL (D-AT): Charles FarreU, Mary Duncan, David 
Torrence, Edith Torke, Dawn O'Day, Guinn Williams, Dick 
Alexander, Tom Maguire, Edward Brady. (NP) December 
28 

•COCK-EYED WORLD, THE (D AT) : Lily Damita, Victor 
McLaglen. Edmund Lowe, Lelia Kamelly. Bobby Burns. 
Jean Bary. Joe Brown. (L) 10,611f. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) 
Oct. 5. (R) Oct. 20. 

•EXALTED FLAPPER. THE (CD-MD) : Sue Carol, Barrv 
Norton, Irene Rich. Albert Conti. Sylvia Field, Stuart 
Irwin, Lawrence Grant, Charles Clary, Michael Visaroff. 
Don AUen, Landers Stevens. (R) May 26, 1929. (NP) 
June 22. (L) 5806f. 

•FAR CALL, THE (D-ME): Charles Morton. Leila Hyams, 
Ulrich HauBt. Stanley J. Sanford, Warren Hymer. Arthur 
Stone. Charles Middleton, Pat Hartigan, Ivan Llnow, Dan 
Wolheim, Randolph Scott, Charles Gorman. Bernard Siegel. 
WilUe Fung, Harry Gripp, Frank Chew, Sam Baker. (L) 
Sound. 5313f; silent, 52S5f. (R) Apr. 2S, 1929. (NP) 
June 1. 

•FAST WORKERS (D-AT): Joseph Wagstaff, Lola Lane, 
Sharon Lynn, Frank Richardson, Walter Catlett. Dixie Lee, 
Charles Judels, Ilka Chase, Larry Steers. 

•FOUR DEVILS (D-TME): Janet Gaynor, Mary Duncan. 
Charles Morton. Barry Norton. Farrell MacDonald. Nancy 
Dreiel. (L) 9.496. (NP) July 20. (TOS) Nov. 9. (R) 
Sept. 15. 

FOX MOVIETONE FOLLIES (MC-AT) : lola Lane. Frank 
Richardson. David Percy, Sue Carol. Dixie Lee, David 
Rollins, Sharon Lynn. John Breedon, Stepin Fetchit. (L) 
8291f. (R) May 25. 1929. (NP) June 15. (TOS) June 29. 

•FROZEN JUSTICE (D-AT): Lenore Ulric. Robert Frazer. 
Louis Wolheim, Ullrich Haupt, Laska Winter, Tom Pat- 
ricola, Alice Lake, Gertrude Astor, Adele Windsor, War- 
ren Heymer, Neyneen FarreU. Arthur Stone and others. 
(NP) Nov. 16. (L) 7,170. (R) Oct. 13. 

•GHOST TALKS, THE (My-TME) : Special cast. (B) Mar. 
30. 1929. (L) 6428f. 

•GIRL FROM HAVANA (D AT): Paul Page, Lola Lane, 
Natalie Moorhead, Kenneth Thomson, Warren Hymer, 
Joseph Girard and Adele Windsor. Directed by Benjamin 
Stoloff. (NP) Sept. 21. 

•HEARTS IN DIXIE (D-AT): Stepin Fetchit, Clarence 
Muse. Eugene Jackson, Dorothy Morrison. Bernice Pilot, 
Clifford Ingram, Mildred Washington, Zach Williams, Ger- 
trude Howard. Vivian Smith. Robert Brooks, A. C. H. 
BiUdrew, Richard Carlysle. (R) Mar. 10. (L) Sound, 
7463f. ; silent? 6444f. (TOS) May 25. 

HOLLYWOOD NIGHTS (DAT): All-star cast. Forthcom- 
ing 1930 release. 

•HOT FOR PARIS (CD-AT) : Victor McLaglen. Fifl Dorsay, 
El Brendel, PoDy Moran. Lennox Pawie, August Tollaire, 
George Fawcett, Charles Judels. Eddie Dillon. Rosita Mars- 
tlni. Agostino Borgato. Tola D'Avril. Anita Murray, Dave 
Valles. (NP) December 28. 

•IN OLD ARIZONA (W-AT) : Warner Baxter, Edmund 
Lowe. (L) 87241. (R) Jan. 20. 1929. (TOS) Mar. 23. 
1929. 

•JOY STREET (CD-ME) : Lois Moran. Nick Stuart. Rei Bell. 
Jose Crespo, Dorothy Ward, Ada Williams. Maria Alba, 
Sally Phlpps. Florence Allen. Mabel Vail, John Breedon. 
(B) Apr. 7, 1929. (L) Silent. 5754f.; sound. 5748f. 
(NP) May 11. 1929. 

•LONE STAR RANGER (W-AT): George O'Brien, Sue 
Carol. Walter McGrail, Warren Hymer. Russell Simpson, 
Lee Shumway. Roy Stewart. Colin Chase. Richard Alexan- 
der, Joel Franz. Joe Blckson, Oliver Eckhardt, Caroline 
Rankin, Elizabeth Patterson. (NP) Dec. 21. 

♦LOVE, LIVE AND LAUGH (D-AT): George Jessel. Lila 
Lee. David RoUins. Henry Kolker. Kenneth MacKeana, 
John Reinhart, Dick Winslow Johnson. Henry Armetta. 
Marcia Manon and Jerry Mandy. (NP) Dec. 7. (L) 8.090. 
(R) Nov. 3. 

•LUCKY STAR (D-TME): Charles Farrell, Janet Gaynor, 
Hedwiga Reicher. Guinn (Big Boy) Williams. Paul Fix. 
Gloria Grey. Hector V. Samo. (L) Talking. 8895f. ; 
silent. 872gf. (R) Aug. 18. 1929. (TOS) Sept. 28. 

•MARRIED IN HOLLYWOOD (D AT) : J. Harold Murray. 
Norma Terris, Walter Catlett. Irene Palaska. Tom Pat- 
ricola, Lennox Pawle and John Garrick. (NP) Nov. 30. 
(L) 9,700. (R) Oct. 27. 

•MASKED EMOTIONS (D-TME): George O'Brien. Nora 
Lane. Farrell MacDonald. David Sharpe. Edward Pell, Sr., 
Frank Hagney. (L) Silent, 5389f. ; sound, 5419f. (B) May 
19, 1929. (NP) June 15. (L) 54191. 

•MASQUERADE (CD-AT): Alan Birmingham. LeUa Hyams, 
Clyde Cook. Farrell MacDonald. Arnold Lucy. George 
Pierce. Rita Le Roy, John Breeden, Jade Pierce, Pat 
Moriarity, Jack Carlisle. Frank Richardson. (N) July 27. 
(L) Talking. 5643f. (R) July 14. 

MEN WITHOUT WOMEN (CD-AT): Kenneth MacKenna, 
Frank Albertson, Paul Page, Walter McGrail, Warren Hy- 
mer, Farrell MacDonald, Stuart Erwln. George Le Guere. 
Ben Hendricks. Jr.. Harry Tenbrook. Warner Richmond. 
Roy Stewart. Charles Gerard, Pat Somerset. (R) Feb. 9. 

•NIX ON DAMES (D-AT): Mae Clarke, Robert Ames, Wil- 
liam Harrigan. Maude Fulton. George Macfarlane, Camille 
RoveUe. Grace Wallace. Hugh McCormack. Benny Hall. 
Gilly Colvin, Frederick Graham and Louise Beaver (NP) 
Dec, 7. (L) 5,988. (R) Nov. 24. 

•NOT QUITE DECENT (D-TME): June Collyer, Louise 
Dresser. Allan Lane. Oscar Apfel. Paul Nicholson. Marjorle 
Beebe, Ben Hewlett, Jack Kenney. (L) Talking, 4965f; 
silent, 4653f. (B) Mar. 24, 1929. (TOS) June 22. (NP) 
May 18. 1929. 

•ONE WOMAN IDEA, THE (D-ME): Rod La RocQue. 
Marceline Day. Sharon Lynn. Sally Phipps, Shirley Dorman. 
Ivan Lebedeff, Douglas Gilmore, Gino Corrado, Joseph W, 
Girard. Arnold Lucy, Frances Eosay. Guy Trento. Daniel 
Hasson. Tom Tamarez, Coy Watson. (L) Talking, 6111f; 
silent. 6106f. (B) June 2, 1929. (NP) June 22. 

•PLEASURE CRAZED (D-AT): Marguerite Churchill. Ken- 
neth Macenna, Dorothy Burgess, Campbell (Julian, Douglas 



Gilmore. Henry Kolker, Frederick Graham, Rex Bell. 
Charlotte Merriam. (E) July. 1929. (NP) July 20. (L) 
Talking, 5560f. 

•PROTECTION (Mel-ME): Dorothy Burgess, Robert Elliott, 
Paul Page, Ben Hewitt, Boy Stewart, Dorothy Ward. Wil- 
liam H. looker, Joe Brown, Arthur Hoyt, (R) May 12. 
(L) 5511f. 

•RILEY THE COP (CD-ME): J. Farrell MacDonald, Louise 
Fazenda, Nancy Drexel, David Rollins, Harry Schultz, Mil- 
dred Boyd, Ferdinand Schumann Heink, Tom Wilson, Del 
Henderson, Russell Powell, Otto H. Fries, Billy Bevan, 
Milie Donlin. 

•RIVER, THE (D-TME): Charles Farrell, Mary Duncan, 
Ivan Linow, Margaret Mann. Aldredo Sabato. (L) 7,704. 
(NP) July 20. (TOS) Nov. 23. (B) Oct. 0. 

ROMANCE OF THE RIO GRANDE (D AT): Warner Bax- 
ter. Antonio Moreno. Mary Duncan. Mona Maris, Robert 
Edeson, Agostino Borgato, Albert Roocardi. Mrs. Jiminez. 
Majel Coleman. Charles Byers, MerrU McCormick. (NP) 
Dec. 21. (TOS) Jan. 4. 

•SALUTE (D-AT): George O'Brien. William Janey. Frank 
Albertson. Helen Chandler, Joyce Compton, Clifford Demp- 
sey, Lumsden Hare, Stephin Fetdiit, David Butler, Bex 
Bell. John Breeden. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) Oct. 26. (L) 
8.500. (R) Sept. 1. 

•SONG OF KENTUCKY, A (D-AT): Lois Moran, Joe 
Wagstaff, Dorothy Burgess. Douglas Gilmore, Hedda Hop- 
per, Edward Davis. Herman Bing. Bert Woodruff. (IfP) 
November 9. (L) 7.125. (R) Nov. 10. 

'SPEAKEASY (CD-AT): Paul Page. Lola Lane. Henry B. 
Walthall. Helen Ware. Warren Hymer. Stuart Erwin, 
Sharon Lynn. ErviUe Alderson, James Guilfoyle, Helen 
Lynch, Marjorle Beebe, Sailor Vincent, Joseph Cawthome. 
Ivan Linow. (L) 5775f. (R) Mar. 24. 1929. (NP) Apr. 
6. 1929. (TOS) Apr. 27. 1929 

•SUNNY SIDE UP (D-AT): Janet Gaynor, Charles Far- 
reU, Sharon Lynn, Frank Biohardson, Bl Brendel, Mar- 
jorle White, Joe Brown, Mary Forbes, Alan Paull, Peter 
Gawthome. Length 11,131. (NP) Nov. 30. (R) Dec. 29. 

•THEY HAD TO SEE PARIS (CD-AT): WiU Rogers. Irene 
Rich, Marguerite Churchill. Fifl Dorsey. Owen Davis. Rex 
Bell. Ivan Lebedeff. Christiane Yves. Edgar Kennedy, 
MarceUe Corday. Marda Manon, Theodore Lodi, Bob Kerr, 
Andre Cheron. Gregory Gay. (NP) Sept. 21. (TOS) 
Dec. 7. 

•THREE SISTERS (D-AT): June Collyer, Tom Dresser, 
Louise Dresser, Kenneth MacKenna. Joyce Compton. Addle 
McPhail. Clifford Saum. Paul Porcasi, John Sainpolis 
and Sidney DeGrey. (NP) Nov. 30. 

•THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES (D-AT): Mary Duncan. 
Edmund Lowe, Warner Baxter. Earle Foxe. Donald Gal- 
lagher. Florence Lake, (R) Apr. 7, 1929. (L) 5166f. 
(NP) May 11. 1929. (TOS) June 8. 

♦TRENT'S LAST CASE (MT-TME) : Raymond Griffith. Ray- 
mond Hatton. Marceline Day, Donald Crisp, Lawrence 
Gray. Nicholas Soussanin. Anita Gravin. Ed Kennedy. 
(R) May 31. 1929. (L) SUent, 58O0f. ; sound. 5834f. 
(NP) May 18. 1929. 

♦VEILED WOMAN. THE (D-ME): Lia Tora. Paul Vlncentl. 
Walter McGraU. Josef Swickard, Kenneth Thompson. Andre 
Cheron. Ivan Lebedeff, Maude George. (L) Silent. 5185f. 
Sound. 5192f. (R) Apr. 14. 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 1929. 

♦WHITE FLAME, THE (D-AT): All-star cast. Forthcom- 
ing 1930 release. 

♦WORDS AND MUSIC (CD-AT): Lois Moran. David Percy. 
Helen Twelvetrees. William Orlamond. Elizabeth Patterson. 
Dtilse Morrison. Frank Albertson. Tom Patricola. Bubbles 
Crowell, BUtmore Quartet. (NP) Sept. 7. (TOS) Sept. 21. 
(L) 6,500. (R) July 21. 

General Pictures 

♦BACHELORS CLUB. THE (D) : Richard Talmadge, Barbara 
Worth. Edna Murphy. Edna EUsmere. V. Talbot Hender- 
son, Herbert Hayes, Barry Palmer. (L) 5600f. (NP) 
June 15. 

♦BACK FROM SHANGHAI (D) : Vera Reynolds, Sojin, 
Joseph W. Girard, Henry Sedley. (L) 5400f. (R) Mar. 15. 

♦HEROIC LOVER (D): Leonard St. Leo, Stuart Holmes, 
Barbara Bedford, Ted Snell, Hugh Metcalf, WUliam 
Franey. (B) Feb. 5. (L) 5500f. 

Gotham 

♦KNEE HIGH: Virginia Corbin. (B) October. 1929. 
♦MODERN SAPPHO. A (T) : Betty Bronson. (R) Septem- 
ber, 1929. 

♦RIVER WOMAN. THE (D-ME); JacotieUne Logan. Lionel 
Barrymore. CJharles Delaney. Harry Todd. Mary Doran. 
Sheldon Lewis. (L) 8 reels. (R) April. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 30. 1929. 

Edward L. Klein 

♦ADVENTURES OF MAYA: (L) Silent. 5400f. (R) Apr. 
28 1929 

♦PRESIDENT. THE (D): Ivan Mosjoukine. Suzy Vernon, 
Niltolai Malikoff, Heinrich Schroth. Luigi Servant!. (L) 
8100f. 

James Leong Prod. 

♦LOTUS BLOSSOM (Silent drama). TuUy MarshaU. Noah 
Beery. Anna May Wong. Lady Tsen Mell. Jack Abee. (L) 
5,800f. 

♦VENDORS OF WOMEN (M) : Edwin Carewe and aU-star 
cast. (L) 4,500f. 

Ernest Mattison 

♦IN DALARNA AND JERUSALEM (D) : Hanson and Veldt. 
(L) 14,000f. Forthcoming 1929 release. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

♦ALIAS JIMMY VALENTINE (Mel-TME) : William Haines. 
Lionel Barrymore, LeUa Hyams. Karl Dane. Tully Uar- 
shall. Howard Hickman. BUly Butt-s, Evelyn MiUs. (L) 
8.000f. (R) Jan. 26. 1929. (NP) Mar. 9. 1929. (TOS) 
Mar. 9 1929 

♦ANNA CHRISTIE (D-AT): Greta Garbo, Robert Ames 
and others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

•BELLAMY TRIAL. THE (D-AT): IjCatrlce Joy. Betty 
Bronson. (L) 7542f. (R) Mar. 2, 1929. (NP) Sept. J9. 
1928. (TOS) Apr. 13. 1929. 

•BROADWAY KIELODY. THE (MC) : Anita Page. Bessie 
Ijove. Charles Edng. Jed Prouty. Kenneth Thomson. Ed- 
ward Dillon, Mary Doran. Eddie Kane, J. Emmett Beck. 
Marshall Ruth, Drew Demarest. (R) Mar. 9. 1929. (L) 
Sound, 9372f. : silent, 5943f. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 20, 1929. 

•CHINA BOUND (CD): Karl Dane. George K. Arthur. Jose- 
phine Dunn, Polly Moran. Hatty Woods Carl Stockdale. 
(L) 6000f. (R) May 18, 1929. (NP) May 11. 1929. 

•DESERT RIDER, THE (W) : Tim McCoy, Raquel Torres, 
Bert Roach, Edward Connelly. Harry Woods. Jess Gavin. 
(B) Ma« 11. 1929. (L) 4943f. (NP) June 22. 

•DUKE STEPS OUT, THE (CD-ME): WiUiam Haines. 
Joan Crawford. Karl Dane, Tenen Holtz. Eddie Nugent. 
Jack Roper. Delmer Davis, Luke Cosgrove. Herbert Prior. 
(L) SUent-6210f. Sound-6206f. (B) Mar. 16, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 30. 1929. 

♦DYNAMITE (D-AT): Kay Johnson. Charles Bickford, Con- 
rad Nagel, Julia Fave. (TOS) January 4, 1930. 

♦GIRL IN THE SHOW, THE (CD-AT): Bessie Love, Ford 
Sterling. Raymond Hackett. (TOS) Aug. 31. 

•HALLELUJAH (D-AT): Nina Mae McKinney. WUlIam 
Fountaine. Daniel L. Haynes. Harry Gray. Fannie Bell 
De Knight. Everett McGarrity, Victoria Spivey. Milton 



Dickerson, Bobert Couch, Walter Talt, Dixie JubUee Sing- 
ers. (L) TaUting. 9650f. (NP) Nov. 30. 

HER OWN DESIRE (D-AT): Ncrma Shearer. Robert Mont- 
gomery. Lewis Stone. BeUe Bennett and Ernest Torrence. 
(TOS) January 4. 1930. 

•HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT (D-AT): John Gilbert. Katherine 
Dale Owen, Nance ©"Neil. Gustav von Seyffertitz. Hedda 
Hopper, TyreU Davis, Gerard Barry, Madeline Seymour, 
Richard Carle, Eva Deunison. Youcca Troubletzkoy. Peter 
Cawthome. (NP) October 19. (TOS) Oct. 26. 

HOLLYWOOD REVUE. THE (MC) : Bessie Love, Charles 
King, Marion Davies, Norma Shearer, WiUiam Haines, 
Gus Edwards, Joan Crawford, John Gilbert. Marie Dressier. 
Polly Moran. Broi Sisters. Anita Page, Buster Keaton, 
Albertina Ballet. (L) Talking, 11.699f. (TOS) Nov. 16. 

•IDLE RICH, THE (D-AT): Conrad Nagel, Bessie Love, 
LeUa Hyams, Robert Ober. James NelU. Edythe Chapman. 
PaiU Kruger, Kenneth Gibson. (L) 7351f. (B) June 16, 
1929. (NP) June T. (TOS) June 22 

•KISS, THE (D-ME): Greta Garbo. Conrad Nagd, Anders 
Bandolf. Holmes Herbert, Lew Ayres and George Davis. 
(NP) Nov. 30. (TOS) Dec. 21. 

•LAST OF MRS. CHEYNEY, THE (D-AT) Norma 
Shearer, BasU Bathbone. George Berraud. Herbert Bunston, 
Hedda Hopper. Moon Carrol, Madeline Seymour, Cyril 
Chadwick, George K. Arthur (In soimd print only). Finch 
SmUes, Maude Turner. (NP) July 20 (L) Talking, 
8651f. ; silent, 6484f. 

•MADAME X (D-AT): Lewis Stone. Ruth Chatterton. Eay- 
mond Hackett. Holmes Herbert. Eugenie Besserer, John P. 
Edington, Mitchell Lewis, Ulrich Haupt, Sidney Toler, 
Richard Carle, Claud King. ChappeU Dossett. (L) 8806f. 
(NP) June 29. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

•MAN'S MAN, A (CD-ME): William Haines. Josephine 
Dunn. Sam Hardy. Mae Busch. (L) 6683f. (B) May 25, 
1929. (NP) June 22. (TOS) June 22. 

•MARIANNE (CD-AT): Marion Davies. Oscar Shaw. Robert 
Castle. Scott Kolk, Emil Chautard. Mack Swain. Oscar 
Apfel. Robert Ames. Recorded on film and disc. (R) July 
20. 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. (TOS) Oct. 19. 

•MYSTERIOUS ISLAND, THE (D-TME): Lionel Barrymore, 
Jane Daly. Lloyd Hughes. Montagu Love. Harry Qrlbbon. 
Snltz Edwards. Gibson Gowland. Dolores BrInkmaZL (NP) 
Oct. 19. (TOS) Nov. 23. 

•OUR MODERN MAIDENS (D-TME): ,Toan Crawford, Bod 
La RocQue, Douglas Fairbanks. Jr.. Anita Page. Edward 
Nugent. Josephine Dtmn, Albert Gran. (NP) Sept. 14. 
(TOS) Nov. 9. 

•PAGAN, THE (D-ME): Ramon Novarro, Renee Adoree. 
Dorothy Janis, Donald Crisp. (L) SUent, 7150f; sound, 
7359f. (R) Apr. 27. 1929. (NP) May 15. 1929. 

•SINGLE STANDARD, THE (D): Greta Garbo, Nils Asther. 
John Mack Brown. Dorothy Sebastian. Lane Chandler, 
Robert Castle, Mahlon HamUton, Kathlyn WlUiams, Zef- 
fle Tidbury. (NP) Aug. 17. (L) 6569f. (TOS) Aug. 1. 

SO THIS IS COLLEGE (CD-AT): EUiott Nugent. Robert 
Montgomery. SaUy Starr, Cliff Edwards. (TOS) Dec. 14. 

•SPEEDWAY (CD-TME): WiUiam Haines. Anita Page. Ern- 
est Torrence. Polly Moran. Karl Dane. John MUjan. (TOS) 
Sept. 14. (NP) Sept. 14. 

♦SPIES (Mel): Rudolph-Klein- Rogge. Gerda Maunis. Lien 
Deyers. Louis Ralph. Craighall Sherry, Willy Fritsch. Lupn 
Pick. Fritz Rasp. (L) 7999f. (NP) June 15. 

•SPITE MARRIAGE (CD-ME): Buster Keaton. Dorothy Se- 
bastian. Edward Earle. LeUa Hyams, WiUiam Bechtel, 
John Byron. (L) 7047f. (R) Apr. 6. 1929. (NP) Apr. 
27 192& 

•SUNKISSED (D-AT): Vilma Bankv and others. 
TRADER HORN (D-AT): Edwina Booth. Harry Carey and 

others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 
•THIRTEENTH CHAIR, THE (Mel-AT) : Conrad NageL 

Leila Hyams. Margaret Wycherly. Helen MilUard. Holmes 

Herbert. Mary Forbes. Bela Lugosi. John Davidson. Charlu 

Quartermalne, Moon Carrol. (NP) Nov. 9. 
•THUNDER (D-ME): Lon Chaney. James Murray. Phyllis 

Haver. George Duryea, Francis Morris, WaUy Albright. 

(L) 7783f. (R) June 25. 1929. (NP) Aug. 3. (TOS) 

Aug. 17 

♦TIDE OF EMPIRE (D-ME): Renee Adoree and Duryea, 
(L) 6552f. (R) Mar. 23. 1929. 

♦TRIAL OF MARY DUGAN (D AT): Norma Shearer. Lewi! 
Stone. H. B. Warner, Raymond Hackett. LUyan Tashman, 
Olive TeU. Adrienne D'Ambricourt. Mary Doran, Dewltt 
Jennings, Wilfrid North, Landers Stevens. Charles Moore, 
Claud AUIster. (NP) May 25. (L) lO.OOOf. (R) June 8. 
(TOS) July 13. 

♦TRAIL OF '98, THE (D-ME): Dolores Del Rio. Ralph 
Forbes, Harry Carey, Tully MarshaU. Emily Fltzroy, Tenen 
Holtz, Russell Simpson. Karl Dane. Cesare Gravina. George 
Cooper. John Down. E. Alyn Warner. (L) 8799f. (B) 
Jan. 5. 1929. (NP) Dec. 29, 1928. (TOS) Mar. 28, 
1929. 

•UNTAMED (D-AT): Joan Crawford. Robert Montgomery, 
Ernest Torrence. Holmes Herbert. John MUjan. Gwen Lee, 
Edward Nugent, Don Terry. Gertrude Astor, MUton Famey, 
Lloyd Ingram. Grace Cimard. Tom O'Brien and Wilson 
Benge. (NP) Nov. 23. (TOS) Dec. 14. 

•VIKING. THE (D-ME): Donald Crisp. Pauline Starke. 
LeRoy Mason. Anders Randolph. Richard Alexander, Harry 
Lewis Woods. Albert MaoQuarrle. Boy Stewart. Torben 
Meyer, Claire MacDowell. JiUIa Swayne Gordon. (L) 
8186f. (NP) Mar. 9, 1929. All in technicolor. (TOS) 
Oct. 26. 

•VOICE OF THE CITY. THE (D AT): Bobert Ames, WU- 
lard Mack, Sylvia Field, James Farley, John MUjan, 
Clark MarshaU, Duane Thompson. Tom McGulre. Alice 
Moe. Beatrice Banyard. (L) Sound. 7427f. (B) Apr. IS, 
1929. (NP) Apr. 27. 1929. (TOS) May 18. 

•WHERE EAST IS EAST (D-TME): Lon Chaney, Lupe 
Velez. EsteUe Taylor, Lloyd Hughes. Louis Stem, Mrs. 
Wong Wing. (L) 6500f. (B) May 4. 1929. (NP) June 
22. (TOS) June 15. 

•WILD ORCHIDS (D-ME): Greta Garbo, Lewis Stone, Mis 
Asther. (L) 9235f. (B) Feb. 23. 1929. (NP) Mar. 2. 
1929. (TOS) Feb. 23. 1929. 

♦WISE GIRLS (D-AT): Elliott Nugent, Norma Lee. Roland 
Young. J. C. Nugent, Clara Blandick. Marion Shilling, 
Leora SpeUman. James Dolan. (NP) October 12. 

•WONDER OF WOMEN (D-TME): Lewis Stone, LeUa 
Hyams. Peggy Wood. Harry Myers. Sarah Padden, George 
Fawcett. Blanche Frederici. Wally Albright, Jr.. Camen- 
clta Johnson. Anita Louise Fremault. Dietrich Haupt, Dll- 
rio Haupt, Jr. . (L) Talking, 8796f; silent. 6835f. (K) 
July 31, 1929. (NP) July 27. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

Paramount 

•APPLAUSE (D-AT): Helen Morgan, Joan Peters, FuUer 
Mellisa. Jr.. .Tade Camerson. Henry Wadsworth. Dorothy 
Cuming. (NP) October 19. (B) Jan. 4. 1930. (L) 
Sound, 8,07P. Silent, 6,896. 

•BATTLE OF PARIS (D-AT): Gertrude Lawrence, Charles 
Buggies, Walter Petrie, Gladys Du Bois, Arthur Treadier 
and Joe King. (NP) Nov. IS. (R) Nov. 30, 1929. 

♦BEHIND THE MAKE-UP: (D-AT): Hal SkeUy, Wmiam 
Powell, Fay Wray, Kay F.'ancis. E. H. Calvert, Paul 
Lukas and Agostino Borganto. (NP) Jan. 4. 193(). 

•BETRAYAL (D-ME): Emil Jannings. Gary Cooper. Esther 
Ralston. .Tada Weller, Douglas Halg, Bodll Rosing. (L) 
Silent. 6492f; sound. 6641f. (B) May 11. 1929. (NP) 
Apr. 27. 1929. (TOS) June 1. 

BURNING UP (D AT): Bichard Arlen, Mary Brian, Fran- 
cis McDonald, Sam Hardy. Charles Sellon and Tully Mar- 
.shaU. (NP) Dec. 21. 

♦CHARMING SINNERS (D-TME): Ruth Chatterton. CUre 
Brook. Mary Nolan. WiUiam Powell, Laura Hope Crews, 
Florence Eldridge, Montagu Love. JiUiette Crosby. Lorraine 



January II, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



55 



Eddy. Claude AJllster. (L) 6164r. (R) July 6, 1939. 
[Nf) AUB. lU. (TUS) Aug. 3. 

•CHINATOWN NIGHTS (U-AT) : Wallace Beery. Florence 
Vldor. Warner Olaud. Jaoli McHugh. Jack Oalde. Tet3U 
Komal, yranit Cbew. Mrs. Wing. Peter Morrison, Freeman 
Wood. (Ii) SUent. 7145r; sound. 7U81f. (K) Mar. 23. 
luay. (1>(P) Mar. II. VJ-M. (TOS) Apr. 6. 1S29. 

•CLOSE HARMONY (CD-AT) : Charles Kogers. Nancy Car- 
roll, Harry Ureen. Jack Uakle. Ulcliard (tjkeets) Qallagner, 
Matty Itoubert. lilcca Allen. Wade Boieler, Baby Mack, 
Oscar Sjmltii, Greta Urandstedt. Qua Partos. (L) Sound. 
BMlf. (It) Apr. 13, laaa. (MP) Mar. 30. 1929. (TOS) 
Apr. 13. l»2a. 

COCOANUTS. THE (C-AT) : Four Marx Brothers. Mary 
£aton. Oscar Sbaw, Katlierlne, Francis, Margaret Uumont, 
Cyril King. Basil Kuisdaoi. Sylvan tiee. Gauiby-Hale Girls. 
Allan K. Foster Girls. (L) 8bl3t. (K) May 23, 1929. 
(MP) July 13. (TOS) July 2U. 

•DANCE OF LIFE, THE (DAT): Nancy Carroll. Hal 
Skeily. Dorothy Hevler. lialph Theador. Charles D. Brown, 
Al St. John. May Boley. Oscar iievant. Gladys DuBols, 
James T. Clulim. James Farley. George Irrlng. (L) Talk- 
ing. 10,(>19r; (K) Sept. 14. Silent. 7488f. (TOS) Sept. 21. 

'DANGEROUS CURVES (D-AT) : Clara Bow. Richard Ar- 
len. Kay Irancls. David NeweU. Anders Itandolpb. May 
Boley. T. uoy Barnes, Joyce Compton. Charles D. Brown, 
Stuart Erwln. Jack liude. (H) July 13, 1929. (MP) 
Aug. 3. (L) Talking. 72781; silent. 6539f. (TOS) July 20. 

•DANGEROUS WOMAN. A (D-AT): Baclanova. Clive Brook. 
Nell Hamilton. Clyde Cook, Leslie Fenton, Snliz Bdwards. 
(li) Sound, (i643f. (It) May 18, 1929. (MP) Mar. 18, 
1929. (TOS) May 18. 

DARKENED ROOMS (M-TME) : Evelyn Brent. Nell Ham- 
ilton. Doris HIU. David MeweU. Gale Henry. WaUace Mo- 
Donald. Blanche Craig, E. H. Calvert. Sammy Brlcker. 
(NP) October 10. (R) Nov. 23, 1929. (L) Sound 6.066, 

•DIVORCE MADE EASY (CD-AT): Douglas MacLean. 
Marie Prevost. Johnay Arthur. Frances l,ee. Dot Farley. 
Jack Duffy, Buddy Watles, Hal WUson. (U) July 6, 
1929. (NP) July 13. (L) Talking, 5386f; silent. 6270f. 
(TOS) July 6. 

•DOCTOR'S SECRET, THE (D-AT): Ruth Cliatterton. H. B. 
Warner, John Loder, Robert Edeson, Wilfred Noy, Ethel 
Wales, Nancy Price. Frank Finch-Smiles. (L) Sound, 
5823f. (N) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Feb. 16, 1929. 

•DUMMY, THE (D-AT): Ruth Chattertou. Frederic March, 
John Cromwell. Fred Kohler, Mickey Bennett, Vondell 
Darr, Jack Oaile. Zasu Pitts. Richard Tucker, Eugene 
Paliette. (L) Sound. 5357f. (R) Mar. 9. 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) Mar. 6. 1929. 

•FASHIONS IN LOVE (D-AT): Adolphe Menjou. Fay 
Compton. Miriam Seegar. John MiUan. Joan Standing, 
Robert Wyne, Uuss Powell, Billie Bennett, Jacques Van- 
aire (L) Talking, 6325f; silent. 6024f. (R) June 29. 
1929. (NP) July 13. (TOS) July 6. 

•FAST COMPANY (CD-AT): Jack Oaltle. Skeets GaUagher. 
Evelyn Brent. Owen Lee. (TOS) Sept. 7. (R) Sept. 14. 
(L) Sound. 6,863: silent. 6.459. 

•FLESH OF EVE (D-TME) : Nancy Carroll. Richard Warner 
Gland, Gustav von Seyflertitz, Francis MacDonald. George 
Kotsonaros. Dorothea Wolbert, Clarence H. Wilson, Evelyn 
Selbie, WUlie Fung, Wong Wing and LilUan Worth. 
(NP) Nov. 30. 

•FOUR FEATHERS (D-ME) : Richard Arlen, Fay Wray. 
William Powell, Clive Brook, Theodore von Eltz, Noah 
Beery, Zaok Williams. Noble Johnson, Harold Hightower. 
Phillipe de Lacey, Edward Ratcifle, George Fawcett, Au- 
gustine Symonds. (L) Sound, 7472f; silent, 7472f. (TOS) 
Sept. 14. 

•GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS (D-AT): Walter Huston. 
Katherine Francis. Charles lluggles, Betty Lawford, Nor- 
man Foster. Duncan Perwarden, Lawrence Leslie. (L) 
Sound. 717Bf. (R) May 4. 1929. (NP) Apr. 13. 1029. 

•GLORIFYING THE AMERICAN GIRL (D-AT): Mary 
Eaton. Edward Crandall, OUve Shea. Dan Healy, Kaye 
Renard. Sarah Edwards. In revue scenes. Eddie Cantor, 
Helen Morgan and Rudy Vallee. (NP) Deo. 7. (R) Dec. 
7. 1929. (L) Sound, 8,071; silent, 6,786. 

•GREENE MURDER CASE. THE (My-AT) : WUliam Powell, 
Florence Eldridge. Dlrich Haupt, Jean Arthur, Eugene 
Paliett, K H. Calvert. Gertrude Norman. Lowell Drew, 
Morgan Farley. Brandon Hurst. Augusta Burmester, Marcln 
Hariss, Mildred Golden, Mrs, Wilfred Buckland, Helena 
PhlUps. Shep Camp. Charles E. Evans. (NP) July 20. 
1929. (L) Talking. 6383f. (TOS) Aug. 17. 

•HALF WAY TO HEAVEN (D-AT): Charles 'Buddy" 
Rogers, Jean Arthur, Paul Lucas. Helen Ware. Oscar 
Apfel, Edna West, Irvin Bacon, Al Hill, Lucille Williams. 
Richard French, Freddy Anderson, Nestor. Aber. Ford 
West and Guy Oliver. (L) Sound 6254. Silent 5179. (NP) 
Dec. 7. (TOS) Dec. 14. 

•HOLE IN THE WALL, THE (My-AT): Claudette Colbert, 
Edward Q. Robinson, David Newell, Nelly Savage. Donald 
Meek, Alan Brooks, Louise Closser Hale. Katherine Em- 
met, Marcia Kasno, Barry MacoUum, George McQuarrie, 
Helen Crane. (L) Sound, 5850f. (E) Apr. 27. 1929. 
(NP) Apr. 6. 1929. 

•HOMECOMING (D) : Lars Hansen. Dita Parlo, Gustav 
FrohUch. (L) 8156f. (E) Feb. 16, 1929. (NP) Feb. 
9 1929 

•HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY (D-TME): A Ufa picture. Lil 
Dagover, Willy Fritsch. Dita Parlo. Fritz Greiner, Gisella 
Bathory. Erich Kaiser Tietz, Leopold Kramer. (NP) 
Aug. 3. (L) 6165f. (R) Aug. 3, 1929. 

•ILLUSION (D-AT): Buddy Rogers, Nancy Carroll. June 
Collyer, Knute Erickson. Eugenie Bresserer. Kay Francis, 
Maude Turner Gordon. Regis Toomey, William McLaughlin, 
Katherine Wallace, William Austin. Frances Raymond, 
Eddie Kane, Michael Visaroff. Bessie Lyle, Emelie Melville. 
Carl Lukas. Col. G. L. McDonnel. (L) 7536f; sUent, 
7538f. (NP) .Tuly 27. (TOS) Sept. 28. 

•INNOCENTS OF PARIS (D-AT): Maurice Chevalier, Sylvia 
Beecher, Russell Simpson, George Fawcett. Mrs. George 
Fawcett, John Miljan, Margaret Livingston. David Durand. 
.Tohnny Morris. (L) Silent. 7816f; sound. 6148f. (E) 
May 25. 1929. (NP) May 4, 1929. (TOS) June 15. 

•INTERFERENCE (D-AT): WiUiam Powell, Evelyn Brent. 
Clive Brook, Doris Kenyon, Tom Eickets, Brandon Hurst, 
Louis Payne, Wilford Noy, Donald Stuart, Eaymond Law- 
rence. (L) Silent, 6643f; sound. 7487f. (R) Jan. 5, 1929. 
(NP) Mar. 16. 1929. (TOS) Feb. 9. 1929. 

JEALOUSY (D-AT): Jeanne Bagels, Frederic March, Halli- 
well Hobbes, Blanche Le Clair. Henry Daniell, Hilda 
Moore. (NP) Sept. 28. (TOS) Oct. 19. 

•KIBITZER (CD-AT): Harry Green. Mary Brian. Neil 
Hamilton. David Newell, Lee Kohlmar. Henry Fink, Tenen 
Holtz, Guy Oliver, Albert Gran. Eddie Kane. (NP) 
Aug. 17. (R) Jan. 11. 1930. (L) South 7273. Silent 
6569. 

LADY LIES. THE (CD-AT): Walter Huston. Claudet Col- 
bert, Charles Ruggles. Betty Gorde. Tom Brown. Patricia 
Deering, (TOS) October 12. (E) Sept, 21. (L) 7004. 

•LAUGHING LADY, THE (D-AT): Euth Chatterton, Clive 
Brook, Dan Healy, Nat Pendleton, Eaymond Walbum, 
Dorothy Hall, Hedda Harrlgan, Lillian B. Tonge, Margaret 
St. John. Hubert Druce, Alice Hegeman. Joe King. Helen 
Hawlev. Betty Bartley. (R) Dec. 28, (L) Sound 7.371. 

•LETTER, THE (D-AT): Jeanne Eagels, O. P. Heggle. 
Reginald Owen, Herbert Marshall, Irene Brown, Lady 
Tsen Mel. Tamakl Toshiwara. (L) Silent. 649nf; sound. 
5778f. (E) Apr. 13, 1929. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. (TOS) 
May 18. 

•LOOPING THE LOOP (D-ME): Werner Kraus, .Tenny Juso. 

Warwick Ward. Gina Manes. (L) Silent. 667fif: sound. 

676nf. (E) Mar. 16. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16. 1929, 
•LOVE DOCTOR (CD-AT); Richard Dix, ,Tune Collyer, 

Morgan Farley, Miriam Seegar, Winifred Harris. Law- 



ford Davidson, Gale Henry. (NP) September 28. (TOS) 

Oct. li). lit) Out. 5, (L) Sound 5,5U3, Silent 5,378. 
•LOVE PARADE. THE (CU-AT) : Maurice Chevalier, 
Jeanette MacDonald, Lupino Lane, Lillian Roth, Edgar 
Norton, Lionel Belmore, Robert Itoccardl, Carleton Stock- 
dale, Hugeue Paliette, Russell Powell, Margaret Fealy, 
Virginia Bruce. (NP) Aug. 3. (K) Jan. 18, 1030. (L) 
Sound, 10.022. 

•MAN I LOVE, THE (D-AT): Richard Arlen, Mary Brian, 
Baclanova, Harry Green, Jack Oakle, Pat O'Malley, Leslie 
Fenton, Charles Sullivan, William Vincent. (11) May 25, 
1929. (L) 6669f; silent. 65241. (NP) Apr. B, 192». 
(TOS) May 26. 

•MARQUIS PREFERRED (D) : Adolph Menjou, Nora Lane. 
Chester Conklln, Dot Farley, Mlscha Auer, Alex Melesn, 
Michael Vlsaroll. (L) B50Bf. (E) Feb. 2, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16. 1929. 

•MARRIAGE PLAYGROUND. THE (CD-AT): Mary Brian. 
Frederic March, Lllyan Tashman, Huntley Gordon, Kaj 
Francis, William Austin, Seena Owen, Philippe de Lacy, 
Anita Louise, Little Mltzl. BUly Sey, Ruby Parsley, 
Donald Smith, Jocelyn Lee, Maude Turner Gordon, David 
Newell. (R) Dec. 21. (L) Sound. 7182. SUent, 6610. 
(MP) Nov. 16. (TOS) Dec, 21. 

•MEN ARE LIKE THAT (CD-AT): Hal Skelly. Doris 
Hill, Charles SeUon. Clara Blandlck, Morgan Farley, 
Helene Chadwlck, William Davidson, Eugene Paliette and 
George Fawcett. (NP) Nov. 23. (R) Feb. 15. 1930. 

♦MIGHTY, THE (D-AT): George Bancroft. Esther Ralston. 
Warner Oland, Eaymond Hatton, Dorothy Eevler, Morgan 
Farley, O. P. Heggle, Charles Sellon. E. H. Calvert, John 

Cromwell. (R) Nov. 16. (L) Sound 6802. Silent 6097. 
(MP) Nov. 9. (TOS) Nov. 23. 

•MYSTERIOUS DR. FU MANCHU, THE (My-AT); Warner 
Oland, Jean Arthur, NeU Hamilton, O. P. Heggle, William 
Austin, Claude King, Charles Stevenson, Noble Johnson, 
Evelyn Selbie, Charles Blblyn, Donald Mackenzie, Lawford 
Davidson, Lask Winter, Charles Stevens. Chapoel Dosset, 
Tully MarshaU. (NP) July 27. (L) Talking, 7663f. 
(TOS) July 20. 

•NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH (CD-AT): Richard Dix, 
Berton Churchill, Louis John Bartels, Ned Sparks, Wynne 
Churchill, Helen Kane, Dorothy Uall, Madeline Gray, 
Nancy Ryon. (L) Sound. 7256f. (E) Apr. 20, 1929. 
(NP) Apr. 20, 1929. (TOS) Apr. 27, 1929. 

POINTED HEELS (D-AT): WilUam Powell. Fay Wray. 
Helen Kane. Richard "Skeets" Gallagher, Phillips Holmes, 
Adrienne Dore. Eugene Paliette. (E) Dec. 21. (L) 
Sound 5089. (NP) Nov. 16, 

•RAINBOW MAN, THE (D-AT): A Sono-Art picture. 
Eddie Dowling. Marian Nixon, Frankie Darro, Sam Hardy, 
Lloyd Ingraham. George Hayes. (L) Talking, 8500f. (E) 
May 18, 1929. (NP) June 22. (TOS) June 22. 

•REDSKIN (D-ME): Richard Dix, Gladys Belmont, Jane 
Novak. Larry Steers, TuUy Marshall, Bernard Suegel, 
George Eigas, Augustlna Lopez, Noble Johnson, Joseph W. 
Girard, Jack Dunne. Andrew J. Callahan, PhUip Ander- 
son, Loraine Rivero, George Walter. (L) SUent. 7204fJ 
sound. 7642f. (E) Feb. 23, 1929. (NP) Feb. 16, 1929. 
(TOS) Feb. 2, 1929. 

•RETURN OF SHERLOCK HOLMES, THE (D-AT): Clive 
Brook, H, Eeeves Smith. Betty Lawford. Charles Hay, 
Phillips Holmes. Donald Crisp, Harry T. Morey, Hulbert 
Bruce and Arthur Mack. Talking footage. 7.102. Silent, 
0378. (E) Oct. 26. 1929. (TOS) Nov, 16. (NP) Nov. 23. 

•RIVER OF ROMANCE, THE (CD-AT): Charles (Buudy) 
Eogers, Mary Brian, Jime Collyer, Henry B. WalthaU, 
Wallace Beery, Fred Kohler. Natalie Kingston, Mrs. George 
Fawcett, Anderson Lawler. George Eeed. (L) Talking, 
7009f; sUent, 7028f. (E) July 20, 1929. (NP) June 29, 
(TOS) Aug. 3. 

•SATURDAY NIGHT KID, THE (D-AT): Clara Bow, 
James HaU, Jean Arthur, Charles SeUon, Ethel Wales, 
Frank Ross, Edna May Oliver, Heymen Meyer, Eddie 
Dun, Leone Lane, Jean Harlow. (R) Oct. 26. (L) Sound 
6015. (Silent) 6392. (NP) Sept. 28. (TOS) Nov. 2. 

•SEVEN DAYS LEAVE (D-AT): Gary Cooper. Beryl Mer- 
cer. Dalsey Belmore. Nora CecU. Temple Pigett, Arthur 
Hoyt. Arthur Metcalfe. (NP) November 16 under title 
of "Medals." (E) January 25. 1930. (L) Sound 7,656. 
Silent. 7.656. 

•STAIRS OF SAND (D-TME); Wallace Beery, Jean Arthur. 
PhiUips E. Holmes, Fred Kohler, Chester Conklin. Guy 
Oliver. Lillian Worth, Prank Rice. Clarence L. Sherwood. 
(L) 4900f. (R) June 8. 1929. (NP) May 18. 1929. 

•STUDIO MURDER CASE, THE (My-AT): NeU Haml'.'on, 
Warner Oland, Frederio March. Florence Eldridge, Doris 
Hill, Eugene Paliette, Chester Conklin, Lane Chandler. 
Gardner James, Guy Oliver. E. H. Calvert. Donald Macken- 
zie. (L) Talking. 6500f; silent, 6070f. (E) June 1, 1929. 
(NP) .Tune 8. (TOS) June 22. 

•SUNSET PASS (W); .Tack Holt. Nora Lane. John Loder. 
Christian J. Frank. Pee Wee Holmes, Chester Conklin. 
Pat Harmon, Alfred Allen. Guy Oliver. (L) 5862f. (E) 
Feb. 9, 1929. (NP) Feb. 23. 1929. 

•SWEETIE (CD-AT): Nancy Carroll. Stanley Smith. Helen 
Kane, Joseph Depew. Jack OaWe. William Austin, Stuart 
Erwin, Wallace MacDonald. Aileen Manning. (R) Nov. 2. 
(L) Sound. 8859. SUent, 6303. (NP) Aug. 17. (TOS) 
Dec 7. 

•THUNDERBOLT (D-AT): George Bancroft. Richard Arlen. 
Fay Wray. TuUy Marshall. Eugenie Besserer, James Spotts- 
wood. Fred Kohler. Mike Donlin, S. S. R. S. Stewart, 
George Irving, William Thorne, E. H. Calvert, King Tut. 
(L) Talking, 8571f; sUent, 7311f. (E) June 22, 1929. 
(NP) June 1. (TOS) Aug. 3. „ „ 

•VIRGINIAN. THE (D-AT): Gary Cooper. Walter Huston. 
Eichard Arlen. Mary Brian. Chester Conklin. Eugene Pal- 
iette, E. H. Calvert. Helen Ware, Victor Potel, Tex Young, 
Charies Stevens. (L) 8717f. (NP) July 20. (H) Nov. 
9 1929 

•STREET OF CHANCE (D-AT): William Powell, Jean 
Arthur. Kay Francis. Regis Toomey. Stanley Fields. 
Brooks Benedict, Betty Francisco. John Risso, Joan Stand- 
ing, Maurice Black and Irving Bacon. Directed by John 
Cromwell. (NP) Jan. 4. 1930. _ , 

•WELCOME DANGER (C-AT): Harold Lloyd. Barbara 
Kent. Noah Young, Charles Middleton, WUllam WaUlng. 
(NP) November 9. _ 

•WHEEL OF LIFE. THE (D-AT): Richard Dix. Esther 
Ralston, O. P. Heggle. Arthur Hoyt. Myrtle Stedman. 
Larry Steers, Eegls Toomey, Nigel de Bnilier. (L) 6163f: 
silent. 5305f. (E) June 22, 1929. (NP) Apr. 27, 1929. 
(TOS) July 6. , ^ ,. 

WHY BRING THAT UP (CD-AT): Moran and Mack, 
Evelyn Brent. Harry Green, Bert Swor, Freeman S. Wood. 
Lawrence Leslie, Helene Lynch. Selmer Jackson, Jack 
Luden. Monte Collins. .Jr., George Thompson, Eddie Kane. 
Charies Hall. (L) 7882f. (NP) October 19. (TOS) Nov. 2. 

•WILD PARTY, THE (CD-AT): Clara Bow, Frederic March. 
Marcellne Day, Shirley O'Hara, Jack Luden. Jack OaMe. 
Arthur Eankin, Lincoln Stedman, Joyce Compton. Ben 
Hendricks. Jr.. Jack Redmond. Adrienne Dore, Jean Lor- 
raine. Virginia Thomas. Kay Bryant. Alice Adair. Amo 
Ingram. Eenee Whitney. Marguerite Cramer. (L) Silent. 
6036f; sound. 7167f. (E) Apr. 6, 1929. (NP) Mar. 23. 
1929. (TOS) Apr. 13. 1929. 

•WOLF OF WALL STREET, THE (D-AT): George Ban- 
croft, Baclanova, Paul Lukas, Nancy Carroll, Lane Chand- 
ler, Brandon Hurst, Paul Guertsman. Craufurd Kent. (L) 
Silent. 6396f; sound. 6810f. (E) Feb. 9, 1929. (NP) Mar. 
9. 1929. (TOS) Mar. 16, 1929. 

•WOLF SONG (D-TME): Lupe Velez. Gary Cooper, Louis 
Wolheim. Constantine Romanoff, Michael Vavltch. Eussell 
Colombo. Augustine Lopez, George Elgas. (L) Silent. 
6060f; sound, 6769f. (E) Mar. 30, 1929. (NP) Mar. 9, 



1929. (TOS) Apr. 6. 1929. 
•WOMAN TRAP (Mcl-AT); Hal Skelly, Evelyn Brent. 
Chester Morris, LesUe Fenton, Effle Ellsler. WUllam B. 
Davidson, Guy Oliver. Charles Glblyn, Wilson HurameU. 
(L) 6168f: silent. 0384r. (NP) July 20. (TOS) Sept. 28. 



Parthenon 



"WILD HEART OF AFRICA, THE (Animal Picture): (NP) 
June 2'^. 



Pathe 



•AWFUL TRUTH, THE (O-AT) : Ina Claire. (L) 0129f. 

(R) Aug. 10. 1929. (TOS) Sept. 7. (TOS) Oct. 19. 
•BACHELOR'S SECRET, A (CD-AT): AUan Hale. (E) 

Juilu 21. 1030. 

•BIG NEWS (My-AT): Eobert Armstrong. Carol Lombard, 
Tom Kennedy. Warner Richmond, Wade Boteler, Sam 
Hardy. Charles SeUon. Robert Dudley. (L) Talldng, 6028f. 
Kecorded on lUm and disc. (E) Sept. 7, 1929. (NP) 
Sept. 7. 

•BIG SHOT, THE (D-AT): (E) Feb. 8, 1930. 

•CAPTAIN SWAGGER (D-ME): Rod La ItocQUe, Sue Carol, 

Richard Tucker, Victor Potel, Dlrich Haupt. (L) 6312f. 

(E) Oct. 14. 1928. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 
"CLOTHES (D-AT): Constance Bennett. (E) May 3. 1930. 
•CRASHING THROUGH (D-AT): William Boyd. (R) June 

7, 1930. 

•DEVIL'S TWIN (W): Leo Maloney. 

•FLYING FOOL, THE (D AT) : WilUam Boyd, Marie Pre- 
vost, Tom O'Brien, EusseU Gleason. (L) Talking, 6746f; 
sUent, 6700f. (NP) July 27. 

".45 CALIBRE WAR (W) : Don Coleman. Ben Corbett, Al 
Hart, Edward Jones, Duke E. Lee, Floyd Ames, Jeanette 
Lotr, Murdock Macijuarrie, Orin Jackson. (R) Feb. 17, 
1929. (L) 4790f. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 

•GERALDINE (CD-TME) : Eddie QuiUan, Marian Nixon. 
Albert Gran, Gaston Glass. (L) 5587f. (R) Jan. 20, 1929. 
(NP) May 26. 1929. 

♦GODLESS GIRL, THE (D-TME): Lina BasQuette. Marie 
Prevost. George Duryea, Noah Beery, Eddie QuIUan, Mary 
Jane Irving, Julia Faye, Viola Louie, Emily Barrye, Clar- 
ence Bin-ton, Dick Alexander, Kate Price, Hedwig Eelchei. 
(L) TaUting. 9328f; sUent, 9019f. (E) Mar. 31, 1929. 
(NP) June 1. 

•GRAND PARADE, THE (MC) : (R) Feb. 2. 1930. 

•GREENWICH VILLAGE FOLLIES (MC) : (R) Feb. 22. 1930. 

♦HAWK OF THE HILLS (W): Ailene Ray. Robert Chandler, 
Jack Ganshorn, Frank Lackteen, Paul Panzer, Wally Oct- 
tel, Harry Semels, Walter MUler, Jack Pratt, Parky Jones, 
Frederick Dana, John T. Prince, Chief White Horse. 
George MagriU, Evangeline Russell. Chief Yowlache. (L) 
4840f. (R) Mar. 17, 1929. (NP) Mar. SO. 1929. 

♦HER PRIVATE AFFAIR (D AT): Ann Harding, Harry 
Bannister. Oct. 5, 1929. (NP) Oct. 6. (TOS) Nov. 9. 

♦HIGH VOLTAGE (D-AT): William Boyd, Owen Moore. 
Carol Lombard, Diane Ellis, BiUy Bevan, Phillips SmaUey, 
(L) 5743f, (NP) June 29. 

•HIS FIRST COMMAND (D-AT): WUliam Boyd. (R) Jan. 
19 1930 

•HOT AND BOTHERED (CD-AT): Eddie UuiUan. (R) 
June 28. 1930. 

♦KING OF KINGS (D-ME): H. B. Warner, Jacqueline 
Logan, Dorothy Cummings, Ernest Torrence, Joseph SchUd- 
kraut, Robert Edeson, Sidney D'Albrook, Rudolph Schlld- 
kraut, Sam DeGrasse, Victor Varconi, William Boyd. Matt 
Moore. Julia Faye, Kenneth Thomson, Alan Brooks, (L) 
13.500f. (R) Sept. 30, 1928. (TOS) Mar. 10. 1028. 

♦LEATHERNECK, THE (D-TME): WiUiam Boyd. Alan 
Hale. Eobert Armstrong. Fred Kohler. Diane ElUs, James 
Aldlne, PaiU Wiegel, Jules Cowlea, Wade Boteler, PbUo 
McCullough, Joe Girard, MitcheU Lewis. (L) 6898f. (E) 
Feb. 24. 1929. (NP) Apr. 20, 1929. (TOS) June 1. 

•LUCKY IN LOVE (D-AT): Morton Downey. Betty Daw- 
ford, Colin Keith-Johnson. HaUlweU Hobbs. J. M. Kerri- 
gan. Eichard Tabor. Edward O'Cormor. Mary Murray, 
Mackenzie Ward, Louis Sorln. Sonia Karlov. TyrreU Darts, 
Elizabeth Murray. (L) 6870f. (E) Aug. 17. 1929. (NP) 
July 27. 

•MARKED MONEY (D) : Coghlan. (L) 5506f. (R) Nov. 
4. 1028. 

♦MANMADE WOMEN (D) : Leatrice Joy. (L) 5762f. (R) 
Sept. 9. 1028. 

♦MOTHER'S BOY (D-AT): Morton Downey. Beryl Mer- 
cer, John T. Doyle. Brian Donlevy. Helen Chandler, Osgood 
Perkins, Lorin Eaker, Barbara Bennett, Jeimie Moskowiti, 
Jacob Prank, Louis Sorin, Eobert Glecker, TyrreU Davis, 
Allan Vincent. LesUe Stowe. (L) 7423f. (NP) Apr. 6, 
1929 

♦NEGLIGEE (D-AT): Ina Claire. (R) March 15. 1930. 

♦NOISY NEIGHBORS (CD-TME); Eddie QuiUan, Alberta 
Vaughn, QuiUan FamUy. Theodore Roberts. Ray HaUor, 
RusseU Simpson, Eobert Perty, Mike Donlin, BiUy GU- 
bert. (L) 5737f. (R) Jan. 27. 1929. (NP) Mar. 16, 1929. 

OFFICER O'BRIEN (D-AT): WiUiam Boyd. (E) Feb. 
23 1030 

♦OFFICE SCANDAL (D-TME): PhyUis Haver. Leslie Fen- 
ton. Eaymond Hatton, Margaret Livingston, Jimmy Adams. 
Jimmy Aldine. (L) 6511f. (E) Mar. 3, 1929. (NP) 
May 25. 1929. (TOS) July 27. 

♦OH, YEAH (D-AT): Eobert Armstrong, James Gleason. 
Zasu Pitts. Patricia Caron. (E) Oct. 19. 1929. (NP) 
Oct. 19. (TOS) Oct. 26. 

♦PARIS BOUND (D-AT): Ann Harding. Frederio March, 
George Irving. Leslie Fenton, Hallam Cooley. JtUlette 
(brosby. Charlotte Walker. Carmelita Geraghty. Ilka Cbuse. 
(L) Talking. 6684f. (R) Aug. 3, 1929. (NP) July 20. 
(TOS) Aug. 10. 

♦PLAY BOY (CD-AT): Eddie Qui'lan. (E) June 14. 1930. 

♦PAINTED DESERT (D-AT): WiUiam Boyd. (E) April 
26. 1930. 

♦PARACHUTE (D-AT): Robert Armstrong, Carol Lombard. 

(R) .Tilly 10, 1930. 
•RACKETEER (D-AT): Eobert Armstrong. Carol Lombard. 

Roland Drew. Jeanette Loff, John Loder, Paul Hurst. (E) 

Nov 9. 1930. (NP) Nov. 30. 
•RED HOT RHYTHM (CD-AT): Alan Hale. Walter 

O'Keefe. Kathryn Crawford, Josephine Dunn, Anita Garvin, 

Ilka Chase. (R) Nov, 23. 1929. (NP) Jan. 5. 
♦RICH PEOPLE (D-AT): Constance Bennett. Regis Tooney. 

Robert Ames. Mahlou Hamilton. (R) Jan. 5. 1929. (TOS) 

Oct. 19. 

♦SAILORS' HOLIDAY (CD-AT): AUan Hale. SaUy EUers. 

George Cooper, Paul Hurst, Mary Carr, Charles Clary. 

(NP) Sept. 21. (R) Sept. 14. (L) 5260f. 
•SARATOGA (D-AT): Constance Bennett. (R) July 5. 1930. 
•SHADY LADY, THE (D-TME): PhyUis Haver. Robert 

Armstrong, Louis Wolheim, Russell Gleason. (L) TalMnf. 

6132f: silent. 5S08f. (R) Jan. 20, 1929. (NP) June 1. 
♦SHOW FOLKS (CD-TME): Eddie QuiUan. (L) 6581f. (R) 

Oct. 21. 1928. 

♦SIN TOWN (CD): Elinor Fair. Ivan Lebedeff. Hugh AUan. 
Jack Oakle. (L) 4554f. (E) Jan. 20. 1929. (NP) June 1. 

♦SOPHOMORE, THE (CD-AT): Eddie QuiUan. SaUy O'NeU. 
StarUev Smith, Jeanette Loff. Russell Gleason. Sarah Pad- 
den. Brooks Benedict, Spec O'DonneU. (L) Talking, 6526f. 
(R) Aug. 24. 1929. (TOS) Aug. 24. 

♦SPIELER. THE (D-TME): Alan Hale. Renee Adoree. (L) 
5816f. (E) Dec. 30. 1928. (TOS) Mar. 9. 1929. 

♦SQUARE SHOULDERS (Mel-TMB) : Louis Wolheim. Junior 
Coghlan, PhUlppe De I^acey, Anita Louise, Montague 
Shaw. .Tohnny Morris, Kewple Morris, Clarence Geldert;. 
ID 5477f. (R) Mar. 31. 1929. (NP) Mar. 30. 1929. 

•STRANGE CARGO (D-AT): Lee Patrick, June Nash. 
George Barraud. Kyrle Bellew, RusseU Gleason, Frank 



56 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



Belcher, Claude King. Ned Sparto. Josephine Brown, 
Charles Hamilton, Andre lieranijer. Otto Matieson. (L) 
Talking, 7um; silent, ()134f. (K) Mar. 31. 1929. (NP) 
June 1. 

•THIS THING CALLED LOVE (D AT) : Constance Bennett. 
Edmund lx)we, Itoscoe Karns, Zasu Pitts, Carmellta 
Gcraghty, John Eoche, Stuart Erwln, Ruth Taylor, Wilson 
Benge, Adele. (NP) Dec. 15. 

•TREASURE GIRL (MC) : (R) March 29. 1929. 

•UP AND AT 'EM (CD-AT) : Alan Hale. Eddie QulUan. 
(K) May 31, 1930. 

•WAR AND WOMEN (D-AT) : WllUam Boyd, Ann Hard- 
ing, Robert Armstrong. (K) April 12, 1930. 

♦WOMAN AFRAID, A (D-T) : (Pvl May 17, 1930. 

Rayart 

♦ANNE AGAINST WORLD (D) : Shirley Mason, Jack Mower, 
James Bradbury, Jr., Isabel Keith, Thomas A. Curran, 
Henry KoQUemore, Belle Stoddard, Bill Franey. (L) 6732f 
(K) Apr. 15. 1929. (NP) June 29. 

♦BLACK PEARL, THE (My-ME) : LUa Lee, Ray Hallor, 
Carlton Stockdale, Thomas (Jurran, George French, Howard 
Lorenz, Sybil Grote, Baldy Belmont, Adele Watson, Lew 
Short, Art Rowland. (L) 5261f. (B) Jan. 1, 1929. (NP) 
Mar. 16, 1929. 

•BROTHERS (D) : Bedford, Keefe. (L) 6092f. (B) Feb. 
15. 1929. 

•DEVIL'S CHAPLAIN, TH E (D) : C. Keefe, Virginia Brown 

Faire. (L) 5451f. (B) Mar. 15, 1929. 
♦HANDCUFFED (MD-AT) : Virginia Brown Falre, Brod- 

erlck O'i'arrell, Prank Clarke, Charles West. (NP) Sept. f. 
•SHANGHAI ROSE: Irene Rich. (L) 6539f. (R) Mar. 1, 

1929. (NP) May 18. 
♦SOME MOTHER'S BOY (D) : Mary Carr, Jason Eobarda, 

Jobyna Ralston, M. A. Dickinson, Henry Barrovra. (L) 

6901f. (R) Feb. 15, 1929. 
PAINTED FACES (D-AT): Joe E. Brown. Helen Foster, 

Barton Hepburn, Dorothy Gulliver, Lester Cole, Sojin and 

Jack Richardson. (NP) Dec. 14. 
♦TWO SISTERS (D): Viola Dana, Rex Lease, Claire Du- 

Brey, Irving Bacon, Boris Karloff, Tom Llngham, miomas 

A. Curran. Adalyn Asbury. (L) 5161f. (R) Apr. 1, 1929. 

(NP) May 25, 1929. 
♦WHEN DREAMS COME TRUE (D) : Helene Costello, Rei 

Lease, Claire McDowell, Ernest HiUiard, Emmett King, 

George Periolat, Danny Hoy, Buddy Brown, Banger, Ban. 

(L) 6242f. (B) Jan. 15, 1929. (NP) Feb. 16, 1929. 

RKO 

♦AIR LEGION, THE (D) : Ben Lyon, Antonio Moreno, 
Martha Sleeper, John Gough, Colin Chase. (L) 6381f. 
(R) Jan. 6, 1929. (NP) Jan. 12, 1929. 

♦AMAZING VAGABOND, THE (M) : Bob Steele. Tom Ling- 
ham, Jay Morley, Perry Murdock, Lafe McKee, Q?helma 
Daniels. (L) 5081f. (R) Apr. 7, 1929. (NP) Apr. t. 
1929. 

♦BIG DIAMOND ROBBERY, THE (W) : Tom Mii. (L) 

6114f. (E) May 13, 1929. 
♦BLOCKADE (D) : Anna Q. Nilsson, McDonald. (L) 6409f. 

(R) Jan. 30, 1929. 
♦DANCE HALL (D-AT): Olive Borden. Alice Lake and 

others. Serial No. 0205. (R) December 22, 1929. 
•DELIGHTFUL ROGUE, THE (D-AT): Rod La Rocque, 

Bebe Daniels. (B) Sept. 22, 1929. Serial No. 0203. 6532t. 
•FIRE WALKER (D-AT): Unnamed cast. (R) November 

24, 1929. Serial No. 0607. 
•HALF MARRIAGE (D-AT): Olive Borden, Morgan Farley 

Ann Greenway, Sally Blaine, Ken Murray, Anderson Law- 

lor, Hedda Hopper, Richard Tucker. (L) Talking, 54811. 

(R) Oct. 13, 1929. 
•HARDBOILED (D) : Sally O'NeU, Donald Reed, Lllyan 

Tashman. Bob Sinclair, Ole M. Ness, Tom O'Grady. 

Alphonz Ethier. (R) Feb. 3. (L) 6940f. 
HIT THE DECK (MC): Polly Walker, Jackie Oaile and 

others. (R) December 15, 1929. 
HUNTED (D-AT): Unnamed cast. (R) December 29, 1929. 

Serial No. 0501. 
•JAZZ AGE (D-TME): Douglas Fairbanlts, Jr., Marceline 

Day, Henry B. Walthall, Myrtle Stedman, E. J. BatclUTe, 

Gertrude Messlnger, Joel McCrea, WiUlam Beohtal, lone 

Holmes and Ed Dearlng. (B) Feb. 10. (L) 82451. 
•IDAHO RED (W-ME): Frankle Darro, Tom Tyler, Patrlca 

Caron, Lew Meehan, Barney Furey. (B) Apr. 21. (L) 

Sound, 4783f; silent, 4769f. With sound effects. 
•JAZZ HEAVEN (D-AT): Sally O'Neil and others. Serial 

No. 0509. (R) November 3. 1929. (L) 6372f. 
•LAUGHING AT DEATH (D) : Bob Steele, Natalie Joyce, 

Captain Vic, Kal Schmidt, Ethan Laldlaw, Armand TrUlor. 

Hector V. Samo. (B) June 2. (L) 6500f. 
•LITTLE SAVAGE (W) : Buzz Barton, Milbum Morante, 

Willard Boelner, Patrica Palmer, Sam Nelson, Bthan 

Laldlaw. (R) May 19. (L) 4781f. 
•LOVE IN THE DESERT (D-TME): Olive Borden, Hugh 

Trevor, Noah Beery, Frank Leigh, William Tooker, Ida 

Darling, Alan Eoscoe, Fatty Carr, Charles Brlnley, Pearl 

Varnell, Gordon Magee. (B) March 17. (L) Sound, 5365f : 

sUent, 6365f. 

•LOVE COMES ALONG (D-AT): Bebe Daniels starred. 

Forthcoming 1930 release. 
•NIGHT PARADE (D-AT): Hugh Trevor and others. Serial 

No. 0204. (R) Oct. 27. (L) 6671f. 
•OUTLAW (W) : Tom Mix. Sally Blane, Frank M. CTarke. 

Al Smith, Ethan Laldlaw, Al Ferguson, Barney Furey. 

(R) .Tan. 21. (L) 6057f. 
•OUT TO KILL (D-TME): Joseph SchUdkraut starred. Feb. 

23 1930 

•PRIDE OF PAWNEE (W) : Tom Tyler, Frankie Darro, 
Ethlyne Clair, Barney Furey, Jack HtUlard, Lew Meehan, 
Jimmy Casev. (L) 4750f. (B) June 9, 1929. (NP) 
June 22. 

•RED SWORD. THE (D) : Marian Nlion. William CoUler, 
Jr., Carmel Myers, Allan Boscoe. (L) 8243f. (B) Feb. 

17 1929. 

Rio' RITA (MC): Bebe Daniels, John Boles, Don Al- 
vardo, Dorothy Lee. Bert Wheeler, Bobert Woolsey, Georges 
Rcnevant, Helen Kaiser, Tiny Sandford, Nick de Bulx, 
Sam Nelson, Fred Bums, Eva Boslta and Sam Blulm. 
Release Sept. 15. (TOS) Nov. 2. Length 15.044. 

•SEVEN KEYS TO BALDPATE (D-AT): Richard Dii and 
Miriam Seegar. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

•SIDE STREET (D-AT): Tom, Matt and Owen Moore, 
Kathryn Perry, Emma Dunn, Frank Sheridan. (L) Talk- 
ing 6465f. (R) Sept. 8, 1929. Serial No. 0202. 

♦STREET GIRL (CD-AT): Jack Oakie, Neb Sparks, John 
Harron, Joseph Cawthom, Betty Compson. (L) Talking, 
8188f. (R) Aug. 11, 1929. (NP) Sept. 28. (TOS) 
Sept. 21. 

♦SYNCOPATION (D-AT): Fred Waring and Band. Barbara 
Beimett, Bobby Watson, Ian Hunter, Morton Downey, Os- 
good Perkins, Mackenzie Ward, Verree Teasdale, Dorothy 
I*e. (L) 7848f. 

♦TANNED LEGS (D-AT): June Clyde. Arthur Lake, Sally 
Blane, AUen Keams, NeUa Walker, Albert Gran, Ed- 
mund Burns, Dofothy Bevler, Ann Pennington. Lincoln 
Stedman. Lloyd Hamilton. (B) Nov. 10. (L) 8377f. 
(NP) Nov. 30. 

•VAGABOND LOVER (D-AT): Rudy Vallee. Sally Blane 
and others. (B) November 24, 1929. Serial No. 0108. 

♦VERY IDEA, THE (D-AT): Frank Craven. Hugh Trevor, 
Theodore von Bltz. Olive TeU, Doris Eaton. Adele Watson, 
Oeanne de Bard, Allen Keams, Sally Blane. (L) Talk- 
ing, 6139f. (R) Sept. 15. 1929. Serial No. 0303. 



♦LUCKY BOY (CD-TllE): George Jessel, Margaret Quimby, 
Rosa Rosanova, William Strauss, Gwen Lee, Richard 
Tucker, Gayne Whitman, Mary Doran. (R) Feb. 2. (L) 
Sound, 8G43t: sUent, 6520f. (NP) Feb. 2. (TOS) Feb. 23, 

•JOURNEY'S END (D-AT): All star cast. 

♦LOST ZEPPELIN, THE (D-TME): Tiffany air thriller, 
with Conway Tearle, Virginia Valli, Rioardo Cortez. Duke 
Martin, Kathryn McGuire and Winter Hall. (NP) Dec. 21. 

♦MIDSTREAM (D-TME): Claire Windsor, Montague Love, 
Larry Kent, Helen Jerome Eddy, Louis Alvarez, Leslie 
Brigham, Genevieve Shrader. (L) 7353f. (NP) Oct. 12. 

♦MISTER ANTONIO (D-AT): Leo Carrillo. Virginia VaUi, 
Frank Belcher, Eugenie Besserer, Franklin Lewis, Gareth 
Hughes. (NP) October 19. 

♦MY LADY'S PAST (D-TilE) : BeUe Bennett, Joe E. Brown, 
Alma Bennett, Russell Simpson, Joan Standing, Billle 
Bennett. (NP) June 15. (L) Talking. 7948f. 

♦NEW ORLEANS (D-TME): William Collier, Jr., Eicardo 
Cortez, Alma Bennett. (L) 6765f. (R) Aug. 1, 1929. 
(NP) Oct. 12. 

♦TROUPERS THREE (D-AT): Bex Lease, Dorothy GulliTer 

and others. 

♦TWO MEN AND A MAID (D-TME): WiUiam Collier, Jr., 

Alma Bennett, Eddie Gribbon, George E. Stone. (L) 
Talking, 6423f. (R) Aug. 1, 1929. (NP) Oct. 12. 

♦WOMAN TO WOMAN (D-AT): Betty Compson, George 
Barraud, Juliette Compton, Margaret Chambers, Reginald 
Sharland, Georgle Billings, Winter Hall. (TOS) Nov. 23. 

♦WRECKER, THE (D-TME): Special cast. (L) Sound, 
6520f. No silent print. 

United Artists 

♦ALIBI (Mel-AT): Chester Morris. Pat O'Malley Harrv 
Stubbs. Mae Busch, Eleanor Griffith, Irma Harrison, 
Regis Toomey, Al Hill, James Bradbury, Jr., Elmer Bal- 
lard, Kerman Cripps, Purnell B. Pratt. DeWitt Jennings, 
Edward Brady. (L) Talking, 1867f. (R) Apr. 20, 1929. 
(NP) June 1. (TOS) Sept. 21. 

•BE YOURSELF (CD-AT): Faimie Price starred. Forth- 
coming release. 

♦BULLDOG DRUMMOND (D AT): Ronald Cohnan, Joan 
Bennett, Lilyan Tashman. Montague Love, Lawrence Gram, 
Wilson Benge, Claud AUister. Adolph Millar. Charles 
Sellon, Tutsu Komal. (L) Talldng, 8376f. (R) Aug. 3. 
(TOS) Oct. 19. 

♦COaUETTE (D-AT): Mary PicMord, John Mack Brown, 
Matt Moore, John Saiupolis, William Janney, Henry 
Kolker, George Irving, Louise Beavers. (L) Silent, 6i)93f. 
(R) Apr. 12, 1929. (NP) June 1. 

♦CONDEMNED (D-AT): Ronald Colman starred. (R) De- 
CGnib6r 7 1929 

♦ETERNAL LOVE (D-ME) : John Barrymore, Camilla Horn, 
Victor Varconi, Hobart Bosworth, Bodil Rosing, Mona Eico, 
Evelyn Selbie. (R) May 11, 1929. (L) 6948f; silent, 
6318f. (NP) June 15. (TOS) June 1. 

•EVANGELINE (D-ME): Dolores Del Bio, Roland Drew, 
Alec B. Francis. John Holland, James Marcus, Paul 
McAllister, Lawrence Grant, Bobby Mack, George Marion. 
(L) 8268f. (NP) June 1. (R) Aug. 24. (TOS) Nov. 9. 

♦IRON MASK, THE (D-TME): Douglas Fairbanks, Belle 
Bennett, Marguerite de la Motte, Dorothy Revier, Vera 
Lewis, Rolfe Sedan, William BakeweU, Gordon Thorpe, 
Nigel de Brulier, Ulrich Haupt, Lon Poff, Charles Stevens, 
Henry Otto. Leon Barry, Standley J. Sandford. Gino Cor- 
rado. (L) Talking. 88551; sUent. 8659f. (E) Mar. 9, 
1929. (NP) June 15. 

♦LADY OF THE PAVEMENTS (D-TME): Lupe Velez, Wil- 
liam Boyd. Jetta Goudal, George Fawcett, Albert Conti, 
Henry Armetta. (E) Feb. 16. (L) Sound, 8329f; silent, 
7495f. 

♦LOCKED DOOR, THE (D-AT): Stanwyck, Rod La Eocque, 
William Boyd, Betty Bronson. (B) November 16. (L) 
6844f. 

♦LUMMOX (D-AT): Winifred Westover, Ben Lyon, Wil- 
liam Collier, Jr. 

♦NEW YORK NIGHTS (D-AT): Norma Talmadge starred. 
(E) December 28. 

♦PUTTING ON THE RITZ (D-AT): Harry Eichman, Joan 
Bennett. James Gleason, Lilyan Tashman. 

♦SHE GOES TO WAR (D-TME): Eleanor Boardman, John 
Holland. Edmimd Burns, Alma Bubens, Al St. John, Glen 
Waters, Margaret Seddon, Tola D'Avril, Evelyn Hall. (L) 
88641. (E) July 13, 1929. (NP) June 1. (TOS) Aug. 10. 

♦TAMING OF THE SHREW, THE (D-AT): Mary Pickford, 
Douglas Fairbanks. (R) Dctober 26. (L) 6.116. (TOS) 
Jan. 4, 1930. 

♦THREE LIVE GHOSTS (D-AT): AUister McNaughton, 
Montgomery. Bennett. (R) Sept. 15. (L) 7,486. 

♦THIS IS HEAVEN (D-TME): VUma Banfcy. James Hall, 
Fritzie Bidgway, Lucien LitUefleld, Richard Tucker. (L) 
7948f. (R) June 22, 1929. (NP) June 1. (TOS) July 20. 

♦THREE PASSIONS. THE (D-ME): Alice Terry, Ivan 
Petrovitch, Shayle Gardner, Leslie Faber, Andrew Engel- 
man Claire Eames. (L) Talking. 6646f; silent, 7676f. 
(R) June "1, 1929. 

♦TRESPASSER, THE (D-AT): Gloria Swanson. Kay Ham- 
mond, William Holden, Robert Ames, Henry Walthall, 
Pumell Pratt. Wally Albright. (R) October 5. (L) 8,223. 
(TOS) Nov. 16. 

♦VENUS (D-ME): Constance Talmadge. Andre Eoanne, 
Jean Murat, Max Maxudian, Baron FUs and Jean Mer- 
canton. (L) Sound 6882f. (NP) June 1. (R) Oct. 12. 



Universal 



Tiffany 



•BROADWAY FEVER (CD): Sally O'Neil, Roland Drew 
Corliss Palmer. (B) Jan. 1. (L) 6412f. 



♦ACE RIDER (W): Hoot Gibson, Eugenia Gilbert. Harry 
Tod. Joseph Girard, Monty Montague, John Oscar, Jim 
Corey, James Farley, Pete Morrison and Joe Bonomo. 
(NP) Dec. 21. 

♦BARNUM WAS RIGHT (CD-AT): Glenn Tryon, Merna 
Kennedy, Otis Harlan, Basil Badford, Clarence Burton, 
Lew Kelly, IsabeUe Keith, Gertrude Sutton. (L) Silent 
4,477. Sound 5,140. (NP) November 9. 

♦BEAUTY AND BULLETS (W) : Ted Wells. Duane Thomp- 
son. Jack Kenney, WUbiir Mack. (L) 479f. 

♦BODY PUNCH, THE (D): Jack Dougherty, Virginia Brown 
Faire, George Kotsonaros, Wilbur Mack, Monte Montague, 
(L) 4786f. (E) July 14, 1929. (NP) July 27. 

♦BORDER WILDCAT, THE (W) : Ted Wells, Kathryn Mc- 
Guire. (E) May 12. (L) 4259f. 

♦BORN TO THE SADDLE (W) : Ted Wells, Duane Thomp- 
son, Leo White, Merrill McCormick, Bryon Douglas, Nelson 
McDowell. (R) Mar. 10. (L) 4126f. 

♦BROADWAY (D-AT): Glen Tryon. Merna Kennedy. Evelyn 
Brent, Thomas Jackson, Robert Ellis, Otis Harlan, Paul 
Porcasi, Marion Lord, Fritz Field, Leslie Fenton. Arthur 
Housman, George Davis. Betty Francisco, Edythe Flynn, 
Florence Dudley, Buby McCoy. (L) 9330f. (E) Sept. 15. 
(TOS) Nov. 16. 

•BURNING THE WIND (W) : Hoot Gibson, Cessare Gravine, 
Virginia Brown Faire, Boris Karloff, Bobert Holmes. Ee- 
leased Feb. 10. (L) 5202f. (NP) Jan. 12. 

CHARLATAN. THE (D-TME): Holmes Herbert. Eockcliffe 
Fellows, Margaret Livingston. (E) Apr. 14. (L) Silent, 
5972f. Sound 6506f. 

♦CLEAR THE DECKS (CD-TME) : Reginald Denny. Olive 
Hasbrouok, Otis Harlan, Colette Merton, Luoien LitUefleld, 
Brooks Benedict, Robert Anderson, Hinor Leslie. (R) 
Mar. 3. (L) Sound, 5792f. Silent, 5740f. 



•COHENS AND KELLYS IN ATLANTIC CITY (CD-TME): 
George Sidney, Mack Swain, Vera Gordon, Kate Price. 
Cornelius Keefe, Nora Lane. Virginia Sales, Tom Kennedy. 
(R) Mar. 17. (L) Sound, 7400f. Silent, 7752f. 

♦COLLEGE LOVE (D-AT): George Lewis, Eddie Phillips, 
Dorothy GuDiver, Churchill Ross, Hayden Stevenson, 
Sumner Getcheli. (L) Talking 684Bf. (R) July 7, 1929. 
(NP) July 27. 

♦COME ACROSS (M-TME) : Lena Basquette. Reed Howes, 
Flora Finch, Craufurd Kent, Gustav von Seyffertitz, Clarissa 
Selwynne. (R) June 30, 1929, (NP) July 27. (L) Talk- 
ing, 5330f; sUent, 55b3f. 

♦COURTIN' WILD CATS (W) : Hoot Gibson and others. 
(B) Dec. 15. 

♦DEVIL'S PIT (D): With a foreign cast. (L) 6258f, 

(NP) Nov. 2. (E) Dec. 8. 
♦DRAKE CASE, THE (Mel-AT): Gladys BrockweU. (NT) 

Sept. 28. (TOS) Sept. 21. (R) Sept. 1. 
♦EMBARRASSING MOMENTS (CD-AT): Reginald Denny, 

Merna Keimedy, Otis Harlan, William Austin, Virginia 

Sale, Greta Grandstedt, Mary Foy. (NP) Oct. 25. (L) 

5230f. (R) Jan. 5, 1930. 
♦EYES OF THE UNDERWORLD (W) : BOl Cody, Sally 

Blane. (R) Apr. 28. (L) 4208f. 
♦FIGHTING LEGION (W-TME) : Ken Maynard, Dorothy 

Dwan and others. 1930 release. 
♦GIRL ON THE BARGE (D-TME): Jean Hersholt, Sally 

O'Neil, Malcolm McGregor, Morris Mcintosh Nancy Kelly, 

George Offerman, Henry West, Rex, (R) Feb. 3. (L) 

Sound, 7510t. Silent, 6908f. 
•GIRL OVERBOARD (D-TME): Mary PhUbin, Fred 

Maokaye, Otis Harlan, Edmund Breese, Francis M<j>onald. 

(L) Talking, 7391f; silent, 7531f. (R) July 28. 1929. 

(NP) Sept. 21. 

♦GRIT WINS (W): Ted Wells, Kathleen Collins, Al Fer- 
guson, Buck Conners, Nelson McDowell, Edwin Moulton. 
(R) Jan. 27. (L) 4596f. 

♦HARVEST OF HATE (W) : Rex, Jack Perrln, Helen Foster, 
Tom London. (L) 47-9f. 

♦HIS LUCKY DAY (CD-TME): Reginald Denny, LoEayne 
Duval, Otis Harlan, Eddie Phillips, Cissie Fitzgerald, 
Harvey Clark, Tom O'Brien, (L) Talking 6713f; silent, 
5603f. (B) June 30, 1929. (NP) June 22. 

♦HOLD YOUR MAN (D-AT): Laura LaPlante, Walter 
Scott. Eugene Borden, MUdred Van Dom. (NP) Oct. 26, 
(L) 5794f. 

♦HOOFBEATS OF VENGEANCE (W) : Bex, Jack Perrin, 
Helen Foster, Al Ferguson, Starlight. (E) June 16. (L) 

4525f 

♦IT CAN BE DONE (CD-TME): Glenn Tryon, Sue Carol. 
Eichard Carlyle, Jack Egan, Tom O'Brien. (R) Mardi 
24. (L) Sound 65601; silent 6090f. 

♦KID'S CLEVER (CD): Glenn Tryon. Kathryn Crawford, 
BusseU Simpson, Lloyd Whitlock, George Chandler, Vir- 
ginia Sales, Joan Standing, Max Asher, Florence Turner, 
Stephin Fetchit. (E) Feb. 17. (L) 5729f. 

•KiNG OF JAZZ REVUE (MC) : Paul Whiteman stars. 
1930 release 

♦KING OF THE CAMPUS (CD-AT): George Lewis, 
Dorothy GuUlver, Eddie Phillips, Hayden Stevenson, 
ChurchiU Boss, CoUette Merton. 

♦KING OF THE RODEO (W) : Hoot Gibson. Kathryn Craw- 
tague. Slim Summerville, Charles K. French, Monty Mon- 
tague, Joseph W. Gerard. (E) Jan. 20. (L) 5509f. 

♦LA MARSEILLAISE (D-AT): Laura LaPlante, John Boles 
and others. Forthcoming 1930 release. 

♦LARIAT KID, THE (W) : Hoot Gibson. Ann Christy. Cap 
Anderson, Mary Foy. Francis Ford, Walter Brennan, Andy 
Waldron, Bud Osborne. Joe Bennett, Jim Corey. (L) 
5247f. (E) Jtme 23. 1929. (NP) June 15. 

♦LAST PERFORMANCE, THE (D-TME): With Conrad 
Veldt, Mary Philbin, Leslie Fenton, Vted MacKaye. Gustav 
Pares. William H. Turner, Anders Randolf, Sam DeGrasaa 
and George Irving. Length (sound), S799f; (silent) 5799f. 
(NP) Nov. 16. 

♦LAST WARNING, THE (Mel-TME) : Laura La Plants, 
Montagu Love, John Boles, Boy D'Arcy, Bert Roach, Mar- 
garet Livingston, Mack Swain, Burr Mcintosh, Carry 
Daumery, George Siunmerville, Torben Meyer, D'Arcy Oor- 
rigan. Bud Phelps, Charles French, Fred Kelsey, Tom 
O'Brien, Harry Nothmp. (L) Talking, 7980f; sUent, 77311. 
(R) Jan. 6. 1929. (NP) June 29. (TOS) Jan. 26. 

♦LONG, LONG TRAIL, THE (W) : Hoot Gibson. Sally EUers. 
Kathryn McGuire, James Mason, Archie Ricks, Walter 
Brennan, Howard Truesdell. (NP) Oct. 26. (L) six reelj. 

♦LONESOME (CD-TME): Glenn Tryon. Barbara Kent. (R) 
Jan. 20 (L) Sound 6761f; silent 6142f. 

♦MAN, WOMAN AND WIFE (D-ME): Norman Kerry, 
Pauline Starke, Marion Nixon, Kenneth Harlan. Craufurd 
Kent, Byron Douglas. (L) 6589f. (B) Jan. 13, 1929. 
(NP) June 29. 

♦MELODY LANE (D-AT): Eddie Leonard, Josephine Dunn. 
Eose Coe. George Stone, Huntley Gordon. (L) Talking, 
6350f. (E) July 21, 1929. (NP) Aug. 31. 

♦MISSISSIPPI GAMBLER (D-AT): Joseph SchUdkraut. 
Joan Bennett, CarmeUta Geraghty, Aleo B. Francis, Otl« 
Harlan, Billy Welsh. (NP) Nov. 9. (L) Sound, 6,412. 
SUent, 5,025. (TOS) Nov. 16. 

♦MODERN LOVE (CD-AT): Charley Chase, Jean Hersholt, 
Kathlyn Crawford. Edward MartindeL (R) July 14, 1929, 
(NP) June 22. (L) Talking, 6501f; sUent, 5730f. 

♦ONE HYSTERICAL NIGHT (CD-TME): Eeginald Denny, 
Nora X/ane, E. J. Ratcllfle, Fritz Field, Slim SummervUlo, 
Jules Cowles, Joyzelle, Walter Brennan, Harry Otto, Mar- 
garet Campbell. (NP) Oct. 26. (L) 61011. 

♦PARADE OF THE WEST (W-AT) : Ken Maynard, Gladys 
McConnell, Otis Harlan, Frank Rice. Bobbie Dunn, Jackie 
Hanlon, Fred Bums, Frank TaconeUl. Stanley Blystone, 
Blue Washington, Tarzan and Rex. (NP) Nov. 23. (B) 
Jan. 19 1929. 

•PARADISE AHOY (CD-AT): Glenn Tryon starred. 1930 
release. 

♦PLUNGING HOOFS (W) : Jack Perrln, Eex, Barbara 
Worth, J. P. McGowan, David Dunbar. (L) Silent, 4344f. 
(E) Apr. 14. (NP) May 18. 

♦POINTS WEST (W): Hoot Gibson. Alberta Vaughn, Frank 
Campeau. Jack Baymond, Martha Franklin, Milt Brown, 
Jim Corey (L) 5491f. (NP) Sept. 28. 

♦RED HOT SPEED (CD-TME): Eeginald Denny. Alice Day, 
Charles Byer, Thomas Bioketts, De Witt Jennings, Frltzl 
Eidgeway, Hector V. Samo. (L) 6621f. (B) Jan. 27, 

1929 (NP) June 29. 

♦RIDIN' DEMON, THE (W) : Ted WeUs, Kathleen CoUins, 
Lucy Beaumont. Otto Bibber. (L) 4380f. (B) Aug. 18, 
1929. (NP) Aug. 3. 

♦RIDIN' KID, THE (W-TME): Hoot Gibson. Forthcomhig 

1930 r6lG3,sc 

•ROARING ADVENTURE, A (W): Jack Hoxle. Mary Mc- 

Alister, Marin Sais, Francis Ford and the Universal 

Eanch Riders. (NP) Dec. 7. 
♦TIP OFF, THE (W) : William Cody, George Hackathome. 

Duane Thompson, L. J. O'Connor, Jack Singleton. Robert 

Bolder. Monte Montague, Walter Shumway. (L) 41091. 

(R) June 2, 1929, (NP) July 13. 
♦SCANDAL (D-TME): Laura LaPlante. John Boles. Jane 

Winton. Huntley Gordon. Nancy Dover. Eddie PhUllps. 

Julia Swayne Gordon. (R) May 4. (L) Sound. 6675f; 

silent. 6475f. (TOS) June 13. 
♦SENOR AMERICANO (W-AT): Ken Maynard, Kathryn 

Crawford. Gino Corrado, J. P. McGowan, Frank Taconelll, 

Frank Beaie and Tarzan. Footage. Sound, 6,662. Silent, 

5.528. (NP) Nov. 23. 
♦SHANGHAI LADY (D) : Mary Nolan. James Murray, 

Wheeler Oakman, Anders Randolph, Lydia Yeamans Titus, 

Tola d'Aml, Mona Rico, Irma lowae. (NP) Nov. 16. 

(TOS) Dec. 7. 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



57 



•SHANNONS OF BROADWAY (D-AT) : James and Luclle 
Gleason. Charles Grapewin. Mary PliUbln. John Breedon.. 
Tom Santsctii. Harry Tj-ler. Gladys CrolJus. Helen Jlehr- 
mann, Robert T. Haines, Slim SummervlUe. Tom Ken- 
nedy and Walter Brennan. (^fP) Nov. 16. 

•SHOW BOAT (D-AT): Laura LaPlante. Joseph Schlld- 
kraut. Emilj- Fltzroy, Otis Harlan. Helen Morgan. Jane 
LaVerne, Alma Rubens. Jack McDonald, Neely Edwards. 
(L) 11.772f; silent. 10,290f. 

SKINNER STEPS OUT (CD-AT) : Glenn Tryon. Merna 

Kennedy. E. J. RadcUffe. Burr Mcintosh. Lloyd Whltlock. 

William Welsh. Katherine Kerrigan. Frederick Lee, Jack 

Lipson and Edna Marian. (NP) Deo. 14. 
•SMILING TERROR. THE (W) : Ted Wells, Derelys Perdue, 

Al Ferguson. Red Osborne. (L) 4525f. (R) June 30. 1929. 

(NP) July 13. 

•THREE GODFATHERS (D-TME) : Charles Bickford. Ray- 
mond Hatton. Fred Kohler. Fritzie Ridgeway, Maria Alba, 
Joe de la Cruz, Buck Connors. Walter James. 

•TONIGHT AT TWELVE (D-AT): Madge Bellamy. George 
Lewis, Robert Ellis, Margaret LivingstoD, Vera Reynolds, 
Norman Trevor. Hallam Cooley. Mary Doran, Madeline 
Seymour. Josephine Brown. Dan Douglas. Loul«e Cajter 
and Niok Thompson. (L) 6,884. (NP) November 2. 

•WAGON MASTER. THE (W-AT) : Ken Maynard. Edith 
Roberts, Frederidt Dana, Tom Santschl, Al Ferguson, Jack 
Hanlon, Bobby Dunn. White Horse, Frank Rice. (L) 
Sound. 6335f; silent, 5679f. (NP) Sept. 29. (R) Sept. 8. 

•WINGED H0RSEIV1EN. THE (W) : Hoot Gibson. Ruth Elder. 
Charles N. Schaeffer, Allan Forrest, Herbert Prior. (L) 
5544f. (R) June 23. 1929. (NP) July 13. 



Warner Bros. 



•AVIATOR, THE (CD-AT): Edward Everett Horton starred. 
Future release. 

•ARGYLE CASE, THE (Mel-AT) : Thomas Meighan, H. B. 
Warner, Gladys Brockwell. Lila Lee, Bert Roach. (TOS) 
Aug. 31. (L) 7794f. 

•CONQUEST (D-AT): Monte Blue. Lois Wilson, H. B. 
Warner, TuUy Marshall. (L) 4706f. (B) Jan. 19, 1929. 
(NP) Aug. 3. (TOS) Jan. 12. 

•DESERT SONG. THE (MC) : John Boles, Charlotte King, 
Louise Fazenda, Edward Martindel, Jack Pratt, Otto Hoff- 
man, John MUJan, Del Elliott. Myrna Loy. (L) Talking. 
U.034f. (R) May 11, 1929. (NP) May 18. (TOS) 
June 8. 

•DISRAELI (D-AT): With George Arliss. Joan Bennett, 
Anthony Bushnell, Doris Lloyd. (TOS) Dec. 14. 

♦EVIDENCE (T): P. Frederick starred. (TOS) Oct. 26. 

•FAME (T-D): Dolores CosteUo starred. Future release. 

•FROM HEADQUARTERS (D-TME): Monte Blue, Edmund 
Breese, EtUyno Claire, (juinn Williams, Lionel Belmore, 
Henry B. WalthaU, Gladys Brockwell. Eddie Gribbon, Pat 
Hartigan, John Kelly, Otto Lederer, WUUam Irving, Pat 
Somerset. J. Girard. (B) June 6. (L) e323f. 

•FROZEN RIVER (D-TME): Rin-Tin-Tin, Davey Lee, Lew 
Harvey, Nina Quartaro. Duane Thompson, Joseph Swiok- 
aid, Frank Campbell. (R) May 25. (L) 5482f. 

•GAMBLERS, THE (D-AT): Lois Wilson. H. B. Warner, 
Jason Robards, George Fawcett. Johnny Arthur, Frank 
Campeau, Pauline Garon. Charles Sellon. (L) Talking, 
6611f; silent, 4S44f, Recorded on disc. (TOS) Aug. 24. 
(R) June 29, 1929. 

•GENERAL CRACK (D-AT): John Barrymore starred. Fu- 
ture release. 

GOLD DIGGERS OF BROADWAY (MC) : Niok Lucas, Ann 
Pennington, Conrad Tearle, Nancy Welford, Winnie Llght- 
ner and others. (B) Oct. 5. (L) 9122. (TOS) Nov. »3. 

•GOLDEN DAWN (D-AT): Walter Woolf starred. Future 
release. 

•GREEN GODDESS, THE (D-AT): With George Arliss and 

others. For release soon. 
•GREYHOUND LIMITED (D-TMB) : Monte Blue, Edna 

Murphy, Grant Withers. Lucy Beaumont. Lew Harvey. 

Ernie Shields. (B) Mar. 23. (L) Sound. 6114f. SUemt. 

4996f. 

•HARDBOILED ROSE (D-TME): Myrna Loy. WiUlam Col- 
lier, Jr., Lucy Beaumont, Gladys Brockwell, Edward Mar- 
tindel. John Miljan. (R) May 4. (L) Sound, 5610f. 
Silent. 4875f. 

•HEARTS IN EXILE (D-AT): Dolores CosteUo, Grant 
Withers and James Erkwood. Pre-release August 14. 
(L) 7,877f. (TOS) Dec. 7. 

•HOLD EVERYTHING (AT-D) : With an aU-star cast. Fu- 
ture release. 

•HONKY TONK (CD-AT): Sophie Tucker, LUa Lee. Audrey 
Ferris, George Diurea, Mahlon Hamilton, John T, Marray. 
(L) Sound, 6412f. (R) Aug. 3. (TOS) Aug. 31. (NP) 
Sept. 14. 

•HOTTENTOT, THE (CD-AT): Edward Everett Horton and 
others. Pre-release August 10. (L) 7,241f. 

♦IN THE HEADLINES (D-AT): Grant Withers, Marian 
Nbton. Clyde Cook, Spec O'DonneU and others. Pre- 
release August 31. (L) 6.427f. (TOS) Oct. 12. 

♦IS EVERYBODY HAPPY (D-AT): With Ted Lewis and 
band starred. (TOS) Dec. 21. 

♦ISLE OF ESCAPE (D-TME): Monte Blue starred. Future 
release. 

•KID GLOVES (D-TME): Conrad Nagel. Lois WUson. Edna 

Murphy. John Davidson. Tom Dugan and Edward Eatle. 

(R) Apr. 13. (L) Sound 627Sf; silent 6658f. 
♦LITTLE WILDCAT (D-TME): George Fawcett. Robert 

Edeson. Audrey Ferris. (R) Jan. 5. (L) Sound 6644f; 

sOent 5161f. 

♦MADONNA OF AVENUE A (D-AT): Dolores CosteUo, 
Grant Withers, Louise Dresser, Douglass Gerard, Otto 
Hoffman, Lee Moran. (L) Talking 6461f; silent 52fl4f. (B) 
June 22, 1929. 

♦MILLION DOLLAR COLLAR (D-TME): Rin-Tin-Tta, 
Matty Kemp. Evelyn French. Tommy Dugan. Allen Carln. 
Phllo McCullough. Grover Liggon. (R) Feb. 9. (NP) 
March 16. (L) Sound 5561f; silent 4878r. 

♦NOAH'S ARK (D-TME): Dolores CosteUo. George O'Brien. 
Noah Beery. Louise Fazenda. Gulnn WlUiamg. Paul Mc- 
Allister. Anders Bandolf. Nigel de BruUer. Armand Kalia, 
JfcTna Loy, WiUlam Mong. Malcolm White. (L) Sound 
9478f: sUent 7752f. 

♦MAMMY (D-AT): Al Jolson starred. Future release. 

♦MAN, THE (D-AT): John Barrymore starred. Future re- 
lease. 

♦MY MAN (CD-AT): Fannie Brice. Gulnn WiUlams, Andre 
de Segurola, Ann Brody. Biohard Tucker. BiUy Sealy. 
Edna Murphy. Arthur Hoyt. (L) 9247f. SUent, 6136f. 
(NP) June 29. 

♦NO DEFENSE (D-AT): Monte Blue. May McAvoy. Lee 
Moran. Kathryn Carver. William Tooker. WlUlam Des- 
mond, Bud MarshaU. (L) Talking. B558f; jUent. 471Jf. 
(R) Apr. 6. 1929. (NP) July 13. 

ON WITH THE SHOW (MC) : Betty Compson. Sam Hardy. 
MoUy O'Day. Joe E. Brown. Sally O'NeU. Louise Fa«nda. 
WiUlam BakeweU. PumeU Pratt, Fairbanks twins. 
Wheeler Oakman. Sam Hardy. Thomas Jeflwson. Lee 
Moran. Harry Gribbon. Arthur Lake. Josephine Houston. 
Henry Kirk. Otto Hoffman. Ethel Walters, Harmount 
Four. Angelus Babe. (L) Sound 8864r; sUent 8441f. 
(TOS) Aug. 17. 



•ONE STOLEN NIGHT (D-TME): Betty Bronson, MltohoU 
Lewis, Buster Collier, Rose Dlone, Nina Quartaro. Harry 
Todd. Otto Ledoer. Angelo Rossltto. Jack Santaro, Harry 
Shultz, ChashlU Malles. (B) Apr. 6. (L) Sound B243f: 
silent 4797f. (NP) March 30. 

•ROUGH WATERS (D-TME): RIn-Tln-Tln. Jobyna Ralston. 
Lane Chandler. Walter MlUer. 1930 release. 

♦SACRED FLAME. THE (D-TME): Pauline Frederick 
starred. Future release. 

'SAP. THE (CD-AT): Edward Everett Horton. Patsy Ruth 
MiUer. Franklin Pangborn. Edna Murphy. Alan Hale, 
RusseU Simpson. Louise Carver. Jerry Mandy. (L) 7.130. 

•SAY IT WITH SONGS (D-AT): Al Jolson. David Lee. 
Marian Nlxou. (L) TaUdng 8324f. (B) Aug. 24. 1929. 

SHOW OF SHOWS (MC) : With 77 stars, including John 
Barrymore, Monte Blue, Ted I,ewl3, Richard Barthelmess, 
Sally Blane. Irene Bordonl. Dolores CosteUo, Frances Lee, 
Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., Prank Fay. Winnie Llghtner. 
Nick Lucas, Jack Mulhall, Ria-Tin-Tln, Ben Turpln, Grant 
Withers and others. (NP) Jan. 4. 1930. 

♦SKIN DEEP (D-TME): Monte Blue. Betty Compson. John 
Davidson. TuUy MarshaU. (TOS) Oct. 6. 

♦SECOND CHOICE (D-AT): Dolores CosteUo starred. Fu- 
ture release. 

•STOLEN KISSES (CD-TME) : Claude GiUingwater. Hallen 
Cooley. May MoAvoy, Edna Murphy. Reed Howes. Arthur 
Hoyt. (L) Talking. 6273f; silent. 6883f. (B) Apr. 13. 
1929. 

♦STARK MAD (D-AT): Louise Fazenda. Claude GiUing- 
water. H. B. Warner. John Miljan, Jacqueline Logan. 
Henry B. Walthall, Andre Beranger, Warner Bichmond. 
Lionel Barrymore, Floyd Shacltleford. (L) Talking, 6631f; 
silent, 4917f. (R) Mar. 2, 1929. 

♦SHE COULDN'T SAY NO (MC) : With Winnie Llghtner 
starred. Release soon. 

•SO LONG LETTY (D-AT): With C. Greenwood starred. 
Future release. 

♦THOSE WHO DANCE (D-TME): Monte Blue starred. Fu- 
ture release. 

•TIGER ROSE (D-AT): Lupe Velez starred. Future release. 
♦TIME, PLACE AND GIRL, THE (AT-D): Grant Withers. 

Betty Compson. James Kirkwood. Bert Roach. (TOS) 

June 22. 

•WIDE OPEN (CD-AT): Edward Everett Horton starred. 
Future release. 

♦WOMAN'S GAME (D-AT): Pauline Frederick starred. Fu- 
ture release. 



Ay won 



World Wide 



♦BERLIN AFTER DARK (MD) : Kurt Green. Ernst Stahl 
Nachbauer, Fritz Kampers. Grlta Ley. (L) 6553f. (B) 
June. 

♦BLACKMAIL (AT-MD) : Donald Calthrop starred. 

BLACK WATERS (AT-D): James Kirkwood. Uoyd Hamil- 
ton. Mary Brian. John Loder. Prank Belcher. Bobert Ames. 
Ben Hendricks. Noble Johnson. HaUam Cooley. (L) 7322f. 
(B) Apr. 14. No silent version. 

♦BONDMAN, THE (D) : Norman Kerry. (B) Mar. 17. 
(L) 7000f. 

•GREAT GABBO (D-AT)! Erich von Stroheim. Betty 
Compson. (TOS) Dec. 21. (B) Oct. 

♦KITTY (T-D): EsteUe Brody. John Stuart. Marie Ault. 
Dorothy Cummings. Winter HaU. Olaf Hytten, Charles 
O'Shaughnessy. (B) June 15. (L) 8441f. 

♦MIDNIGHT DADDIES (C-AT): Andy Clyde, Harry Grib- 
bon. Bosemary Theby, Addle MoPhaU. Alma Bennett, 
Jack Cooper. Katherine Ward. (NP) October 12. (E) 
Aug. 3, 192&. 

♦SCARLET DEVIL. THE (D) : Matheson Lang. Margaret 

Hume. Nelson Keys. Hadden Mason. Juliette Compton. 

Douglas Payne. Harold Huth. (NP) October 12. 
♦MOULIN ROUGE (ME-D) : Olga Chekova. Eve Gray. Jean 

Bradin. (B) January 30. (L) Sound 8312f. 
♦PAWNS OF PASSION (D) : Olga Chekova. Sidney Suberly, 

Henry Baudln. Hans Stever, Lola Josane. Carmine GaUone. 

(B) Feb. 17. (L) 7196f. 
♦PICADILLY (MD-AT): Gilda Grey. Anna May Wong. 

Jameson Thomas. (L) 8080f. (B) June 1. (NP) Oct. 12, 

(TOS) Aug. 24. 
•PRINCE AND THE DANCER (D) : Dina Graller, Albert 

Paulig, Werner Pittschau, Anna KaUlna. (NP) Not. 2. 

(B) June 29. 

♦TRIUMPH OF THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL, THE (D) : 
MatJieson Lang, Margaret Hume. Nelson Keys, Hadden 
Mason, Juliette Compton, Douglass Payne, Harold Ruth. 
(L) 6490f. (E) June 22. 1929. 

Miscellaneous Companies 
Affiliated European 

♦BEHIND THE ALTAR (D) : WiUielm Dieterie. MarceUa 

Albani. (L) 6200f. Silent flhn. 
♦ESCAPE FROM HELL (MD) : Jean Murat. Louis Balph, 

Countess Agnes von Esterhazy. PaiU Heldman. B. Van 

Biel. Leo Penkert. W. Kaiser Hayl. Harry Frank. Lewis 

Brody. , 
♦PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC (D): MUe. Falconettl. M. 

Silvain. M. Schutz, Bavet. Andre Berly. Antonin Artaud. 

(L) TOOOf. 

♦RUSSIA (D): MarceUa Albnai. V. Gaidarov. WUhelm Die- 
terie. liouis Balph. (B) May 12. (L) 7500f. 



Aida Films 



•KIF TEBBI: Marcello Spade, Donatelle Neri, Glni Viotl, 
Ugo Graocio. SUent film. 



Amer. -Anglo 



•BETRAYAL. THE (D) : Jerro 'd Robertshaw, Gerlad Bring, 

Charles Emerald. EUssa Landi. (L) 7400f. 
•LIVINGSTONE IN AMERICA (D) : M. A. WetheraU. Henry 

Walton. MoUy Rogers. Reginald Fox. (L) 5799f. 



Ass. Ind. Prod. 



♦FAR WESTERN TRAILS (W) : Ted Thompson, Bud Os- 
borne, Lew Ames, Betty O'Doan. (B) May 20. (L) 4316f. 

•MIDNIGHT ON THE BARBARY COAST (D) : WiUiam 
Barrymore. Kala Pasha, Jack Richardson. (II) Feb. 9. 
(Ll 42o0f. 

Australasian Films 

•BLACK CARGOES OF THE SOUTH SEAS (D) : Edmund 
Burns, Edith Boberts, Susan Dennis. Silent film. 

•FOR THE TERM OF HIS NATURAL LIFE (D) : Eva 
Novak, Arthur McLaglen, George Flslt, Kay Soupen, Matlsn 
Clark, Dunstan Webb. Susan Dennis. (L) ll.OOOf. 



•BEAUTIFUL BLUE DANUBE 'D) : Hans Junkormiin. JuUus 
FaUtensteln, Harry Lledko. Ernest Verebes and f,ya Mara. 
Silent picture. 



Bell Pictures 



"BAD MAN'S MONEY (W) : Yakima Canutt. (L) 4860r. 
(R) Mar. 31. 

♦BOHEMIAN DANCER (D): Lya Mara. Harry Lledtka. 
(L) 5800f. Silent only. 



Bertad Pictures 



•BLACK CRUISE (MD) : (L) OOOOf.' (B) June 1. SUent 
film. 

♦FIGHTING THE WHITE SLAVE TRAFFIC (T-D): EmU 
Jannlngs. Werner Kraus. (R) June 15. (L) Sound. 9(M)0f. 



Biltmore Prod. 
Conquest 



♦REWARD OF FAITH (D) : An.lre Carnege. Marcel Charbrie, 
Plerette Lugand. (R) April 1. (L) 6.927. Silent film. 

♦PHANTOMS OF THE NORTH (D) : Edith Boberts. Donald 
Keith. Kathleen Key. Borris Karloff. Joe Bonomo Josef 
Swickard. (B) June 2. (L) 4600f. 

El Dorado Pictures 

♦ARIZONA DAYS (W) : Bob Custer. Peggy Montgomery, 
John LoweU Russell, J. P. McGowan, Mack V. Wright, 
Jack Ponder. Silent picture only. 

♦FALSE FEATHERS (D) : Noah Beery. Horace B. Car- 
penter. Francis Poinerantz. E. A. Martin. 

Film Arts Guild 

•LIFE OF BEETHOVEN (D) : Fritz Kortner. Eme3t 
Baumeister, LUian Gray, Heinz, Altringen. Willy Schmelder. 
(L) 7000f. 

Franco-Film 

•A PASSION ATA: (L) 6800f. SUent film. 



Gainsborough 



•CONSTANT NYMPH (D) : Ivor Novello. Mabel Poulten, 
George Heinrich, Dorothy Boyd. Frances Dable. SUent 
film. 

Michael J. Gourland 

•CRIME AND PUNISHMENT (D) ; Gregor Chmara. Michael 
Tarshanoff. Maria Germanova. Pavel Payloff. M. Toma, 
Vera Orlova. Ivan BersennlefT. (L) GOOOf. 

Capt. C. W. R. Knight 

•FILMING OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE: SUent picture. 

Mutual 

•LUCRETIA BORGIA (D) : Conrad Veldt, Diane Hald, Paul 
Wegener, Lulgl Bobaccio. (L) 7100f. 

New Era 

•BATTLE OF MOMS (D): Special cast. (L) 5900f. SUent 
film only, 

Pole Pictures 

•AT THE SOUTH POLE: Special cast. (L) SOOOf. SUent 
film only. 

Syndicate 

•LAW OF THE MOUNTED (D) r Bob Custer, J. P. Mc- 
Gowan, MaoV. Wright, Frank Ellis, SaUy Winters, Cliff 
Lyons, Mary Mabery, Lynn Anderson. (E) Jan. 15 (D 
4694f. 



Trinity 



•BROKEN HEARTED (D) : Agnes Ayres, Gareth Hughes. 

Eddie BroneU. (L) SOOOf. SUent only. 
•BYE. BYE BUDDY (D) : Agnes Ayres. Bud Shaw. Fred 

Shanley. Ben WUson. John Orlando. Arthur HotaUng. Dave 

Henderson. (B) Mar. 23. (L) 6700f. 
•CHINA SLAVER (D) : Sojin. Albert Valentino, Iris Tama- 

oaka. Carl Theobald. Bud Shaw. Ben WUson. Dick Suther- 
land. Jimmy Aubrey. Opal Baker. (R) JaiL 26. (L) 6500f. 
•GIRLS WHO DARE (D) : Rei Lease, PrlscIUa Bonner. 

Rosemary Theby. Ben WUson, Steve HaU. HaU Cllne. 

(R) Jan. 1. (L) 6600f. 
•LITTLE WILD GIRL (D) : Lila Lee. CuUen Landls, Frank 

Merril. Sheldon Lewis, Boris Karloff. Bud Shaw. Cyclone. 

Arthur HotaUng. (L) 5300f. 
•MUST WE MARRY (D) : Pauline Garon, Loraine Eason. 

Bud Shaw, Vivian Rich. Edward Brownell. Louise Carver. 

Charles HIU, Thomas A. Curran. (L) 5400f. 

UFA 

•ELEVEN WHO WERE LOYAL (D) : Mary Nolan. Ernst 
Eueckert. Greta Eeinwald. Gustav Semmler, Budolf Melnert 
(L) 6925f. 

•HIS LATEST EXCELLENCY (D): Willy Frisch. Ernst 
Gronau. Max Hansen, Hermlne Sterler, Lydia Potechlna, 
Olga Tschekova, Fritz Kampers, Hans Junkermann, Truus 
Von Aalten. Max Kuekstorf, JuUus FaUtensteln. 



Unusual Photoplays 



♦MARIE ANTOINETTE (D) : Diana Karenne, Walter 
Schwanneke. (L) 6000f. Unusual photoplays. 



Franklin Warner 



•GREAT POWER (T-D): Hirshel MayaU. Minna GombeU, 
Allan Birmingham. Nelan Jaap, G. Davidson Clark. John 
Anthony, Helen Shipman, Jack LesUe, Walter Walker, 
Conway Wingfleld, Alfred Swenson, Walter F, Scott, 
Eleanor Martin. 

Worldart Films 

•EAST SIDE SADIE (D) : Bertina Goldln. Jack EUls. Boris 
Bosenthal. Abe Sinkoff. Lucia Segar. Jack Halliday, Al 
Stanley. 

Zakora 

♦FACES OF CHILDREN (D) : Bachel Devrys. Victor Vina. 
Henry Duval. Pierrietta Honyez. Arlette Teryon. Jean 
Forest. (L) SOOOf. 



58 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



THE VOICE OF THE INDUSTRY 

LETTERS FROM READERS 



On Talking Film Costs 

I HAVE JUST FINISHED READING 

Kent's speech as published in the Herald- 
World some time ago regarding adjustments, 
lower prices on product, etc 

To me that talk is a lot of "bologna" as I 
just finished an intensive argument with a 
Paramount salesman. To my way of thinking 
Mr. Kent's speech was not sincere. If it was, 
why was I asked $50 film rental, $10 record- 
ing charges with a split figure of $125? My 
running expense in sound is over $100 for a 
three days showing. Just where do I come in, 
in a deal like that? 

I have no ax to grind with Paramount. I 
have been a consistent user of their product 
and sure made money with it. I would be 
using it today if I could get a fair deal — 
a deal that would enable me to make a profit 
before having to split with them. 

Mr. Kent, if you meant what you said, why 
do you allow or allow your organization to 
demand a proposition like that? Do you call 
that a fair deal? 

Please print this. I am in hopes that Mr. 
Kent will read it.— L. E. Palmer, Postville, 
Iowa. 

P. S.- — Please understand that I am not 
begging for Paramount product. I am getting 
along fine. Thanks. — LEP. 



"Smiit" in Pictures 

I WONDER IF THERE IS ANY WAY IN 

which the directors, writers, producers, and 
any others who have anything to do with the 
producing of all-talking pictures, can be con- 
vinced that the theatre patron as a whole in 
the United States does not talk smut in his 
or her home and does not want it spoken 
from the talking screen. 

All the complaint I have had during the 
year I have been showing talking pictures has 
been on this one thing, smut lines and smut 
gags, placed in the picture by some nitwit 
who thought it would get a laugh, and it 
always does' from the roughnecks and morons. 

This week I had two fine examples of this 
kind of thing. In Fox's all-talking picture. 
Big Time, Mae Clark informs her husband, 
Lee Tracy, that she is going to present him 
with a son or daughter on Christmas day. 
Then in comes Daphne Pollard and wants to 
know what's the matter with Lee, and he 
tells her, "I'm going to have a baby." Well, 
that's not so bad, but pretty rough stuff out 
here in the small towns. 

In Metro's Girl in the Snow the bloodhound 
gets grouchy and one of the characters wants 
to know what's wrong with that dog, she's 
always growling. Another character tells 
her, "I guess you would growl, too, if you 
were going to have pups." Another character 
pipes in with this one, "It will be just our 
luck for her to have them there pups on a 
cake of ice some night when Eliza is cross- 
ing." Then later on, Ford Sterling takes the 
dog to the garage m,an to trade her for a 
taxi bill, and the garage man looks her over 
and says, "Looks like she's going to have 
pups," and Ford tells him, "Well, you can 
have them, too, when she has them." 

Now this is just a samole of what they are 
placing in the dialog right along and it may 
be all okey for the large cities but I doubt 
that the city dads and mothers want their 
kids to listen to any such trash. Anyway, out 
here in this small town and in all others it's 
bad medicine for our business and is going to 



bring down a lot of blue nosed ladies before 
the local city council wanting something done 
about the matter, and next thing we know 
the vote gitters are agoing to appoint some 
of these good ladies as a local board to look 
over our pictures before they are shown and 
then — Oh, hell, you know what that means. 

In the silent days we could cut out subtitles 
that were raw, could cut out scenes that were 
raw, and get away with a lot of things that 
cannot be done in talking pictures. I don't 
know the answer to this but after spending 
21 years in the business of projecting motion 
pictures on a sheet, I do know that from the 
standpoint of the exhibitor in the small town 
of 50,000 and under, something had better be 
done about it or there is going to be plenty 
done by people who do not have our interests 
at heart. 

If you make any comment on this it will 
not be necessary to use my name as I am 
not looking for any free publicity. All I 
want to do is stay in this business and show 
good clean pictures, the kind that 95 per cent 
of the public likes and the only kind that 
make money. 

I hope that you will become interested to 
the extent that you will call this to the at- 
tention of those who can stop the practice. — 
Steve Farrar, Colonial Amusement Company, 
Harrisburg, 111. 



WESTERN ELECTRIC WIRINGS 
IN OTHER COUNTRIES 

{Continued from page 31") 



Paris, Convention IS-PD 

Paris, Clichy Palace 2SX-FD 

Paris, Gambetta Palace 2SX-FD 

Paris, Gaumont Palace IS-FD-NS 

Paris, Le Grand Cinema 

Paris, Marcadet Palace IS-PD 

Paris. Madeleine 2S-FD-NS 

Paris, Montrouge Palace IS-FD-NN 

Paris, Paramount 2SX-Fr)-N'; 

Paris, E«gina Aubert 3S-FD 

Paris, St. Paul IS-FD-NS 

Paris, TiTOU IS-PD-NS 

Strasbourg, Broglie Palace 2SX-PD 

GERMANY 

Berlin, Gloria Palast S-FD-NS 

GUATEMALA 

Guatemala City, Capitol IS-FD-NS 

HUNGARY 

Budapest, Fomm 2S-D-NS 

INDIA 

Bombay, Excelsior 2SX-PD-NS 

Calcutta, Elphinstone Picture Palace 2D-FD-NS 

Colombo, Empire 2D-PD-NS 

Lahore, Elphinstone 2D-FD-NS 

Rangoon. Excelsior 2S-FD-NS 

ITALY 

Bologna, Savoia 2SX-FD-NS 

Florence, Savoia 2SX-FD-NS 

Genoa, Olympia 2S-FD 

Milan, CoUoseo IS-FD-NS 

Milan, Corso IS-FD-NS 

Milan, San Carlo 2SX-FD-NS 

Palermo, Excelsior Super 2SX-FD-NS 

Naples, Augusteo IS-PD 

Rome, Capronica 2S-FD 

Rome, Super Cinema IS-PD-NS 

Trieste, Nazionale _ 2SX-FD-NS 

Turin. Ghersi 2SX-FD-NS 

Venice, Rossini 2SX-FD-NS 

JAMAICA (B.W.L) 

Kingston, Movies 2S-FD-NS 

JAPAN 

ToMo, Hogaku-Za 2SX-PD-NS 

Tokio. Musashino 2SX-PD-NS 

Tolij-o, Shibazona 3S-PD-NS 

MEXICO 

Mexico D. P., Regis 2S-PD-NS 

Mexico D. P., Mundial IS-FD-NS 

Mexico D. P., Olimpia IS-PD-NS 



NETHERLANDS 

Amsterdam, TuscWnski 2SX-PD-NS 

Rotterdam, Grand 2SX-PD 

NEW ZEALAND 

Auckland, Arcadia 2S-FD-NS 

Auckland, Capitol 2S-PD-NS 

Auckland, Crystal Palace 2S-PD-NS 

Auckland, Empress 2SX-PD-NS 

Auckland, Plaza 2SX-PD-NS 

Auckland. Regent 2SX-FD-NS 

Auckland, Roxy 3S-PD-NS 

Auckland. Strand 2SX-PD-NS 

Auckland, Tivoli 2S-FD-NS 

Blenheim, His Majesty 2S-D-NS 

Cambridge, Town Hall 3S-PD 

Christchurch, Civic 2SX-PD-NS 

Christchurch, Crystal Palace 2SX-PD-NS 

Christchurch, Liberty 2SX-PD-NS 

Christchurch, Tiieatre Royal 2SX-FD-NS 

Dunedin, Empire IS-FD-NS 

Dunedin, Octagon 2S-PD-NS 

Dunedin, Regent IS-PD-NS 

Grisborne. Palace 2SX-PD-NS 

Hervera, Opera House 3S-PD 

Huntley, Municipal 3S-FD-NS 

Invercargill. Regent 2SX-PD-NS 

Napier, Gaiety 2S-PD-NS 

New Plymouth, People's 3S-FD-NS 

Nelson Northern, Regent 3S-PD-NS 

Paeroa, Aurora 3S-FD 

Stratford, ICings 3S-PD 

Tearaha. Majestic 3S-FD 

Teawamutu, Empire 3S-FD 

Wanganui, Grand 3S-FD-NS 

Wanganui, Regent 2SX-FD-NS 

Wellington, De Luxe 2SX-FD-NS 

Wellington, Opera House 2SX-FD-NS 

Wellington, Paramount 2SX-PD-NS 

Wellington, Regent 2SX-FD-NS 

NORWAY 

Oslo, Colosseum IS-FD-NS 

Oslo, Eldorada 2SX-PD-NS 

Trondhjem, Verdensteatret 2S-PD-NS 

PANAMA 

Colon. Strand - 2S-FD-NS 

Panama City, Cecelia 2SX-PD-NS 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Manila, Ideal 3S-PD-NS 

Manila, Rialto 2SX-PD-NS 

POLAND 

Warsaw, Splendid 2SX-PD-NS 

PORTO RICO 

Humacao, Oriente 2S-FD-NS 

Ponce. Broadway 2S-BT)-NS 

San Juan, Capitol 2S-FD-NS 

San .Juan, Olimpo 3S-FD-NS 

San Juan, Rialto 3S-FD-NS 

San .Tuan, San Jose 3S-PD-NS 

San Juan, Victoria 3S-FD-NS 

SPAIN 

Barcelona, CoKseum IS-FD-NS 

Barcelona, Gemina 2SX-FD-NS 

Bilbao, Buenos Aires - IS-PD-NS 

Bilbao, Coliseo Albia IS-FD-NS 

Madrid, Cine Callao 2SX-PD-NS 

Madrid, Palacio de Musica IS-FD-NS 

Madrid, San Miguel 2SX-FD-NS 

SWEDEN 

Goteborg, Victoria 2S-PD-NS 

Malmo, Palladium 2SX-PD-NS 

Malmo, Scania 2SX-PD-NS 

Stockholm, Astoria 2S-FD-NS 

Stockholm, China _ 2SX-FD-NS 

Stocldiolm, Metropole Palais 2S-PD-NS 

Stockholm, Olympia _ 2S-FD-NS 

Stockholm, PaUadium 2SX-PD-NS 

Stockholm, Rialto 2S-FD-NS 

SWITZERLAND 

Basle, Capitole 2SX-D-NS 

Geneva, Alhambra 2SX-D-NS 

Geneva, Molard 3S-PD-NS 

Lucerne, Flora Cinema 3S-FD-NS 

Zurich, Capitole 2SX-PD-N.S 

TURKEY 

Constantinople, Alhambra 3S-FD-NS 



Scarcity of Pictures 
In Germany Becoming 
Serious, Says Canty 

(Special to the Herald-World) 
BERLIN, Dec. 22.— (By Mail)— George R. 
Canty, whose trade reports from Paris are 
read in Europe with great interest, has 
gathered some valuable information concern- 
ing the motion picture industry in Berlin. 

The silent picture, says Canty, is practically 
a relic now, thus American distributors in 
Berlin are having less and less good silents 
at their disposal, and German exhibitors want 
about 30 pictures a month. The Americans 
under the present conditions cannot exhibit 
their talking pictures, and the shortness of 
silent films might force the American renters 
to close their offices. 

The unreasonable demands of the German 
electric companies in the sound film dispute. 
Canty concludes, would bring Germany, 
through want of material, to a position from 
which it could hardly recover. 



January II, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



59 



WHAT THE PICTURE DID FOR ME 

Verdicts on Films in Language of Exhibitor 



Copyright, 1930 

KEY TO SOUND SYMBOLS: AT (All-Talking) designates pictures in which all speaking to be observed 
in the essential action is recorded, the designation including any musical score which the picture may 
have; TME (Talking-Musical Score-Sound Effects) designates part-talking pictures, the designation in- 
cluding the musical score necessary in such pictures and any sound effects; MC (Musical Comedy) desig- 
nates pictures corresponding to the type of stage production called "musical comedies," being extrava- 
ganzas or revues featuring musical acts and dancing and with all sounds essential to the action, including 
dialog, recorded; O (Operetta) designates pictures corresponding to the light operas of the stage called 
"operettas"; ME (Musical Score, Effects) designates pictures which have a musical score, may have inci- 
dental effects, but which have no scenes with dialog. When no symbols appear directly after the title, 

the picture was run in silent form. 



Columbia 

THE DONOVAN AFFAIR (AT) : Jack Holt- 
Have seen better high school plays than this turned 
out to be. The acting (if you would call it that) 
was very crude. Disc recording very bad for the 
first four reels, but from then on will get by. Dark 
print and plenty old. — Floyd Albert, Majestic theati'e, 
Mount Carroll, 111. — Small town patronage. 

THE DONOVAN AFFAIR (AT): Special cast- 
Did not see this either, but judging from the re- 
ceipts it did not go over very good. Recording very 
good. — L. E. Palmer, Postville theatre, Postville, la. 
— General patronage. 

THE DONOVAN AFFAIR: Jack Holt— Novem- 
ber 22. Fine, about the most entertaining picture 
yet. Jack is good, but Ethel Wales and Hank Mann 
take the cake. They are a riot. Wish they were in 
more pictures. Eight reels. — Robert K. Yancey, 
Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General patronage. 

THE DONOVAN AFFAIR: Jack Holt— Novem- 
ber 29-30. Very good picture, liked by all. Seven 
reels. — P. G. Held, Strand theatre, Griswold, la. — 
General patronage. 

TRIAL MARRIAGE (TME) : Special cast— De- 
cember 6. Very good picture, patrons pleased. Disc 
recording good. — R. A. Wilson, New theatre, De- 
Witt, Ark. — General patronage. 

TRIAL MARRIAGE: Sally Eilers— December 6-7. 
Fine. We enjoyed this. Don't know about the 
crowd. They seldom say anything, but no one 
■walked out. Seven reels. — Robert K. Yancey, Bonny 
theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General patronage. 

THE COLLEGE COQUETTE (AT): Special cast 
■ — Just another petting party, just another track 
race, another football game, and you have all four 
of the college pictures that have been made this 
year. The public is sick of them. The directors 
don't seem to have the bright idea to make some- 
thing different in any of them. Certainly no pic- 
tures were ever before cut on the same pattern as 
the college picture of today. Service is right about 
college didoes. It's all that and more. — Columbia 
City theatre, Columbia City, Ind. — General patron- 
age. 

THE COLLEGE COQUETTE: Ruth Taylor— No- 
vember 19. Pretty good college picture, but don't 
like Ruth Taylor. She's too silly and can't act. Six 
reels. — Robert K. Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mansfield, 
Mo. — General patronage. 

THE WARNING: Jack Holt— December 3. Good 
picture of its kind, I suppose, but don't like under- 
world stories. There are too many of them. Six 
reels. — ^Robert K. Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mansfield, 
Mo. — General patronage. 

THE FALL OF EVE (AT> : Special cast— 
This is all okay in every way. Fine recording 
in both music and talking. Eight reels. — Walter 
Odom & Sons, Dixie theatre, Durant, Miss. — 
General patronage. 

THE FALL OF EVE (AT) : Patsy Ruth Miller- 
December 13. Vei-y good comedy-drama. Satisfied 
patrons. Comments good. All Columbias have been 
good this far. Disc recording good. — R. A. Wilson, 
New theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — General patronage. 

FATHER AND SON: Jack Holt— No box office 



DATA ON SHORTS 

O EADERS and contributors of this de- 
•"-^ partment have doubtless noted in a 
growing number of instances the past 
few weeks, the absence of two items of 
necessary information in reports on short 
subjects. These items are, whether or 
not the short was played in sound, and 
the length. 

We do not know precisely why this in- 
formation has been left out of the re- 
ports. Space is definitely indicated on 
the blanks for the data on both sound 
and length. Every contributor wants to 
get that information from the reports 
from other exhibitors. Why should he 
sometimes neglect to give that informa- 
tion in his own reports? We hazard the 
guess that the cause is simply forgetful- 
ness, due partly perhaps to a tendency to 
regard the short subjects of less impor- 
tance than long features. 

Short subjects, however, are important 
on the program, as every exhibitor 
knows. And reports on them are there- 
fore important. When one exhibitor does 
not include all the necessary information 
in his reports, he can only expect some 
other exhibitor to do likewise, and the 
result will be that he will miss this in- 
formation in reports more and more, to 
his own disadvantage. 

It is therefore urgently asked that 
every contributor make an effort to in- 
clude all the information provided for 
on the blanks, in his reports on short 
subjects, just as in those on long features. 
Occasionally, of course, he may have dif- 
ficulty in recalling the exact length of a 
sound act. But instances of that kind will 
be few and far between, and we believe 
that almost always the length of short 
can be accurately given. And naturally 
he can recall very easily whether or not 
be played the picture in sound form. The 
importance of this information demands 
that it be given, and every report which 
does not contain it, we believe, is taking 
so much from the value of this, the ex- 
hibitors' own department. Don't you 
think so? 

—GEORGE SCHUTZ. 



bet, but a good program picture. We need specials 
in this business. — L. E. Palmer, Postville theatre, 
Postville, la. — General patronage. 

HURRICANE: Special cast— December 8-9. Good 
picture. A little too rough in places, but I guess 



that belongs with a sea picture. Seven reels. — P. G. 
Held, Strand theatre, Griswold, la. — General patron- 
age. 

THE YOUNGER GENERATION (TME): Special 
cast — Recording fair. No box office appeal, however. 
Barely made expenses. — L. E. Palmer, Postville the- 
atre, Postville, la. — General patronage. 

First National 

DARK STREETS (AT): Jack Mulhall— Don't 
know where a person could find a better production 
than this one. Mulhall sure fine. A favorite here. 
— Jack Green, New Geneseo theatre, Geneseo, 111. — 
Small town patronage. 

THE FORWARD PASS (AT) : Douglas Fairbanks, 
Jr. — Very attractive football picture, with Doug, Jr., 
winning the game, and many new fans. Recording 
very good. — Floyd Albert, Majestic theatre. Mount 
Carroll, III. — Small town patronage. 

DRAG (AT) : Richard Barthelmess— December 9- 
10. Patrons liked this picture. Recording in spots 
is not so hot on this, but it is entertaining and it 
drew a fair business. Roads and weather have been 
pretty tough. Then everyone is thinking Christmas. 
Eight reels. — Ray W. Musselman, Princess theatre, 
Lincoln, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

THE NIGHT WATCH: Billie Dove— November 5- 
6-7. A very good program picture. Seven reels. — • 
Benjamin Shnitka, Royal theatre, Innisfail, Alta., 
Canada. — Small town patronage. 

CALIFORNIA MAIL: Ken Maynard— November 
14-15-16. A good Western, with real riding. Six 
reels. — Benjamin Shnitka. Royal theatre, Innisfail, 
Alta., Canada. — Small town patronage. 

SCARLET SEAS: Richard Barthelmess— A rather 
rough picture. Seemed to satisfy about fifty per 
cent. Poor business. — Ernest Vetter, Majestic the- 
atre, Homer, Mich. — Small town patronage. 

HARD TO GET (AT): Dorothy Mackaill— Nice 
little program picture, which cost the producers very 
little to turn out. They should make some money 
on it. Recording very good. — Floyd Albert, Majestic 
theatre. Mount Carroll, 111. — Small town patronage. 

FAST LIFE (AT) : Special cast— November 22-23. 
Excellent picture and fair di'awing card. Acting 
and recording good. — Charles Bom, Elks theatre, 
Prescott, Ariz. — General patronage. 

BROADWAY BABIES (TME) : Alice White— 
A very good talking, singing, dancing picture. 
It has everything, with good recording. The 
supporting cast steals this picture. Tom Dugan 
and Fred Kohler exceptionally good. Step on 
this one. It will deliver. — Ray W. Musselman, 
Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General patron- 
age. 

THE GREAT DIVIDE (AT): Special cast- 
Opened sound program policy with this picture. Had 
good drawing power, but could only get the town 
people out. Roads were next to impassable. Doub- 
ling and duped music hard to get over. Not so good 
recording. Had an orchestra playing out in the 
hills. Never see that in this neck of the woods. 
Farmers couldn't fathom it. — Ray W. Musselman, 
Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General patronage. 

THE GLORIOUS TRAIL: Ken Maynard— A dandy 



60 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



picture. — W. A. Shillitoe, Dulamae theatre, Denmark, 
S. Car. — General patronage. 

YOUNG NOWHERES (AT) : Richard Barthelmess 
—Watch out for this one. It's as rotten as they 
could possibly make it. Six reels.— A. Mitchell, Dixie 
theatre, Russellville, Ky. — General patronage. 

TWIN BEDS (TME) : Jack Mulhall— The title 
would lead you to believe that it would be spicy, 
but it isn't. It is just full of good old fun that all 
can enjoy and can be recommended to the rest of 
the family. — Jack Green, New Geneseo theatre, Gene- 
seo. III. — Small town patronage. 

HER PRIVATE LIFE (AT) : Billie Dove— This 
one will not please. Possibly about 15 per cent of 
your audience will like it. Too bad they don't give 
Billie Dove a chance, she can talk. Seven reels. — 
A. Mitchell, Dixie theatre, Russellville, Ky. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

HER PRIVATE LIFE (AT) : Billie Dove— De- 
cember 4-5. A talking picture, not entertainment. 
Star, cast, acting and recording excellent. — Charles 
Born, Elks theatre, Prescott, Ariz. — General patron- 
age. 

THE LAWLESS LEGION: Ken Maynard— No- 
vember 25-26-27. Good Western and silent print 
■which cost far less than sound and leaves you some 
profit. Six reels. — Benjamin Shnitka, Royal theatre, 
Innisfail, Alta., Canada. — Small town patronage. 

SMILING IRISH EYES (AT) : Colleen Moore 
— There was something lacking in this one. Did 
not go over as it should with this star. Some 
of the Irish dialect was not very clear, especially 
where there are not many Irish, as is the case 
here. I think the powers that be should elim- 
inate dialects as much as possible in talkies. It's 
hard enough at times to understand good Amer- 
ican language, let alone strange dialects. But 
Colleen was as good, if not better, in this one 
than in any of her ethers. You just got to hand 
it to this Moore person. — Jack Green, New (Jene- 
seo theatre, Geneseo, 111. — Small town patronage. 

SMILING IRISH EYES (AT) : Colleen Moore- 
December 16-17. My patrons thought this was a 
very good picture, contrary to a number of reports. 
Had trouble with reproducer the first night. It got 
out of sink. This, and a cold wave, sure blowed 
things up for the second night. Recording was fair, 
and I got a lousy bunch of records. Were played 
so many times there wasn't any place left to make 
a mark, and I paid for one new set. Try and get 
'em. Nine reels. — Ray W. Musselman, Princess the- 
atre, Lincoln, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

SATURDAY'S CHILDREN (TME): Corinne Grif- 
fith — Just fair. Will get by. Not a two day pic- 
ture. Seven reels. — A Mitchell, Dixie theatre, Rus- 
sellville, Ky. — General patronage. 

PHANTOM CITY: Ken Maynard— Best picture 
with Western background ever run here. Well re- 
ceived. Action and plenty of it. — W. A. Shillitoe, 
Dulamae theatre, Denmark, S. Car. — General pat- 
ronage. 



Fox 

SALUTE (AT) : George O'Brien— November 27- 

28. Very entertaining, which means very good. If 
a talking picture is not entertaining, all the stars, 
direction, technicolor, etc., counts for little with the 
patron — I mean, my patrons. — Charles Born, Elks 
theatre, Prescott, Ariz. — General patronage. 

SALUTE (AT): George O'Brien— December 14. 
Good picture, played to satisfied patrons. Disc re- 
cording good. Very favorable comments. Nine reels. 
— R. A. Wilson, New theatre, DeWitt, Ark.— Gen- 
eral patronage. 

SALUTE (AT) : George O'Brien— December 15- 

16. You won't go wrong in pleasing the masses with 
this Army-Navy football classic. It pleases the women 
as well as the men. A good audience picture that 
the entire family will enjoy. Has comedy, romance, 
stirring march music and action enough to keep up 
your interest. Advertise it so they will not be misled 
by the title. Salute. It is not a war drama. — Charles 
H. Ryan, Buckingham theatre, Chicago, 111. — General 
patronage. 

THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES: Warner Baxter 
— December 11. Well liked by the few that saw it. 
Title will not draw them in. Good plot, though 
confusing to some. Six reels.^ — Mrs. I. H. Dietz, 
Star theatre, Covington, Ga. — Small town patronage. 

THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES (AT): Special 
cast — Three different versions of a murder solution. 
Made interesting enough. Recording on disc was 
nothing to rave or brag about. Six reels. — Ray W. 
Musselman, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General 
patronage. 

FAZIL: Charles Farrell — What a gyppin' I got 
on this hunk of baloney. Tried to get a rise out of 
Fox on it, but didn't even get an answer to my let- 
ter. Suppose they felt so ashamed they couldn't 
write. Run it, but hold your nose. — Ray W. Mus- 
selman, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General 
patronage. 

LUCKY STAR: Gaynor-Farrell— This team don't 
seem to draw for me. I paid too much dough for 
this and lost plenty. Did Fox ever make an adjust- 
ment? — Ray W. Musselman, Princess theatre, Lin- 
coln, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

LOVE, LIVE AND LAUGH (AT): George 
Jessel — One of the cleanest and best entertain- 
ments we have played in many days. A picture 
that can be played any night in the week and 
will please everybody from 3 to 103 years old. — 
Allwein & Shrcffler, Castamba theatre, Shelby, 
O. — General patronage. 

SPEAKEASY (AT) : Special cast— December 6-7. 

A good picture of its type. Seemed to please and 
draw well. Recording excellent. — Charles Born, Elks 
theatre, Prescott, Ariz. — CJeneral patronage. 

WHY LEAVE HOME (AT) : Special casf^De- 
cember 7. Pleased our patrons. Received some very 
good comments. Disc recording good. — R. A. Wil- 
son, New theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — General patronage. 

WHY LEAVE HOME (AT): Special cast— De- 
cember 4-5. About as funny as you would care to 



NOTICE 



Don't buy talking equipment. You may use ours free for one or two years — 

When you contract to play our short talking subjects. Our releeises will be 6 one 
reel talkers every week. We know you are unable to play talkies without machines. 
Therefore we will furnish you with a complete disc talking equipment — and you do 
not have to buy it. You may play each short 2 or 3 days with 2 or 3 singles on 
each program. The talking equipment remains in your theatre for the contract 
term of one or two years, to play all releases of all producers, including Paramount, 
Warners, Metro, Pathe Features and News, Fox Features and News; F. B. O. First 
National, Tiffany, Universal, Radiotone and all independent releases. 

YOU PAY ACCORDING TO CAPACITY — FOR SHORTS AND MACHINES: 

500 seat theatre $50. weekly 

600 seat theatre 60. weekly 

700 seat theatre 65. weekly 

1000 seat theatre 70. weekly 

Special consideration for theatres having less than 500 or more than 1,000 seats. 

Equipment shipped from New York Factory direct to you. 

Service, film and bookings, to be handled by an exchange in your territory. 

Act at once on this convenient plan for machines and shorts. 

RADIOTONE PICTURES CORPORATION 

729 Seventh Ave., New York 



see. And will it build? Just get this and get a 
few in for the first night. The second night will 
take care of itself. It is just what they want and 
it is human. Recording on disc is good. Six reels. 
— Ray W. Musselman, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. 
— General patronage. 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer 

BROADWAY MELODY (MC) : Special cafi1>- 
Plenty good, but played it too late, as many from 
here had seen it. Disc recording good. — Floyd Al- 
bert, Majestic theatre. Mount Carroll, 111. — Small 
town patronage. 

BROADWAY MELODY (MC) : Special cast- De- 
cember 4-5. Not the big high-priced special as sold 
to me. Good picture, but no special. Disc recording 
good.— R. A. Wilson, New theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — 
General patronage. 

SO THIS IS COLLEGE (AT): Special cas<^ 
When they make a better picture than this, I 
want to know where I can get it. Music, sing- 
ing, dancing, youth, pep and everything. If this 
doesn't go over in every spot it plays in, better 
close up your theatres. Nugent, Starr and Mont- 
gomery great. Give us more like this, Metro. 
This is the stuff. — L. E. Palmer, Postville the- 
atre, Postville, la. — General patronage. 
THE DUKE STEPS OUT: William Haines— De- 
cember 12-13-14. This is one of Haines' best. Eight 
reels. — Benjamin Shnitka, Royal theatre, Innisfail, 
Alta., Canada.- — Small town patronage. 

SPEEDWAY: William Haines— November 28. 
Good comedy and pleased. Business dull before 
Christmas. Seven reels. — Robert K. Yancey, Bonny- 
theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — General patronage. 

GIRL IN THE SHOW (AT) : Special cast- A 
great title, but a very poor picture. Recording okay. 
A disappointment. — L. E. Palmer, Postville theatre, 
Postville, la. — General patronage. 

THE UNHOLY NIGHT (AT): Special cast— The 
poorest all talking picture Metro ever made. A com- 
plete flop in this town. Recording okay. — L. E. 
Palmer, Postville theatre, Postville, la. — General 
patronage. 

HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT: John Gilber^-Not so 
hot. Picture is good, but I struck bad weather. 
Old and snow spoiled crowds. — L. E. Palmer, Post- 
ville theatre, Postville, la. — General patronage. 

ALIAS JIMMY VALENTINE: William Haines— 
December 6. A very good picture, and Haines a 
fair draw , for me. Satisfied a small house. Will 
try to get it back in sound. Eight reels. — Ray W. 
Musselman, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General 
patronage. 

LADY OF CHANCE: Norma Shearer— December 
9-10-11. A good program picture. Eight reels. — 
Benjamin Shnitka, Royal theatre, Innisfail, Alta., 
Canada. — Small town patronage. 

MADAME X (AT) : Ruth Chatterton— Wonderful 
picture. Went over to a very large crowd, and 
everyone was loud in its praise. — L. E. Palmer, Post- 
ville theatre, Postville, la. — General patronage. 

WISE GIRLS (AT) : Special cast— Boys, here is 
real entertainment. A great comedy, clean as a 
whistle. ESveryhtody well pleased. Elliot Nugent a 
big hit. Recording fair. — L. E. Palmer, Postville 
theatre, Postville, la. — General patronage. 

THUNDER: Lon Chaney— December 6-7. A real 
picture that was liked by everyone that saw it. 
Chaney sure is a wonderful actor. Phyllis Haver 
also does fine work. If you haven't played this pic- 
ture you are missing a good hit. Seven reels. — P. G. 
Held, Strand theatre, Griswold, la. — General patron- 
age. 

Paramount 

THE COCOANUTS (AT) : Four Marx Brothers 
• — A swell comedy, kept the audience on their toes 
all through. While it did not draw very well, it was 
not the fault of the picture. Business is not so 
good right now. — Jack Green, New Geneseo theatre, 
Geneseo, 111.— Small town patronage. 

THE COCOANUTS (AT) : Marx Brothers—No- 
vember 17. Craziest comedy ever made, wonderful 
drawing power and pleased. If your patrons like 
to laugh, don't pass this up. — J. J. Hoffman, Plain- 
view theatre, Plainview, Neb. — General patronage. 

THE COCOANUTS (AT) : Four Marx Brothers- 
December 9-10. Good comedy. Some good dancing 
and beautiful sets. Satisfied customers. Played two 
days to satisfactory business. Disc recording good. 



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January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



61 



— R. A. Wilson, New theatre, DeWitt, Ark.— Gen- 
eral patronp.ge. 

ILLUSION (AT) : Nancy Carroll— Hard to 

beat this. Just one swell picture from start to 

finish. — Jack Greene, New Genesco theatre, Gcne- 

sco. 111. — Small town patronage. 

THE LADY LIES (AT): Claudette Colbert— De- 
cember 2-3-4. An exceptionally good picture with 
adult appeal. Claudette (3olbert, Walter Huston and 
Charles Ruggles are a trio of stage people who give 
an outstanding example of how perfect dialog should 
be presented in a talking drama. You can faithfully 
recommend this production to your patrons. — CHiarles 
H. Ryan, Buckingham theatre, Chicago, 111. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

WHY BRING THAT UP (AT) : Moran and Mack 
— November 17-18-19. A good drawing card on ac- 
count of popularity of Moran and Mack. Picture 
missed being great by weak vehicle, and vehicle 
missed on account of sacrificing finished stage pres- 
entations for back stage squabbles and rehearsals. 
Recording excellent. — Charles Born, Elks theatre, 
Prescott, Ariz. — General patronage. 

DANGEROUS CURVES: Clara Bow— Good pic- 
ture and cast. — William R. Leonard, Ridgeway Ckim- 
munity theatre, Ridgeway, Mo. — General patronage. 

DANGEROUS CURVES (AT): Clara Bow— Did 
not see this on account of sickness. Business very 
good, however. Recording fair. — L. E. Palmer, Post- 
ville theatre, Postville, la. — General patronage. 

INNOCENTS OF PARIS (AT) : Maurice Chevalier 
— December 22. A very interesting singing and 
dancing picture. Not a kick on story and recording. 
Many good comments. General recording fairly good, 
and ninth reel exceptionally good on disc. Ten reels. 
— George J. Rhein, Manchester theatre, Manchester, 
Wis. — Small town patronage. 

SHOPWORN ANGEL: Nancy Carroll— December 
19. A good picture with a poor ending. Print was 
dark in spots, and the photography was very poor. 
Could hardly tell what was going on. Eight reels. — 
Ray W. Musselman, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. 
— Small town patronage. 

FAST COMPANY; Special cast— December 12-13. 
Fairly good comedy. Very light stuff which must 
have gone over big in talking. Will please the base- 
ball fans, will not draw the women. Seven reels. — 
Mrs. I. H. Dietz, Star theatre, Covington, Ga. — 
Small town patronage. 

STAIRS OF SAND: Wallace Beery— December 14. 

We found this one to be neither as good as a Zane 
Grey ought to be, nor as bad as some reports indi- 
cated. Would call it just ordinary run of the studio 
program fodder. Since print and photography were 
both good, we have no kicks. Six reels. — O. B. 
Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town 
patronage. 

STAIRS OF SAND: Special east— A good West- 
ern. Six reels.- — Ei-nest Vetter, Majestic theatre, 
Homer, Mich. — Small town patronage. 

GENTLEMEN OF THE PRESS (AT): Special 
cast — November 9-10. Not a bad picture, but it ap- 
pears that some of the country folks did not under- 
stand newspapermen stuff. In general, I think it 
was enjoyed, although not so much of a small town 
picture. Disc recording from fair to very good — 
that is, in a few scenes fair, rest good. Eight reels. 
— George J. Rhein, Manchester theatre, Manchester, 
Wis. — Small town patronage. 

ABIE'S IRISH ROSE: Charles Rogers— November 
8-9-10. Played this one on a return engagement, 
and box office clicked well. Twelve reels. — Benja- 
min Shnitka, Royal theatre, Innisfail, Alta., Canada. 
— Small town patronage. 

WHAT A NIGHT: Bebe Daniels— Good pleaser.— 
William R. Leonard, Ridgeway Community theatre, 
Ridgeway, Mo. — General patronage. 

BETRAYAL: Emil Jannings— Good picture. Will 
not please all classes. — William R. Leonard, Ridge- 
way Community theatre, Ridgeway, Mo. — General 
patronage. 

WINGS: Special cast — September 11. One of the 
best war pictures I've ever shown. It pleased 100 
per cent and held everyone's interest all through. 
This was played as a silent. Play it, as it's sure 
to give satisfaction. — F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, 
Stockton, Mo. — ^General patronage. 

FOUR FEATHERS (ME): Special cast— A very 
good picture, but did not go over very good in draw- 
ing power. Those who saw it liked it, with the ex- 
ception of those who think silent pictures are passe. 
— Jack Green, New Geneseo theatre, Geneseo, 111. — 
Small town patronage. 

THE SATURDAY NIGHT KID (AT): Clara Bow 
— December 8-9. The audience accepted this as good 
entertainment. All comments were favorable, and 
even the kiddies got a kick out of it. Clara Bow as 
the personality bonfire girl as she was in Wild Party, 
with Jean Arthur and James Hall in supporting 
parts. Title had box office value in this locality. — 



Charles H. Ryan, Buckingham theatre, Chicago, 111. 
— General patronage. 

THE MAN I LOVE: Special cast— As a fight pic- 
ture it is all right. — William R. Leonard, Ridgeway 
Community theatre, Ridgeway, Mo. — General patron- 
age. 

THE I\1A.N I LOVE: Richard Arlen— November 
24-25. Very good program picture. — P. G. Held, 
Strand theatre, Griswold, la. — General patronage. 

THE LOVE DOCTOR: Richard Dix— December 
5-6. One of the best comedy-dramas we have shown 
in a long time. We like to see Dix in this type of 
picture. Paramount lost a good hit when they let 
Richard go. Drew well and greatly pleased the audi- 
ence. Seven reels. — Mrs. I. H. Dietz, Star theatre, 
Covington, Ga. — Small town patronage. 

THE LOVE DOCTOR (AT): Richard Dix— No- 
vember 22. Splendid comedy-drama, with perfect 
recording. — J. J. Hoffman, Plainview theatre. Plain- 
view, Neb. — General patronage. 

WOMAN TRAP: Special cast— A bunch of sordid 
junk. This kind of pictm'e puts us out of business. 
— W. A. Shillitoe, Dulamae theatre, Denmark, S. 
Car. — General patronage. 

CHINATOWN NIGHTS: Wallace Beery— Decem- 
ber 18. A fairly entertaining picture. I used this 
with Shopworn Angel on a double feature program. 
Gave my patrons plenty of pictures to look at, and 
while there wasn't the variety that I wanted, it got 
rid of two remodeled commotion pictures. Eight 
reels. — ^Ray W. Musselman, Princess theatre, Lin- 
coln, Kan. — Small town patronage. 

THREE WEEK ENDS: Clara Bow— Old, but 
Clara Bow is a draw for me. Kinda hot in spots, 
but nothing to get worried about. — Ray W. Mussel- 
man, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General pat- 
ronage. 

THUNDERBOLT: George Bancroft— November 
26-27. Nothing to it. No moral. A very poor pic- 
ture to show to children. It also flopped bad at the 
bad office. Seven reels. — P. G. Held, Strand theatre, 
Griswold, la. — General patronage. 

THUNDERBOLT: George Bancroft— Very fine 
acting, favorable comments. Poor business owing 
to bad weather. Eight reels. — Ernest Vetter, Ma- 
jestic theatre. Homer, Mich. — Small town patronage. 

THE DANGEROUS WOMAN (AT): Special cast 
— November 17. Story not suitable for small town. 
Disc recording very rotten. I cannot understand 
why a producer sends out anything like this, as it 
sure is suicide, and how ! One picture like this will 
drive away more business than can be gained with 
ten good pictures well recorded. Eight reels. — - 
George J. Rhein, Manchester theatre, Manchester, 
Wis. — Small town patronage. 

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH (AT) : Richard Dix 
— October 26-27. A very good comedy-drama. Good 
comments. Okay for small town patronage. Disc 
recording fair. Eight reels.- — George J. Rhein, Man- 
chester theatre, Manchester, Wis. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

THE LEGION OF THE CONDEMNED: Gary 
Cooper — November 11-12-13, Old but good. Eight 
reels. — Benjamin Shnitka, Royal theatre, Innisfail, 
Alta., Canada. — ^Small town patronage. 

SOMEONE TO LOVE: Special cast— December 21. 
Nice little picture which did not even come close to 
paying its way. Old Boreas and Santa Glaus are a 
combination we cannot buck. Seven reels. — O. B. 
Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town 
patronage. 

THE GAY DEFENDER: Richard Dix— Dandy 
pleaser. — William R. Leonard, Ridgeway Community 
theatre, Ridgeway, Mo. — General patronage. 

DARKENED ROOMS (TME) : Evelyn Brent- 
December 19-20. Very good sound, good acting. 
Spiritual story that, although well carried out, has 
no drawing power. — J. F. Fletas, Monroe theatre. 
Key West, Fla. — General patronage. 

CHARMING SINNERS (TME): Ruth Chatterton 
— December 17-18. Great story, extra-good cast and 
extra-good work and presentation. The sound is 
not good — ^price a little high. — J. F. Fletas, Monroe 
theatre. Key West, Fla. — ^General patronage. 

THE RAINBOW MAN (AT): Eddie Dowling 
— Very good picture. Comments all good. A 
few said it was the best picture they ever saw. 
Recording good on disc. Ten reels. — George J. 
Rhein, Manchester theatre, Manchester, Wis. — 
Small town patronage. 

STUDIO MURDER CASE (AT): Neil Hamilton- 
November 2-3. Seems everyone liked this one, as 
we received many nice comments on it and no bad 
ones. The disc recording in a couple of reels not 
too good, in my opinion, but when I asked patrons 
what they thought of the recording, they replied 
that it was good and appeared surprised that I 
thought otherwise. Anyway, the recording is good 
during the greater part of the picture. Seven reels. 
— George J. Rhein, Manchester theatre, Manchester, 
Wis. — Small town patronage. 



THE WHEEL OF LIFE: Richard Dix— Decem- 
ber 15. Picture, print and business all away below 
average. Smallest Sunday attendance we have had 
for months. Figured that this would draw pretty 
good, as we just ran Redskin a couple of weeks 
ago, but it neither drew nor satisfied. Six reels. — 
O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small 
town patronage. 

THE WHEEL OF LIFE: Richard Dix— Good pic- 
ture, pleased all. — William R. Leonard, Ridgeway 
Community theatre, Ridgeway, Mo. — General patron- 
age. 



Pathe 



BIG NEWS (AT) : Special cast— Very good pro- 
gram picture. Good strong story well carried out, 
and extra-good sound. Price right. — J. F. Fletas, 
Monroe theatre. Key West, Fla. — General patronage. 

THE FLYING FOOL (AT): William Boyd— 
Opened sound with this one and was well satisfied 
with results. Dialog very distinct. Disc recording 
good. — Floyd Albert, Majestic theatre. Mount Car- 
roll, 111. — Small town patronage. 

OH YEAH (AT) : Special cast— This one was en- 
joyed by all. Received many good comments on it. — 
Jack Green, New Geneseo theatre, Geneseo, 111. — 
Small town patronage. 



RKO 



RIO RITA (MC): Bebe Daniels— The finest pic- 
ture played this season. If you have sound, play it 
and stand on your head in advertising it. Buy Radio 
pictures. — Allwein & Shreffler, Castamba theatre, 
Shelby, O. — General patronage. 

STREET GIRL (AT): Betty Compson— De- 
cember 15-16-17. One of the best we have 
played, bar none. Story interesting, direction fine 
and the cast extra-good. Betty Compson in a 
class by herself, the most versatile actress on 
the screen. And Oakic, Sparks and Cawthom 
furnished some real comedy that was funny. 
John Harron and the rest very good. You man- 
agers "that ain't bought this picture," if you 
want a show that will give 100 per cent satis- 
faction, get busy. — Bert Silver, Silver Family 
theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage. 
STREET GIRL (AT): Betty Compson— I bought 
R K O on the strength of Street Girl and Rio Rita. 
Looks like the other pictures are not so hot. RKO 
should take example from Metro. It's not the big 
specials and a few "crows" that we exhibitors need, 
but consistently good pictures, consecutively, if you 
know what I mean. Street Girl is a great picture. 
Book it, boost it. — L. E. Palmer, Postville theatre, 
Postville, la. — General patronage. 

HALF MARRIAGE: Olive Borden— If Olive Bor- 
den would act in a natural and human manner she 
would be a nice star, but she slithers affectedly 
through this picture in such an uncalled for manner 
that patrons were disgusted. — L. E. Palmer, Post- 
ville theatre, Postville, la. — General patronage. 



Tiffany 



WHISPERING WIND (TME): Special cast— No- 
vember 21-22-23. Very good program picture. Re- 
cording good. Seven reels. — Benjamin Shnitka, 
Royal theatre, Innisfail, Alta., Canada. — Small town 
patronage. 



United Artists 



THE TRESPASSER (AT): Gloria Swanson— De- 
cember 15-16-17. Great, great! Gloria Swanson is 
remarkably great in this picture. — Allwein & 
Shreffler, Castamba theatre, Shelby, O. — General 
patronage. 

SHE GOES TO WAR: Eleanor Boardman— De- 
cember 1-2. Very good picture. Acting and direct- 
ing good. Eight reels.— P. G. Held, Strand theatre, 
Griswold, la. — General patronage. 



Afo Losses in the Box Office 

ICKET REGISfEl^ 




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Register Corp. 

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Tickets Jot Every Purpose^ LOWEST Market Prices 



62 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



ETERNAL LOVE: John Barrymore — December 
18-19. Just one of those big pictures that do not 
satisfy a soul. Possibly we need one of this kind 
once in a while to show the contrast between the 
good and bad. Well, this did. — ^Bert Silver, Silver 
Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patron- 
age. 

THE GAUCHO: Douglas Fairbanks — November 
29-30. An extra-good picture. One of the best we 
ever ran. Nothing draws much this time of year. 
TJine reels. — Robert K. Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mans- 
-field. Mo. — General patronage. 

COLLEGE: Buster Keaton— December 17-18. 
Pretty good. Buster kept the audience convulsed — 
-when they could follow the picture. So much cut 
■out of this print that it was rather disconnected. 
Took lots of work to get the print in shape to 
project. Maybe we pay a higher price for U A pic- 
tures because we can be sure of lots of practice re- 
pairing film. Business not very good, but the 
-weather was terrible. Six reels. — O. B. Wolfe. 
Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — S'mall town patron- 
age. 

Universal 

SENOR AMERICANO (AT) : Ken Maynard— 
December 14. Good Western entertainment, with 
good sound, and price is right. — J. F. Fleitas, Mon- 
roe theatre. Key West, Fla. — General patronage. 

THE WINGED HORSEMAN: Hoot Gibson- 
Plenty good. Hoot rides everything but his horse 
and he gets him in action some. This star always 
has been a di'aw for me, and I think he will knock 
'em cold with sound. Anyway, I'm waiting to give 
him a try. — Ray W. Musselman, Princess theatre, 
Lincoln, Kan. — General patronage. 

RIDING FOR FAME: Hoot Gibson— November 26. 
Good Western. Hoot pleases our people. Six reels. 
. — Robert K. Yancey, Bonny theatre, Mansfield, Mo. — 
■General patronage. 

GRINNING GUNS: Hoot Gibson— December 
7. Hoot always gets me some business, and 
this one was no exception. Roads bad, but they 
got here for this show. Six reels. — Ray W. Mus- 
selman, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General 
patronage. 

THE MAN WHO LAUGHS: Special cast— De- 
cember 3-4. One of those pictures that cost a lot of 
money and are not worth a tinker's damn at the 
l)ox office. Why producers make the exhibitors run 
such bunk is more than I can understand. I lost 
money on this one, like most of the other exhibitors 
did.— P. G. Held, Strand theatre, Griswold, la.— 
General patronage. 

Warner Bros. 

GOLD DIGGERS OF BROADWAY (MC) : Special 
cast — December 8-9-10. Is 100 per cent entertain- 
ment of the type that puts the exhibitors and 
patrons into the same mutual admiration society. 
A real musical comedy, all in technicolor with a — 
Oh, shucks, you never had one try to describe the 
Grand Canyon, to you, did you? It's a real audience 
picture and entertainment, with the accent on en- 
tertainment. — Charles Born, Elks theatre, Prescott, 
Ariz. — General pati-onage. 

HONKY TONK (AT): Sophie Tucker- 1 cannot 
see anything- so bad about this picture but what it 
could be shown in any and all theatres. It's good 
for a second night's showing, as it creates lots of 
mouth-to-mouth publicity. Seven reels. — Walter 
Odom & Sons, Dixie theatre, Durant, Miss. — General 
patronage. 

HONKY TONK (AT) : Sophie Tucker— November 
15. This is everything T. O. Service said it was in 
the August 31 number, but for those who missed 
his comments we will repeat them, although we can- 
not remember the exact words, but anyway he said 
.something to the effect that it was a good thing for 
Al that Honky Tonk was not released before The 
Singing Fool, and a lot of other nice things, and 
Tie was right. — J. J. Hoffman, Plainview theatre, 
Plainview, Neb. — General patronage. 

SO LONG LETTY (AT): Charlotte Green- 
wood — This is the kind that makes show busi- 
ness. So Long Letty, we hope not. Make some 
more, Letty. You have the right idea, — Allwein 
& Shreffler, Castama theatre, Shelby, O.— Gen- 
eral patronage. 

IS EVERYBODY HAPPY (AT) : Ted Lewis- 
Play it and rejoice, because it will make you and all 
-who come to see it happy. It's up and going from 
.start to finish. Nine reels. — Walter Odom & Sons, 
Dixie theatre, Durant, Miss. — General patronage. 

THE HOTTENTOT (AT) : Edward Everett Horton 
— November 28. A scream from start to finish, won- 
derful cast and perfect recording. — J. J. Hoffman, 
Plainview theatre, Plainview, Neb. — General patron- 
.age. 



MY MAN (AT) : Fannie Price — November 18-19- 
20. Story good. Cannot report on T M E as my 
equipment was only installed and did not perfectly 
reproduce. Twelve reels. — Benjamin Shnitka, Royal 
theatre, Innisfail, Alta., Canada. — Small town pat- 
ronage. 

THE LION AND THE MOUSE (TME) : Special 
cast — November 28-29-30. Very good story, and re- 
cording good. Eight reels. — Benjamin Shnitka, 
Royal theatre, Innisfail, Alta., Canada. — Small town 
patronage. 

KID GLOVES (TME) : Special cast— December 13- 

14. A very good program picture. — Bert Silver, Sil- 
ver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General pat- 
lonage. 

KID GLOVES (TME) : Special cast— December 2- 
3. Very good crook drama to poor business. Disc 
recording about the best we have run to date. Should 
please anywhere. — R. A. Wilson, New theatre, De- 
Witt, Ark. — General patronage. 

FROM HEADQUARTERS: Monte Blut^Novem- 
ber 22-23. An ordinary program picture, not good 
and not bad. One of those that just get by. Seven 
reels. — P. G. Held, Strand theatre, Griswold, la. — • 
General patronage. 

LITTLE WILD CAT: Audrey Ferris— September 
9. A good comedy- drama, with quite a bit of com- 
edy throughout. Rather good entertainment from 
first to last reel. Seven reels. — F. H. Babbs, Stock- 
ton theatre, Stockton, Mo. — General patronage. 

STOLEN KISSES: May McAvoy— November 20. 

One of the silliest, foolishest pictures I have ever 
seen. There's nothing to it. — F. H. Babbs, Stockton 
theatre, Stockton, Mo. — General patronage. 

FANCY BAGGAGE: Audrey Ferris— September 27. 
A number A-1 comedy. Plenty of entertainment. 
Had several comments on it and they all were good. 
Six reels. — F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, Stockton, 
Mo. — General patronage. 

Miscellaneous 

FRECKLED RASCAL: (F B O) Buzz Barton- 
September 23 — Just an average Western. Nothing 
big about the story, and yet it pleased fairly well. 
An action picture. — F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, 
Stockton, Mo. — General patronage. 

GUN LAW: (FBO) Tom Tyler— September 16. 

A fair program picture that will please your Satur- 
day night ci-owd as it has plenty of action. Six 
reels. — F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, Stockton, Mo. 
— General patronage. 

KING COWBOY: (FBO) Tom Mix— Action and 
Tom Mix. Gets plenty of patrons on Saturday 
night. Not such a bad picture, but they kinda got 
Tom away from the old mine and he only had to 
whip a few of the boys in dresses. They gave him 
some help, though, and put in some comedy, so this 
offering got by in good shape. Hope to see more 
talking Westerns. They're bread and butter pictures. 
Seven reels. — Ray W. Musselman. Princess theatre, 
Lincoln, Kan. — General patronage. 

OUTLAWED: (FBO) Tom Mix— Pretty good 
picture and satisfied my action-loving Saturday night 
patrons. Have to have a cowboy out front on the 
paper to get them in. Tom and Tony usually sat- 
isfy. This is no exception. — Ray W. Musselman, 
Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General patronage. 

SHOULD A GIRL MARRY: (State Rights) 
Helen Foster — November 30. A sex picture that 
v>'asn't any worse than lots of ordinary pictures 
shown. A good little story, and the picture seems 
to have drawing power. Seven reels. — F. H. Babbs, 
Stockton theatre, Stockton, Mo. — General patronage. 

TAXI 13: (FBO) Chester Conklin— September 9. 

Bought this one for a special, but wouldn't even con- 
sider it a program picture. Very little comedy. — 
F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, Stockton, Mo. — Gen- 
eral patronage. 

YOUNG WHIRLWIND: (FBO) Buzz Barton— 
This boy made some very good pictures. Nothing 
big or outstanding but there was plenty of enter- 
tainment packed in most everyone I ran. — Ray W. 
Musselman, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Kan. — General 
patronage. 

Serials 

THE PIRATE OF PANAMA (Universal) : Special 
cast — well, that's finished. Now we're going to take 
a rest fi-om serials for a while, maybe forever. This 
one interested quite a few kids and more adults than 
usual, but was a pain in the neck to most of our 
patrons. We have fed 'em serials for over a year 
but can't get many worked up over them. Twelve 
chapters. — O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, 
O. — Small town patronage. 



Short Features 

(SOUND) 
EDUCATIONAL 

THE BRIDE'S RELATIONS, 2.— Plenty funny, 
and they sure got a big kick out of this. It was my 
first all-talking comedy and it set a fast pace. Good 
recording. (Ray W. Musselman, Princess theatre, 
Lincoln, Neb. — Small town patronage.) 

DON'T GET EXCITED, 2.— A fair comedy with a 
few laughs. Nothing to write home about. Re- 
cording good. (Ray W. Musselman, Princess the- 
atre, Lincoln, Neb. — Small town patronage.) 

LUPINO LANE COMEDIES, 2.— Shipmates. A 
mighty good all-talking comedy. Lane plenty funny 
and a real acrobat. Haven't had any kicks on a 
Lane comedy. Good recording. (Ray W. Mussel- 
man, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Neb. — Small town 
patronage.) 

FOX 

MEDICINE MAN, 2.— Clark & MacCullough. A 

funny slap stick act. (Bert Silver. Silver Family 
theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

TINY TOWN REVUE (Act No. 784-B).— A very 
fine act. (Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Green- 
ville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

WATER BOY. — Good singing act. Fine voices. 
(Bert Silver, Silver Family theatre, Greenville, Mich. 
— General patronage.) 

MGM 

CHARLEY CHASE COMEDIES, 2.— The Bigr 
Squawk. Charley acted like he didn't quite know 
what it was all about. But, Charley, I'll bet on 
you every time. As soon as you find yourself yoa 
will be just as good in talkers as you were in silents, 
and that's saying a lot. (Jack Greene, New Geneseo 
theatre, Geneseo, 111. — Small town patronage.) 

OUR GANG COMEDIES, 2.— Small Talk. A com- 
edy made around an orphan's home. Not much 
comedy, but it got some laughs. Disc recording 
good. (R. A. Wilson, New theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — 
General patronage.) 

SPITALNY'S BAND, 2.— Not much to it. Just 
two reels of music. Disc recording good. (R. A. 
Wilson, New theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — General patron- 
age.) 

VICTOR ARTISTIC, 1.— Very poor. Just an- 
other reel, Disc recording good. (R. A. Wilson, 
New theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — General patronage.) 

KELLER SISTERS AND LYNCH, 1 Very good 

singing and dancing act. Did not receive any ap- 
plause. Disc recording good. (R. A. Wilson, New 
theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — General patronage.) 

PARAMOUNT 

FARO NELL, 2. — Louise Fazenda. Shame on you. 
Paramount, for putting out a thing like this. Whose 
fault was It, anyway. Too bad the guns in this 
were not loaded with real bullets and used as they 
should be. Supposed to be a burlesque. Oh, boy! 
If this is comedy, then I never saw a comedy. 
Would have been much better if they had let the 
cowpunchers sing all the way through, but they 
were interrupted with a lot of silly drivel. (Jack 
Greene, New Geneseo theatre, Geneseo, 111. — Small 
town patronage.) 

HIGH HAT, 1.— A musical act that pleased. Re- 
cording very good. (J. J. Hoffman, Plainview the- 
atre, Plainview, Neb. — General patronage.) 

PARAMOUNT SOUND NEWS NO. 31.— Ran my 
first last week. Good news but is too old for me. 
Disc recording good. (R. A. Wilson, New theatre, 
DeWitt, Ark. — General patronage.) 

RADIO RHYTHM, 1.— Very slow act, can't give it 
much. Disc recording good. (R. A. Wilson, New 
theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — General patronage.) 

RAYMOND GRIFFITH COMEDIES, 2.— Sleeping 
Porch. A real comedy. Recording very good. (J. 
J. Hoffman, Plainview theatre, Plainview, Neb. — 
General patronage.) 

WARNER BROS. 
VITAPHONE ACTS NOS. 903 AND 2369.— Very 
good filler, but very short. We find these acts 
shorter than any other company's. We have to play 
so many each night that the expense is taking all 
of our profits and we will certainly be glad when 
the contract is out. (Bert Silver, Silver Family 
theatre, Greenville, Mich. — General patronage.) 

(SILENT) 

COLUMBIA 

THE SKELETON DANCE, 2 — A perfectly mar- 
velous short. Must be seen to be appreciated. (J. 
J. Hoffman, Plainview theatre, Plainview, Neb. — 
General patronage.) 

EDUCATIONAL 
DOROTHY DEVORE COMEDIES, 2.— Circus 
[Reports continued on page following Jaysee] 



January II, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



65 



J. C. Jenkins — His Colyum 



FORT WORTH, TEX. 
December 22, 1929. 

DEAR HERALD-WORLD: 

Tonight there was a guy in the lobby of the hotel kept playing one 
jazz record after another on tlie phonograph. We didn't kill him 
because there is no open season on 'em down here in Texas. That's 
one place where the law is lame. 

The man who wrote the first jazz score is heralded throughout the 
length and breadth of the land as the "King of Music," and there are 
altogether too many saps trying to imitate the king. But the man 
who invented the storage battery to create the spark that sets in mo- 
tion the energy to carry millions of people bUIions of miles over our 
highway^ is never heard of nor never thought of. Kinda looks like 
our ideas of greatness is a little out of plumb in this country. 

But speaking of Texas laws, we note they have a Sunday closing 
law down here that is pretty drastic. The law however, makes a few 
exceptions, one of the exceptions being that steamships can operate on 
Sunday. Just imagine what a calamity it would be to Fort Worth, 
Dallas and San Antonio if the steamships couldn't dock there on 
Sunday. Gosh, it would be awful. 

We ran out of space last week before we got around to tell you 
about that Henry Reeve of the Mission theatre at Menard. We 
remember that when we were a boy a fellow gave us a pup, and after 
we got well acquainted with that pup, we thought he was about the 
nicest piece of dog flesh that ever hit Indiana, and that's the way we 
feel about Henry after we got acquainted with him, and it didn't take 
us long to do' it. He took us up to his home and introduced us to 
Mrs. Henry and the kids, and Mrs. Henry introduced us to about 
the best dinner we ever sat down to, and from this on we are ex- 
tremely strong for Mrs. Henry. But please keep it quiet from Henry. 
They have three girls, all of 'em 100 per cent plus. We wanted to 
steal one little tot about four years old, but though these Texas laws 
exempt steamships, it frowns on kidnapping. 

Henry has sound in his theatre. It is an "independent" device, and 
he wanted us to hear it and tell him what we thought of it. Wc 
listened very closely and found that part of the dialog was as clear 
and distinct as any we had ever heard, and part of it was "mushy" 
and inaudible. Henry asked us what we thought he could do to 
remedy the defect, and we told him he could do nothing except to take 
it up with the people who made the records. 

We told him that a talking device was like a clothes wringer. If 
he could run a shirt through it, there was no sense or reason why he 
couldn't run a pair of socks through it, and if he goes out to milk a 
cow he mustn't expect to get sweet milk and buttermilk at the same 
time — cows don't do business that way. These independent devices 
have to stand the gaff for everything — scratchy records, mushy and 
inaudible recording and every thing else the producers can think of, 
and they can think of aplenty. 

We are no electrical engineer, and what we don't know about these 
matters would make several large sized volumes, but as we see it 
from Mike's front porch, there are just three things that enter into 
perfect reproduction — acoustics, synchronization and amplification, 
and if these three are perfect in your theatre, it doesn't matter 
whether the device was made in New York or Smith's Corners. The 
Lincoln is a mighty good automobile, but "April Shower" is a Chrys- 
ler Plymouth and it suits us fine and it cost us about one fifth of 





what the Lincoln costs; in fact, we couldn't afford to drive a Lincoln, 
we are a "Main Street" driver, and you "Main Street" boys want to 
figure accordingly. Well that's that about Henry and his device. But 
you boys don't know him as we do, and that's your hard luck. 

Then there is another thing. Have you folks seen "Rio Rita?" No? 
Well, don't wait too long. "Rio Rita" was produced by R K 0, was 
directed by Luther Reed and stars Bebe Daniels and John Boles. If 
a better picture is made in 1930 we haven't the slightest idea who 
will make it. If there was a better one made in 1929, they must have 
shown it when we weren't there. 

"Rio Rita" has what the critics would term a Mexican atmosphere, 
and much of the action takes place on a barge in the Rio Grande 
river. Bebe is a Spanish senorita; in fact, she's more than that. And 
John Boles is captain of the Texas Rangers. John is looking for a 
gazabo who robbed the Fremont bank and he goes over into Mexico 
to find him and meets Bebe, and from then on business picks up. 
Bebe's brother is under suspicion as the culprit, and a Mexican 
hombre who wears gaudy costumes and claims to be the big splash 
down there, falls in love with Bebe and tells her he will protect her 
brother, provided Bebe will shake the Texas gringo and cuddle up to 
him. But Bebe don't want to cuddle. She has already met John 
Boles, and that has settled it. 

"Rio Rita" has the most gorgeous settings we have ever seen. The 
musical score is superb. Bebe sings like a nightingale, and John 
Bole's tenor voice is a marvel. The lawyer and the "bigamist" com- 
pose the best comedy team we have seen in many a day; in fact, 
they are a riot. If "Rio Rita" don't bring Broadway to Main Street, 
then we are a Siwash Indian full of firewater. 

A ^ * 

Two years ago when we called on Charlie Cooper of the Alvarado 
theatre at Alvarado, he told us that his little baby had the whooping 
cough, and knowing what the whooping cough is apt to do to little 
babies, we made him promise to write us how the little fellow got 
along. He never did it, and when we called on him today we jumped 
on him about it, and he said that when we got to his house for dinner 
we would find out. We went to dinner with him and found this 
little chap as chipper as a chipmunk and we surely were pleased. 

Charlie took Mr. Snyder to dinner also. Mr. Snyder is the Service 
man for the RCA Photophone and was there making a survey of 
Charlie's house for RCA sound. It just beats all how much fried 
chicken, sweet potatoes, preserves, cake, pie, etc., a service man can 
stow away when he sits down to that kind of a dinner. We stopped 
eating before we really wanted to just to try and choke Snyder off, 
but we couldn't do it. Must be that he has been feeding at cafes and 
restaurants, too. 

After dinner Snyder felt so at peace with all the world that he 
pulled out three bucks and handed them to us and told us to send 
him the HERALD- WORLD. Said he read our Colyum once and 
always wanted the magazine but had never been able to get it and 
that he had stood it just as long as he could. Yeah, we always sup- 
posed that the "film hounds" were the only ones who peddled the 
Isull, but it seems like the service men have acquired the habit too. 
Well, anyhow, we met Mrs. Cooper, and she had a most delicious 
dinner for us, and we want to tell you right now that we are getting 
stronger for these Texas folks every day. If we stay here until spring 
we may send home for our summer underwear and other impedi- 
menta (as Eagle Eye Joe would say), but the last we saw of our 
impedimenta, they had holes in 'em. 

And still they print that Abe Martin picture in our Colyum. Na- 
tions have gone to war for less than that, and we don't blame 'em. 
They had a right to! 

J. C. JENKINS, 
The HERALD-WORLD man. 
P. S.— The HERALD-WORLD covers THE field like an April Shower. 



64 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



{Continued from page 62) 

Blues. A very good comedy. (P. G. Held. Strand 
theatre, Griswold, la. — General patronage.) Up in 
Arms. Fairly good comedy. (Mrs. I. H. Dietz, Star 
theatre, Covington, Ga. — Small town patronage). 

HOT TIMES, 2.— Good. (P. G. Held, Strand the- 
atre, Griswold, la. — General patronage ) 

JERRY DREW COMEDIES, 2.— Studio Pests. 
Pretty good. (P. G. Held, Strand theatre, Griswold, 
la.^ — General patronage.) Not so hot. Got a snicker 
now and then. (Ray W. Museelman, Princess the- 
atre, Lincoln, Neb. — Small town patronage.) Nice 
little comedy, with Jerry trying hard to be another 
Chaplin. Better than average and got lots of laughs. 
(O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — 
Small town patronage.) 

LUPINO LANE COMEDIES, 2.— Be My King. 
Lane gets mixed up with a bunch of savages, after 
a shipwreck. His adventures cause many a laugh, 
and how they enjoyed it! (Ray W. Musselman, Prin- 
cess theatre, Lincoln, Neb. — Small town patronage.) 
Joy Land. Good. (P. G. Held, Strand theatre, Gris- 
wold, la. — General patronage.) 

THE LUCKY DUCK, 1 — A Cameo that is chock- 
ful of slapstick and therefore pleases the non-elite 
element. Considerable attention given to posterior 
extremities, so you fellows v/ith tender sensibilities 
better lay off. (O. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, 
Nevada, O. — Small town patronage.) 

MERMAID COMEDIES, 2 Slippery Head. Fair. 

(P. G. Held, Strand theatre, Griswold, la. — General 
patronage.) 

MOM 

LAUREL-HARDY COMEDIES, 2.— Hats Off. One 

of the best we have ever run, although we say this 
every time we show these two. They are the best 
comedy team on the screen today. (Mrs. I. H. Dietz, 
Star theatre, Covington, Ga. — Small town patron- 
age.) Wrong Again. They wrecked a home with a 
horse. Funny in spots. They are a good team and 
usually get plenty of laughs. (Ray W. Musselman, 
Princess theatre, Lincoln, Neb. — Small town patron- 
age.) 

MADAM Q, 2. — This comedy got a few good 
laughs. Disc recording good. (R. A. Wilson, New 
theatre, DeWitt, Ark. — General patronage.) 

MGM INTERNATIONAL NEWS.— Taking all 
items, large and small, into consideration, believe 
this is the prime silent newsreel of all. Using two 
issues weekly, we find that we have built up a fol- 
lowing for newsreels, some of whom don't even stay 
to see the rest of the program. Metro has finally 
advanced our odd-numbered issue so that we are 
playing both issues now with reasonable freshness. 
We recommend MGM International. (O. B. Wolfe, 
Princess theatre, Lincoln, Neb. — Small town patron- 
age.) 

OUR GANG COMEDIES, 2.— Holy Terror. Very 
good comedy and got a lot of laughs. Have had bet- 
ter Gangs, but not lately. (Ray W. Musselman, 
Princess theatre, Lincoln, Neb. — Small town patron- 
age.) 

PATHE 

DANCING AROUND, 2 — Special cast— A very en- 
joyable piece of work. Both principals clever. (Jack 
Greene, New Geneseo theatre, Geneseo, III. — Small 
town patronage.) 

UNIVERSAL 
ARTHUR LAKE COMEDIES, 2.— Doing His Stuff. 

Not very good. (Mrs. I. H. Dietz, Star theatre, 
Covington, Ga. — Small town patronage.) 

BE MY GUEST, 1.— We did not know these were 
reissues when we bought them. They are too old 
to appreciate the comedy. (Mrs. I. H. Dietz, Star 
theatre, Covington, Ga. — Small town patronage.) 

CALFORD ON HORSEBACK, 2 The best coUe- 

legiate comedy we've had in quite a while. Different 
from most of them. (F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, 
Stockton, Mo. — General patronage.) 

THE COLLEGIANS SERIES, 2.— On Guard. 

Regular Collegian picture. Not much comedy, but 
different for a change when run in a series. (Mrs. 
I. H. Dietz, Star theatre, Covington, Ga. — Small town 
patronage.) Kicking Through. A good Collegian 
comedy. They all are very good, but seem to have 
too much of the sameness to every one. Paddling 
Coeds. Has quite a bit of entertainment, but is along 
the same line as most of the Collegian comedies. 
(F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, Stockton, Mo. — 
General patronage.) 

BUSTER BROWN SERIES, 2.— Magic Pretty thin 
stuff. Hardly impressed even the kids. Only about 
one out of four Buster Browns is passable. (O. B. 
Wolfe, Screenland theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town 
patronage.) 

THE NEWLYWEDS COMEDIES, 2.— Newlyweds 
Camp Out. Fair enough for those that like the stuff. 
Brings a few snickers. (O. B. Wolfe, Screenland 
theatre, Nevada, O. — Small town patronage.) 

OSWALD THE LUCKY RABBIT CARTOONS, 1. 



Color Pictures Popular 
In Europe, Says Kalmus 
On Return to New York 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Europe is enthusi- 
astic about color films, especially in London 
and Berlin, reports Dr. Herbert T. Kalmus, 
president of Technicolor, upon his return from 
Europe. He was accompanied by Mrs. Kal- 
mus. 

W'hile in England, Dr. Kalmus stated, he 
received many favorable offers of business 
from British film producers and that he plans 
a technicolor plant to be constructed in Eng- 
land in the immediate future to supply the 
demands of the European markets. 

Roger Wolfe Kahn Joins 
Paramount's L. I. Staff 

(Special to the[ Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— Roger Wolfe Kahn, 
son of Otto Kahn, has joined the staff of the 
Paramount Long Island studio, where he is 
studying the technique of talking picture mak- 
ing. Later on he plans to compose and pos- 
sibly record musical numbers for future mo- 
tion picture productions. 

Steroscopy Process 

Rights Sold in France 

(Special from the Department of Commerce) 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 7.— A new process, 
giving what it is claimed as complete stereo- 
scopy, is being runs by Mons. Beaujon, general 
manager of Metropol Films of France. He 
has purchased the rights of this new system, 
which needs a special lens and a new type 
screen. The cost of the apparatus is 9,000 
francs. The process is Swiss in origin. 

Robertson to Complete 

Fejos Picture for ''U" 

(Special to the Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7— Paul Fejos, who 
is ill as a result of an injury while he was 
directing La Marseillaise, has relinquished 
direction of the picture and John S. Robert- 
son has been assigned to complete the remain- 
ing scenes. Fejos fell from a scaffolding from 
which he was directing a battle scene. 



— Pussy Willie. Our patrons like these Oswald car- 
toons. (Mrs. I. H. Dietz, Star theatre, Covington, 
Ga. — Small town patronage.) Wood Chopper. 
Good, as are all of the Oswald cartoons. (Ray W. 
Musselman, Princess theatre, Lincoln, Neb. — Small 
town patronage.) 

THE RANGE OP FEAR, 2.— Bob Curwood. 
There was galloping hither and yon, flourishing of 
six-guns and waving of fists, but finally the hero 
triumphed over the forces of evil, and the heroine 
rewarded him in the same old way. Crystal clear 
photography. (0. B. Wolfe, Screenland theatre, 
Nevada, O. — Small town patronage.) 

MISCELLANEOUS 

ARABIAN FIGHTS (FBO), 2.— Better than most 
of F B O's comedies. It will get by okay. (F. H. 
Babbs, Stockton theatre, Stockton, Mo. — General 
patronage. ) 

BARNEY GOOGLE COMEDIES (FBO), 2.— 
Horsefcathers. HorsefeatherS is right! Neigh, Spark 
Plug, Neigh. About the neai'est to nothing I've seen 
for a comedy. (F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, 
Stockton, Mo. — General patronage.) 

DON'T SAY AIN'T (FBO), 2.— So silly it's funny. 
(F. H. Babbs, Stockton theatre, Stockton, Mo. — ■ 
General patronage.) 

MICKEY McGUIRE COMEDIES (FBO), 2.— 
Mickey's Explorers. The only Mickey comedy we have 
played that pleased half way. Nothing to them. 
(Mrs. I. H. Dietz, Star theatre, Covington, Ga. — - 
Small town patronage.) Mickey's Last Chance. Just 
fair. Nothing to rave about. (F. H. Babbs, Stock- 
ton theatre, Stockton, Mo. — General patronage.) 



NEW 
PICTURES 



In "New Pictures" the EXHIBITORS 
HERALD-WORLD presents in concise 
form information on current and forthcom- 
ing attractions. 

The facts as presented will serve exhib- 
itors in booking and in the preparation of 
their advertising campaign. 

HARMONY AT HOME: Fox all-talking comedy 
drama, with Marguerite Churchill, Charles Eaton, 
Charlotte Henry, William Collier, Sr., Rex Bell, 
Dixie Lee, Dot Farley, Elizabeth Patterson, Clare 
Kummer, Edwin Burke, Elliott Lester, Charles J. 
McGuirk. Directed by Hamilton McFadden. 

TYPE AND THEME: Joe HaUer is promoted 
to superintendent at the steel mills with an in- 
creased salary. His family plan to take advantage 
of the raise. Willie HaUer decides to quit work- 
ing. Dora says she'll give up her piano lesson3 
for an electric piamo. Ma HaUer sees a chance to 
marry off Louise, the eldest daughter. Joe angered, 
demands that the family stick to its former ways 
of living. Louise is escorted home by Dick Grant. 
All in the family question Louise about her new 
boy friend. Pa chases them to bed. Willie enters 
a dancing contest. Pa reads about it and rushes 
to the dance hall. He enters the contest and wins 
first prize from Willie. Louise invites Dick to her 
home. Ma spoils the affair with her silly questions, 
but Pa fixes it up. 

* * * 

CAMEO KIRBY: Fox all-talking drama from the 
play by Booth Tarkington and Harry Leon Wilson. 
In the cast are J. Harold Murray, Norma Terris, 
Douglas Gilmore, Robert Edeson, Charles Morton, 
Stephin Fetchit, John Hyams, Mme. Daumery, 
Myrna Loy and Beulah Hall Jones. Directed by 
Irving Cummings. 

TYPE AND THEME: Adele Randall meets 
Cameo Kirby when the latter rescues her from 
the hands of rotvdies. Each becomes interested in 
another. Kirby tells Adele she is an aristocrat 
and he is just a gambler. Adele is sent to her 
father's plantation. Soon after. Cameo foUows. 
On the same ship are Adele's father and Gilmore, 
a gambler. Kirby, Gillmore and Randall get into 
a card game. Randall loses all his money. He 
puts his plantation up as a stake. Kirby wins the 
game. He plans to give the note back to RamdaU 
as soon as Gilmore is out of sight. Randall kills 
himself. Kirby takes possession of the plantation. 
He tries to explain to Adele, but she refuses to 
listen. Lea, Gilmore's former girl friend, reveals 
that Gilmore had planned to have Kirby accused 
of the death. Adele consents to marry Kirby. 



Believe Radio Factor 
In Popularizing Sound 
Films and Their Stars 

United Artists 1929 Broadcasts 
Carry Voices of Stars 
to England 

(Special to thel Herald-World) 

NEW YORK, Jan. 7.— The similarity be- 
tween radio and sound pictures tends to bring 
the two closer together, United Artists officials 
believe, and they feel that the radio serves to 
create goodwill for talking pictures and their 
stars. 

In April, 1929, a pioneer broadcast by the 
members of the cast of the talking picture 
"Alibi" was carried over 47 stations to listen- 
ers in America and Canada. On May 2 the 
world premiere of Ronald Colman's "Bulldog 
Drummond" was broadcast from the Apollo 
theatre, New York City. On September 5 
Gloria Swanson sang "Love" from station 
2L0, British Broadcasting company in Lon- 
don, which was picked up by WEAF and put 
over fifteen other stations. December S a 
coast-to-coast hookup was made for the 
premiere of Ronald Colman's "Condemned." 

These are a few of the broadcasts conducted 
by United Artists in 1929. The arrangement 
for broadcasting is made individually with the 
star and commercial advertiser of the radio 
company. 



Raoul Walsh Back in States 

NEW YORK. — Raoul Walsh, who has been vaca- 
tioning in Europe for the past month, returned De- 
cember 23. Walsh's latest picture for Fox is "Hot 
for Paris," which will be released this month. 



January II, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



65 



CLASSIFIED 
Advertising 

Ten cents per word, payable in advance. Minimum charge, 
$1.00. Copy and checks should be addressed Classified Ad Dept. 
Exhibitors Herald-World, 407 So. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 

The Recognized National Classified Advertising Medium 




Managers' Schools 



WANTED THKA.TRE EMPLOYEES to learn 
modern theatre management and theatre advertising. 
The Institute's training leads to better positions. 
Write for particulars. Address Theatre Managers 
Institute, 325 Washington St., Elmira, N. Y. 



Equipment for Sale 

BIG BARGAINS in rebuilt Simple.^ Powers 6-B 
and 6-A motiograph machines, all motor driven, in 
guaranteed condition, as well as used low intensity 
arc reflector _ lamps with or without machines at 
reasonable prices. Big stock of rebuilt exhaust and 
oscillating fans for AC and DC current. Generators, 
all makes, ticket selling machines, film containers, all 
at bargain prices for immediate shipment. Write for 
bargain list. Address Illinois Theatre Equipment 
Company, 12-14 East Ninth street, Chicago, Illinois. 



THEATRE EQUIPMENT, new and used. Opera 
chairs, projectors, screens, generators, rectifiers, re- 
flecting arc lamps, etc. Write for bargain list and 
catalogue. Address Movie Supply Co., 844 Wabash, 
Chicago. 



FOR SALE — Reflector Arc Lamps and accessories, 
also guaranteed rebuilt Powers 6-A and 6-B and Sim- 
plex Heads. Best prices. Write Joseph Spratler, 
12-14 E. Ninth street, Chicago, 111. 



Theatres for Sale 



IN COUNTY SEAT town in Kansas. No compe- 
tition, fully equipped, talkies. Simplex machines. Will 
also sell building or lease. Address Box 461, Exhib- 
itors Herald-World, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



COLONIAL THEATRE, Colfax Illinois. On 
route 163. Investigate. Address Mrs. Faye Corpe. 



Cameras for Sale 



AKELEY: (Bell-Howell professional). Write for 
booklet. Address Wood, 204 Inland Bank, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 



TURRETT Model Universal camera, 3 lens. Bar- 
gain, $150. Holmes portable $150. Address Carol 
Fenyvessy, 62 St. Paul St., Rochester, N. Y. 



Position Wanted 



PROJECTIONIST— 2 years' 
machines. References. Address 
Huron, S. Dak. 



experience Simplex 
Bert Younkin, 



ATTENTION THEATRE OWNERS. Specially 
trained managers, assistant managers, advertising 
men, service men, available for employment at short 
notice. Address Theatre Managers Institute, Elmira, 
N. Y. 



ORGANIST — Married man, 30. Competent, union. 
Address Box 455, Exhibitors Herald-World. 407 S. 
Dearborn St., Chicago, II! 



THEATRE MANAGER— With 20 years valuable 
experience. Go anywhere. Small salary to start. Ad- 
dress Capt. W. D. Ament, General Delivery, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 



SOUND PROJECTIONIST— 14 years experience. 
All machines. Western Electric equipment. Single, 
reliable, references. Address R. W. Housworth, P. 
O. Box 972, Columbia, S. C. 



YOUNG MAN experience in amusement advertising 
and promotion. Desires opportunity to learn show 
business. Address Box 462, E.xhibitors Herald- World, 
407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, HI. 



Chairs for Sale 



1,600 HIGH GRADE, spring constructed uphol- 
stered theatre chairs, made by the Heywood- Wake- 
field company. Upholstered in imitation Spanish 
leather, at very reasonable prices. 500 upholstered 
theatre chairs, back and seat covered in broadcloth. 
1,000 upholstered seats covered in Spanish imitation 
leather. Veneered back and squab seats, very reason- 
able. 1,000 heavy 5-ply veneer chairs, 54 in. back. 
1,500 light 5-ply veneer chairs at very reasonable 
prices. 300 folding chairs in sections of 2. Also a 
large stock of chair parts to match any style seat. 
In fact, everything for the theatre. We assure you 
great savings. For information, prices and literature 
on our merchandise, write Illinois Theatre Equip- 
ment Company, 12-14 East Ninth street, Chicago, Illi- 
nois. 



BIG BARGAIN in used Opera chairs, 600 uphol- 
stered, 800 Veneer. Address Movie Supply Co., 
844 Wabash arenue, Chicago, 111. 



2500 USED 3 PLY VENEERED theatre chairs in 
good condition. $1.00 each. Immediate delivery. 
Address Illinois Theatre Equipment Company, 12-14 
East Ninth street, Chicago, 111 



FOR SALE — 1200 plush upholstered theatre chairs 
in good condition. Must be sold at once. Apply 
William J. Dunn, Academy building, Fall River, Mass. 



OPERA CHAIRS, seats and backs for all makes, 
five ply, at prices that save you money. Jobs in new 
and used chairs. Address Redington Company, 
Scranton, Pa. 



FOR SALE— 125 used opera chairs in fiirst class 
condition. Priced at $2.00 each for quick sale. For 
particulars write Battle Lake Community Hall Assn., 
Battle Lake, Minn. 



Equipment Wanted 

WANT SEVERAL MERCURY RECTIFIERS, 
good, bad or incomplete, cheap. Address Preddey, 
188 Golden Gate avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 



WANTED — Peerless or Simplex projectors, also 
Strong reflector arc lamps. State price, condition 
and number of machines. Will pay cash, or one 
third down and balance C.O.D. Address Box 337 
Exhibitors Herald- World, 407 S. Dearborn street, 
Chicago, 111. 

HIGHEST PRICES paid for used opera chairs, 
projection machines, etc. Address Movie Supply Co., 
844 Wabash, Chicago. 



Stationery 



"NEARGRAVURE" ("Neargravurembosso" plate- 
less embossing) processes. Special Neargravure 2S0 
envelopes, 500 8i^x7i/" letterheads $3.33, or SJ^xll* 
$4.44, postpaid. Sollidays, EXH-124, Knox, Indiana. 



Projector Repairing 



SKILLED MECHANICS, specialized tools, and a 
shop equipped for but one purpose can offer you 
nothing but the best in repair work. That is what I 
have, and I can offer you the best in the overhauling 
of your motion picture machinery equipment. One 
of the oldest repair men in the territory, and serving 
some of the largest houses. Relief equipment fur- 
nished free. For results bring vour work to Joseph 
Spratler, 12-14 E. Ninth St., Chicago, 111. 

BEST SHOP for repairing projection machines. 
Prompt service, reasonable prices. Address MoTie 
Supply Co., 844 Wabash, Chicago. 



Help Wanted 



A POSTER ARTIST FOR CLASS A THEATRE. 
State salary, experience and give references in first 
wire or letter. Address Box 460, Exhibitors Herald- 
World, 407 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



Miscellaneous 



DO YOU WANT Sunday Movies? We can help 
you get them. Campaigners, attorneys and publicity 
directors furnished. Address National Association 
Opposed to Blue Laws, Inc., Hamilton Hotel, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



Your Classified Ad Will Do the Work 

Exhibitors Herald- World has helped hundreds of Theatre owners in solving many a problem. The classified advertising 
department has placed organists all over the country, has helped in obtaining equipment, in selling equipment, and in 
solving many another problem that seemed difficult. The rates are but 10c per word payable with order, 10% discount 
if run for 3 insertions. See this week's classified pages. Maybe you are in need of something that is being advertised this 
week. The cost is small, the results are great. 



66 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January II, 1930 



CHICAGO PERSONALITIES 



By JOE FISHER 

WHEN Balaban and Katz sent Bill Pine over to the Oriental theatre last 
week it started something. Or perhaps it would be more correct to say 
that Bill started something. Bill, who is one of the circuit's ace pub- 
licity men, has a habit of doing that little thing. His first move was to make a 
big advertising splash on Columbia's big war picture, Flight. Then he hooked 
up with the local recruiting offices of the Marines, and the Devil Dogs outfit 
placed posters on the streets telling all about the picture. 

WILLIAM T. SCANLON'S book, "God 
Have Mercy on Us," was sold out 
last week at all local book stores. The 
book tells the story of the battles of the 
World War. Scanlon is on the staff of the 
ABC studio in Chicago. The book was 
a $25,000 prize winner. Scanlon was a 
hardboiled officer in the war. 



that were destroying the St. Elizabeth's 
church on the South Side last Friday, Gene 
Cour and his gang of Pathe Newshounds 
were there also. The boys received ex- 
cellent shots of the fire. 



* * * 

Sammy Krunstein, formerly in charge of 
Essaness art studio, has resigned to start a 
studio of his own on Film Row. Just 23, 
Sammy has a wide knowledge of the film 
business, having worked for Warner Broth- 
ers and other exchanges. He also managed 
the Gold, L & T, Madison Square and Vista 
theatres. Sammy won distinction recently 
for his displays for the opening of the 
Pantheon theatre. 

^ ^ ^ 

Steve Montgomery comes into the lime- 
light this week with the announcement that 
he intends to put over a foot race between 
Max Levy and Abe Tague, providing the 
boxing bout between Shires and Sidney 
Stern is a success. The race will be run 
on Wabash avenue between Eighth and 
Ninth streets. 

^ ^ ^ 

The country salesmen of First National 
presented W. W. Brumberg with a beautiful 
solid silver wrist watch.f 
^ ^ ^ 

Eddie Grossman has a new special 9-reel 
feature, Sacrifice, which he is going to road- 
show. He has employed J. L. Newman 
as exploiteer.f 

* * * 

Catherine Murray, the little brunette from 
Movie-Phone oifice, js moving her baggage 
to the Tiffany exchange. She is succeeding 
Elsie Gratias, who has resigned to join 
another company, outside the film business, 
she says. 

* * * 

Henri Ellman says he always has a good 
time when he visits Jack O'Toole at the 
Tiffany office in Milwaukee. Henri was 
there during the Christmas holidays. 

* * * 

The way that sales gang is going at it for 
A. S. Hyman Attractions' local exchange, 
W. G. McCoy, manager, is just about able 
to lift the old right wing from O. Kaying 
that downpour of contracts that flowed into 
the Consumers building during the week 
of January 4. Of course, those two city 
representatives, Ed Bricketto and H. R. 
Phillips, the modest and shrinking "violets" 
of local filmdom, have nothing further to 
add than smiles with a strong optimistic 
accent.! 

* * * 

Just a few minutes after the first fire 
wagon appeared to extinguish the flames 

§As it appeared on the Chicago page ten years 
ago. 

tFrom the Chicago page of five years back. 



Independent Group 

[Story on page 25] 

Following is the list given out by the newly 
formed Illinois Independent Exhibitors Asso- 
ciation as its present record of memibership : 

Sid Sella:, Gem; Saul Best, Mabel; Harry Lasker, 
Bertha; M. A. Chinsky, Newberry; Fred Gilford, 
Century; Sol Fichtenberg, U. S. ; Louis Rudolph, 
Emmet; Henry Goldson, Plaza; Dave Brotman, Ava- 
lon; Louis Roth, Regent; Mat Cooper, Rosette; 
Henry Lauten, Grand; Jack Rose, Hamilton; Ray- 
mond Kozlawski, Crane; Gleicha Plocinsky, Schin- 
dler; Marks, Crescent. 

Jack Rubin, Harmony; E. Bemesch, Avon; S. M. 
Meltzer, Milford; Mat Small, Franklin; L. Susman, 
Adelphi; Gus Stathis, Casraer, Cameo; Andrew Cuzer, 
Queen, Webster; H. Nepp, Lindy. 

Mitchell Brost, Patio; Janes Stepanel, Lynn; Lei- 
bowitz, Independence; A. W. Hafiferkamp, Holly- 
wood; Nate Joseph, Lincoln-State; Nat Gumbiner, 
Commodore; R. Salkin. Shore, Jackson Park, New- 
berry; Carl Fricke, Karlov; Louis Fleisher, Home. 

Louis Brecka, Standard, Elston, Homan; Juen 
Szanto, Lucille; Phil Tague, Halsted 61st; G. Pierce, 
Rainbow, Burnside; Stitzberg. Hamlin; Christiansen, 
LaSalle; Robert Solo, Model; Dan J. Fortunato, 
Lorraine; Schacter. Bell: George Burdick, American; 
Aaron Saperstein, Calo, Lexington. 

Samuel Halper, Irving, Waverly, Halsted, Gar- 
field; Martin Lapatka, Hawthorne: M. B. Lang, Har- 
rison; Abe Halper & Son, Clearing; Walter Babitz, 
Grand-Cicero; Robert Gumbiner, DeLuxe; Joseph 
Pastor, Bryn Mawr, Ardmore, Orchard, Lincoln- 
Wpbster. 

Henry Banboro, Temple; Morris Reingold, Vision: 
Nat Wolf, Biltmore; Charles Auerbach, New Strand: 
E. Golin, Banner; Frasal, California. 



Jack MUler's Mute 
Greeting to Visitors 



It lies beneath the glass which 
covers the desk of Jack Miller, pres- 
ident of the Chicago Exhibitors As- 
sociation — a broad sheet of paper on 
which has been lettered two quota- 
tions from Abraham Lincoln. Be- 
tween the quotations has been pasted 
a cut-out picture of the Emancipator 
himself. The whole, which faces the 
visitor as he may sit in conference 
opposite Miller, is composed in the 
following fashion: 



"I 



So You May Understand Me 

shall not try to 



read, much less answer 
all the criticisms of me 
and my associates. Else 
this office might as well 
be closed for any other 
business." 

"I do the very best I 
know how — the very 
best I can; and I mean 



to keep doing so until 
the end. If the end 
brings me out all right, 
what is said against me 
won't amount to any- 
thing. If the end brings 
me out wrong, ten thou- 
sand angels swearing I 
was right would make 
no difTerence." 




That's Good Enough for Me 



When a group of Film Men get together 
it means, "Calooley," a new Spanish word 
for Whoopee. From left to right, Clutrlie 
Lindau, Ben Judell, Boh Stobo, Steve 
Montgomery, Jimmy Abrose and Dave 
Dubin. 

Benj. Judell, former wellknown exchange 
manager of these parts, spent a brief vaca- 
tion here en route from Minneapolis. Quite 
reticent with regard to the nature of his 
visit but Bennie is fast taking on a Scan- 
dinavian mien from his extended stay up 
North.§ 

* * * 

Sol Soloman, special representative of the 
International Photoplay Distributors, a sub- 
sidiary of General Talking Pictures Corpora- 
tion, arrived in Chicago this week to open up 
a Western office to distribute the company's 
pictures. 

The features Soloman has ready for release 
are : The Unwritten Law, Crimson Circle, by 
Edgar Wallace, After the Verdict, Dark Red 
Roses and High Speed Love. He is also dis- 
tributing community singing novelty reels. 
Soloman will make his headquarters in the 
local General Talking Picture office, where 
Bert Rosenberg is manager. 

^ 

Harry Phillips has joined the sales staff 
of Talking Picture Epics. Harry is a 
brother of Clarence, star salesman for 
Columbia. 

^ >K 

Lou Reinheimer, proprietor of the Rose- 
land-State theatre, 110th place and Michi- 
gan avenue, fought and arrested John 
Augartis, of West 103rd street, who he 
claimed passed a counterfeit $5 bill at the 
box office two weeks ago. Police held 
Augartis for the alleged offense. t 

s|: * 

Jacob Lasker, head of the exhibiting firm, 
Jacob Lasker & Sons, is not himself connected 
with the newly foiTned Illinois Independent 
Exhibitors Association, as reported last week. 
His sons, Harry and Benjamin, however, are 
members of the new organization. 

The boys of Pathe office got together and 
■ gave Manager Fred C. Aiken a beautiful 
golf bag filled with the finest clubs. Now 
Fred has to make good on his scores, the 
poor quality of which he says was due to 
crooked sticks or something.! 

^ * % 

Bob Stobo, formerly a salesman for 
Goetz Movie-Phone, has resigned to sell 
the picture Her Unborn Child with Jimmy 
Abrose in the Iowa and Nebraska territory. 
^ ^ 

John Nolan, special representative of the 
Fox Home Office, paid a visit to Clyde 
Eckhardt last Friday. 

* * * 

Barney Brotman, the popular exhibitor 
from Moline, Illinois, brightened up Film 
Row with his big smiles last Friday. 
Barney operates the Paradise, Avon and 
Rialto theatres in Moline. 



LOW-COST TINTS 

that match every mood in 

SOUND PICTURES 

The widest range of tints ever offered the 
industry is embraced by Eastman Sono- 
chrome Tinted Positive Films, They can be 
used to match every mood in the story, or 
to reproduce the one lighting or tone that 
predominates throughout the picture .... 
In either case Sonochrome gives beautiful 
color. It gives faithfully reproduced 
sound. And it costs no more than regular 
black-and-white positive. 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

J. E. Brulatour, Inc., Distributors 

New York Chicago Hollywood 



(ADVERTISEMENT) 



WILLIAM HAINES' "NAVY BLUES" SMASH SENSATION 

M'G-M Talkie Tremendous in Minneapolis^ Baltimore and Other Cities 

EXH I B ITO RS 

RALD 





W 







"Ramon Novarro turns out to 
be the most charming player of 
light romance on the screen. 
'Devil May Care' is one of the 
most engaging talkies on Broad- 
way."— Co/ven, Jr., Sun 



'"Novarro must 
now be definitely 
set down as one of 
the triumphant 
personages of the 
new cinema. Ad- 
mirable singing 
voice, expert come- 
dy manner, thor- 
oughly engaging." 

—Warn It., 

Herald Tribune 

^'A thoroughly 
charming musical 
romance, Novarro 
is the best interpre- 
ter of romantic roles 
on the screen to- 
d^y." 

—Boehnel, Telegram 



"The best bet on Broadway. The 
girls are going crazy over the New 
Novarro. You have no idea what 
he can do until you've seen 
'Devil May Care.' It's a knock- 
out." — Bland, Mirror 



"You'll love hearing him sing 'The 
Shepherd's Serenade,"IfHe Cared,' 
'Charming, "The March of the Old 
Guard' and 'Pompadour.' A grand 
triumph for the already triumphant 
Novarro."— Thirer, Daily News 




"Watch the No- 
varro fans grow 
after this exhibition 
of his talents. 'Devil 
May Care' a thrill- 
ing story." 

— Shawell, Graphic 

"The production is 
magnificent and the 
picture thoroughly 
entertaining." 

— Crewe, American- 



"Delightful enter- 
tainment. Novarro 
one of the best o 
the audible screen 
stars. 

— Pehwick, Journal 



''NOVAItflO PiCTURE Blli'' savs Variety. JUST ONE 
OF METRO-GOLDWYN-M AVER'S $2 QUALITY HITS! 



A New School of Sound Opens — Page 21 



EXH I B ITO RS 





w 






RALD 



I 



4 




EXTRA! 

Lightning strikes 
twice in the 
same place— 





BOX 

OFFICI 



Haw MAH'v: 




HARLES King— Bessie Love 

are on the way to your public with a 
singing, dancing, talking drama that 
actually tops their '^Broadway Melody'' 

CHASING 

Qet Hot about ^ BOWS 



lilletro-Goldwyn-Mayer's 



witfi JACK BENNY, MARIE mE^'SLER, POLLY MORAN,-^ 
EDDIE PHILLIPS. Directed by CHARLES F. RIESNER 




'TUSH DEM 
V CLOUDS AWAYr 

Business is always SUNNY when you 

have one oi those 



UNITED ARTISTS 

pictures shining in your Ughts 



Mary Pickford in "Coquette" 
Rolaiid West's "Alibi" 
Ronald Colman's "Bulldog Drummond" 
Gloria Swanson's "The Trespasser" 
Max Marcin's "Three Live Ghosts" 
Ronald Colman's "Condemned" 
The Society Thriller, "The Locked Door" 
Herbert Brenon's "Lummox" 



Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks ii 

"Taming of the Shrew" 
Norma Talmadge's "New York Nights" 
Harry Richman in "Puttin' on the Ritz" 
Fannie Brice in "Be Yourself" 
Henry King's "Hell Harbor" 
Lillian Gish— "The Swan" 
Dolores Del Rio— "The Bad One" 



ALWAYS — The Backbone Service of the Country^ s Wisest Showmen 



January 18, 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



3 



THE NEW REASON IS HERE! 



PARAMOUNT doesn't make you wait 
until Fall for 1930 Style Hits; 
They're right here NOW! 




"No. I among the $2 talkers." (Variety) "Eas- 
ily the best picture of the year." {Liberty} 



MArRICE CHETAIilER in 
ERI¥ST liUBITSCH'S "Thel,ove 
Parade".with jeanette Macdonald, 

Lupino Lane and Lillian Roth. Now in Sth 
S.R.O. $2 week at Criterion, N. Y. The in- 
dustry's biggest hit to date! 



Hi*** 



Paramount presents Greatest of all Singing 
Romances as Perfect All-Technicolor Gem 



DEIVI¥IS KIIVO in "The Vaga- 
bond King". With JEANETTE MAC- 
DONALD, Warner Oland, O. P. Heggie and 
Lillian Roth. Ludwig Berger Produetion. 
Coming soon and destined to top all pre- 
vious b. o. records! 



^ Heading a list of 31 great Paramount releases coming between now and 
August. 11 of them not heretofore announced or sold. ^ Including the 1930- 
style Revue of Revues, "PARAMOUNT ON PARADE two sweeping all-outdoors 
specials, "THE TEXAN" (Gary Cooper) and "THE BORDER LEGION" (Arlen 
and big cast); two Jack Oakie star specials; and more, more! ^ See your 
PARAMOUNT representative and book a spot in the front ranks of the parade ! 




AR 




OUNT 



NEW SHOW WORLD OF 1930 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD January 18, 1930 




PARAMOUNT 
solve the vital problem of 



"OUT OF THE HUMDRUM TO A NEW PLANE" 

— Variety 

FUNNIEST COMEDIES WE HAVE SEEN" ^ 

— Exhibitor's Herald World 



"GOOD FROM BROADWAY TO A TENT SHOW 



59 



—Zit's 



GREAT SHORTS FOR WIRED HOUSES" 



— Billboard 



PARAMOUNT CHRISTIE 



January 18, 1930 



LXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



5 



CURRENT CHRISTIE HITS 





CHARLES GRAPEWIN 
ANNA CHANCE in 
"Red Headed Hussy" 



LOIS WILSON 
BERT ROACH in 
' For Love or Money ' 





LOUISE FAZENDA 
BERT ROACH in 
' So This is Paris Green ' 



TAYLOR HOLMES 
in 

"Let Me Explain" 



CHRISTIE TALKING PLAYS 
booking shorts that sell seats! 



CHRISTIES ARE GEMS FOR ANY PROGRAM" 



— Exhibitor's Daily Review 



"BEST OF THE MONTH IS A CHRISTIE 



59 



— Liberty Magazine 



"A CERTAIN BET IN ANY HOUSE 



— Variety 




— Photoplay Magazine 



TALKING PLAYS 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 18, 1950 




in a theatre 
that never held 
over a picture 
before a real 
record smasher! 




J THE WORLD'S ^— ^ GREATEST 



NEWSPAPER 





rOLUMBIA 



SENSATION 



Stops traffic at the 
State- Lake Chicago 



And all the 
Critics Rave! 



"Review-Chicago fcvenmg Post. 



Robert Armstrong Has 

an Excellent Role 



"THE RACKETEER. 



*!'daA7^^'" Illustrated Ti™ea 

*'RACKETEER» DIGS 

AT COPS^GUNMEN 

Carol Lombard and Bdbwli^Pk.„ 
Talkie 



in State-Lake 



A Pathe 
ard Higgi 



Uae Tlnee.ln 
Chicago Tribune 

"The Racketeer^ 
Wim on Actings 
Direction^ Too 



While Carol Lombard Is 
^One Beautiful Blonde.' 



THE RACKETEER." 

[ALTAIJUtB] 

★ ★ ★ 

[One Btar mcanj fairly pood 'wo f'j."?. 
jootl rljiTP si;ir''. .Mcelleiit Iinir %larf>, 
«ztraonlincirj' > .Va' ^sfe^-Ju^t aofithcr 
movie.] 

P.-ortufed by Paite. 

Dirtded liy Howard ITiicelc. 

Preteoted si the iiJate-Loke tVater. 
THE CAST.' , 

RecCe .Robrrt Arni5tropr 

Rboda.' ^ t . k . t . . •' ■ Carol , LombnMl 

Tony .■:.,',^i.j,...K^iaka4 Drew 

MilUr '..V,.i Jeapette Lolf 

j£kck '....,.•«.*..*... ■Jdbn Loder 

Meljiiff,v ...Jam Htfrst 

Mr. Simpton Winter HaU 

Ura. Simp&oD , ^Wisifred Karris 



Sqald 

Tho E»t.^ 

Mrs 1^ 

Welw. , 



,.. .Sit Guard 

, XI Hill 

.. .Bobbie Dunn 
,,Hedda Hopper 
.'Sub Fins 



By Mae T*-_ef 
Good vj^lng* 




fh 
' etch'^d 
, from Mr. 
cKeteer " down' 
hia car and thp 

.beat, are beyon'd 

^..iL.-.^iu-. ■ Seta. i>hQtography, sound, 
are all Tight up. tovthe minut? and, 
because ot actlne-and direoUon, youi' 
int-erest "never lags. Care! l.ambard is 
one beautiful blonde. Jeanette ,Lo(f ia 
another, 

I repeat. 1 dlda't like the endlUff. 
but we: kiww that " C^tme Poesn t 
Pay," So si reehon tbe only au fait 
thing to 4» was treat Mr. Armstrong 
rough. Otherwisft— where would the 
mdral be"? CAJeo-^tt^.-^wld 1b full of 
feminine flJii fans ^^o would probab- 
ly throw ftiftt « anj-thlng serious were 
pennittea-to lUppen to Roland Drew.j 



Carol Frlnk in 
Chicago Herald- 
Examiner. 

GANG FILM 
FIRST RATE, 
SAYSCAROL 

Carol Lombard Leaps 
S e ve r a 1 Steps in 
SThis as *,ah Actress 



"r^ci^bi'ebr;." 

Directed t>T BoWud HlKcIrt ui^ 
presented jbr Patbe at the StatcLak* 
Theater. 

7BE CAST. 

Reene Robert Amutronc 

Bhofla ..■ Carol Lombars 

Tony .Roland Drew 

Minie Jeanette Cnff. 

jac!t • John Loder 

Moliar7> ''""'APV/ni 

Squid Al Hill 

Mrs. Lee Bedda Hopper 



BY CAROL FRINK, 

CAKOL LOMBARD is going to be 
mighty lmiH)ptaTit- after 
i Withov 




iesr 
man.- 
mldway point 
•eally are — Iti othe' 
acts Hke a real live 
son Instead of a movie 2^'* 
Teame*' with W.-v 

or ' 

the? 

■Kiemb^^ 

lCKETEKP'^p' ^ triJOj 
At ^fcesPT & ] l^Armr 



lave found; !u 
^Is characteV arfiuw* 
ITone wbit overdrawn. ',' 
The story la that of a gangster 
fcln^ who falls In lovti with a^dec* 
lease sooiety woman who has bceri 
Qlvtfrced by her husband because 
of an elopement with a; penniless vio- 
U«i3t. Although she la atill hopeiess' 
ly In love" with a her rather Impo.'^- 
alble fiddler when the'story openJiV 
•Mf. Armstrong flucceeda In winning 
her. All of this Is pretty subtly 
'done, -and the only flaw In tho sce- 
nario Is Rhoda's unreasonable pref- 
erence for the less attractive of th^ 
two men. As Roland X>rew pla>3 
Toiiy he la a spoiled weakling, total- 
Ijr lacking in magnetism. 

This Is -a fh^t-rate gangster stoi v 
of a dlfCerenf'aort. An expert ^cast 
and a welf thought out story give 
It unusual! class for the type. 




3^ > 

PATHE 



ALL JN MUSie— SOUND— DIALOOUC 



Robert Armstrong 

The RACKETEER 



with 



Carol Lombard 



Directed hy Howard Higgin. Associate Producer Ralph Block. 



10 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



January 18, 1930 




WmiMASH as m an TTO^ ofeice 

CiiRD§^ asIKpreot c EssbOiT 

CIC E I EO \Af 0RLD« -new YORK MORNING TELEGRAPH 



1- 



All talking movietone mirthqucke 




Wl 



th 



VICTOR McLAGLEN 

FIFIDORSAY POLLY MORAN EL BRENDEL 

Storyby RAO UL WALSH 
Dialog by WILLIAM K.WELLS 
Music by WALTER DONALDSON 
Lyrics by EDGAR LESLIE 
Directed by RAOUL WALSH 
Presented by Wl LLIAM FOX 




"It seemed significant yesterday at noontime to see the waiting 
film patrons flung along 50th Street past the full length of the Roxy 
itself and half-way to Sixth Avenue- four deep. The Walsh-McLaglen 
label would seem to be sure-fire. It hasn't missed the mark to date, 
it is a superb comedy... begins with a laugh and so it concludes. 
I say YES for 'Hot for Paris.'" -new york world 

"Tornado of mirth in 'Hot for Paris.' A merry-go-round of fun... 
spinning fast and furious." -new york American 

"Pace brisk and lively. Amused loudly a number of the customers 
at the Roxy. Fast, colorful, humorous." -new york herald tribune 

"McLaglen a riotous lad. He gets the laughs. The world will find it 
vastly entertaining." - new york daily mirror 

"Few persons in the Roxy Theatre yesterday could control their 
laughter." -new york times 

"We nominate Fifi Dorsay for her work in Fox's "Hot for Paris." 
Those eyes! Can she use 'em? Oh, boy. And those beautiful cen- 
trifugal movements of the waist line. She dances. She sings. She 
makes oo-la-la. She's a wow. A pip. Go see her and then write 
your own adjectives. We've exhausted ours." —FILM DAILY 

HOT FOR PARIS DID BIGGER BUSINESS AT THE 
FOX PHILADELPHIA IN FIVE DAYS THAN THE 
COCK EYED WORLD DID IN SIX ! 




January 18, 1950 



EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD 



It 





DETROIT, JAN. 3, 1930 

UNIVERSAL FILM EXCH. 

DESPITE TERRIFIC RAIN SLEET AND 
SNOW STORMS TWENTY DEGREE TEMP- 
ERATURE DROP AND AGAINST HEAVY 
OPPOSITION PHANTOM OF OPERA OPEN- 
ED ORIENTAL DOWNTOWN FIRST RUN 
HOUSE HERE TODAY TO STAND- 
OUT BUSINESS JAMMING THEATRE 
FROM OPENING TO CLOSING TIME. 



-LEO M. DEVANEY 





A new Phantom! 
New Dialog! 
New Prints! 



/ 



DALLAS, TEXAS, JAN. 6, 1930 

UNIVERSAL FILM EXCH. 

WE OPENED WITH PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA YESTERDAY TO CAPACITY BUSI- 
NESS LOBBY WAS PACKED BEFORE FIRST 
SHOW OVER AND PEOPLE STANDING UN- 
TIL NINE THIRTY TURNED AWAY THOU- 
SANDS EXCELLENT REVIEWS DALLAS 
NEWS SAYS NEW SOUND TREATMENT 
MAKES IT ONE OF IMPORTANT RELEASES 
OF SEASON. 

— R. J. STINNET, CAPITOL THEATRE 



niANTOIH 



OF 

THE 



Starring 




Now in 

MUSIC, DIALOG, 
TECHNICOLOR 



ION CH4NEY 

With Norman Kerry, Mary Philhin and 
hundreds of others. Directed by Rupert 
Julian. From the novel by Gaston Leroux. 
Presented by CARL LAEMMLE. 

SOUND 



GREATER UNIVERSALIS NEW SELLING SEASON STARTS NOWf 



Member Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, Inc.— WU H. Hays, President 



^ejd BIGGEST HITS 




"Vitaphone" is the registefed trade mark of 
the Vitaphone Corp. designating its products 



with Lowell Sherman 
Marian Nixon, Armida, 
Hobart Bosworth - - .♦ 
From the novel by 
George Preedy - ' - 
Adapted by Walter 
Anthony - Screen play 
and dialogue by J. 
Grubb Alexander 

Directed by 

Alan C r o s I oji d. 
WITH TECHNICOLOR, 



ON BROADWAY 



Brooi/ii/aa 
Is a 




STREET to these 




with Alexander Gray 
Bern ice Claire 
Louise Fazenda. 
Adapted from musical 
comedy by Frank 
Mandel,OttoHarbach, 
Vincent Youmans and 
Emii Nyitray. Directed 
by Clarence Badger. 
WITH TECHNICOLOR. 




t*^^ \* .\Ve« vcO>*^ 




FIRST NATIONAL HAS THE GREAT 





RICHARD 
BARTHELMESS 
in "Son Of The Gods" 
with 

Constance Bennett 



BILLIE DOVE 
in "The Other 
Tomorrow" and 
"The Notorious 
Affair" 




CORINNE 
GRIFFITH 

"Lilies Of The Field" 
and "Back Pay" 




ALICE WHITE 
in 

"Playing Around" 
and "Show Girl In 
Hollywood" 




MARILYN 
MILLER 

in pictures 
as big as 
"Sally" 




DOROTHY 
MACKAILL 
in "Strictly Modern" 
and "The 
Flirting Widow" 




wnat will lou ininKwnen 

FIRST NATIONAL 

Givef You THE5E 

RICHARD 

BARTH E LMESS 

In Rex Beach's Great Novel 

"SON OF THE GODS " 

With CONSTANCE BENNETT 



Supreme sensation of the century. Biggest production from the most 
popular male star in pictures. Direction by Frank Lloyd and dialog by 
Bradley King who gave you "Weary River." Surpasses any Vitaphone or 
silent drama ever produced. Technicolor sequences. 

NO, NO, NANETTE 

Set for extended runs throughout the country beginning with New York 
Strand. With Alexander Gray — Bernice Claire singing love-team and 
Louise Fazenda, Lucien Littlefield, Zasu Pitts, Lilyan Tashman, Bert Roach, 
Mildred Harris. Mostly Technicolor. 



SONG OF THE FLAME 

Most famous of all modern operettas. All Technicolor. With Bernice Claire, 
Alexander Gray, Noah Beery, Alice Gentle, Bert Roach. 5000 extras in 
Petrograd panic sequence. George Gershwin music. Mammoth sets. 



BRIDE REGIMENT' 

All Technicolor with Vivienne Segal, Allan Prior, Walter Pidgeon, Louise 
Fazenda, Ford Sterling, Myrna Loy, Lupino Lane. Sigmund Romberg music. 






EST STARS 





JACK MULHALL 

••Murder Will Out" 
and ••Show Girl In 
Hollywood" 



DOUGLAS 
FAIRBANKS, Jr. 
in 

"Loose Ankles" 



LORETTA 
YOUNG 
in ••Loose Ankles" 
and "Murder On 
The Second Floor" 



ALEXANDERGRAY 
and BERNICE